Heart Attack News and Research RSS Feed - Heart Attack News and Research

Useful tips for physicians to help patients make the right choice on statin drugs

Useful tips for physicians to help patients make the right choice on statin drugs

Cholesterol-lowering statins have transformed the treatment of heart disease. But while the decision to use the drugs in patients with a history of heart attacks and strokes is mostly clear-cut, that choice can be a far trickier proposition for the tens of millions of Americans with high cholesterol but no overt disease. [More]
New tool can measure cardiovascular risk in persons aged 40 or older

New tool can measure cardiovascular risk in persons aged 40 or older

For the first time, scientists have developed a new risk score that can predict the 10-year risk of developing heart disease or having a stroke in persons aged 40 years or older in any world country. [More]
Women who undergo total joint replacement surgery less likely to have complications compared to men

Women who undergo total joint replacement surgery less likely to have complications compared to men

While women may have their first total joint replacement (TJR) at an older age, they are less likely to have complications related to their surgery or require revision surgery, according to a new study presented today at the 2015 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. [More]
Non-invasive imaging tests may predict healthy adults' future risk of heart attack, stroke or death

Non-invasive imaging tests may predict healthy adults' future risk of heart attack, stroke or death

Adding two non-invasive imaging tests to traditional cardiovascular disease risk factor assessment more precisely predicts a healthy patient's future risk of heart attack, stroke, or premature death, according to a study led by Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published in the March 24 edition of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. [More]
Research suggests genetic predisposition to spontaneous coronary artery disease

Research suggests genetic predisposition to spontaneous coronary artery disease

A Mayo Clinic study has identified a familial association in spontaneous coronary artery dissection, a type of heart attack that most commonly affects younger women, suggesting a genetic predisposition to the condition, researchers say. [More]
Plexin D1 gene determines body fat distribution in humans

Plexin D1 gene determines body fat distribution in humans

Scientists have known for some time that people who carry a lot of weight around their bellies are more likely to develop diabetes and heart disease than those who have bigger hips and thighs. [More]
Newly identified proteins could shed light on the mechanisms of ALS

Newly identified proteins could shed light on the mechanisms of ALS

Where ALS comes from and how it progresses are mysteries that continue to vex medical science. But recent research at Sweden's KTH Royal Institute of Technology has found three proteins that could shed some light on the mechanisms behind this deadly disease. [More]
Discontinuation of statin therapy may benefit patients with terminal illness

Discontinuation of statin therapy may benefit patients with terminal illness

Discontinuing statin use in patients with late-stage cancer and other terminal illnesses may help improve patients' quality of life without causing other adverse health effects, according to a new study by led by researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus and Duke University and funded by the National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR). [More]
Using the butterfly effect to predict heart disease: an interview with Dr George and Dr Parthimos, Cardiff University

Using the butterfly effect to predict heart disease: an interview with Dr George and Dr Parthimos, Cardiff University

The emergence of the butterfly effect in many physical events reveals two fundamental laws that underpin all nonlinear systems. The first principle is known as determinism, which means that the evolution of an event can be followed accurately in the future, as long as we know its precise starting point and the rules of how a situation can change with time. [More]
Anticoagulant drug bivalirudin shows mixed results in MATRIX trial

Anticoagulant drug bivalirudin shows mixed results in MATRIX trial

Patients with acute coronary syndrome undergoing angioplasty who received the anticoagulant drug bivalirudin did not show significant improvements in either of two co-primary endpoints--a composite of rate of death, heart attack or stroke at 30 days, or a composite of those events plus major bleeding--as compared to patients receiving standard anticoagulation therapy, according to a study presented at the American College of Cardiology's 64th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Using arm as access point for catheter-based heart procedures lowers risk of major bleeding, death

Using arm as access point for catheter-based heart procedures lowers risk of major bleeding, death

Patients with acute coronary syndrome undergoing coronary angiogram, a procedure used to assess blockages in the heart's arteries, had a significantly lower risk of major bleeding and death if their interventional cardiologist accessed the heart through an artery in the arm rather than the groin, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 64th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
New anti-clotting therapy no better than established anticoagulants

New anti-clotting therapy no better than established anticoagulants

A novel therapy that would allow doctors to turn the body's blood-clotting ability off and on in a more controlled way was about as effective as established anticoagulants in patients undergoing angioplasty but was associated with higher rates of moderate to severe bleeding, according to an analysis of data from a terminated Phase III trial presented at the American College of Cardiology's 64th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
New diet may significantly lower risk of Alzheimer's disease

New diet may significantly lower risk of Alzheimer's disease

A new diet, appropriately known by the acronym MIND, could significantly lower a person's risk of developing Alzheimer's disease, even if the diet is not meticulously followed, according to a paper published online for subscribers in March in the journal Alzheimer's & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association. [More]
Semler receives 510(k) marketing clearance from FDA for next generation PAD testing system

Semler receives 510(k) marketing clearance from FDA for next generation PAD testing system

Semler Scientific, Inc., an emerging medical risk assessment company that develops, manufactures and markets patented products that assist healthcare providers in monitoring patients and evaluating chronic diseases, today announced receipt of 510(k) marketing clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for its next generation peripheral artery disease (PAD) testing system. [More]
New approach to improve cardiac regeneration

New approach to improve cardiac regeneration

The heart tissue of mammals has limited capacity to regenerate after an injury such as a heart attack, in part due to the inability to reactivate a cardiac muscle cell and proliferation program. Recent studies have indicated a low level of cardiac muscle cell (cardiomyocytes) proliferation in adult mammals, but it is insufficient to repair damaged hearts. [More]
Diet based on UK health guidelines could reduce CVD risk

Diet based on UK health guidelines could reduce CVD risk

Men and women who adapt their daily diet to meet current UK dietary guidelines could reduce their risk of a heart attack or a stroke by up to a third, according to a new study by King's College London. [More]
Simultaneous use of hormones and statins can protect women from heart disease after menopause

Simultaneous use of hormones and statins can protect women from heart disease after menopause

Hormones may not protect women from heart disease or stroke after menopause, but when combined with cholesterol-lowering statin drugs, they may help protect women from these killers, shows a population study from Sweden to be published in the April issue of Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society. [More]
Patients who experience deadliest form of heart attack may benefit from angioplasty

Patients who experience deadliest form of heart attack may benefit from angioplasty

Patients who experience the deadliest form of heart attack--ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI)--and suffer from substantial narrowing in multiple heart arteries may benefit from receiving angioplasty in constricted arteries not affected by the heart attack, thereby reducing the need for future angioplasty, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 64th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
New drug fails to prevent irreversible injury to the heart after angioplasty

New drug fails to prevent irreversible injury to the heart after angioplasty

Patients who received the new drug Bendavia before undergoing angioplasty or receiving a stent to clear blocked arteries after a heart attack showed no significant reduction in scarring as compared to patients given a placebo, according to a study presented at the American College of Cardiology's 64th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Routine use of thrombectomy in heart attack patients may increase risk of stroke

Routine use of thrombectomy in heart attack patients may increase risk of stroke

The largest study ever of its kind, led by researchers from McMaster University and the University of Toronto, has found that a routine strategy of blood clot removal during treatment for heart attacks was not beneficial and was associated with an increased risk of stroke. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement