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UTHealth's Mobile Stroke Unit fights stroke through research, technology and patient care

UTHealth's Mobile Stroke Unit fights stroke through research, technology and patient care

About 800,000 strokes occur in America each year; that's about one every 40 seconds. Houston resident Joe Carrabba experienced one of them. [More]
Study finds link between respiratory sinus arrhythmia and survival prospects of heart attack patients

Study finds link between respiratory sinus arrhythmia and survival prospects of heart attack patients

The heart rate may be an indicator of a person's life expectancy. A research team at the Technical University of Munich has to this end analyzed an effect which at first seems paradoxical: Minor irregularities in the heartbeat are indicative of a healthy body. [More]
ART alone not sufficient to reduce arterial inflammation among HIV-infected patients, study finds

ART alone not sufficient to reduce arterial inflammation among HIV-infected patients, study finds

Initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) soon after diagnosis of an HIV infection did not prevent the progression of significant arterial inflammation in a small group of previously untreated patients. [More]
Mice study shows heart medication helps reduce build-up of plaque in brain's blood vessels

Mice study shows heart medication helps reduce build-up of plaque in brain's blood vessels

A new study from örebro University, published in Science Signaling today, shows that heart medication reduces the build-up of plaque in the brain's blood vessels in mice. The question is if this is true also in humans? If the answer is yes, it might bring scientists a step closer to developing a medicine against Alzheimer's disease. [More]
WPI receives patent for novel method of reprogramming human skin cells

WPI receives patent for novel method of reprogramming human skin cells

Cell therapies for a range of serious conditions, including heart attacks, diabetes, and traumatic injuries, will be accelerated by research at Worcester Polytechnic Institute that yielded a newly patented method of converting human skin cells into engines of wound healing and tissue regeneration. [More]
Rapid hand-held troponin blood test for heart attack diagnosis launched by Philips

Rapid hand-held troponin blood test for heart attack diagnosis launched by Philips

Chest pain patients presenting at the emergency department are set to benefit from a major development by Royal Philips. The company today announced that it has CE marked its cardiac troponin I (cTnI) blood test on the Minicare I-20 handheld device. Minicare cTnI delivers its lab comparable test results in less than 10 minutes near the patient, reducing the time for the physician to decide on treatment. [More]
Study finds link between sodium intake and clinical CVD events in CKD patients

Study finds link between sodium intake and clinical CVD events in CKD patients

In a study appearing in the May 24/31 issue of JAMA, Jiang He, M.D., Ph.D., of the Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, New Orleans, and colleagues evaluated more than 3,500 participants with chronic kidney disease (CKD), examining the association between urinary sodium excretion and clinical cardiovascular disease (CVD) events. [More]
Study explores incidence of heart failure following myocardial infarction

Study explores incidence of heart failure following myocardial infarction

One in four patients develop heart failure within four years of a first heart attack, according to a study in nearly 25 000 patients presented today at Heart Failure 2016 and the 3rd World Congress on Acute Heart Failure by Dr Johannes Gho, a cardiology resident at the University Medical Center Utrecht, in Utrecht, the Netherlands. [More]
Epigenetic modification of Igfbp2 gene may increase risk of obesity and fatty liver

Epigenetic modification of Igfbp2 gene may increase risk of obesity and fatty liver

Scientists of the German Center for Diabetes Research led by the German Institute of Human Nutrition have shown in a mouse model that the epigenetic modification of the Igfbp2 gene observed in the young animal precedes a fatty liver in the adult animal later in life. [More]
HbA1C test can effectively detect hidden diabetes among hyperglycemia patients

HbA1C test can effectively detect hidden diabetes among hyperglycemia patients

A retrospective review of medical records found the HbA1C test, commonly used to diagnose and manage diabetes, can effectively detect hidden disease among hospital patients with hyperglycemia, commonly known as high blood sugar. [More]
Tips for improving cardiovascular health

Tips for improving cardiovascular health

New research by UT Southwestern heart specialists shows that sedentary behavior such as sitting for long periods of time at a desk or on the couch is associated with increased amounts of calcium in the arteries, which in turn can lead to higher risk of heart attack. [More]
Aggressive blood pressure intervention can benefit frail adults aged 75 and older

Aggressive blood pressure intervention can benefit frail adults aged 75 and older

NIH-supported researchers are reporting additional details about a widely-publicized study that linked a systolic blood pressure target under 120 mm Hg (millimeters of mercury) with reduced cardiovascular disease and a lower risk of death. [More]
Pre-procedural use of antiplatelet therapy becoming less routine in heart attack treatment

Pre-procedural use of antiplatelet therapy becoming less routine in heart attack treatment

Doctors worried about dangerous blood clots in patients undergoing a coronary artery procedure— such as angioplasty to treat a heart attack — will often administer antiplatelet therapy to head off complications. [More]
Intensive blood pressure lowering therapies can cut heart disease risk in older adults

Intensive blood pressure lowering therapies can cut heart disease risk in older adults

Intensive therapies to reduce high blood pressure can cut the risk of heart disease in older adults without increasing the risk for falls, according to doctors at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center. [More]
Study finds that ACS NSQIP Surgical Risk Calculator has excellent calibration

Study finds that ACS NSQIP Surgical Risk Calculator has excellent calibration

The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Surgical Risk Calculator accurately estimates the chance of a patient experiencing postoperative complications, and its performance can improve with recalibration of the tool according to research findings appearing online in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons in advance of print publication. [More]
Researchers identify new culprit that may contribute to heart disease

Researchers identify new culprit that may contribute to heart disease

Medical professionals have long known that the buildup of plaque in arteries can cause them to narrow and harden, potentially leading to a whole host of health problems — including heart attack, heart disease and stroke. [More]
High blood pressure could increase vascular dementia risk

High blood pressure could increase vascular dementia risk

High blood pressure could significantly raise the risk of developing the second most common form of dementia, according to a new study from The George Institute for Global Health. [More]
New Research: High blood pressure raises risk of dementia

New Research: High blood pressure raises risk of dementia

High blood pressure could significantly raise the risk of developing the second most common form of dementia, according to a new study from The George Institute for Global Health. [More]
World Hypertension Day: AMA joins hands with AHA to increase public awareness of hypertension

World Hypertension Day: AMA joins hands with AHA to increase public awareness of hypertension

With the number of deaths caused by high blood pressure on the rise in the United States, the American Medical Association is joining the American Heart Association to increase public awareness of this “silent killer.” [More]
Rural hospitals may work well for straightforward surgeries in relatively healthy patients

Rural hospitals may work well for straightforward surgeries in relatively healthy patients

They may be in small towns. They may only have a couple of surgeons. But for common operations, they may be safer and less expensive than their larger cousins, a new study finds. [More]
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