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Hospital bed positioning can affect outcomes of stroke patients

Hospital bed positioning can affect outcomes of stroke patients

During the first 24 hours after a stroke, attention to detail --such as hospital bed positioning -- is critical to patient outcomes. [More]
Golden Jubilee National Hospital holds performance review in public

Golden Jubilee National Hospital holds performance review in public

Today, the Golden Jubilee National Hospital held its Annual Review, demonstrating that they have continued to lead the way in safe, effective and person centred care for the NHS in Scotland. [More]
Mediterranean-style diets, physical activity can lower risk of first-time stroke

Mediterranean-style diets, physical activity can lower risk of first-time stroke

Eating Mediterranean or DASH-style diets, regularly engaging in physical activity and keeping your blood pressure under control can lower your risk of a first-time stroke, according to updated AHA/ASA guideline published in the American Heart Association's journal Stroke. [More]
Women delay seeking medical care for heart symptoms, put health at risk

Women delay seeking medical care for heart symptoms, put health at risk

When heart symptoms strike, men and women go through similar stages of pain but women are more likely to delay seeking care and can put their health at risk, according to a study presented at the Canadian Cardiovascular Congress. [More]
Early brain imaging studies may help prevent vascular diseases

Early brain imaging studies may help prevent vascular diseases

Future prevention and treatment strategies for vascular diseases may lie in the evaluation of early brain imaging tests long before heart attacks or strokes occur, according to a systematic review conducted by a team of cardiologists, neuroscientists, and psychiatrists from Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published in the October issue of JACC Cardiovascular Imaging. [More]
Novel way for treating non-cardiac chest pain due to esophageal hypersensitivity

Novel way for treating non-cardiac chest pain due to esophageal hypersensitivity

Chest pain doesn't necessarily come from the heart. An estimated 200,000 Americans each year experience non-cardiac chest pain, which in addition to pain can involve painful swallowing, discomfort and anxiety. Non-cardiac chest pain can be frightening for patients and result in visits to the emergency room because the painful symptoms, while often originating in the esophagus, can mimic a heart attack. [More]
Flu vaccines have protective effect against heart disease

Flu vaccines have protective effect against heart disease

Flu vaccines are known to have a protective effect against heart disease, reducing the risk of a heart attack. For the first time, this research, published in Vaccine, reveals the molecular mechanism that underpins this phenomenon. The scientists behind the study say it could be harnessed to prevent heart disease directly. [More]
Boston Scientific starts PLATINUM Diversity trial to evaluate Promus PREMIER Stent System

Boston Scientific starts PLATINUM Diversity trial to evaluate Promus PREMIER Stent System

As part of its commitment to innovation and improving patient outcomes, Boston Scientific Corporation has initiated the PLATINUM Diversity trial to evaluate the clinical performance of the Promus PREMIER Everolimus-Eluting Platinum Chromium Coronary Stent System in underserved patient populations, including women and people of color. [More]
Depression, anxiety after MI more common in women than men

Depression, anxiety after MI more common in women than men

Women are more likely to develop anxiety and depression after a heart attack (myocardial infarction; MI) than men, according to research presented at Acute Cardiovascular Care 2014 by Professor Pranas Serpytis from Lithuania. [More]
Patients with severe psoriasis more likely to have uncontrolled hypertension, shows research

Patients with severe psoriasis more likely to have uncontrolled hypertension, shows research

Patients with more severe psoriasis are also more likely to have uncontrolled hypertension, according to new research by a team at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Researchers discover new signaling pathway to fight excess body weight

Researchers discover new signaling pathway to fight excess body weight

The number of overweight persons is greatly increasing worldwide - and as a result is the risk of suffering a heart attack, stroke, diabetes or Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Reducing heart failure deaths: an interview with Dimitrios Georgiopoulos, UK Medical Director, Novartis

Reducing heart failure deaths: an interview with Dimitrios Georgiopoulos, UK Medical Director, Novartis

Heart failure is a debilitating, and life-threatening, condition in which the heart cannot pump enough blood around the body. When heart failure continues to progress and worsen over time, the persistent condition is known as chronic heart failure. [More]
New treatment strategy may improve repair process after heart attack

New treatment strategy may improve repair process after heart attack

In a study that could point the way toward a new strategy for treating patients after a heart attack, UCLA stem cell researchers led by associate professor of medicine (cardiology) and Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research member Dr. Arjun Deb have discovered that some scar-forming cells in the heart, known as fibroblasts, have the ability to become endothelial cells (the cells that form blood vessels). [More]
Women prescribed different medication than men to bring down blood pressure

Women prescribed different medication than men to bring down blood pressure

Women who are treated for high blood pressure are not given the same medication as men, nor do they hit the treatment targets as often, reveals a thesis from the University of Gothenburg. [More]
Viewpoints: Ebola myths; Sen. McCain's 'opportunistic alarmism'; Gov. Jindal on CDC's misspent resources

Viewpoints: Ebola myths; Sen. McCain's 'opportunistic alarmism'; Gov. Jindal on CDC's misspent resources

Hubris is the greatest danger in wealthy countries -; a sort of smug assumption that advanced technologies and emergency-preparedness plans guarantee that Ebola and other germs will not spread. It was hubris that left Toronto's top hospitals battling SARS in 2003, long after the virus was conquered in poorer Vietnam. It was hubris that led the World Health Assembly in 2013 to cut the WHO's outbreak-response budget in favor of more programs to treat cancer and heart disease. [More]
Mental stress affects women's hearts more than men's

Mental stress affects women's hearts more than men's

Researchers have known for decades that stress contributes to heart disease. But a new analysis by researchers at Duke Medicine shows mental stress may tax women's hearts more than men's. [More]
Four UCLA researchers receive NIH Director's New Innovator Award

Four UCLA researchers receive NIH Director's New Innovator Award

Four scientists from the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA have received a National Institutes of Health Director's New Innovator Award that will forward revolutionary stem cell and neuro-science in medicine. [More]
Power grid failure inside injured cardiac cells triggers post-heart attack arrhythmias

Power grid failure inside injured cardiac cells triggers post-heart attack arrhythmias

Heart attack survivors often experience dangerous heart rhythm disturbances during treatment designed to restore blood flow to the injured heart muscle, a common and confounding complication of an otherwise lifesaving intervention. [More]
Temple researchers to create awareness about healthy diet among low-income Asian Americans

Temple researchers to create awareness about healthy diet among low-income Asian Americans

Although low-income Asian Americans are at a high risk for diabetes, hypertension, heart attack and stroke, they are under a misconception that their diet is healthy and not a risk factor for these chronic diseases. [More]
U-M researchers propose new ways to fight sepsis

U-M researchers propose new ways to fight sepsis

A decade ago, America's health care community took on heart attacks with gusto, harnessing the power of research and data to make sure that every patient got the best possible care. [More]