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Strong link found between incarceration of family members during childhood and heart attacks in men

Strong link found between incarceration of family members during childhood and heart attacks in men

A parent's incarceration has immediate, devastating effects on a family. Now, Virginia Tech and University of Toronto researchers say there may be a longer term risk: Men who as children experienced a family member's incarceration are approximately twice as likely to have a heart attack in later adulthood in comparison with men who were not exposed to such a childhood trauma. [More]
African-American patients with connective tissue diseases at risk for cardiovascular disease

African-American patients with connective tissue diseases at risk for cardiovascular disease

A study based on medical records from more than a quarter million adult patients found that African-American patients with connective tissue diseases such as lupus or rheumatoid arthritis were twice as likely as white patients to suffer from narrowed or atherosclerotic blood vessels, which increase the risk of a heart attack, stroke or death. [More]
Texting could promote medication adherence among chronically ill patients

Texting could promote medication adherence among chronically ill patients

Text messages can double the odds of medication adherence in patients with chronic disease. That is the central finding of a new study published today in JAMA Internal Medicine. [More]
Higher aerobic fitness levels may improve chances of survival after first heart attack

Higher aerobic fitness levels may improve chances of survival after first heart attack

People who are fit are more likely to survive their first heart attack, according to a study of nearly 70,000 patients of Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit. [More]
Applying ultrasound therapies for recovery of cardiac stem cells

Applying ultrasound therapies for recovery of cardiac stem cells

A joint project of researchers from Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (UPM), Julius Wolff Institute and led by Spanish National Center for Cardiovascular Research shows that when cardiac stem cells undergo low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment, these cells can perform continuing modifications, tissue remodeling and regeneration of damaged cardiac tissue after a heart attack. [More]
MRI safe for patients with implantable cardiac devices

MRI safe for patients with implantable cardiac devices

The findings of a major study led by cardiovascular imaging specialists at Allegheny General Hospital, part of the Allegheny Health Network, suggest that magnetic resonance imaging is a safe and effective diagnostic procedure for patients with implantable cardiac devices. [More]
U of M's 'Ask About Aspirin' initiative aims to reduce incidence of first heart attack or stroke

U of M's 'Ask About Aspirin' initiative aims to reduce incidence of first heart attack or stroke

Cardiovascular diseases are the leading causes of death and disability in the United States, accounting for nearly one-third of all deaths. The diseases also create an immense national health economic burden. [More]
TSRI scientists reveal workings of key 'relief-valve' in cells

TSRI scientists reveal workings of key 'relief-valve' in cells

A team led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute has solved a long-standing mystery in cell biology by showing essentially how a key "relief-valve" in cells does its job. [More]
New SBP research may lead to novel approach to treat heart failure

New SBP research may lead to novel approach to treat heart failure

More than 5 million people in the United States suffer from heart failure, according to the American Heart Association. Less than half of those with heart failure live five years after diagnosis. [More]
New technique may reduce need for amputation in patients with critical limb ischemia

New technique may reduce need for amputation in patients with critical limb ischemia

A new imaging technique could reduce the need for amputation in patients with critical limb ischemia, according to a study publised today in the scientific journal JACC. [More]
Research provides new molecular insight into heart failure

Research provides new molecular insight into heart failure

More than 5 million people in the United States suffer from heart failure, according to the American Heart Association. Less than half of those with heart failure live five years after diagnosis. [More]
CNIC researchers identify how two proteins control heart growth and adaptation to hypertension

CNIC researchers identify how two proteins control heart growth and adaptation to hypertension

Researchers at the Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares Carlos III have identified how two proteins control the growth of the heart and its adaptation to high blood pressure (hypertension). [More]
First national PSA campaign launched with strong message: No one is excused from prediabetes

First national PSA campaign launched with strong message: No one is excused from prediabetes

Losing weight and being healthier are at the top of everyone’s New Year’s resolutions. But, despite the best intentions, work, kids, and social events often push lifestyle changes to the bottom of the list. [More]
Regular physical activity improves cardiovascular health, lowers mortality risk

Regular physical activity improves cardiovascular health, lowers mortality risk

The majority of citizens in developed countries should not be concerned by potential harm from exercise but rather by the lack of exercise in their lives, according to a clinical perspective published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology from the ACC Sports and Exercise Cardiology Leadership Council. [More]
Specialized oral nutrition supplement associated with 50% lower death rate in older patients

Specialized oral nutrition supplement associated with 50% lower death rate in older patients

Results from a new clinical trial show that a specialized oral nutrition supplement was associated with a 50 percent lower death rate in older malnourished patients with a heart or lung disease 90 days following hospitalization. [More]
Troponin T test provides possible one hour diagnosis of heart attack

Troponin T test provides possible one hour diagnosis of heart attack

Results from the TRAPID-AMI clinical study have been published online by the Annals of Emergency Medicine, confirming a novel approach for a more rapid diagnosis of heart attack in patients with acute chest pain. [More]
Using statins before and after heart surgery can help reduce cardiac complications, mortality risks

Using statins before and after heart surgery can help reduce cardiac complications, mortality risks

Using statins before and after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery can help reduce cardiac complications, such as atrial fibrillation, following surgery and also can reduce the risk of death during and after surgery, according to a review article posted online today by The Annals of Thoracic Surgery. [More]
Cedars-Sinai researcher receives $2.5 million grant to develop risk assessment tool for sudden cardiac arrest

Cedars-Sinai researcher receives $2.5 million grant to develop risk assessment tool for sudden cardiac arrest

A Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute physician researcher has received a $2.5 million grant from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute to develop a risk assessment tool that could identify patients susceptible to sudden cardiac arrest, a usually fatal heart rhythm malfunction. [More]
Using skin cells to treat injured hearts

Using skin cells to treat injured hearts

Following a heart attack or other heart trauma, the heart is unable to replace its dead cells. Patients are often left with little option other than heart transplants, which are rarely available, or more recently cell therapies that transplant heart cells into the patient's heart. In far too many cases, however, the transplanted heart cells do not engraft well, resulting in poor recovery. [More]
Finding cost-effective ways of lowering blood pressure among adults living in rural Southeast Asia

Finding cost-effective ways of lowering blood pressure among adults living in rural Southeast Asia

Researchers from the Duke Global Health Institute and their international collaborators are launching a study to find cost-effective ways of lowering blood pressure in adults living in rural in South Asia. [More]
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