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SCS therapy can be key to reducing use of opioids in patients battling chronic pain, study finds

SCS therapy can be key to reducing use of opioids in patients battling chronic pain, study finds

New research has found spinal cord stimulation (SCS) therapy can be key to reducing or stabilizing the use of opioids in patients battling chronic pain. [More]
Medical students' licensing exam barely covers items related to obesity, study finds

Medical students' licensing exam barely covers items related to obesity, study finds

Obesity is one of the most significant threats to health in the U.S. and is responsible for the development of multiple serious medical problems such as diabetes, heart disease and some forms of cancer. [More]
Study compares effects of two types of sugar on metabolic and vascular function

Study compares effects of two types of sugar on metabolic and vascular function

The type of sugar you eat—and not just calorie count—may determine your risk for chronic disease. [More]
UC biologists use frog models to study how early stressors may play role in onset of adult diseases

UC biologists use frog models to study how early stressors may play role in onset of adult diseases

UC biologists have turned to amphibian sources -- specifically frogs and tadpoles -- to help shed light on how early stressors in the womb and shortly after birth may play a part in the onset of adult diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease. [More]
More than half of AF patients who undergo catheter ablation become asymptomatic, study reports

More than half of AF patients who undergo catheter ablation become asymptomatic, study reports

More than half of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) become asymptomatic after catheter ablation, reports the largest study of the procedure published today in European Heart Journal. [More]
Brief waiting room interaction could prompt increased fruit and vegetable consumption among families

Brief waiting room interaction could prompt increased fruit and vegetable consumption among families

Low-income families were more likely to use their federal food assistance on nutritious food after learning that their dollars can be doubled for more fruits and vegetables, a new study finds. [More]
Disadvantaged women more likely to suffer heart attack than men, new study finds

Disadvantaged women more likely to suffer heart attack than men, new study finds

Women from low socioeconomic backgrounds are 25 per cent more likely to suffer a heart attack than disadvantaged men, a major new study has found. [More]
Scientists developing painless ‘smart’ patch that releases insulin in response to rising glucose levels

Scientists developing painless ‘smart’ patch that releases insulin in response to rising glucose levels

Treatment for certain diabetes cases involves constant monitoring of blood-glucose levels and daily insulin shots. [More]
New ‘5-D fingerprint’ technique could precisely measure properties of individual protein molecules

New ‘5-D fingerprint’ technique could precisely measure properties of individual protein molecules

In research that could one day lead to advances against neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, University of Michigan engineering researchers have demonstrated a technique for precisely measuring the properties of individual protein molecules floating in a liquid. [More]
Chronic kidney disease patients have high out-of-pocket healthcare expenditures, study finds

Chronic kidney disease patients have high out-of-pocket healthcare expenditures, study finds

Patients who have chronic kidney disease but are not on dialysis have higher out-of-pocket healthcare expenses than even stroke and cancer patients, according to a study by researchers at Loyola University Chicago and Loyola Medicine. [More]
New report highlights trends in heart disease care in the U.S.

New report highlights trends in heart disease care in the U.S.

Over 93 percent of heart attack patients are receiving stents within the guideline-recommended threshold of 90 minutes after arriving at the hospital, with the median time to stenting only 59 minutes, according to a broad report on trends in heart disease care from the American College of Cardiology's National Cardiovascular Data Registry published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. [More]
Heart CT scans can help personalize treatment for patients with mild high blood pressure

Heart CT scans can help personalize treatment for patients with mild high blood pressure

Using data from a national study, Johns Hopkins researchers determined that using heart CT scans can help personalize treatment in patients whose blood pressure falls in the gray zone of just above normal or mild high blood pressure. [More]
Recognition given to Edwards Lifesciences for hemodynamic monitoring product

Recognition given to Edwards Lifesciences for hemodynamic monitoring product

Edwards Lifesciences Corporation, the global leader in patient-focused innovations for structural heart disease and critical care monitoring, has received CE Mark for its HemoSphere advanced monitoring platform, which provides greater clarity on a patient’s hemodynamic status to enable clinicians to make timely, potentially life-saving decisions. [More]
New study reports link between truck driver’s poor health and crash risk

New study reports link between truck driver’s poor health and crash risk

As commuters shimmy past large, lumbering trucks on the road, they may glance over and wonder, "How safe is that driver next to me?" If the truck driver is in poor health, the answer could be: Not very. [More]
Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator improves survival rate in older patients, study finds

Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator improves survival rate in older patients, study finds

Of patients over age 65 who received an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) after surviving sudden cardiac arrest or a near-fatal arrhythmia, almost 80 percent survived two years--a higher rate than found in past trials performed to demonstrate the efficacy of the devices in this situation, according to a study today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. [More]
Tobacco control policies can provide economic and public health benefits, report reveals

Tobacco control policies can provide economic and public health benefits, report reveals

Policies to control tobacco use, including tobacco tax and price increases, can generate significant government revenues for health and development work, according to a new landmark global report from the World Health Organization and the National Cancer Institute of the United States of America. [More]
Skidmore College scientist discovers health benefits of balanced, protein-pacing, low-calorie diet

Skidmore College scientist discovers health benefits of balanced, protein-pacing, low-calorie diet

Research by Skidmore College exercise scientist Paul Arciero has found that a balanced, protein-pacing, low-calorie diet that includes intermittent fasting not only achieves long-term weight loss, but also helps release toxins in the form of PCBs from the body fat stores, in addition to enhancing heart health and reducing oxidative stress. [More]
Study reveals brain activity may be key to link between stress and heart disease

Study reveals brain activity may be key to link between stress and heart disease

Increased activity in a deep-lying region of the brain called the amygdala is associated with a higher risk of heart attack and stroke, according to a study published in The Lancet.

The amygdala is known to process emotions such as fear and anger and the finding sheds light on the possible mechanism by which stress can lead to cardiovascular disease (CVD), say the study authors. [More]
Experts suggest new five-stage system of classifying patients at risk for heart attack

Experts suggest new five-stage system of classifying patients at risk for heart attack

Experts at Johns Hopkins and New York's Mount Sinai Health System have published a suggested new plan for a five-stage system of classifying the risk of heart attack in those with heart disease, one they say puts much-needed and long-absent focus on the risks faced by millions of Americans who pass so-called stress tests or have less obvious or earlier-stage danger signs. [More]
VTCRI scientist receives $2.1 million grant for research to combat heart disease

VTCRI scientist receives $2.1 million grant for research to combat heart disease

Steven Poelzing, an associate professor at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, has received a $2.1 million grant from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health for research to combat the nation's No. 1 killer — heart disease. [More]
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