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HealthInsight to lead health care quality improvement activities for Medicare program

HealthInsight to lead health care quality improvement activities for Medicare program

HealthInsight has been named to lead health care quality improvement activities for the Medicare Program for a four-state region serving Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon and Utah under a five-year contract awarded by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS). [More]
Clinical judgement with ECG and blood test effective in reducing hospital admissions for chest pain

Clinical judgement with ECG and blood test effective in reducing hospital admissions for chest pain

Clinical judgement, combined with an electrocardiogram (ECG) and blood test on arrival, is effective in reducing unnecessary hospital admissions for chest pain, a new study shows. [More]
First Edition: July 25, 2014

First Edition: July 25, 2014

Today's headlines include reports that the Obama administration is moving ahead in preparations for the health law's employer mandate. [More]
University of Leicester receives funding from two Masonic charities for heart study

University of Leicester receives funding from two Masonic charities for heart study

A University of Leicester research project has received vital philanthropic funding for the second year from two Masonic charities. [More]
New research sheds light on genetic basis for heart disease in women

New research sheds light on genetic basis for heart disease in women

When it comes to heart disease, Dr. Ross Feldman says women are often in the dark. Historically, it was thought that heart disease was a men's-only disease, however, data has shown that post-menopausal women are just as likely as men to get heart disease and are less likely to be adequately diagnosed and treated. [More]
Study: History of stroke associated with increased risk of adverse events after elective noncardiac surgery

Study: History of stroke associated with increased risk of adverse events after elective noncardiac surgery

In an analysis that included more than 480,000 patients who underwent elective noncardiac surgery, a history of stroke was associated with an increased risk of major adverse cardiovascular events and death, particularly if time elapsed between stroke and surgery was less than 9 months, according to a study in the July 16 issue of JAMA. [More]
Mount Sinai awarded AHA grant to prevent heart disease among NYC children and parents

Mount Sinai awarded AHA grant to prevent heart disease among NYC children and parents

Mount Sinai Heart at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai has been awarded a $3.8 million grant by the American Heart Association to promote cardiovascular health among high-risk New York City children, and their parents, living in Harlem and the Bronx. With assistance from the NYC Administration for Children's Services, the research team's mission is to reduce each child's future risk of obesity, heart attack, stroke, and type 2 diabetes. [More]
Research roundup: Clinics and electronic records; young adults baffled by exchange; Medicare spending slowdown

Research roundup: Clinics and electronic records; young adults baffled by exchange; Medicare spending slowdown

We found that in 2012 nine out of ten health centers had adopted a EHR system, and half had adopted EHRs with basic capabilities. Seven in ten health centers reported that their providers were receiving meaningful-use incentive payments from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). [More]
Charles H. Hennekens wins prestigious Alton Ochnser Award

Charles H. Hennekens wins prestigious Alton Ochnser Award

The Ochnser Clinic Foundation recently announced that the 29th annual recipient of the prestigious Alton Ochnser Award is Charles H. Hennekens, M.D., Dr.P.H., the first Sir Richard Doll professor and senior academic advisor to the dean in the Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine at Florida Atlantic University. [More]
Exeter scientists find health benefits in rotten egg gas

Exeter scientists find health benefits in rotten egg gas

It may smell of flatulence and have a reputation for being highly toxic, but when used in the right tiny dosage, hydrogen sulfide is now being being found to offer potential health benefits in a range of issues, from diabetes to stroke, heart attacks and dementia. A new compound (AP39), designed and made at the University of Exeter, could hold the key to future therapies, by targeting delivery of very small amounts of the substance to the right (or key) places inside cells. [More]
Mercy Memorial Hospital System signs LOI to join Promedica

Mercy Memorial Hospital System signs LOI to join Promedica

Mercy Memorial Hospital System signed a letter of intent to join ProMedica, a not-for-profit, multi-hospital system based in Toledo, Ohio. [More]
Complications from partial knee replacement is very small than total knee replacement

Complications from partial knee replacement is very small than total knee replacement

Partial knee replacement surgery is safer than total knee replacement, according to a new study published in The Lancet today (July 8). [More]
Researchers discover mechanical threshold that regulates angiogenesis

Researchers discover mechanical threshold that regulates angiogenesis

Angiogenesis, the sprouting of new blood vessels from pre-existing ones, is essential to the body's development. As organs grow, vascular networks must grow with them to feed new cells and remove their waste. [More]
Discovery points the way to potential new strategies to treat blood disorders

Discovery points the way to potential new strategies to treat blood disorders

Like a line of falling dominos, a cascade of molecular events in the bone marrow produces high levels of inflammation that disrupt normal blood formation and lead to potentially deadly disorders including leukemia, an Indiana University-led research team has reported. [More]
Acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease are interconnected, say GW researchers

Acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease are interconnected, say GW researchers

For more than 40 years, physicians have treated diminished kidney function as two distinct syndromes: acute kidney injury (AKI) and chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, recent epidemiologic and mechanistic studies suggest the two syndromes are not distinct entities, but interconnected. [More]
Pneumonia patients treated with azithromycin face lower risk of death, slightly increased risk of heart attack

Pneumonia patients treated with azithromycin face lower risk of death, slightly increased risk of heart attack

In a study that included nearly 65,000 older patients hospitalized with pneumonia, treatment that included azithromycin compared with other antibiotics was associated with a significantly lower risk of death and a slightly increased risk of heart attack, according to a study in the June 4 issue of JAMA. [More]
Testosterone therapy does not increase men's risk for heart attack, shows UTMB study

Testosterone therapy does not increase men's risk for heart attack, shows UTMB study

Testosterone prescriptions for older men in the United States have increased more than three-fold over the past decade. Recent studies linking testosterone use with increased risk of heart attack and stroke have caused widespread concern among patients and their families. [More]
Researchers use simple tactics to reduce unnecessary blood tests, health care spending

Researchers use simple tactics to reduce unnecessary blood tests, health care spending

Researchers at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center used two relatively simple tactics to significantly reduce the number of unnecessary blood tests to assess symptoms of heart attack and chest pain and to achieve a large decrease in patient charges. [More]
GNS automated data analytics can predict future risk of metabolic syndrome in patients

GNS automated data analytics can predict future risk of metabolic syndrome in patients

Research published today in The American Journal of Managed Care demonstrates that analysis of patient records using state-of-the-art data analytics can predict future risk of metabolic syndrome. [More]
Analysis of patient records can predict future risk of metabolic syndrome

Analysis of patient records can predict future risk of metabolic syndrome

Research published today in the American Journal of Managed Care demonstrates that analysis of patient records using state-of-the-art data analytics can predict future risk of metabolic syndrome. [More]