Heart Attack (Myocardial Infarction) News and Research RSS Feed - Heart Attack (Myocardial Infarction) News and Research

A Heart Attack (Myocardial Infarction) occurs when blood flow to a section of heart muscle becomes blocked. If the flow of blood isn’t restored quickly, the section of heart muscle becomes damaged from lack of oxygen and begins to die.

Heart attack is a leading killer of both men and women in the United States. But fortunately, today there are excellent treatments for heart attack that can save lives and prevent disabilities. Treatment is most effective when started within 1 hour of the beginning of symptoms. Heart attacks occur most often as a result of a condition called coronary artery disease (CAD). In CAD, a fatty material called plaque (plak) builds up over many years on the inside walls of the coronary arteries (the arteries that supply blood and oxygen to your heart). Eventually, an area of plaque can rupture, causing a blood clot to form on the surface of the plaque. If the clot becomes large enough, it can mostly or completely block the flow of oxygen-rich blood to the part of the heart muscle fed by the artery.
Cedars-Sinai researcher receives $2.5 million grant to develop risk assessment tool for sudden cardiac arrest

Cedars-Sinai researcher receives $2.5 million grant to develop risk assessment tool for sudden cardiac arrest

A Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute physician researcher has received a $2.5 million grant from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute to develop a risk assessment tool that could identify patients susceptible to sudden cardiac arrest, a usually fatal heart rhythm malfunction. [More]
Young diabetic women have six-fold heart attack risk

Young diabetic women have six-fold heart attack risk

Women aged 45 years and under with diabetes have a six-fold risk of heart attack, according to research presented at ESC Congress today.1 The study in more than 7 000 women also found that young women who had a heart attack (myocardial infarction, MI) were more likely to be smokers than older women with MI. [More]
Study: Knee or hip replacement surgery may increase heart attack risk

Study: Knee or hip replacement surgery may increase heart attack risk

Contrary to recent reports, Boston-based researchers found that osteoarthritis patients who had total knee or hip joint replacement surgery, known as arthroplasty, were at increased risk of heart attack (myocardial infarction) in the early post-operative period. [More]
Proton pump inhibitors linked to increased risk of heart attack

Proton pump inhibitors linked to increased risk of heart attack

People who use proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are up to 21% more likely to experience a heart attack than people who do not use the antacids, according to researchers from Stanford University, California. [More]
Using cardiac biomarkers to identify NSTEMI and ACS patients: an interview with Peter Mason

Using cardiac biomarkers to identify NSTEMI and ACS patients: an interview with Peter Mason

ACS is currently identified through the use of ECGs pre-hospital and the confirmed via a Troponin biomarker test once in the acute setting. [More]
A single gene mutation can halve the risk of heart disease

A single gene mutation can halve the risk of heart disease

Recent research has shown that inactivation of a single gene reduces the risk of heart attack by 50%. [More]
Depression, anxiety after MI more common in women than men

Depression, anxiety after MI more common in women than men

Women are more likely to develop anxiety and depression after a heart attack (myocardial infarction; MI) than men, according to research presented at Acute Cardiovascular Care 2014 by Professor Pranas Serpytis from Lithuania. [More]
Reducing heart failure deaths: an interview with Dimitrios Georgiopoulos, UK Medical Director, Novartis

Reducing heart failure deaths: an interview with Dimitrios Georgiopoulos, UK Medical Director, Novartis

Heart failure is a debilitating, and life-threatening, condition in which the heart cannot pump enough blood around the body. When heart failure continues to progress and worsen over time, the persistent condition is known as chronic heart failure. [More]
Measuring coronary artery blockage in heart attack patients can help avoid surgery

Measuring coronary artery blockage in heart attack patients can help avoid surgery

A method for measuring coronary artery blockage in heart attack patients can help more than one fifth of them avoid stents or surgery, according to a British study presented at the ESC Congress 2014 today. [More]
Study suggests that energy drinks can cause heart problems

Study suggests that energy drinks can cause heart problems

Energy drinks can cause heart problems according to research presented at ESC Congress 2014 today by Professor Milou-Daniel Drici from France. [More]
Cheaper drug could potentially improve heart attack patient outcomes and save health services millions

Cheaper drug could potentially improve heart attack patient outcomes and save health services millions

A new study published in The Lancet compares outcomes for two drugs used to prevent blood clot formation during emergency heart attack treatment. The study suggests that use of one of the drugs, heparin, could result in improved outcomes (such as a reduced rate of repeat heart attacks), compared to the other drug tested, bivalirudin, which is in widespread use in high-income countries, and is around 400 times more expensive than heparin. [More]
P2Y12 and blood clotting: an interview with Dr. Jacobson, NIH

P2Y12 and blood clotting: an interview with Dr. Jacobson, NIH

We already understand the many steps involved in blood clotting in great mechanistic detail. The process of blood vessels closing off in response to injury is necessary for preserving life, but blood platelets that are over-active, or activated inappropriately because of unstable plaque, can lead to heart attacks and strokes. [More]
Controlling low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels: an interview with Jay Edelberg, M.D., Sanofi and Bill Sasiela, Ph.D., Regeneron

Controlling low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels: an interview with Jay Edelberg, M.D., Sanofi and Bill Sasiela, Ph.D., Regeneron

Lipids, primarily cholesterol and triglycerides, come from two sources: what is naturally manufactured in the liver and what comes from the intestines through the diet. [More]
Marijuana may cause heart complications in young people

Marijuana may cause heart complications in young people

Marijuana smoking may increase the risk of serious and even fatal heart problems among young or middle-aged users, according to a new French study. [More]
Outbursts of anger may trigger heart attacks and strokes, shows study

Outbursts of anger may trigger heart attacks and strokes, shows study

Outbursts of anger may trigger heart attacks, strokes and other cardiovascular problems in the two hours immediately afterwards, according to the first study to systematically evaluate previous research into the link between the extreme emotion and all cardiovascular outcomes. [More]
New discovery has potential to transform heart attack treatments

New discovery has potential to transform heart attack treatments

An Australian discovery has the potential to transform the treatment of a heart attack, after a new approach boosted heart function and reduced heart scarring in preclinical studies. [More]
High aerobic fitness in late adolescence may reduce heart attack risk later in life

High aerobic fitness in late adolescence may reduce heart attack risk later in life

Researchers in Sweden have found an association between a person’s fitness as a teenager and their risk of heart attack in later life. In a study of nearly 750,000 men, they found that the more aerobically fit men were in late adolescence, the less likely they were to have a heart attack 30 or 40 years later. [More]
Specialists use pioneering treatment to reduce high blood pressure in kidney patient

Specialists use pioneering treatment to reduce high blood pressure in kidney patient

SPECIALISTS at Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust have used a pioneering treatment to reduce high blood pressure in a kidney patient whose blood pressure could not be controlled with conventional medication. [More]
Heart disease signs in newborns: an interview with Dr Michael Skilton, University of Sydney

Heart disease signs in newborns: an interview with Dr Michael Skilton, University of Sydney

Thickening of the walls of the main arteries is the best indicator of poor cardiovascular health in healthy young children. [More]
Weight loss and heart damage: an interview with Dr Lili Barouch, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Weight loss and heart damage: an interview with Dr Lili Barouch, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Obesity causes an increase in the stiffness of the heart, making it hard for the heart muscle to relax and fill with blood in between heartbeats. This abnormal stiffness can lead to congestive heart failure and other problems as it becomes more severe. [More]
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