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Young women veterans referred for cardiac tests more likely to be depressed than men veterans

Young women veterans referred for cardiac tests more likely to be depressed than men veterans

Women veterans who had specialized heart tests were younger and more likely to be obese, depressed and suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder than men veterans, according to a study published in an American Heart Association journal. [More]
Regeneron announces EU approval of EYLEA (aflibercept) Injection for retinal vascular disease treatment

Regeneron announces EU approval of EYLEA (aflibercept) Injection for retinal vascular disease treatment

Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced that EYLEA (aflibercept) Injection has been approved by the European Commission for the treatment of visual impairment due to Macular Edema secondary to Retinal Vein Occlusion (RVO). [More]
Novel technology could improve diagnosis of peripheral arterial disease

Novel technology could improve diagnosis of peripheral arterial disease

Approximately 8 to 12 million people in the United States alone are suffering from peripheral arterial disease (PAD), a common vascular problem that is caused by narrowing of the arteries as a result of plaque buildup. The plaque accumulation leads to an insufficient blood flow to the body's extremities and increases a person's risk for heart attack and stroke by up to six times. PAD is also one of the most serious complications of diabetes. [More]
Researchers find key protein critical to the success of common anti-platelet drug Plavix

Researchers find key protein critical to the success of common anti-platelet drug Plavix

Researchers at the UNC School of Medicine have found that the blood platelet protein Rasa3 is critical to the success of the common anti-platelet drug Plavix, which breaks up blood clots during heart attacks and other arterial diseases. [More]
Beneficial effects of statin treatment exaggerated, say researchers

Beneficial effects of statin treatment exaggerated, say researchers

Hailed as miracle drugs when they hit the market two decades ago, statins, the cholesterol-lowering drugs prescribed to prevent heart attacks, are not as effective nor as safe as we have been led to believe, say Dr. David M. Diamond, a professor of psychology, molecular pharmacology and physiology at the University of South Florida, and Dr. Uffe Ravnskov, an independent health researcher and an expert in cholesterol and cardiovascular disease. [More]
Simple diagnostic tool could reduce hospital admissions by 40% for patients with chest pain

Simple diagnostic tool could reduce hospital admissions by 40% for patients with chest pain

A new test that rules out heart attacks in patients could reduce hospital admissions by as much as 40%, for patients with chest pain, according to research published by Bournemouth University (BU). [More]
New study finds that statins may not reduce risk for Parkinson's disease

New study finds that statins may not reduce risk for Parkinson's disease

The use of statins may not be associated with lowering risk for Parkinson's disease, according to a new study led by researchers at Penn State College of Medicine and National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. The findings cast doubts on reports suggesting that the cholesterol-lowering medications may protect against this neurodegenerative brain disorder. [More]
MIT chemical engineers develop new type of self-healing hydrogel

MIT chemical engineers develop new type of self-healing hydrogel

Scientists are interested in using gels to deliver drugs because they can be molded into specific shapes and designed to release their payload over a specified time period. However, current versions aren't always practical because must be implanted surgically. [More]
Targeted nanomedicines could help prevent heart attacks caused by atherosclerosis

Targeted nanomedicines could help prevent heart attacks caused by atherosclerosis

Nanometer-sized "drones" that deliver a special type of healing molecule to fat deposits in arteries could become a new way to prevent heart attacks caused by atherosclerosis, according to a study in pre-clinical models by scientists at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Columbia University Medical Center. [More]
High-fat diet may reduce heart attack damage by 50%

High-fat diet may reduce heart attack damage by 50%

It's well known that over the long run, a high-fat diet increases the risk of heart attack and stroke. [More]
Anticoagulant fondaparinux lowers risk of major bleeding events, death in heart attack patients

Anticoagulant fondaparinux lowers risk of major bleeding events, death in heart attack patients

Patients who experienced a certain type of heart attack who received the anticoagulant fondaparinux had a lower risk of major bleeding events and death both in the hospital and after six months compared to patients who received low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH), although both groups had similar rates of subsequent heart attack or stroke, according to a study in the February 17 issue of JAMA. [More]
Study: Most risk calculators used by clinicians overestimate risk of heart attack

Study: Most risk calculators used by clinicians overestimate risk of heart attack

Most "risk calculators" used by clinicians to gauge a patient's chances of suffering a heart attack and guide treatment decisions appear to significantly overestimate the likelihood of a heart attack, according to results of a study by investigators at Johns Hopkins and other institutions. [More]
Short-term, high-fat diet may reduce heart attack damage, shows study

Short-term, high-fat diet may reduce heart attack damage, shows study

It's well known that over the long run, a high-fat diet increases the risk of heart attack and stroke. [More]
Large majority of coronary patients fail to meet lifestyle, risk factor targets

Large majority of coronary patients fail to meet lifestyle, risk factor targets

The large majority of coronary patients in Europe are failing to achieve their lifestyle, risk factor and therapeutic targets as set out in the latest prevention guidelines. [More]
UBMD physician discusses the dangers of hypothermia

UBMD physician discusses the dangers of hypothermia

The arctic cold snap affecting the Midwest and the Northeast this weekend should not be taken lightly, says David Holmes, MD, clinical associate professor of family medicine in the University at Buffalo School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. [More]
Researchers demonstrate advantages of implanted defibrillator in preventing non-ischaemic heart failure

Researchers demonstrate advantages of implanted defibrillator in preventing non-ischaemic heart failure

Sudden cardiac arrest is a possible cause of death in patients with non-ischaemic cardiac muscle weakness, i.e. a type of heart failure caused by genetics or for which no cause is known. Now, researchers at the University Department of Internal Medicine II at the MedUni Vienna (Clinical Department of Cardiology), as part of an international cooperation, have successfully demonstrated the advantages of an implanted defibrillator (ICD) as a means of prevention in patients with moderately restricted cardiac function, and that patients with the condition must be treated as carefully as patients with ischaemic heart failure which has developed following a heart attack, for example. [More]
Widely used clinical calculators overrate heart attack risk

Widely used clinical calculators overrate heart attack risk

Most "risk calculators" used by clinicians to gauge a patient's chances of suffering a heart attack and guide treatment decisions appear to significantly overestimate the likelihood of a heart attack, according to results of a study by investigators at Johns Hopkins and other institutions. [More]
Prime Healthcare acquires St. Mary's Medical Center and St. Joseph Medical Center in Missouri

Prime Healthcare acquires St. Mary's Medical Center and St. Joseph Medical Center in Missouri

Prime Healthcare announced today that it has completed its acquisition of St. Joseph Medical Center in Kansas City, MO, and St. Mary's Medical Center in Blue Springs, MO, as well as other assets of Carondelet Health from Ascension Health. St. Joseph and St. Mary's medical centers are acute-care hospitals with 456 beds and 900 physicians on staff combined. [More]
Blood pressure-lowering treatment lowers CVD, heart disease risks among type 2 diabetes patients

Blood pressure-lowering treatment lowers CVD, heart disease risks among type 2 diabetes patients

Blood pressure-lowering treatment among patients with type 2 diabetes is associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and heart disease events and improved mortality, according to a study in the February 10 issue of JAMA. [More]
Study shows link between low vitamin D levels in childhood and occurrence of atherosclerosis in adulthood

Study shows link between low vitamin D levels in childhood and occurrence of atherosclerosis in adulthood

Low levels of 25-OH vitamin D in childhood were associated with subclinical atherosclerosis over 25 years later in adulthood, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. [More]