Heart Rate News and Research RSS Feed - Heart Rate News and Research

Heart rate is determined by the number of heartbeats per unit of time, typically expressed as beats per minute (BPM), it can vary with as the body's need for oxygen changes, such as during exercise or sleep.

Baxter reports topline results from BAX 111 Phase 3 trial for treatment of von Willebrand disease

Baxter International Inc. today announced topline results from a Phase 3 clinical trial evaluating the safety, efficacy and pharmacokinetics (PK) of BAX 111. BAX 111 is a recombinant von Willebrand factor (rVWF) under investigation for the treatment of bleeding episodes in patients with von Willebrand disease, the most common type of inherited bleeding disorder. [More]

Pradaxa receives FDA approval for treatment and reduction of risk of recurrence of DVT and PE

Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Pradaxa® (dabigatran etexilate mesylate) for the treatment of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) in patients who have been treated with a parenteral anticoagulant for five to 10 days, and to reduce the risk of recurrent DVT and PE in patients who have been previously treated. DVT and PE are collectively referred to as venous thromboembolism (VTE). [More]
TomTom releases Runner Cardio GPS sport watch with heart rate technology

TomTom releases Runner Cardio GPS sport watch with heart rate technology

TomTom today launches the Runner Cardio GPS sport watch with cutting-edge heart rate technology. The Runner Cardio has a built-in Heart Rate Monitor, eliminating the need for a separate chest strap. [More]
Patients who stay longer in ICU have substantial physical impairments 2 years later

Patients who stay longer in ICU have substantial physical impairments 2 years later

Patients have substantial physical impairments even two years after being discharged from the hospital after a stay in an intensive care unit (ICU), new Johns Hopkins research suggests. [More]

Infants show unique physiological, behavioral responses to pleasant touch, says study

Infants show unique physiological and behavioral responses to pleasant touch, which may help to cement the bonds between child and parent and promote early social and physiological development, according to research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. [More]
Clonidine increases hypotension and non-fatal cardiac arrest after noncardiac surgery

Clonidine increases hypotension and non-fatal cardiac arrest after noncardiac surgery

Clonidine - a drug that reduces blood pressure and heart rate - increased rates of clinically concerning hypotension and non-fatal cardiac arrest after noncardiac surgery, according to the POISE-2 trial presented at the American College of Cardiology's 63rd Annual Scientific Session. [More]
TV watching leads to excessive snacking, cardiovascular risk in middle school kids

TV watching leads to excessive snacking, cardiovascular risk in middle school kids

Middle school kids who park themselves in front of the TV for two hours or more each day are more likely to consume junk food and have risk factors for cardiovascular disease, even compared to those who spend an equal amount of time on the computer or playing video games, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology's 63rd Annual Scientific Session. [More]
World of digital health changing global healthcare landscape

World of digital health changing global healthcare landscape

The 4th Mobile and Wearable Technology: Healthcare 2014 Conference will be taking place from 3 – 4 April 2014 in Singapore at the Parkroyal Hotel. [More]
Formula for peak exercise heart rate does not account for differences between men and women

Formula for peak exercise heart rate does not account for differences between men and women

The formula for peak exercise heart rate that doctors have used for decades in tests to diagnose heart conditions may be flawed because it does not account for differences between men and women, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology's 63rd Annual Scientific Session. [More]

St. Jude Medical announces first enrollments in LEADLESS Pacemaker Observational Study

St. Jude Medical, Inc., a global medical device company, today announced the first enrollments in the company’s LEADLESS Pacemaker Observational Study evaluating the Nanostim leadless pacing technology. The Nanostim pacemaker received CE Mark in 2013, and post-approval implants have occurred in the UK, Germany, Italy, Czech Republic, France, Spain, and the Netherlands. [More]
Pierre Fabre Dermatologie receives FDA marketing authorization for pediatric drug Hemangeol

Pierre Fabre Dermatologie receives FDA marketing authorization for pediatric drug Hemangeol

Pierre Fabre Dermatologie has obtained marketing authorization from the FDA for the pediatric drug Hemangeol (propranolol hydrochloride), which is the first and only approved treatment for "proliferating infantile hemangioma requiring systemic therapy". [More]
Microvascular coronary dysfunction in women may be triggered by emotional stress, say researchers

Microvascular coronary dysfunction in women may be triggered by emotional stress, say researchers

​Researchers at the Barbra Streisand Women's Heart Center at the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute have found that emotional stressors - such as those provoking anger - may cause changes in the nervous system that controls heart rate and trigger a type of coronary artery dysfunction that occurs more frequently in women than men. [More]
Monash University research offers new hope to people with heart attacks

Monash University research offers new hope to people with heart attacks

Melbourne scientists are a step closer to creating a new drug to stop a heart attack in its tracks and reduce the damage caused, without any side effects. [More]

Music does not speak to everyone

Although it is not associated with any apparent biological advantagess or useful value (such as money), music is ranked among the highest sources of pleasure. Music's important role in our society and culture has led to the assumption that its ability to induce pleasure is universal. However, this assumption has never been empirically tested. [More]
Safeguard Scientifics reports net income of $24 million for fourth quarter 2013

Safeguard Scientifics reports net income of $24 million for fourth quarter 2013

Safeguard Scientifics, Inc. today announced fourth quarter and full-year 2013 financial results. For the three months ended December 31, 2013, Safeguard's net income was $24.0 million, or $1.10 per share, compared to net loss of $10.8 million, or $0.51 per share for the same period in 2012. For the year ended December 31, 2013, Safeguard's net loss was $35.5 million, or $1.66 per share, compared to $39.4 million, or $1.88 per share for the same period in 2012. [More]

Azoi announces launch of innovative mobile health monitoring device

Azoi, a technology company dedicated to helping people improve their lives, today announced Wello – an innovative health monitoring device embedded within a mobile phone case. With just a few powerful sensors, Wello fits onto a smartphone and measures a number of key vitals including blood pressure, electrocardiography (ECG), heart rate, blood oxygen, temperature, lung functions and more – with a high level of accuracy. Fast and easy-to-use, Wello empowers people to track key data, improve awareness of their body's state, and make more informed lifestyle choices. [More]
Outbursts of anger may trigger heart attacks and strokes, shows study

Outbursts of anger may trigger heart attacks and strokes, shows study

Outbursts of anger may trigger heart attacks, strokes and other cardiovascular problems in the two hours immediately afterwards, according to the first study to systematically evaluate previous research into the link between the extreme emotion and all cardiovascular outcomes. [More]

Doctors devise new way to treat atrial fibrillation

Doctors in the U.S. and Japan have devised a way to treat atrial fibrillation by adding a little alcohol to minimally invasive therapies that target a cluster of misbehaving nerves known to trigger arrhythmia. In the most recent Journal of the American College of Cardiology (online before print), the researchers say the new therapy may dull or stop the transmission of electrical impulses that cause atrial fibrillation. [More]
Angry outbursts increase heart attack risk

Angry outbursts increase heart attack risk

Call it what you will - getting red in the face, hot under the collar, losing your cool, blowing your top - we all experience anger. And while we know that anger is a normal, sometimes even beneficial emotion, we're also aware of the often harmful connection between anger and health. New research from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical shows an even more compelling reason to think about getting anger in check - a nearly fivefold increase in risk for heart attack in the two hours following outbursts of anger. [More]

Study investigates how biology, social factors interact within marriage to affect heart health

Does the stress of marriage contribute to heart disease, which accounts for one of every four deaths in the United States? [More]