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People with schizophrenia more likely to have diabetes than general population

People with schizophrenia more likely to have diabetes than general population

People with early schizophrenia are at an increased risk of developing diabetes, even when the effects of antipsychotic drugs, diet and exercise are taken out of the equation, according to an analysis by researchers from King's College London. [More]
Reducing cocaine use can potentially reverse coronary atherosclerosis

Reducing cocaine use can potentially reverse coronary atherosclerosis

People who use cocaine regularly are at high risk of coronary artery disease. A study in the Journal of Addiction Medicine, the official journal of the American Society of Addiction Medicine, reports that stopping or reducing cocaine use can potentially reverse the process of coronary atherosclerosis. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
Study reveals brain activity may be key to link between stress and heart disease

Study reveals brain activity may be key to link between stress and heart disease

Increased activity in a deep-lying region of the brain called the amygdala is associated with a higher risk of heart attack and stroke, according to a study published in The Lancet.

The amygdala is known to process emotions such as fear and anger and the finding sheds light on the possible mechanism by which stress can lead to cardiovascular disease (CVD), say the study authors. [More]
Researchers move one step closer to regenerating heart wall using stem cells

Researchers move one step closer to regenerating heart wall using stem cells

A process using human stem cells can generate the cells that cover the external surface of a human heart -- epicardium cells -- according to a multidisciplinary team of researchers. [More]
Experts suggest new five-stage system of classifying patients at risk for heart attack

Experts suggest new five-stage system of classifying patients at risk for heart attack

Experts at Johns Hopkins and New York's Mount Sinai Health System have published a suggested new plan for a five-stage system of classifying the risk of heart attack in those with heart disease, one they say puts much-needed and long-absent focus on the risks faced by millions of Americans who pass so-called stress tests or have less obvious or earlier-stage danger signs. [More]
Genetic testing at UMMC helps doctors identify effective medication for heart stent patients

Genetic testing at UMMC helps doctors identify effective medication for heart stent patients

The University of Maryland Medical Center is now offering a simple genetic test to patients who receive heart stents to determine whether they have a genetic deficiency that affects how they respond to a common drug to prevent blood clots. [More]
Resistance-based interval training can improve blood vessel function, study shows

Resistance-based interval training can improve blood vessel function, study shows

Just one session of interval weight-training can improve the risk of Type 2 diabetes complications, according to a UBC Okanagan study. This is encouraging news for those starting the New Year with good intentions. [More]
KIT researchers prove that neurons regulate blood vessel growth

KIT researchers prove that neurons regulate blood vessel growth

A team of researchers at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology shake at the foundations of a dogma of cell biology. [More]
Study to test impact of diet on Alzheimer's disease and other dementias

Study to test impact of diet on Alzheimer's disease and other dementias

The first study of its kind designed to test the effects of a diet on the decline of cognitive abilities among a large group of individuals 65 to 84 years who currently do not have cognitive impairment will begin in January. [More]
CRCHUM receives NIH grant to study ways to prevent mortality after myocardial infarction

CRCHUM receives NIH grant to study ways to prevent mortality after myocardial infarction

The University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre has been awarded a grant of US$2 million from the National Institutes of Health to pilot the Canadian component of a study to determine the optimal amount of blood to transfuse in anemic patients who have suffered a myocardial infarction. [More]
Alcohol abuse linked to increased risk of heart conditions

Alcohol abuse linked to increased risk of heart conditions

Alcohol abuse increases the risk of atrial fibrillation, heart attack and congestive heart failure as much as other well-established risk factors such as high blood pressure, diabetes, smoking and obesity, according to a study published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. [More]
Researchers create molecules with potential to deliver healing power to stressed cells

Researchers create molecules with potential to deliver healing power to stressed cells

Molecules with the potential to deliver healing power to stressed cells - such as those involved in heart attacks - have been created by University of Oregon researchers. [More]
Researchers examine national trends in perioperative cardiovascular outcomes and mortality after noncardiac surgery

Researchers examine national trends in perioperative cardiovascular outcomes and mortality after noncardiac surgery

In a study published online by JAMA Cardiology, Sripal Bangalore, M.D., M.H.A., of the New York University School of Medicine, New York, and colleagues examined national trends in perioperative cardiovascular outcomes and mortality after major noncardiac surgery. [More]
Scripps physician first to treat heart attack patients with supersaturated oxygen therapy

Scripps physician first to treat heart attack patients with supersaturated oxygen therapy

A physician at Scripps Health's Prebys Cardiovascular Institute has become the first in the Western United States to treat heart attack patients with a new supersaturated oxygen (SSO2) system in an attempt to reduce permanent damage to their heart muscle. [More]
Financial penalties can reduce hospital readmissions

Financial penalties can reduce hospital readmissions

Hospitals that were financially penalized for too many readmissions were more likely than non-penalized institutions to subsequently reduce readmissions for all conditions, according to a new study by Yale School of Medicine researchers and colleagues in the Journal of the American Medical Association. [More]
Saint Louis University geriatrician urges older patients to talk to doctors about too many pills

Saint Louis University geriatrician urges older patients to talk to doctors about too many pills

If you're 65 or older and taking more than four medications, resolve to talk to your doctor about doing a New Year's triage to make sure too many pills aren't making you sick, advises Milta Little, D.O., associate professor of geriatrics at Saint Louis University. [More]
Researchers develop synthetic cardiac stem cells that offer therapeutic benefits

Researchers develop synthetic cardiac stem cells that offer therapeutic benefits

Researchers from North Carolina State University, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University have developed a synthetic version of a cardiac stem cell. [More]
LifePoint Health earns Chest Pain Center Accreditation for 35 facilities

LifePoint Health earns Chest Pain Center Accreditation for 35 facilities

Thirty-five LifePoint Health facilities earned Chest Pain Center Accreditation in 2016, bringing the total number of accredited facilities to 63, as part of a system-wide collaboration between LifePoint Health and the American College of Cardiology. [More]
Discrimination interacts with certain genetic variants to negatively impact health

Discrimination interacts with certain genetic variants to negatively impact health

It's no secret that discrimination is stressful for those who experience it, but turns out the issue is more than skin deep—these stressors can interact with our genetics to negatively impact our health, a new University of Florida study shows. [More]
Heart attack risk for people with HIV nearly 50% higher than predicted

Heart attack risk for people with HIV nearly 50% higher than predicted

Current methods to predict the risk of heart attack and stroke vastly underestimate the risk in individuals with HIV, which is nearly double that of the general population, reports a new Northwestern Medicine study. [More]
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