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Mortality rates vary depending on socioeconomic differences among areas in Europe

Mortality rates vary depending on socioeconomic differences among areas in Europe

For a number of years now, scientific literature has questioned whether mortality rates depend on socioeconomic differences among the population. Recently, a new study carried out in 15 European cities - including Barcelona and Madrid - detected inequalities for the majority of causes, concluding that higher levels of poverty are associated with higher mortality rates and there is a great deal of variation among areas. [More]
Recent ban on trans fats may not affect the food industry, says food scientist

Recent ban on trans fats may not affect the food industry, says food scientist

A recent ban on trans fats may have you looking a little closer at the foods you buy, but a Kansas State University food scientist points out you might not find what you're looking for on the label. [More]
UCLA cardiologists use less invasive approach to replace heart valve

UCLA cardiologists use less invasive approach to replace heart valve

Last summer, after a long career as a successful entrepreneur and a brief retirement, Richard Whitaker was helping to start another new company. Unfortunately, a serious health concern caused a couple of interruptions in his work on the new venture. One of Whitaker's heart valves wasn't working properly, which caused congestive heart failure and led to two hospitalizations within several months. [More]
Eating at full-service restaurants not necessarily healthier than eating at fast-food outlets

Eating at full-service restaurants not necessarily healthier than eating at fast-food outlets

When Americans go out to eat, either at a fast-food outlet or a full-service restaurant, they consume, on average, about 200 more calories a day than when they stay home for meals, a new study reports. They also take in more fat, saturated fat, cholesterol and sodium than those who prepare and eat their meals at home. [More]
UCSD researchers report that statins make women aggressive, but men calmer

UCSD researchers report that statins make women aggressive, but men calmer

Statins are a hugely popular drug class used to manage blood cholesterol levels and reduce the risk of heart disease. Previous studies had raised questions about adverse behavioral changes with statins, such as irritability or violence, but findings with statins have been inconsistent. In the first randomized trial to look at statin effects on behavior, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report that aggressive behavior typically declined among men placed on statins (compared to placebo), but typically increased among women placed on statins. [More]
Mandatory targets to reduce salt in processed foods could substantially cut cardiac deaths

Mandatory targets to reduce salt in processed foods could substantially cut cardiac deaths

Mandatory targets to reduce salt in processed food would help tackle inequalities in coronary heart disease that lead to excess deaths in deprived areas of England, according to research by the University of Liverpool. [More]
Frequent consumption of citrus fruits may increase risk of skin cancer

Frequent consumption of citrus fruits may increase risk of skin cancer

A new analysis of dietary patterns among more than 100,000 Americans suggests that frequent consumption of citrus -- namely whole grapefruit and orange juice -- may be associated with an increased risk of melanoma. [More]
Study of genetic mutations could lead to optimized treatment plans for aplastic anemia patients

Study of genetic mutations could lead to optimized treatment plans for aplastic anemia patients

Scientists have identified a group of genetic mutations in patients with aplastic anemia, which likely will help doctors optimize treatment for this rare and deadly blood condition. The study, appearing in the New England Journal of Medicine, could lead to tailor-made treatment plans for aplastic anemia patients as part of the emerging precision medicine movement. [More]
Study: Around 6% survive cardiac arrest outside of hospital setting

Study: Around 6% survive cardiac arrest outside of hospital setting

Cardiac arrest strikes almost 600,000 people each year, killing the vast majority of those individuals, says a new report from the Institute of Medicine. Every year in the U.S., approximately 395,000 cases of cardiac arrest occur outside of a hospital setting, in which less than 6 percent survive. Approximately 200,000 cardiac arrests occur each year in hospitals, and 24 percent of those patients survive. Estimates suggest that cardiac arrest is the third leading cause of death in the U.S. behind cancer and heart disease. [More]
Eating healthy diet associated with lower risk of dying from heart disease, cancer and other diseases

Eating healthy diet associated with lower risk of dying from heart disease, cancer and other diseases

Eating a healthy diet was linked with a lower risk of dying from heart disease, stroke, cancer or other diseases among a population of low-income individuals living in the Southeastern U.S., according to research led by Vanderbilt University investigators. [More]
Tree nut consumption associated with lower body weight and lower risk of obesity

Tree nut consumption associated with lower body weight and lower risk of obesity

In a study published this week in Nutrition Journal*, researchers compared risk factors for heart disease and metabolic syndrome of tree nut consumers versus those who did not consume tree nuts. Tree nut (almonds, Brazil nuts, cashews, hazelnuts, macadamias, pecans, pine nuts, pistachios and walnuts) consumption was associated with lower body mass index (p=0.004), systolic blood pressure (p=0.001), insulin resistance (p=0.043) and higher levels of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (good cholesterol) (p=0.022). [More]
Experts at West Virginia University welcome FDA’s ban on trans fat

Experts at West Virginia University welcome FDA’s ban on trans fat

West Virginia University experts say the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's mandate to remove artificial trans fats from the country's food supply by 2018 is a long overdue move in the right direction for public health. [More]
Drinking low-calorie cranberry juice may help lower risk of heart disease, diabetes and stroke

Drinking low-calorie cranberry juice may help lower risk of heart disease, diabetes and stroke

A new study reveals that drinking low-calorie cranberry juice cocktail may help lower the risk of chronic diseases that rank among the leading causes of death worldwide, including heart disease, diabetes and stroke. The finding is welcome news considering the World Health Organization estimates the trio of diseases annually claim 15.6 million lives around the globe. [More]
Canadian Partnership Against Cancer launches landmark health data portal

Canadian Partnership Against Cancer launches landmark health data portal

A landmark research portal that includes health and biological data from 300,000 Canadians — nearly one in every 50 individuals between the ages of 35 and 69 – is being launched today by the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer (the Partnership). [More]
Scientists identify association between coronary heart disease and osteoporosis

Scientists identify association between coronary heart disease and osteoporosis

University of Southampton scientists have discovered a link between coronary heart disease and osteoporosis, suggesting both conditions could have similar causes. [More]
New research reveals that polluted Toronto neighbourhoods have high rates of childhood asthma

New research reveals that polluted Toronto neighbourhoods have high rates of childhood asthma

Children who develop asthma in Toronto are more likely to have been born in a neighbourhood that has a high level of traffic-related air pollution, new research suggests. [More]
Helen DeVos Children's Hospital uses two imaging techniques to produce hybrid 3D model of a patient's heart

Helen DeVos Children's Hospital uses two imaging techniques to produce hybrid 3D model of a patient's heart

Congenital heart experts from Spectrum Health Helen DeVos Children's Hospital have successfully integrated two common imaging techniques to produce a three-dimensional anatomic model of a patient's heart. [More]
Omega-3 Coalition forms scientific advisory council to educate consumers about benefits, safety of omega-3s

Omega-3 Coalition forms scientific advisory council to educate consumers about benefits, safety of omega-3s

The Omega-3 Coalition, a group of industry stakeholders working to improve consumer knowledge of omega-3s, today announced the formation of a scientific advisory council. [More]
Johns Hopkins scientists use experimental therapy to reverse progression of atherosclerosis in rodents

Johns Hopkins scientists use experimental therapy to reverse progression of atherosclerosis in rodents

In what may be a major leap forward in the quest for new treatments of the most common form of cardiovascular disease, scientists at Johns Hopkins report they have found a way to halt and reverse the progression of atherosclerosis in rodents by loading microscopic nanoparticles with a chemical that restores the animals’ ability to properly handle cholesterol. [More]
Steady rise in obesity, excess weight also signals upward swing in chronic health conditions

Steady rise in obesity, excess weight also signals upward swing in chronic health conditions

Obesity and excess weight, and their negative impact on health, have become a significant focus for physicians and other health-care experts in recent years. [More]
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