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Researchers treat myocardial infarction with new telomerase-based gene therapy

Researchers treat myocardial infarction with new telomerase-based gene therapy

The enzyme telomerase repairs cell damage produced by ageing, and has been used successfully in therapies to lengthen the life of mice. Now it has been observed that it could also be used to cure illnesses related to the ageing process. [More]
Baylor Scott & White Health forms alliance with Cleveland Clinic

Baylor Scott & White Health forms alliance with Cleveland Clinic

Baylor Scott & White Health today announces an alliance with Cleveland Clinic's Sydell and Arnold Miller Family Heart & Vascular Institute. [More]
Researchers explore lifespan variability between races

Researchers explore lifespan variability between races

Eliminating health disparities between races is a goal of many groups and organizations, but a team of sociologists suggests that finding the reasons for the differences in the timing of black and white deaths may be trickier than once thought. [More]
New study shows that people may inherit intestinal bacteria that cause inflammatory bowel disease

New study shows that people may inherit intestinal bacteria that cause inflammatory bowel disease

A new study by an international team of researchers shows for the first time that people may inherit some of the intestinal bacteria that cause Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, collectively know as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The study, recently published in Genome Medicine, also confirmed that antibiotics could worsen the imbalance in the gut microbes. [More]
CVRx receives HDE approval for Barostim neo legacy device

CVRx receives HDE approval for Barostim neo legacy device

CVRx, Inc., a privately held medical device company, announced today that it has received Humanitarian Device Exemption (HDE) approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for its Barostim neo legacy device. [More]
New 3-D imaging catheter aims to reduce risk of complications during cardiac interventions

New 3-D imaging catheter aims to reduce risk of complications during cardiac interventions

An emerging 3-D imaging catheter aims to provide cardiologists with a live view from inside the heart during cardiac catheterizations. Developed by RTI International, the catheter contains an ultrasound microarray made using semiconductor circuit fabrication that can provide unprecedented volumetric field-of-view, in real time. [More]
Novartis announces FDA approval of Signifor LAR for treatment of patients with acromegaly

Novartis announces FDA approval of Signifor LAR for treatment of patients with acromegaly

Novartis announced today that the US Food and Drug Administration has approved Signifor long-acting release (LAR) (pasireotide) for injectable suspension, for intramuscular use, for the treatment of patients with acromegaly who have had an inadequate response to surgery and/or for whom surgery is not an option. [More]
Revolutionising back pain treatments: an interview with Dr Kieran O’Sullivan

Revolutionising back pain treatments: an interview with Dr Kieran O’Sullivan

Back pain is exceptionally common. In fact, to not experience back pain at some point of your life would be thoroughly abnormal. Experiencing back pain is like becoming tired or becoming sad; we don’t necessarily like it, but it’s perfectly common. [More]
Many college students regard hookah smoking safer than smoking cigarettes

Many college students regard hookah smoking safer than smoking cigarettes

Despite emerging evidence otherwise, many college students consider hookah smoking safer than smoking cigarettes, reports a University of South Florida College of Public Health study published this month by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [More]
St. Jude Medical receives CE Mark approval for Quadra Allure MP CRT-P

St. Jude Medical receives CE Mark approval for Quadra Allure MP CRT-P

St. Jude Medical, Inc., a global medical device company, today announced CE Mark approval of the Quadra Allure MP™ cardiac resynchronization therapy pacemaker (CRT-P). [More]
Cold 'sensor' hold key to new therapeutic target for treatment of frostbite and hypothermia

Cold 'sensor' hold key to new therapeutic target for treatment of frostbite and hypothermia

A cold 'sensor' which triggers the skin's vascular response to the cold could represent an exciting new therapeutic target for the treatment of frostbite and hypothermia, according to scientists at King's College London. [More]
CWRU researchers find mechanism that enables LRAT enzyme to store vitamin A

CWRU researchers find mechanism that enables LRAT enzyme to store vitamin A

Researchers at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have uncovered the mechanism that enables the enzyme Lecithin: retinol acyltransferase (LRAT) to store vitamin A — a process that is indispensable for vision. [More]
Researchers find that one in six Ontario adults reports a history of TBI

Researchers find that one in six Ontario adults reports a history of TBI

Nearly seventeen per cent of adults surveyed in Ontario said they have suffered a traumatic brain injury that left them unconscious for five minutes or required them to be hospitalized overnight, according to new research. These same adults also reported more substance use, smoking and recent psychiatric distress. [More]
CVRx gets CE Mark approval to expand labeling of Barostim neo System as MR Conditional

CVRx gets CE Mark approval to expand labeling of Barostim neo System as MR Conditional

CVRx, Inc., a privately held medical device company, announced today that CE Marking has been granted to expand labeling of the Barostim neo System as MR Conditional, or safe for use in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) systems under specified conditions. [More]
Smaller blood transfusions during surgeries better for patients with heart disease

Smaller blood transfusions during surgeries better for patients with heart disease

Patients with heart disease who receive transfusions during surgeries do just as well with smaller amounts of blood and face no greater risk of dying from other diseases than patients who received more blood, according to a new Rutgers study. [More]
Scientists report new family of selective molecules to combat causal agent of malaria

Scientists report new family of selective molecules to combat causal agent of malaria

Malaria is one of the most serious health problems worldwide, registering 200 million clinical cases and more than 600,000 attributable deaths per year, according to information from the World Health Organization in 2013. Given the emerging resistance to the standard treatment most widely used throughout the world, which is based on artemisinin and its analogs, there is a need for new antimalarial compounds. [More]
Researchers pinpoint rare gene mutations that increase risk of heart attack early in life

Researchers pinpoint rare gene mutations that increase risk of heart attack early in life

A team of investigators from the Broad Institute, Massachusetts General Hospital and other leading biomedical research institutions has pinpointed rare mutations in a gene called APOA5 that increase a person's risk of having a heart attack early in life. These mutations disable the APOA5 gene and also raise the levels in the blood of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, a type of fat. [More]
STSI researchers launch study to examine root cause of sudden unexpected death

STSI researchers launch study to examine root cause of sudden unexpected death

Researchers at the Scripps Translational Science Institute have launched a clinical trial aimed at cracking one of the toughest mysteries in forensic science -- sudden unexplained death. [More]
Enzymatic activity essential for vision may provide target for drug transport

Enzymatic activity essential for vision may provide target for drug transport

Researchers at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have uncovered the mechanism that enables the enzyme Lecithin: retinol acyltransferase (LRAT) to store vitamin A--a process that is indispensable for vision. [More]
Simple supplement could reduce heart disease in individuals born with low birth weight

Simple supplement could reduce heart disease in individuals born with low birth weight

A simple supplement could be a safe and cost-effective way of reducing heart disease in individuals born with a low birth weight, suggests research from the University of Cambridge. The study, carried out in rats, also raises the possibility of developing a blood test to indicate how much damage there is in the aortas of these individuals. [More]