Heart Attack News and Research RSS Feed - Heart Attack News and Research

Majority of patients who survive cardiac arrest experience cognitive problems

Majority of patients who survive cardiac arrest experience cognitive problems

Half of all patients who survive a cardiac arrest experience problems with cognitive functions such as memory and attention. [More]
Aspirin use continues to surge among older adults in US

Aspirin use continues to surge among older adults in US

A national survey suggests that slightly more than half of the older adults in the United States are now taking a daily dose of aspirin, even though its use is not recommended by the Food and Drug Administration for most people who have not yet had a heart attack or stroke. [More]
UH Seidman Cancer Center uses SpaceOAR System to perform first-ever prostate cancer treatment

UH Seidman Cancer Center uses SpaceOAR System to perform first-ever prostate cancer treatment

The radiation oncology team at UH Seidman Cancer Center at UH Geauga Medical Center performed the first-ever prostate cancer treatment on April 3 using a newly approved device. The device, called SpaceOAR System, enhances the efficacy of radiation treatment by protecting organs surrounding the prostate. The device, a temporary injectable gel, received FDA clearance on April 1. [More]
New Forsyth Institute study sheds light on connection between the mouth and heart

New Forsyth Institute study sheds light on connection between the mouth and heart

A new study from the Forsyth Institute is helping to shed more light on the important connection between the mouth and heart. According to research recently published online by the American Heart Association, scientists at Forsyth and Boston University have demonstrated that using an oral topical remedy to reduce inflammation associated with periodontitis, more commonly known as gum disease, also results in the prevention of vascular inflammation and can lower the risk of heart attack. [More]
Latest findings regarding nitric oxide offer new avenues to save lives

Latest findings regarding nitric oxide offer new avenues to save lives

Professor Jonathan Stamler's latest findings regarding nitric oxide have the potential to reshape fundamentally the way we think about the respiratory system - and offer new avenues to save lives. It may be time to rewrite the textbooks. [More]
Toronto General Hospital unveils novel technology-based platform to improve patient care

Toronto General Hospital unveils novel technology-based platform to improve patient care

The Toronto General Hospital today becomes the first healthcare institution in the world to unveil a novel technology-based platform aimed at shortening the time required to translate medical research into clinical practice. This will enable faster diagnoses and more rapid treatment for patients with heart disease and other conditions that are detected using advanced medical imaging devices. [More]
Administration of selenide protects heart tissue post cardiac arrest, shows study

Administration of selenide protects heart tissue post cardiac arrest, shows study

Damage to heart muscle from insufficient blood supply during cardiac arrest and reperfusion injury after blood flow is restored can be reduced by nearly 90 percent if selenide, a form of the essential nutrient selenium, is administered intravenously in the wake of the attack, according to a new preclinical study by researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. [More]
Gratitude in heart attack patients improves cardiac health

Gratitude in heart attack patients improves cardiac health

Recognizing and giving thanks for the positive aspects of life can result in improved mental, and ultimately physical, health in patients with asymptomatic heart failure, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. [More]
Changes in height can affect risk of coronary heart disease

Changes in height can affect risk of coronary heart disease

The shorter you are- the more your risk of coronary heart disease. That's the key finding of a new study led by the University of Leicester which discovered that every 2.5 inches change in your height affected your risk of coronary heart disease by 13.5%. For example, compared to a 5ft 6inch tall person, a 5 foot tall person on average has a 32% higher risk of coronary heart disease because of their relatively shorter stature. [More]
Study identifies gut immune system as new, effective target for diabetes

Study identifies gut immune system as new, effective target for diabetes

A commonly-used drug to treat inflammatory bowel disease, such as Crohn's disease, has been shown to lower blood sugar levels in obese mice, potentially identifying the gut immune system as a new and effective target in treating diabetes in humans. [More]
Combination of pomegranate juice and dates protects against heart disease

Combination of pomegranate juice and dates protects against heart disease

Glorious, red pomegranates and their Middle Eastern sister, luscious toffee-like dates, are delicious, increasingly trendy, and healthy to boot. [More]
Nanomedicine strategy can help reduce heart attacks, strokes

Nanomedicine strategy can help reduce heart attacks, strokes

A research team showed that a nanotherapeutic medicine can halt the growth of artery plaque cells resulting in the fast reduction of the inflammation that may cause a heart attack, according to a study led by researchers from Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published April 3 in Science Advances. [More]
Study: APOSEC protein concentrate reduces severity of damage after spinal cord injuries

Study: APOSEC protein concentrate reduces severity of damage after spinal cord injuries

In tests conducted on animals, the APOSEC protein concentrate extracted from white blood cells has reduced the severity of damage after an accident involving spinal cord injuries when the agent was injected in the abdominal cavity 40 minutes after the acute lesion. As a result, severe consequential paralyses can be prevented. [More]
CABG surgery improves long-term survival in diabetic patients with severe heart disease

CABG surgery improves long-term survival in diabetic patients with severe heart disease

Among diabetic patients with severe heart disease, coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery is better than stenting (percutaneous coronary intervention; PCI) at improving long-term survival and reducing the risk of adverse complications, according to an article in the April 2015 issue of The Annals of Thoracic Surgery. [More]
Folic acid supplements can improve blood vessel dilation in older adults

Folic acid supplements can improve blood vessel dilation in older adults

Supplemental folic acid can enhance blood vessel dilation in older adults, according to Penn State researchers, suggesting that folic acid supplements may be an inexpensive alternative for helping older adults to increase skin blood flow during heat waves and reduce cardiovascular events. [More]
Useful tips for physicians to help patients make the right choice on statin drugs

Useful tips for physicians to help patients make the right choice on statin drugs

Cholesterol-lowering statins have transformed the treatment of heart disease. But while the decision to use the drugs in patients with a history of heart attacks and strokes is mostly clear-cut, that choice can be a far trickier proposition for the tens of millions of Americans with high cholesterol but no overt disease. [More]
New tool can measure cardiovascular risk in persons aged 40 or older

New tool can measure cardiovascular risk in persons aged 40 or older

For the first time, scientists have developed a new risk score that can predict the 10-year risk of developing heart disease or having a stroke in persons aged 40 years or older in any world country. [More]
Women who undergo total joint replacement surgery less likely to have complications compared to men

Women who undergo total joint replacement surgery less likely to have complications compared to men

While women may have their first total joint replacement (TJR) at an older age, they are less likely to have complications related to their surgery or require revision surgery, according to a new study presented today at the 2015 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. [More]
Non-invasive imaging tests may predict healthy adults' future risk of heart attack, stroke or death

Non-invasive imaging tests may predict healthy adults' future risk of heart attack, stroke or death

Adding two non-invasive imaging tests to traditional cardiovascular disease risk factor assessment more precisely predicts a healthy patient's future risk of heart attack, stroke, or premature death, according to a study led by Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published in the March 24 edition of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. [More]
Research suggests genetic predisposition to spontaneous coronary artery disease

Research suggests genetic predisposition to spontaneous coronary artery disease

A Mayo Clinic study has identified a familial association in spontaneous coronary artery dissection, a type of heart attack that most commonly affects younger women, suggesting a genetic predisposition to the condition, researchers say. [More]
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