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Heart failure (HF) is a condition in which a problem with the structure or function of the heart impairs its ability to supply sufficient blood flow to meet the body's needs. It should not be confused with cardiac arrest or myocardial infarction.
Award-winning vitamin D oral spray could help improve heart function

Award-winning vitamin D oral spray could help improve heart function

Relief from low vitamin D levels could now be just a spray away thanks to an award-winning vitamin D oral spray that could help boost the vitamin D levels of those with chronic heart failure, resulting in improved heart function, according to a recent study. [More]
Losmapimod drug fails to meet primary endpoint in clinical trial

Losmapimod drug fails to meet primary endpoint in clinical trial

Patients taking losmapimod, an anti-inflammatory drug currently being developed, for 12 weeks following a heart attack did not show improvements in the trial's primary endpoint, the rate of cardiovascular death, subsequent heart attack or urgent coronary revascularization, which includes placement of a stent or coronary artery bypass surgery, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 65th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
New stem cell therapy significantly improves outcomes in patients with severe heart failure

New stem cell therapy significantly improves outcomes in patients with severe heart failure

A new stem cell therapy significantly improved long-term health outcomes in patients with severe and end-stage heart failure in a study presented at the American College of Cardiology's 65th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
New implantable medical device fails to reduce rates of heart failure-related hospitalization

New implantable medical device fails to reduce rates of heart failure-related hospitalization

A new implantable medical device intended to help patients with heart failure by stimulating the vagus nerve did not significantly reduce rates of heart failure-related hospitalization or death from any cause in a study presented at the American College of Cardiology's 65th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Investigational stem cell therapy improves outcomes in patients with severe heart failure

Investigational stem cell therapy improves outcomes in patients with severe heart failure

An investigational stem cell therapy derived from patients' own blood marrow significantly improved outcomes in patients with severe heart failure, according to a study from the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute. [More]

Edema Guard Monitor appears to reduce heart failure-related hospitalizations by more than half

In patients with heart failure, use of an investigational device that monitors the accumulation of fluid in the lungs appeared to cut heart failure-related hospitalizations by more than half, meeting the study's primary endpoint, and reduced deaths from any cause by 39 percent per year compared with standard assessment and treatment, researchers reported at the American College of Cardiology's 65th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Inhalable form of Ambrisentan drug could offer faster-acting treatment option for pulmonary edema

Inhalable form of Ambrisentan drug could offer faster-acting treatment option for pulmonary edema

In a new study, researchers show an aerosolized, inhalable form of the drug Ambrisentan could offer a faster-acting treatment option for pulmonary edema, a life-threatening condition in which fluid accumulates in the lungs. Pulmonary edema is a significant risk for anyone spending time at high altitudes, and also affects people with chronic conditions including congestive heart failure and sickle cell anemia. [More]
End-stage heart failure patients treated with cell therapy experience fewer cardiac events

End-stage heart failure patients treated with cell therapy experience fewer cardiac events

End-stage heart failure patients treated with stem cells harvested from their own bone marrow experienced 37 percent fewer cardiac events - including deaths and heart failure hospital admissions - than a placebo-controlled group, according to a new study. [More]
Ischemic postconditioning for STEMI patients shows no clinical outcomes

Ischemic postconditioning for STEMI patients shows no clinical outcomes

A large randomized controlled trial of ischemic postconditioning in patients who had experienced the deadliest form of heart attack—ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI)—failed to show that this procedure significantly reduces death from any cause or hospitalization for heart failure, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 65th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Brominated fire retardants overstimulate aldosterone in a way that may lead to cardiovascular disease

Brominated fire retardants overstimulate aldosterone in a way that may lead to cardiovascular disease

Brominated fire retardants, used in many consumer products and known to cause hormonal irregularities, overstimulates an adrenal gland hormone in a way that may lead to the development of cardiovascular disease, new research in human cells finds. Researchers will present their study results Saturday at the Endocrine Society's 98th annual meeting in Boston. [More]
Deferred stent implantation fails to show benefit in STEMI patients

Deferred stent implantation fails to show benefit in STEMI patients

Delayed or deferred stent implantation in patients experiencing the deadliest form of heart attack--ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI)—failed to reduce death from any cause, hospitalization for heart failure, subsequent heart attacks or the need for a repeat procedure to restore blood flow to the heart, researchers reported at the American College of Cardiology's 65th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Apple body shape linked to higher heart risk than pear-shape in diabetics

Apple body shape linked to higher heart risk than pear-shape in diabetics

People with type 1 or 2 diabetes who have apple-shaped bodies with excessive fat around the abdomen and stomach, can be at higher risk of serious heart disease than patients with pear-shaped figures who store excess fat around their hips, according to a new study from Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute and John Hopkins University. [More]
Excess activation of LOX may play causative role in progression of cardiac failure

Excess activation of LOX may play causative role in progression of cardiac failure

Heart failure is a progressive condition, where structural and functional alterations of the ventricle limit the ability of the heart to either fill or eject blood. There are approximately 550,000 new cases of heart failure each year with a prevalence of nearly 5 million; most patients die within five years of diagnosis. [More]
Gene plays vital role in controlling appetite for salt and risk of blood pressure

Gene plays vital role in controlling appetite for salt and risk of blood pressure

Scientists have shed light on why some people crave salty food, even when they know it can seriously damage their health. [More]
CCN5 protein reverses cardiac fibrosis in heart failure models

CCN5 protein reverses cardiac fibrosis in heart failure models

CCN5, a matricellular protein, has been found to reverse established cardiac fibrosis in heart failure models, according to a study led by Roger J. Hajjar, MD, Professor of Medicine and Director of the Cardiovascular Research Center at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and Woo Jin Park, PhD, Professor of Life Sciences at the Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, South Korea. [More]
Incretin-based drugs do not increase risk of heart failure

Incretin-based drugs do not increase risk of heart failure

Incretin-based drugs, a type of medication used to treat type 2 diabetes, do not increase the risk of being hospitalized for heart failure relative to commonly used combinations of oral anti-diabetic drugs, according to a new study published in the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
Children with cardiomyopathy may benefit from family-linked treatment

Children with cardiomyopathy may benefit from family-linked treatment

A newly published national study by the Children's Hospital of Michigan and Wayne State University School of Medicine researchers shows that "parental impact and family functioning" become increasingly abnormal when children with cardiomyopathy-related chronic heart disease are more severely ill than children less affected by the disease. [More]
Family-linked treatment may benefit children with cardiomyopathy-related chronic heart disease

Family-linked treatment may benefit children with cardiomyopathy-related chronic heart disease

A newly published national study by the Children's Hospital of Michigan and Wayne State University School of Medicine researchers shows that "parental impact and family functioning" become increasingly abnormal when children with cardiomyopathy-related chronic heart disease are more severely ill than children less affected by the disease. [More]
Older types of arthritis medicine appear to be dangerous for the heart

Older types of arthritis medicine appear to be dangerous for the heart

Many Danes are prescribed NSAIDs for the treatment of painful conditions, fever and inflammation. But the treatment also comes with side effects, including the risk of ulcers and increased blood pressure. [More]
Surgeons successfully perform heart transplant at Baylor University Medical Center

Surgeons successfully perform heart transplant at Baylor University Medical Center

A surgical team at Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas successfully performed a heart transplant on a patient they were keeping alive with a total artificial heart, a portable device that pumps blood throughout the body when both sides of the heart fail. [More]
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