Heart Rate News and Research RSS Feed - Heart Rate News and Research

Heart rate is determined by the number of heartbeats per unit of time, typically expressed as beats per minute (BPM), it can vary with as the body's need for oxygen changes, such as during exercise or sleep.
Case study from Intel and UCSD highlights health sciences research

Case study from Intel and UCSD highlights health sciences research

A case study from Intel and UCSD highlights the transformative collaboration between the school's bioengineering department and the Intel® Internet of Things (IoT). [More]

Researchers treat common elastic bands with graphene to create flexible sensor for medical use

Although body motion sensors already exist in different forms, they have not been widely used due to their complexity and cost of production. [More]
Stimulating nerves in ear could improve health of heart

Stimulating nerves in ear could improve health of heart

Stimulating nerves in your ear could improve the health of your heart, researchers have discovered. A team at the University of Leeds used a standard TENS machine like those designed to relieve labour pains to apply electrical pulses to the tragus, the small raised flap at the front of the ear immediately in front of the ear canal. [More]
Patients who rely on pacemakers and defibrillators run risk of serious health complications

Patients who rely on pacemakers and defibrillators run risk of serious health complications

Patients who rely on pacemakers and defibrillators to maintain a normal heart rhythm run the risk of serious health complications if they don't fully understand how the devices work and what to do when they experience an irregular heartbeat. [More]
High-intensity exercise can help stable heart transplant patients

High-intensity exercise can help stable heart transplant patients

High-intensity exercise can help stable heart transplant patients reach higher levels of exercise capacity, and gain better control of their blood pressure than moderate intensity exercise, investigators report in a new study published in the American Journal of Transplantation. [More]
Study sheds new light on how carbon monoxide could help protect hearts against arrhythmias

Study sheds new light on how carbon monoxide could help protect hearts against arrhythmias

A study, funded by the British Heart Foundation and Medical Research Council, has shed new light on how carbon monoxide could be used to protect against life-threatening arrhythmias after a heart attack. [More]
Study: Younger, older people likelier to visit ER repeatedly with gallstone pain before surgery

Study: Younger, older people likelier to visit ER repeatedly with gallstone pain before surgery

Gallstone pain is one of the most common reasons patients visit emergency rooms. Figuring out who needs emergency gallbladder removal and who can go home and schedule surgery at their convenience is sometimes a tricky question, and it isn't always answered correctly. [More]
New disposable device may help doctors to monitor post-operative ileus

New disposable device may help doctors to monitor post-operative ileus

A disposal, plastic listening device that attaches to the abdomen may help doctors definitively determine which post-operative patients should be fed and which should not, an invention that may improve outcomes, decrease healthcare costs and shorten hospital stays, according to a UCLA study. [More]
Eating pistachios may reduce body's response to stresses among adults with diabetes

Eating pistachios may reduce body's response to stresses among adults with diabetes

Among people with type 2 diabetes, eating pistachios may reduce the body's response to the stresses of everyday life, according to Penn State researchers. [More]
Mother singing to her preterm infant while providing kangaroo care may see benefits in health

Mother singing to her preterm infant while providing kangaroo care may see benefits in health

A mother who sings to her preterm infant while providing 'kangaroo care,' or holding with direct skin-to-skin contact, may see improvements in both her child's and her own health. [More]
Scientists study how artificial light influences biological clock

Scientists study how artificial light influences biological clock

Researchers at Inserm, led by Claude Gronfier (Inserm Unit 846: Stem Cell and Brain Institute), have, for the first time, conducted a study under real conditions on the body clocks of members of the international polar research station Concordia. [More]
New smartphone app to improve quality of life for older adults

New smartphone app to improve quality of life for older adults

A team of researchers from the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya · BarcelonaTech (UPC) and the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB) is creating a smartphone app that will help older adults to understand their state of health and develop healthier habits. [More]
Taiwan researchers develop new optical device to detect early complication of diabetes sooner

Taiwan researchers develop new optical device to detect early complication of diabetes sooner

A group of researchers in Taiwan has developed a new optical technology that may be able to detect an early complication of diabetes sooner, when it is more easily treated. If the device proves safe and effective in clinical trials, it may pave the way for the early detection and more effective treatment of this complication, called diabetic autonomic neuropathy, which is common among people with both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. [More]
FDA approves Ryanodex for treatment of malignant hyperthermia linked with anesthesia

FDA approves Ryanodex for treatment of malignant hyperthermia linked with anesthesia

Eagle Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced the U. S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Ryanodex® (dantrolene sodium) for injectable suspension indicated for the treatment of malignant hyperthermia (MH), along with the appropriate supportive measures. [More]
Mother's nurturing role directly molds early neural activity of her offsprings' brain

Mother's nurturing role directly molds early neural activity of her offsprings' brain

By carefully watching nearly a hundred hours of video showing mother rats protecting, warming, and feeding their young pups, and then matching up what they saw to real-time electrical readings from the pups' brains, researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center have found that the mother's presence and social interactions - her nurturing role - directly molds the early neural activity and growth of her offsprings' brain. [More]
Telemedicine could improve quality of life of patients with chronic liver diseases

Telemedicine could improve quality of life of patients with chronic liver diseases

Although telemedicine could improve the quality of life of patients with chronic liver diseases, viable home care systems are still lacking. Scientists working on the EU-project "d-LIVER" mean to remedy this situation. Initial results have now been released. [More]
Cardiac stress test findings normal in premotor Parkinson’s disease patients

Cardiac stress test findings normal in premotor Parkinson’s disease patients

People who go on to develop Parkinson’s disease do not perform significantly differently from normal controls on exercise stress testing, an Israeli study has found. [More]
Transcription factor IRF4 plays key role in brown fat's thermogenic process

Transcription factor IRF4 plays key role in brown fat's thermogenic process

The body contains two types of fat cells, easily distinguished by color: White and brown. While white fat serves to store excess calories until they're needed by the body, brown adipocytes actually burn fat by turning it into heat. [More]
Regular walking may ease Parkinson's symptoms

Regular walking may ease Parkinson's symptoms

People with mild to moderate Parkinson's disease who regularly walk for exercise may improve their motor function, mood, tiredness, fitness and some aspects of thinking abilities, according to a study published in the July 2, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Ipsen submits Supplemental New Drug Application to FDA for Somatuline Depot 120mg injection

Ipsen submits Supplemental New Drug Application to FDA for Somatuline Depot 120mg injection

Ipsen today announced that it has submitted a Supplemental New Drug Application to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for Somatuline Depot 120mg injection for the treatment of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs). [More]