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Heart rate is determined by the number of heartbeats per unit of time, typically expressed as beats per minute (BPM), it can vary with as the body's need for oxygen changes, such as during exercise or sleep.
Mother's nurturing role directly molds early neural activity of her offsprings' brain

Mother's nurturing role directly molds early neural activity of her offsprings' brain

By carefully watching nearly a hundred hours of video showing mother rats protecting, warming, and feeding their young pups, and then matching up what they saw to real-time electrical readings from the pups' brains, researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center have found that the mother's presence and social interactions - her nurturing role - directly molds the early neural activity and growth of her offsprings' brain. [More]
Telemedicine could improve quality of life of patients with chronic liver diseases

Telemedicine could improve quality of life of patients with chronic liver diseases

Although telemedicine could improve the quality of life of patients with chronic liver diseases, viable home care systems are still lacking. Scientists working on the EU-project "d-LIVER" mean to remedy this situation. Initial results have now been released. [More]
Cardiac stress test findings normal in premotor Parkinson’s disease patients

Cardiac stress test findings normal in premotor Parkinson’s disease patients

People who go on to develop Parkinson’s disease do not perform significantly differently from normal controls on exercise stress testing, an Israeli study has found. [More]
Transcription factor IRF4 plays key role in brown fat's thermogenic process

Transcription factor IRF4 plays key role in brown fat's thermogenic process

The body contains two types of fat cells, easily distinguished by color: White and brown. While white fat serves to store excess calories until they're needed by the body, brown adipocytes actually burn fat by turning it into heat. [More]
Regular walking may ease Parkinson's symptoms

Regular walking may ease Parkinson's symptoms

People with mild to moderate Parkinson's disease who regularly walk for exercise may improve their motor function, mood, tiredness, fitness and some aspects of thinking abilities, according to a study published in the July 2, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Ipsen submits Supplemental New Drug Application to FDA for Somatuline Depot 120mg injection

Ipsen submits Supplemental New Drug Application to FDA for Somatuline Depot 120mg injection

Ipsen today announced that it has submitted a Supplemental New Drug Application to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for Somatuline Depot 120mg injection for the treatment of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs). [More]

MedicAlert Foundation announces free medical IDs for individuals living with Malignant Hyperthermia

MedicAlert Foundation is pleased to announce that individuals living with Malignant Hyperthermia (MH) are now eligible to receive free medical IDs and live 24/7 emergency response services as the result of a grant obtained through the Sandi Ida Glickstein Fund at the Malignant Hyperthermia Association of the United States. [More]
G protein-coupled receptors: Natural targets for new drug development

G protein-coupled receptors: Natural targets for new drug development

They are the largest family of receptors on the surface of our cells, and they help us maintain basics like blood pressure and heart rate. [More]
Huntington Memorial Hospital patient implanted with tiny, leadless cardiac pacemaker

Huntington Memorial Hospital patient implanted with tiny, leadless cardiac pacemaker

A Huntington Memorial Hospital patient has become the first patient in the San Gabriel Valley to be implanted with a tiny, leadless cardiac pacemaker. Developed for patients with bradycardia - a heart rate that is too slow - the Nanostim device is designed to be placed directly in a patient's heart without the visible lump, scar and insulated wires (called leads) required for conventional pacemakers. [More]
Men with prostate cancer achieve stronger muscles and remain active through playing football

Men with prostate cancer achieve stronger muscles and remain active through playing football

Men with prostate cancer aged 43‒74 achieve bigger and stronger muscles, improve functional capacity, gain positive social experiences and the desire to remain active through playing football for 12 weeks. [More]
Playing football could help lower blood pressure in women aged 35-50

Playing football could help lower blood pressure in women aged 35-50

The World Cup in Brazil may be attracting a global armchair audience of millions, but new research has shown that playing football could help lower blood pressure in women aged 35-50. [More]
Apitope starts preclinical development of ATX-GD-459 for Graves' disease treatment

Apitope starts preclinical development of ATX-GD-459 for Graves' disease treatment

Apitope, the drug discovery and development company focused on disease-modifying treatments for patients with autoimmune and allergic diseases, announced today that it has started preclinical development of its novel peptide therapy ATX-GD-459 for the treatment of Graves' disease. [More]
Viewpoints: U.S. health care: Expensive and deficient; GOP threat to gun violence research

Viewpoints: U.S. health care: Expensive and deficient; GOP threat to gun violence research

Britain and Switzerland were top scorers in a study examining the quality and efficiency of health care systems in 11 advanced nations by a leading American research organization. As usual, the United States finished last overall and last on several important measures of cost and health outcomes, despite having the most costly system in the world (6/16). [More]
Study: Many overrate intensity of exercise

Study: Many overrate intensity of exercise

Do you work out for health benefits and feel you are exercising more than enough? You might be among the many Canadians who overrate how hard they work out or underestimate what moderate intensity exercise means, according to a recent study out of York University's Faculty of Health. [More]
Research on effects of caffeine on young people after puberty

Research on effects of caffeine on young people after puberty

Caffeine intake by children and adolescents has been rising for decades, due in large part to the popularity of caffeinated sodas and energy drinks, which now are marketed to children as young as four. [More]

People exposed to core disgusts show higher levels of attention

We know it too well. We are watching a horror film and the antagonist is about to maim a character; we ball up, get ready for the shot and instead of turning away, we lean forward in the chair, then flinch and cover our eyes - Jason strikes again! But what is going on in our body that drives us to this reaction, and why do we engage in it so readily? Recent research published in the Journal of Communication found that people exposed to core disgusts (blood, guts, body products) showed higher levels of attention the more disgusting the content grew even though they had negative reactions to the content. [More]
Heart rate may identify premature infants at risk of developing necrotizing enterocolitis

Heart rate may identify premature infants at risk of developing necrotizing enterocolitis

Measuring variability of heart rate may identify premature infants at risk of developing necrotizing enterocolitis, a serious inflammatory condition that can lead to death, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. [More]
Recreational football training sessions lower blood pressure and improves heart function

Recreational football training sessions lower blood pressure and improves heart function

The studies, published in the acclaimed Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports, show that 24 weeks of twice-weekly recreational football training sessions lower blood pressure and improves heart function in men with high blood pressure and men with type 2 diabetes. [More]

New biometric wearable devices use scattered light to monitor glucose levels and pulse

Monitoring a patient's vital signs and other physiological parameters is a standard part of medical care, but, increasingly, health and fitness-minded individuals are looking for ways to easily keep their own tabs on these measurements. Enter the biometric watch. [More]
Study demonstrates link between obstructive sleep apnea and development of diabetes

Study demonstrates link between obstructive sleep apnea and development of diabetes

In the largest study to date of the relationship between sleep apnea and diabetes, a new study of more than 8,500 Canadian patients has demonstrated a link between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and the development of diabetes, confirming earlier evidence of such a relationship from smaller studies with shorter follow-up periods. [More]