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Veterans with PTSD at higher risk of developing heart failure

Veterans with PTSD at higher risk of developing heart failure

In a study of more than 8,000 veterans living in Hawaii and the Pacific Islands, those with posttraumatic stress disorder had a nearly 50 percent greater risk of developing heart failure over about a seven-year follow-up period, compared with their non-PTSD peers. [More]
New tool can measure cardiovascular risk in persons aged 40 or older

New tool can measure cardiovascular risk in persons aged 40 or older

For the first time, scientists have developed a new risk score that can predict the 10-year risk of developing heart disease or having a stroke in persons aged 40 years or older in any world country. [More]
Study shows high-fat diet may increase risk for depression, psychiatric disorders

Study shows high-fat diet may increase risk for depression, psychiatric disorders

Can the consumption of fatty foods change your behavior and your brain? High-fat diets have long been known to increase the risk for medical problems, including heart disease and stroke, but there is growing concern that diets high in fat might also increase the risk for depression and other psychiatric disorders. [More]
USF scientists identify potential compounds to improve cardiovascular system, small vessel disease

USF scientists identify potential compounds to improve cardiovascular system, small vessel disease

University of South Florida scientists have identified a group of compounds with the potential for beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system and small vessel disease while researching grape seed extracts discovered at USF. [More]
Novasep, Celladon sign agreement to develop and supply MYDICAR drug substance

Novasep, Celladon sign agreement to develop and supply MYDICAR drug substance

Novasep, a leading supplier of services and technologies for the life sciences and chemical industries, and Celladon Corporation, a clinical-stage cardiovascular gene therapy company, today announce that they have signed a Development, Manufacturing and Supply Agreement pursuant to which, if supported by upcoming MYDICAR clinical data, Novasep would manufacture MYDICAR drug substance through 2018 with extension options through 2020. [More]
Women who give birth to four or more children at risk of heart disease

Women who give birth to four or more children at risk of heart disease

Women who give birth to four or more children are more likely to have cardiovascular changes that can be early indicators of heart disease than women who have fewer children, new research by UT Southwestern Medical Center cardiologists finds. [More]
Study finds clustered cardiometabolic risk factors in children

Study finds clustered cardiometabolic risk factors in children

Lifestyle-related cardiometabolic risk factors cluster already in children in the same way as in adults, according to research from the University of Eastern Finland. A cardiometabolic risk score was used to evaluate cardiometabolic risk in different age groups. [More]
Newly discovered bodily process may explain fetal brain bleeds

Newly discovered bodily process may explain fetal brain bleeds

A newly discovered bodily process in mice may explain why some human fetuses who have different antigens than their mothers suffer life-threatening brain bleeds, according to a new study. [More]
Research suggests genetic predisposition to spontaneous coronary artery disease

Research suggests genetic predisposition to spontaneous coronary artery disease

A Mayo Clinic study has identified a familial association in spontaneous coronary artery dissection, a type of heart attack that most commonly affects younger women, suggesting a genetic predisposition to the condition, researchers say. [More]
Plexin D1 gene determines body fat distribution in humans

Plexin D1 gene determines body fat distribution in humans

Scientists have known for some time that people who carry a lot of weight around their bellies are more likely to develop diabetes and heart disease than those who have bigger hips and thighs. [More]
New report highlights the need for disclosing Alzheimer's diagnosis to patients

New report highlights the need for disclosing Alzheimer's diagnosis to patients

The Alzheimer's Association's 2015 Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures report, released today, found that only 45 percent of people with Alzheimer's disease or their caregivers say they were told the diagnosis by their doctor. [More]
Home-exercise plan for HIV patients

Home-exercise plan for HIV patients

In addition to antiretroviral medications, people with HIV may soon begin receiving a home exercise plan from their doctors, according to a researcher at Case Western Reserve University's Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing. [More]
Using the butterfly effect to predict heart disease: an interview with Dr George and Dr Parthimos, Cardiff University

Using the butterfly effect to predict heart disease: an interview with Dr George and Dr Parthimos, Cardiff University

The emergence of the butterfly effect in many physical events reveals two fundamental laws that underpin all nonlinear systems. The first principle is known as determinism, which means that the evolution of an event can be followed accurately in the future, as long as we know its precise starting point and the rules of how a situation can change with time. [More]
Gene regulatory code remained same across the evolution

Gene regulatory code remained same across the evolution

The language used in the switches that turn genes on and off has remained the same across millions of years of evolution, according to a new study led by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden. The findings, which are published in the scientific journal "eLife", indicate that the differences between animals reside in the content and length of the instructions that are written using this conserved language. [More]
Amgen seeks marketing approval of Repatha (evolocumab) in Japan for treatment of high cholesterol

Amgen seeks marketing approval of Repatha (evolocumab) in Japan for treatment of high cholesterol

Amgen today announced that an application seeking marketing approval of Repatha (evolocumab) for the treatment of high cholesterol has been submitted for review to the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare in Japan. [More]
New diet may significantly lower risk of Alzheimer's disease

New diet may significantly lower risk of Alzheimer's disease

A new diet, appropriately known by the acronym MIND, could significantly lower a person's risk of developing Alzheimer's disease, even if the diet is not meticulously followed, according to a paper published online for subscribers in March in the journal Alzheimer's & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association. [More]
Vitamin D plays major role in preventing diabetes and atherosclerosis

Vitamin D plays major role in preventing diabetes and atherosclerosis

In recent years, a deficiency of vitamin D has been linked to type 2 diabetes and heart disease, two illnesses that commonly occur together and are the most common cause of illness and death in Western countries. Both disorders are rooted in chronic inflammation, which leads to insulin resistance and the buildup of artery-clogging plaque. [More]
New bodily process may explain low blood oxygen levels for cystic fibrosis patients with lung infection

New bodily process may explain low blood oxygen levels for cystic fibrosis patients with lung infection

Researchers have defined a new bodily process in mice that may explain why blood oxygen levels are lower for patients with cystic fibrosis when they get a lung infection. [More]
Diet based on UK health guidelines could reduce CVD risk

Diet based on UK health guidelines could reduce CVD risk

Men and women who adapt their daily diet to meet current UK dietary guidelines could reduce their risk of a heart attack or a stroke by up to a third, according to a new study by King's College London. [More]
Simultaneous use of hormones and statins can protect women from heart disease after menopause

Simultaneous use of hormones and statins can protect women from heart disease after menopause

Hormones may not protect women from heart disease or stroke after menopause, but when combined with cholesterol-lowering statin drugs, they may help protect women from these killers, shows a population study from Sweden to be published in the April issue of Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society. [More]
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