Heart Rate News and Research RSS Feed - Heart Rate News and Research

Heart rate is determined by the number of heartbeats per unit of time, typically expressed as beats per minute (BPM), it can vary with as the body's need for oxygen changes, such as during exercise or sleep.
Mast plans to develop vepoloxamer for chronic heart failure treatment

Mast plans to develop vepoloxamer for chronic heart failure treatment

Mast Therapeutics, Inc., a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company leveraging its molecular adhesion and sealant technology (MAST) platform to develop novel therapies for sickle cell disease, arterial disease and heart failure, today announced its plans to develop vepoloxamer (MST-188) for the treatment of patients with chronic heart failure. [More]
Experts call for global review of sepsis guidelines

Experts call for global review of sepsis guidelines

Experts are calling for a global review of guidelines used to diagnose sepsis, after a study found one in eight patients with infections severe enough to need admission to an Intensive Care Unit in Australia and New Zealand, did not meet current criteria. [More]
Living near greened vacant lots reduces stress

Living near greened vacant lots reduces stress

Greening vacant lots may be associated with biologic reductions in stress, according to a new study from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Residents who walked near newly greened vacant lots had significantly lower heart rates compared to walking near a blighted, or neglected, vacant lot. [More]
Diet based on UK health guidelines could reduce CVD risk

Diet based on UK health guidelines could reduce CVD risk

Men and women who adapt their daily diet to meet current UK dietary guidelines could reduce their risk of a heart attack or a stroke by up to a third, according to a new study by King's College London. [More]
Mayo Clinic researchers find that energy drinks may increase risk of cardiac events

Mayo Clinic researchers find that energy drinks may increase risk of cardiac events

Healthy young adults who don't consume caffeine regularly experienced greater rise in resting blood pressure after consumption of a commercially available energy drink — compared to a placebo drink — thus raising the concern that energy drinks may increase the risk of cardiac events, Mayo Clinic researchers found. [More]
New device can detect cyanide exposure within 70 seconds

New device can detect cyanide exposure within 70 seconds

A victim of cyanide poisoning can die within 30 minutes. The diagnostic test to determine cyanide exposure takes 24 hours. [More]
Organ-on-a-chip could replace use of animals to test drugs for safety and efficacy

Organ-on-a-chip could replace use of animals to test drugs for safety and efficacy

When University of California, Berkeley, bioengineers say they are holding their hearts in the palms of their hands, they are not talking about emotional vulnerability. [More]
New algorithm can gauge long-term death risk based on treadmill exercise performance

New algorithm can gauge long-term death risk based on treadmill exercise performance

Analyzing data from 58,000 heart stress tests, Johns Hopkins cardiologists report they have developed a formula that estimates one's risk of dying over a decade based on a person's ability to exercise on a treadmill at an increasing speed and incline. [More]
Feast-or-famine diet may extend lifespan, improve age-related diseases

Feast-or-famine diet may extend lifespan, improve age-related diseases

University of Florida Health researchers have found that putting people on a feast-or-famine diet may mimic some of the benefits of fasting, and that adding antioxidant supplements may counteract those benefits. [More]
LGTmedical issued U.S. patent for Kenek Core audio waveform technology

LGTmedical issued U.S. patent for Kenek Core audio waveform technology

LionsGate Technologies, Inc., a privately-held medical device company, announced today that the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office has issued a patent for its pulse oximetry technology based on the Kenek Core proprietary audio waveform platform. [More]
'Walking football' could have a multitude of health benefits, say researchers

'Walking football' could have a multitude of health benefits, say researchers

The new sporting craze of 'Walking Football' may enable people to continue playing football into their 60s and 70s while reaping a multitude of health benefits, according to Aston University researchers. [More]
Nicotine metabolite supports learning, memory by amplifying action of primary chemical messenger

Nicotine metabolite supports learning, memory by amplifying action of primary chemical messenger

Nicotine's primary metabolite supports learning and memory by amplifying the action of a primary chemical messenger involved in both, researchers report. [More]

Electric fans prevent heat-related elevations in heart rate, core body temperature

Although some public health organizations advise against the use of electric fans in severe heat, a new study published in the February 17 issue of JAMA demonstrated that electric fans prevent heat-related elevations in heart rate and core body temperature. [More]
UBMD physician discusses the dangers of hypothermia

UBMD physician discusses the dangers of hypothermia

The arctic cold snap affecting the Midwest and the Northeast this weekend should not be taken lightly, says David Holmes, MD, clinical associate professor of family medicine in the University at Buffalo School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. [More]
Consortium formed to develop program to improve health outcomes for Ebola patients

Consortium formed to develop program to improve health outcomes for Ebola patients

Scripps Translational Science Institute will lead a consortium of four partners to develop a program through which wearable, wireless health sensors, a wireless vital signs monitoring platform and advanced analytics technology will be tested in a new "precision medicine" approach designed to improve health outcomes for Ebola patients, increase the safety of health care workers and reduce risk of spreading the virus to others. [More]
Study shows in-flight blood transfusions improve outcomes in trauma victims

Study shows in-flight blood transfusions improve outcomes in trauma victims

Air-lifted trauma victims who received blood transfusions in the helicopter before arriving at a trauma center had higher one-day survival rates and less chance of shock than air-lifted patients who did not receive blood transfusions until they arrived at the trauma unit, according to study findings published online in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons. [More]
Thync electrical neurosignaling reduces brain's response to stress, shows study

Thync electrical neurosignaling reduces brain's response to stress, shows study

Thync today announced results from a study published via bioRxiv that show electrical neurosignaling delivered by its consumer wearable device reduces the brain's response to stress in a chemical-free manner. [More]
Short nap can reverse hormonal impact of poor night's sleep

Short nap can reverse hormonal impact of poor night's sleep

A short nap can help relieve stress and bolster the immune systems of men who slept only two hours the previous night, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. [More]
Loyola doctor offers tips to stay healthy during shoveling season

Loyola doctor offers tips to stay healthy during shoveling season

Mother Nature scored a touchdown this Super Bowl Sunday, dumping more than a foot of wet, heavy snow on the Chicago area and causing many to take to the streets and alleys to clear thoroughfares. [More]
Use of STAN in addition to usual monitoring does not improve perinatal outcomes

Use of STAN in addition to usual monitoring does not improve perinatal outcomes

In a study to be presented on Feb. 5 in an oral plenary session at 8 a.m. PST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting™, in San Diego, researchers will report that use of the ST segment (STAN) as an adjunct to conventional intrapartum electronic fetal heart rate monitoring did not improve perinatal outcomes or decrease operative deliveries in hospitals in the United States. [More]
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