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Researchers treat myocardial infarction with new telomerase-based gene therapy

Researchers treat myocardial infarction with new telomerase-based gene therapy

The enzyme telomerase repairs cell damage produced by ageing, and has been used successfully in therapies to lengthen the life of mice. Now it has been observed that it could also be used to cure illnesses related to the ageing process. [More]
Ortho-Clinical Diagnostics announces availability of NEPHROCHECK Test System for AKI patients

Ortho-Clinical Diagnostics announces availability of NEPHROCHECK Test System for AKI patients

Ortho-Clinical Diagnostics, Inc. today announced the nationwide availability to hospitals of the NEPHROCHECK Test System designed to help healthcare providers identify patients at risk of developing moderate or severe acute kidney injury (AKI) within 12 hours of patient assessment. [More]
Study: Coordinated emergency response could help improve patient survival from heart attack

Study: Coordinated emergency response could help improve patient survival from heart attack

A faster, coordinated emergency response in collaboration with hospital cardiac catheterization laboratories in each U.S. region, including New York City, is associated with improving patient survival from a heart attack caused by a sudden, completely blocked artery called an ST-elevated myocardial infarction (STEMI), according to a study presented at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions 2014. [More]
Deoxygenated hemoglobin triggers conversion of nitrite to nitric oxide

Deoxygenated hemoglobin triggers conversion of nitrite to nitric oxide

Understanding how nitrite can improve conditions such as hypertension, heart attack and stroke has been the object of worldwide research studies. New research from Wake Forest University has potentially moved the science one step closer to this goal. [More]
Cold 'sensor' hold key to new therapeutic target for treatment of frostbite and hypothermia

Cold 'sensor' hold key to new therapeutic target for treatment of frostbite and hypothermia

A cold 'sensor' which triggers the skin's vascular response to the cold could represent an exciting new therapeutic target for the treatment of frostbite and hypothermia, according to scientists at King's College London. [More]
Research links increase in sudden cardiovascular death with consumption of cocaine

Research links increase in sudden cardiovascular death with consumption of cocaine

A joint piece of research conducted by the UPV/EHU, the Basque Institute of Forensic Medicine, and the Biomedical Research Centre Network into Mental Health of the Carlos III Institute of Health links, for the first time, the increase in sudden cardiovascular death with the recent consumption of cocaine. In people in the 19-49 age bracket this risk is quadrupled. [More]
Researchers pinpoint rare gene mutations that increase risk of heart attack early in life

Researchers pinpoint rare gene mutations that increase risk of heart attack early in life

A team of investigators from the Broad Institute, Massachusetts General Hospital and other leading biomedical research institutions has pinpointed rare mutations in a gene called APOA5 that increase a person's risk of having a heart attack early in life. These mutations disable the APOA5 gene and also raise the levels in the blood of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, a type of fat. [More]
New study reveals how COX-2 inhibitors can increase risk of heart attack in arthritis patients

New study reveals how COX-2 inhibitors can increase risk of heart attack in arthritis patients

A class of drug for treating arthritis - all but shelved over fears about side effects - may be given a new lease of life, following the discovery of a possible way to identify which patients should avoid using it. [More]
Study calls for new protocols to treat women with high blood pressure

Study calls for new protocols to treat women with high blood pressure

That blood pressure plays a role in human health has been known for quite a while. Hypertension - the medical term for high blood pressure - was first described as a disease in the early 1800s, and the inflatable cuff that's used in measuring blood pressure was invented in 1896. [More]
Study evaluates effect of 2011 ACGME duty hour reforms on patient outcomes

Study evaluates effect of 2011 ACGME duty hour reforms on patient outcomes

In the first year after the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) reduced the number of continuous hours that residents can work, there was no change in the rate of death or readmission among hospitalized Medicare patients, according to a new study published in JAMA. [More]
UTHealth receives $7.3 million grant to research on health information technology

UTHealth receives $7.3 million grant to research on health information technology

The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Biomedical Informatics has been awarded grants totaling $7.3 million to enhance health care and biomedical discovery through the use of health information technology. [More]
Studies presented at ASH meeting compare new, standard-of-care treatments for blood clots

Studies presented at ASH meeting compare new, standard-of-care treatments for blood clots

Studies presented at the 56th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting and Exposition compare new and standard-of-care treatments for blood clots and further illuminate clot risks in vulnerable populations, such as cancer patients. [More]
Jakafi receives expanded approval from FDA for use in treatment of polycythemia vera

Jakafi receives expanded approval from FDA for use in treatment of polycythemia vera

Diplomat Pharmacy, Inc., the nation's largest independent specialty pharmacy, announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved an expanded indication of Jakafi (ruxolitinib). [More]
New drug offers hope for victims of spinal cord injury

New drug offers hope for victims of spinal cord injury

Scientist in the U.S have developed a drug that could help paralysed victims of spinal cord injury regain their ability to move. [More]
New chemical compound shows promise in restoring function lost to spinal cord injury

New chemical compound shows promise in restoring function lost to spinal cord injury

Case Western Reserve scientists have developed a new chemical compound that shows extraordinary promise in restoring function lost to spinal cord injury. The compound, which the researchers dubbed intracellular sigma peptide (ISP), allowed paralyzed muscles to activate in more than 80 percent of the animals tested. [More]
New NHLBI grant to support development of prevention strategies for deadly heart condition

New NHLBI grant to support development of prevention strategies for deadly heart condition

One of medicine's most prominent experts in sudden cardiac arrest has received a new $2.36 million grant to study how to better predict the deadly heart condition that kills an estimated 300,000 Americans each year. [More]
Mediterranean diet improves cardiovascular performance in patients with erectile dysfunction

Mediterranean diet improves cardiovascular performance in patients with erectile dysfunction

The Mediterranean diet is linked to improved cardiovascular performance in patients with erectile dysfunction, according to research presented at EuroEcho-Imaging 2014 by Dr Athanasios Angelis from Greece. Patients with erectile dysfunction who had poor adherence to the Mediterranean diet had more vascular and cardiac damage. [More]
Co-enzyme Q supplement lowers age-associated damage that leads to heart disease

Co-enzyme Q supplement lowers age-associated damage that leads to heart disease

New research involving rats, and published in the December 2014 issue of The FASEB Journal, suggests that if you were born at a low birth weight, supplemental co-enzyme Q (CoQ) may lower your risk for heart disease. [More]
President of Institute of Medicine to deliver presentation at University of Louisville

President of Institute of Medicine to deliver presentation at University of Louisville

The president of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies will present the 2014 Leonard Leight Lecture at the University of Louisville. [More]
DFG to establish eight new Collaborative Research Centres

DFG to establish eight new Collaborative Research Centres

The Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG, German Research Foundation) will establish eight new Collaborative Research Centres (CRCs). [More]