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Re-engineering cardiac scarring process could improve clinical outcomes for heart disease patients

Re-engineering cardiac scarring process could improve clinical outcomes for heart disease patients

Literal heartbreak, from illness or injury, triggers the body's natural healing mechanisms. [More]
Study helps identify traits that may cause elders to need help with medications

Study helps identify traits that may cause elders to need help with medications

As age increases, older adults can develop problems taking their medications. But until now, few studies have examined the traits that might cause elders to need help with their medications, or how widespread a problem this might be. [More]
Diabetes increases risk of dying from heart attack by 50%

Diabetes increases risk of dying from heart attack by 50%

Having diabetes increases the risk of dying from the effects of a heart attack by around 50 per cent, according to a widespread study. [More]
ACP provides physician perspective on rising prescription drug prices

ACP provides physician perspective on rising prescription drug prices

The American College of Physicians today provided physician perspective on the escalating cost of prescription drugs, the impact of the costs on internal medicine physicians and their patients, and support for the intent of the bipartisan Creating and Restoring Equal Access to Equivalent Samples (CREATES) Act of 2016 to reduce anti-competitive practices. [More]
New protein risk score may help predict cardiovascular risk in patients with CHD

New protein risk score may help predict cardiovascular risk in patients with CHD

In a study appearing in the June 21 issue of JAMA, Peter Ganz, M.D., of the University of California-San Francisco, and colleagues conducted a study to develop and validate a score to predict risk of cardiovascular outcomes among patients with coronary heart disease using analysis of circulating proteins. [More]
New Aspirin-Guide mobile app helps clinicians and patients make informed decisions about aspirin use

New Aspirin-Guide mobile app helps clinicians and patients make informed decisions about aspirin use

Low dose aspirin is recommended by clinicians as a preventive measure for patients who have already had a heart attack or stroke, but the risk of taking low-dose aspirin to prevent or delay a first heart attack or stroke is less clear, as the benefit for reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) must be balanced with the increased risk of gastrointestinal or other bleeding. [More]
AF patients at risk for stroke mostly treated with aspirin-only prescription instead of blood thinners

AF patients at risk for stroke mostly treated with aspirin-only prescription instead of blood thinners

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine report that more than 1 in 3 atrial fibrillation (AF) patients at intermediate to high risk for stroke are treated with aspirin alone, despite previous data showing this therapy to be inferior to blood thinners. [More]
VentureMed Group receives FDA 510(k) clearance for FLEX Scoring Catheter

VentureMed Group receives FDA 510(k) clearance for FLEX Scoring Catheter

VentureMed Group, Ltd., a medical device company based in northwest Ohio, has received 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the commercial distribution of a new surgical device for treating peripheral artery disease (PAD). [More]
People with higher levels of IgG/IgM antibodies less likely to have heart attack

People with higher levels of IgG/IgM antibodies less likely to have heart attack

Measuring antibody levels in the blood could be used to detect a person's heart attack risk after researchers, part-funded by the British Heart Foundation, discovered that higher levels of these antibodies are linked to a lower heart attack risk. [More]
Nonopioid interventional options for chronic pain not covered by insurance in few U.S. states

Nonopioid interventional options for chronic pain not covered by insurance in few U.S. states

Recent studies have shown significant therapeutic value from the use of high-frequency - 10,000 (HF-10) spinal cord stimulation (SCS) for patients experiencing chronic back and leg pain. [More]
Study evaluates effectiveness of robotic approach over manual ablation in treating heart arrhythmia

Study evaluates effectiveness of robotic approach over manual ablation in treating heart arrhythmia

Whether ablation of the highest-risk heart arrhythmia is best handled by a robot or the hands of an electrophysiologist should be answered by an international comparison of the two. [More]
IGF-1 protein may be key to prevent heart disease in older adults

IGF-1 protein may be key to prevent heart disease in older adults

As men and women grow older, their chances for coronary heart disease also increase. Atherosclerosis is a condition in which plaque builds up inside the arteries, which can lead to serious problems, including heart attacks, strokes or even death. [More]
Study links whole grain consumption to positive health effects

Study links whole grain consumption to positive health effects

Eating three more portions of dietary fiber a day--say, two pieces of whole grain bread and a bowl of whole grain breakfast cereal--is associated with a lower risk for all cardiovascular diseases and for dying of cancer, diabetes, and respiratory and infectious diseases, a study just published in the BMJ has shown. [More]
Female migraine patients have increased cardiovascular disease risk

Female migraine patients have increased cardiovascular disease risk

Women who suffer from migraine headaches have a slightly increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease in later life. A team of researchers led by Prof. Tobias Kurth, Head of the Institute of Public Health at Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, has now been able to establish the following: female migraine patients have a higher risk of stroke or heart attacks than women without migraine. [More]
Liraglutide drug effectively decreases cardiovascular disease risk in type 2 diabetes patients

Liraglutide drug effectively decreases cardiovascular disease risk in type 2 diabetes patients

Researchers have shown that the glucose-lowering drug liraglutide safely and effectively decreases the overall risk of heart attack, stroke, or cardiovascular death for people with type 2 diabetes. [More]
New, implantable device offers promise for patients with OSA

New, implantable device offers promise for patients with OSA

Since the 1980s, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) - in which positive pressure is pushed through the nasal airways to help users breathe while sleeping - has been by far the most widely used treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). [More]
Diabetes-heart disease combination can increase death risk

Diabetes-heart disease combination can increase death risk

The combination of type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease can be deadly. New research from a global study led by a physician from UConn Health has found that patients with Type 2 diabetes admitted into the hospital for congestive heart failure face a one in four chance of dying over the next 18 months. [More]
U.S. study shows adults with diabetes born in 1940s living longer with less disability

U.S. study shows adults with diabetes born in 1940s living longer with less disability

Older Americans with diabetes born in the 1940s are living longer and with less disability performing day to day tasks than those born 10 years earlier, according to new research published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology journal. [More]
ACCORDION study shows lowering blood glucose can reduce progression of diabetic retinopathy

ACCORDION study shows lowering blood glucose can reduce progression of diabetic retinopathy

People with type 2 diabetes who intensively controlled their blood sugar level during the landmark Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) Trial Eye Study were found to have cut their risk of diabetic retinopathy in half in a follow-up analysis conducted four years after stopping intensive therapy. [More]
New effort in biomedical engineering may improve heart repair

New effort in biomedical engineering may improve heart repair

Jianyi "Jay" Zhang, M.D., Ph.D., brought his biomedical engineering expertise to the University of Alabama at Birmingham to fix hearts. [More]
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