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Heart rate is determined by the number of heartbeats per unit of time, typically expressed as beats per minute (BPM), it can vary with as the body's need for oxygen changes, such as during exercise or sleep.
Simple strategies may help people stave off neurodegenerative condition

Simple strategies may help people stave off neurodegenerative condition

Diet, exercise, a good night's sleep -- all sound recommendations for mitigating one's risk for everything from heart disease to diabetes and, as it turns out, Alzheimer's. [More]
LifeWatch's wireless, patch-based vital signs monitoring system receives FDA clearance

LifeWatch's wireless, patch-based vital signs monitoring system receives FDA clearance

LifeWatch AG, a leading developer and provider of medical solutions and remote diagnostic monitoring services in the digital health market, is pleased to announce that it has received FDA clearance for its continuous Vital Signs Monitoring Service. [More]
Physically fit individuals' maximal heart rate decline at slower rate with age

Physically fit individuals' maximal heart rate decline at slower rate with age

Cardiovascular disease remains the number one cause of death. It is well known that being physically fit is associated with lower risk of disease. One factor associated with higher risk of cardiovascular disease is having a low maximal heart rate. [More]
Bradycardia does not increase cardiovascular disease risk

Bradycardia does not increase cardiovascular disease risk

Bradycardia - a slower than normal heartbeat - does not increase the risk of developing cardiovascular disease, according to a study conducted by researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center. The study is published in the Jan.19 online edition of the Journal of American Medical Association Internal Medicine. [More]
Regular practice of Transcendental Meditation benefits active-duty service members

Regular practice of Transcendental Meditation benefits active-duty service members

Regular practice of Transcendental Meditation enables some active duty service members battling post-traumatic stress disorder to reduce or even eliminate their psychotropic medication and get better control of their often-debilitating symptoms, researchers report in the journal Military Medicine. [More]
Vagus nerve stimulation effective in inhibiting cortical spreading depression

Vagus nerve stimulation effective in inhibiting cortical spreading depression

According to a study led by scientists at Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School published in the journal Pain, vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) was found to suppress cortical spreading depression (CSD). [More]
Scientists find genetic link to unexplained heart failure affecting pregnant women

Scientists find genetic link to unexplained heart failure affecting pregnant women

Scientists have found that women who suffer unexplained heart failure towards the end of pregnancy or shortly after giving birth share certain genetic changes. [More]
Premature triplets released from Loyola University Medical Center in time for first Christmas

Premature triplets released from Loyola University Medical Center in time for first Christmas

Triplets Finn, Kyle and Ava Santiago, who were born six weeks premature and underweight, went home from Loyola University Medical Center Dec. 24, just in time to celebrate their first Christmas. [More]
Cardiome files NDS with Health Canada's TPD for approval of intravenous vernakalant

Cardiome files NDS with Health Canada's TPD for approval of intravenous vernakalant

Cardiome Pharma Corp. (NASDAQ: CRME / TSX: COM) today announced the filing of a New Drug Submission (NDS) with Health Canada's Therapeutic Products Directorate (TPD) seeking Canadian approval of intravenous vernakalant for the rapid conversion of recent onset atrial fibrillation (AF) to sinus rhythm in adults with AF for up to 7 days. [More]
Carbohydrates boost endurance sports performance

Carbohydrates boost endurance sports performance

Carbohydrates are the body's main energy source during high-intensity, prolonged running, a new study published in Journal of Applied Physiology reports. [More]
UB physicians testing new exercise treatment for concussion

UB physicians testing new exercise treatment for concussion

The standard of care for acute concussion may undergo a dramatic change, depending on the results of a new exercise treatment that physicians at the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at the University at Buffalo have developed and begun testing. It is the first randomized, controlled clinical trial of this exercise treatment for concussion. [More]
New class of diabetes drugs differs in efficacy and safety profiles, shows new research

New class of diabetes drugs differs in efficacy and safety profiles, shows new research

Once-weekly glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RAs) differ in their efficacy and safety profiles, according to new research by the University of Leicester. [More]
STSI launches home-based clinical trial that uses wearable sensors to identify people with AFib

STSI launches home-based clinical trial that uses wearable sensors to identify people with AFib

Researchers at the Scripps Translational Science Institute have launched a home-based clinical trial that uses wearable sensor technology to identify people with asymptomatic atrial fibrillation (AFib). [More]
Vibration-based therapy can successfully treat apnea events in preterm infants

Vibration-based therapy can successfully treat apnea events in preterm infants

Researchers from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center's Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University and the University of Massachusetts Medical School have found that a vibration-based therapy known as stochastic resonance (SR) stimulation can successfully treat preterm infants experiencing apnea of prematurity (AOP), disrupted breathing, bradycardia (slowed heart rate) and oxygen desaturation (diminished oxygen levels). [More]
Vasovagal syncope may mask psychogenic symptoms

Vasovagal syncope may mask psychogenic symptoms

Psychogenic pseudosyncope may be going undetected in some patients because it coincides with vasovagal syncope, researchers report in Neurology. [More]
Use of aconitine may lead to severe poisoning, warns Chinese physicians report

Use of aconitine may lead to severe poisoning, warns Chinese physicians report

Chinese physicians report on the case of a woman who presented with aconitine-induced cardiovascular symptoms. Their report, published in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology, warns that the use of this natural ingredient may lead to severe poisoning. [More]
FDA approves Narcan nasal spray to prevent or reverse effects of opioid overdose

FDA approves Narcan nasal spray to prevent or reverse effects of opioid overdose

Today the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Narcan nasal spray, the first FDA-approved nasal spray version of naloxone hydrochloride, a life-saving medication that can stop or reverse the effects of an opioid overdose. Opioids are a class of drugs that include prescription medications such as oxycodone, hydrocodone, and morphine, as well as the illegal drug heroin. [More]
Treating insomnia through a CBT device? An interview with Dr Ebrahim

Treating insomnia through a CBT device? An interview with Dr Ebrahim

Insomnia refers to a clinical condition that is characterised by one or more of the following – difficulty initiating sleep and/or maintaining sleep and/or waking up too early AND associated with symptoms the next day such as sleepiness, lethargy, loss of concentration. [More]
Screening for asymptomatic atrial fibrillation could reduce risk of stroke, premature death

Screening for asymptomatic atrial fibrillation could reduce risk of stroke, premature death

Screening for asymptomatic atrial fibrillation (AF) in people aged 65 and over and treating it with anticoagulant medications could greatly reduce the risk of stroke and premature death, say cardiologists in today's Journal of the American Medical Association. [More]
European regulator concludes that evidence does not support a causal relationship between human papillomavirus vaccines and CRPS or POTS

European regulator concludes that evidence does not support a causal relationship between human papillomavirus vaccines and CRPS or POTS

The European Medicines Agency’s Pharmacovigilance Risk Assessment Committee (PRAC) has completed a detailed scientific review of the evidence surrounding reports of two syndromes, complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) and postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) in young women given human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines. [More]
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