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New UAB research shows that HBP medications can increase stroke risk

New UAB research shows that HBP medications can increase stroke risk

Untreated high blood pressure, or hypertension, wreaks havoc on the body, leading to heart disease and stroke. New research from the University of Alabama at Birmingham published in the journal Stroke shows that, although HBP medications are beneficial, it is as risky to wait for the condition to develop and then treat it to a controlled level. [More]
Patient characteristics may guide TKI use in CML

Patient characteristics may guide TKI use in CML

The likelihood of complications associated with tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy in patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia may be reduced by considering patient factors and differences in the toxicity profiles of the different drug options, a review suggests. [More]
Tackling comorbidities could improve MS survival

Tackling comorbidities could improve MS survival

Survival of patients with multiple sclerosis is still reduced, despite recent improvements, say researchers. [More]
Data supporting anti-cancer potential of Biscayne’s GHRH antagonist to be discussed at ASCO Annual Meeting

Data supporting anti-cancer potential of Biscayne’s GHRH antagonist to be discussed at ASCO Annual Meeting

Biscayne Pharmaceuticals, Inc., today announced that data supporting the anti-cancer potential of its growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) technology will be discussed in a poster presentation at the 2015 ASCO Annual Meeting. [More]
Study explores accuracy of body weight perception and obesity in Chinese Americans

Study explores accuracy of body weight perception and obesity in Chinese Americans

Worldwide, obesity is becoming more prevalent. According to The World Health Organization, worldwide obesity has nearly doubled since 1980, and in 2008 25% of adults aged 20 and over were overweight, and another 11% were obese. Obesity has been identified as a major source of unsustainable health costs and numerous adverse outcomes, including morbidity and mortality due to hypertension, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and certain types of cancer. [More]
TSRI scientists awarded $2.2 million NIH grant to advance innovative approach to obesity treatment

TSRI scientists awarded $2.2 million NIH grant to advance innovative approach to obesity treatment

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have been awarded nearly $2.2 million by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases of the National Institutes of Health to advance an innovative approach to the treatment of obesity, a serious health problem that affects more than one-third of all Americans. [More]
Modest lifestyle changes help breast cancer survivors lose weight

Modest lifestyle changes help breast cancer survivors lose weight

Carrying extra body fat increases the risk for diabetes, heart disease and stroke, and also increases risk of cancer recurrence after a breast cancer diagnosis. A multi-institutional study presented at the American Society for Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting 2015 shows that female breast cancer survivors are able to lose weight through modest lifestyle changes. [More]
UM researcher receives grant to examine effects of CBT on racial/ethnic minority smokers

UM researcher receives grant to examine effects of CBT on racial/ethnic minority smokers

Numerous studies have shown that African Americans and Hispanics are less likely than Caucasians to quit smoking, even if they participate in cessation interventions. [More]
FEV1/FVC lower limit of normal aids surgery risk stratification in COPD

FEV1/FVC lower limit of normal aids surgery risk stratification in COPD

Researchers say that using the lower limit of normal of the forced expiration volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity ratio improves risk stratification in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease undergoing thoracic surgery. [More]
Research findings cast new light on biological process that can lead to diabetes

Research findings cast new light on biological process that can lead to diabetes

Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation scientists have pinpointed a cell that begins the process of scarring in fatty tissue. The findings cast new light on a biological process that occurs with obesity and can lead to diabetes. [More]
People who have higher HDL function experience fewer heart attacks later in life

People who have higher HDL function experience fewer heart attacks later in life

HDL is the 'good cholesterol' that helps remove fat from artery walls, reversing the process that leads to heart disease. Yet recent drug trials and genetic studies suggest that simply pushing HDL levels higher doesn't necessarily reduce the risk of heart disease. [More]

New testing method could help get faster results, reduce volume of urine needed for sample

If you've been to the doctor, you probably know what to do when you're handed a plastic cup and shown to the bathroom. Most patients hand over the sample and give little thought to what happens when it's shipped to the lab for analysis. Ken Marcus and his students are the exceptions. They have developed a new testing method that they believe will reduce costs, get faster results and lower the volume of urine needed for a sample. [More]
Canadian researchers shed light on molecular dynamics of chronic pain

Canadian researchers shed light on molecular dynamics of chronic pain

Chronic pain affects hundreds of millions of people worldwide and is a major cause of disability, causing more disability than cancer and heart disease. Canadian researchers, including Michael Salter at SickKids are shedding light on the molecular dynamics of chronic pain. They have uncovered a critical role for a class of cells present in the brain and spinal cord, called microglia, in pain. [More]
CVRx announces presentation of positive data from Barostim Therapy for Heart Failure clinical trial at HRS 2015

CVRx announces presentation of positive data from Barostim Therapy for Heart Failure clinical trial at HRS 2015

CVRx, Inc., a private medical device company, announced that positive results from the 'Barostim Therapy for Heart Failure' randomized, controlled clinical trial were presented at the 2015 annual Scientific Sessions of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) in a Late-Breaking Clinical Trial Session. Results were presented by Dr. Michael Zile from the Medical University of South Carolina. [More]
Study explores how our intestinal tract changes as we age

Study explores how our intestinal tract changes as we age

Scientists and clinicians on the Norwich Research Park have carried out the first detailed study of how our intestinal tract changes as we age, and how this determines our overall health. [More]
Hope For Heroes Foundation forms national alliance with USA Medical Card

Hope For Heroes Foundation forms national alliance with USA Medical Card

Hope For Heroes Foundation today announced the formation of a groundbreaking national alliance with USA Medical Card, a leading provider of free pharmacy discount cards. The new nationwide initiative benefiting Hope For Heroes will help fund programs that empower independence for our nation's disabled military veterans, police, firemen, and EMS professionals, and will help more people afford their prescriptions. [More]
CWRU's Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing receives grant to study multiple chronic conditions

CWRU's Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing receives grant to study multiple chronic conditions

Case Western Reserve University's Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing will begin training predoctoral and postdoctoral researchers to study people with multiple chronic illnesses in hopes of discovering better methods for managing such a complex combination of illnesses. [More]
Patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention at higher risk for sleep apnea

Patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention at higher risk for sleep apnea

Patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), a coronary artery widening procedureused to treat heart disease, are at high risk for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), according to new research presented at the 2015 American Thoracic Society International Conference. [More]
Pre-pregnancy maternal weight has significant impact on baby's immune system

Pre-pregnancy maternal weight has significant impact on baby's immune system

Almost 60 percent of women of childbearing age in the United States are overweight or obese. Obesity is a major public health issue, and has been linked to health problems like heart disease, cancer and hypertension. It can complicate pregnancy by increasing the mother's risk of having gestational diabetes, preeclampsia, preterm birth or a baby with birth defects. Maternal obesity is also linked to several adverse health outcomes for the infant that can persist into adulthood, such as type-2 diabetes, heart disease and mortality. [More]

UMD expert working to accelerate development of improved implantable cardiac devices

A University of Maryland expert in the model-based testing of embedded software is working to accelerate the development of improved implantable medical devices used in the treatment of heart disease. [More]
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