Hearing Loss News and Research RSS Feed - Hearing Loss News and Research

Hearing loss, impairment or deafness may be of two major types: one that develops some time in life, one that a baby is born with – or congenital deafness. Most commonly, hearing loss is seen with age or is caused by exposure to loud noises.
MU researcher develops intervention to help older adults gradually adjust to hearing aids

MU researcher develops intervention to help older adults gradually adjust to hearing aids

When individuals wear their hearing aids for the first time, they are flooded with sounds they have not heard in months or years; yet, previous research has shown that not all new sounds are welcomed. Ambient noises such as air conditioners, wind and background conversations can be painful, irritating and difficult to ignore, causing some individuals to stop using their hearing aids right away. [More]
TSRI researchers identify enzyme that produces inflammatory lipid molecules in the brain

TSRI researchers identify enzyme that produces inflammatory lipid molecules in the brain

A team led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute has identified an enzyme that produces a class of inflammatory lipid molecules in the brain. Abnormally high levels of these molecules appear to cause a rare inherited neurodegenerative disorder, and that disorder now may be treatable if researchers can develop suitable drug candidates that inhibit this enzyme. [More]
Sex enhancement product recalled after Health Canada test finds undeclared drug ingredient

Sex enhancement product recalled after Health Canada test finds undeclared drug ingredient

One lot of the sex enhancement product "Forta for Men" (NPN 80045132) is being recalled after Health Canada testing confirmed it contains an undeclared drug: homosildenafil. [More]
Northwestern Medicine neurosurgeons use new adaptive hybrid surgery technology to treat brain tumor

Northwestern Medicine neurosurgeons use new adaptive hybrid surgery technology to treat brain tumor

It started with numbness on the left side of his face. A few months later, Steve Mores couldn't feel his tongue or chew on the left side of his mouth. TV commercials featuring food or even being in a grocery store made him nauseous. A long time drummer in a popular band, Mores lost 30 pounds and had to find a replacement. [More]
Researchers find way to prevent noise-induced hearing loss

Researchers find way to prevent noise-induced hearing loss

Researchers from Weill Cornell Medical College and the Gladstone Institutes have found a way to prevent noise-induced hearing loss in a mouse using a simple chemical compound that is a precursor to vitamin B3. This discovery has important implications not only for preventing hearing loss, but also potentially for treating some aging-related conditions that are linked to the same protein. [More]
Dantrolene drug may be effective treatment for rare form of diabetes

Dantrolene drug may be effective treatment for rare form of diabetes

A commonly prescribed muscle relaxant may be an effective treatment for a rare but devastating form of diabetes, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis report. [More]
TSRI study shows how mutations in Tmie gene can cause deafness from birth

TSRI study shows how mutations in Tmie gene can cause deafness from birth

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have discovered how one gene is essential to hearing, uncovering a cause of deafness and suggesting new avenues for therapies. [More]
University at Buffalo researchers receive $500,000 grant to study IED-induced vision loss

University at Buffalo researchers receive $500,000 grant to study IED-induced vision loss

It's well known that battlefield explosions can cause hearing loss, but veterans may be surprised to learn that their vision may also suffer — sometimes weeks or months after combat exposure. [More]

Researcher develops loudspeaker system for people with hearing problems

Families often watch TV together, but what happens when one member has hearing difficulties? Usually the result is a compromise on listening volume that doesn't really satisfy anyone. [More]
Scientists awarded grant to investigate new drug-based treatment for NF2

Scientists awarded grant to investigate new drug-based treatment for NF2

Scientists from Plymouth University Peninsula Schools of Medicine and Dentistry have been awarded a grant from young person's cancer charity The Laura Crane Youth Cancer Trust to investigate a new drug-based treatment for a multi-tumour brain and nervous system cancer which affects teenagers and young adults. [More]
Scientists develop new system to treat a host of genetic conditions

Scientists develop new system to treat a host of genetic conditions

As potential next-generation therapeutics and research tools, few life sciences technologies hold more promise than genome-editing proteins – molecules that can be programmed to alter specific genes in order to treat or even cure genetic diseases. [More]
New therapy appears to help tinnitus patients cope better with phantom noise

New therapy appears to help tinnitus patients cope better with phantom noise

Patients with tinnitus hear phantom noise and are sometimes so bothered by the perceived ringing in their ears, they have difficulty concentrating. A new therapy does not lessen perception of the noise but appears to help patients cope better with it in their daily lives, according to new research. [More]
DSN supports research into possible links between deafness and dementia

DSN supports research into possible links between deafness and dementia

A Cheshire charity is set to generate national impact by backing research into possible links between deafness and dementia. [More]
Study suggests that objective hearing tests need to be refined for teenagers at risk for hearing loss

Study suggests that objective hearing tests need to be refined for teenagers at risk for hearing loss

Subjective screening questions do not reliably identify teenagers who are at risk for hearing loss, according to researchers at Penn State College of Medicine. The results suggest that objective hearing tests should be refined for this age group to replace screening questions. [More]
Finding could help improve treatment of hearing loss caused by noise, normal aging

Finding could help improve treatment of hearing loss caused by noise, normal aging

Scientists have restored the hearing of mice partly deafened by noise, using advanced tools to boost the production of a key protein in their ears. [More]
UNMC researcher receives $3.3 million grant to study rare diseases that affect children

UNMC researcher receives $3.3 million grant to study rare diseases that affect children

University of Nebraska Medical Center researcher, William Rizzo, M.D., has received a five-year, $3.3 million grant to study 10 rare diseases that affect children beginning in infancy or early childhood and throughout their life. [More]
Otoharmonics receives Class 2 medical device license for Levo system from Health Canada

Otoharmonics receives Class 2 medical device license for Levo system from Health Canada

Otoharmonics Corporation, announces that it has received a Class 2 medical device license from Health Canada for the Levo system, a personalized neuroscience-based sound therapy for use in the temporary relief of tinnitus symptoms. [More]
Cumulative noise exposure can cause hearing loss in teachers

Cumulative noise exposure can cause hearing loss in teachers

Ringing bells, slamming lockers, loud announcements, chattering students – the classic sounds of back-to-school are not always music to the ears of today's teachers. [More]
Newborn screening can prevent lifelong disability

Newborn screening can prevent lifelong disability

When your baby was born you likely heard a loud cry and examined your baby to make sure he/she had a full set of adorable fingers and toes. But just imagine a few days after you arrive home, your phone rings: your baby has screened positive for a genetic disorder. [More]

MU study reinforces importance of early hearing interventions

Infants' vocalizations throughout the first year follow a set of predictable steps from crying and cooing to forming syllables and first words. However, previous research had not addressed how the amount of vocalizations may differ between hearing and deaf infants. [More]