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New research shows schizophrenia comprises 8 genetically distinct disorders

New research shows schizophrenia comprises 8 genetically distinct disorders

New research shows that schizophrenia isn't a single disease but a group of eight genetically distinct disorders, each with its own set of symptoms. The finding could be a first step toward improved diagnosis and treatment for the debilitating psychiatric illness. [More]
Amgen announces phase 3 ivabradine data for treatment of chronic HF

Amgen announces phase 3 ivabradine data for treatment of chronic HF

Amgen (NASDAQ: AMGN) today announced data from the Phase 3 SHIFT (Systolic Heart failure treatment with the If inhibitor ivabradine Trial) study evaluating ivabradine in patients with chronic heart failure (HF) were presented at the 18th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Heart Failure Society of America (HFSA) in Las Vegas. [More]
Six research institutions awarded NIH grants to create database of human cellular responses

Six research institutions awarded NIH grants to create database of human cellular responses

Building on a successful three-year pilot project, the National Institutes of Health has awarded more than $64 million to six research institutions to create a database of human cellular responses, the Library of Integrated Network-based Cellular Signatures. [More]
Researchers report that dendritic cells can affect psoriasis

Researchers report that dendritic cells can affect psoriasis

Different types of dendritic cells in human skin have assorted functions in the early and more advanced stages of psoriasis report researchers in the journal EMBO Molecular Medicine. [More]
Study: High-dose prescribing increases by 23% in Canada

Study: High-dose prescribing increases by 23% in Canada

High-dose opioid prescribing increased by 23 per cent in Canada between 2006 and 2011, despite clinical guidelines recommending that most patients should avoid high-doses of these drugs, according to new research. [More]
Study looks at blood type and risk of cognitive impairment

Study looks at blood type and risk of cognitive impairment

People with blood type AB may be more likely to develop memory loss in later years than people with other blood types, according to a study published in the September 10, 2014, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Continuing to work during depressive illness may offer employees certain health benefits

Continuing to work during depressive illness may offer employees certain health benefits

The collaborative study between the University Of Melbourne and the Menzies Research Institute at the University of Tasmania is the first to estimate the long-term costs and health outcomes of depression-related absence as compared to individuals who continue to work among employees with depression in Australia. [More]
American men have worse access to reproductive and sexual health care, shows research

American men have worse access to reproductive and sexual health care, shows research

Compared with women, American men have worse access to reproductive and sexual health care, research shows, a disparity fueled in part by the lack of standard clinical guidelines on the types and timing of exams, tests and treatments that should be offered to all men of reproductive age. [More]
Scientists identify how molecular motor essential for human development works

Scientists identify how molecular motor essential for human development works

Another mystery of the human body has been solved by scientists who have identified how a molecular motor essential for human development works. [More]
Most prevalent form of discrimination is due to mental illness and homelessness

Most prevalent form of discrimination is due to mental illness and homelessness

Vulnerable populations in ethnically diverse Toronto reported more discrimination by health care workers based on their housing status, mental health or substance abuse issues than race, a new study has found. [More]
Study ties eating in response to food cues to habit-forming region in obese adults

Study ties eating in response to food cues to habit-forming region in obese adults

People who are obese may be more susceptible to environmental food cues than their lean counterparts due to differences in brain chemistry that make eating more habitual and less rewarding, according to a National Institutes of Health study published in Molecular Psychiatry. [More]
New potential therapeutic targets for treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension

New potential therapeutic targets for treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension

Two new potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension, a deadly disease marked by high blood pressure in the lungs, have been identified by researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago. [More]
Ill. fines hospitals for preventable hospital readmissions

Ill. fines hospitals for preventable hospital readmissions

Also, a federal lawsuit in California alleges nursing homes overmedicated their residents and seeks repayment. Illinois will be collecting $16.3 million in penalties from 82 hospitals that had too many Medicaid patients readmitted to their hospital, the state said Friday. [More]
FDA approves Epaned for treatment of symptomatic and asymptomatic heart failure

FDA approves Epaned for treatment of symptomatic and asymptomatic heart failure

Silvergate Pharmaceuticals, Inc., focused on the development and commercialization of innovative and safe medicines for children, today announced that the United States Food and Drug Administration approved Epaned for the treatment of symptomatic heart failure and the treatment of asymptomatic left ventricular dysfunction (to decrease the rate of development of overt heart failure and to reduce hospitalization for heart failure). [More]
Intensive glycaemic control shows ischaemic heart disease benefit

Intensive glycaemic control shows ischaemic heart disease benefit

Intensive glucose lowering may significantly reduce the risk of ischaemic heart disease in at-risk middle-aged people with Type 2 diabetes, a post-hoc analysis of the ACCORD trial suggests. [More]
Investigators make thought-provoking discovery about type of cholesterol believed to be "bad guy"

Investigators make thought-provoking discovery about type of cholesterol believed to be "bad guy"

A team of investigators at the University of Kentucky has made a thought-provoking discovery about a type of cholesterol previously believed to be a "bad guy" in the development of heart disease and other conditions. [More]
Accreditation of bariatric surgery centers contributes to improved safety for patients

Accreditation of bariatric surgery centers contributes to improved safety for patients

Patients who underwent weight loss operations in recent years, when most bariatric surgical centers were accredited, had fewer postoperative complications and were 2.3 times less likely to die in the hospital than patients who had bariatric procedures performed before a national movement toward facility accreditation was taking place, according to new study findings. [More]
Researchers call for implementation of taxes and subsidies to improve dietary quality

Researchers call for implementation of taxes and subsidies to improve dietary quality

In a Viewpoint published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association, a team of Boston researchers call for the implementation of taxes and subsidies to improve dietary quality in the United States. [More]
Increasing obesity rates linked with decrease in seatbelt usage

Increasing obesity rates linked with decrease in seatbelt usage

Obesity is associated with many health risks, including heart disease and diabetes, but University of Illinois researchers have found a possible way to mitigate one often-overlooked risk: not buckling up in the car. [More]
New data confirms that mechanical heart valves raise risks during and after pregnancy

New data confirms that mechanical heart valves raise risks during and after pregnancy

The fact that mechanical heart valves increase risks during and after pregnancy, has been confirmed by data from the ROPAC registry presented for the first time today in an ESC Congress Hot Line session by Professor Jolien W. Roos-Hesselink, co-chair with Professor Roger Hall of the registry's executive committee. [More]