Heart Rate News and Research RSS Feed - Heart Rate News and Research

Heart rate is determined by the number of heartbeats per unit of time, typically expressed as beats per minute (BPM), it can vary with as the body's need for oxygen changes, such as during exercise or sleep.
Aptensio XR once-daily treatment for ADHD to be available in Summer 2015

Aptensio XR once-daily treatment for ADHD to be available in Summer 2015

Today, Rhodes Pharmaceuticals L.P. announced that Aptensio XR, a once-daily central nervous system stimulant indicated for the treatment of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) will be available to patients beginning Summer 2015. [More]
Heart rate measures could identify individuals with higher risk of diabetes

Heart rate measures could identify individuals with higher risk of diabetes

An association between resting heart rate and diabetes suggests that heart rate measures could identify individuals with a higher future risk of diabetes, according to an international team of researchers. [More]
Vagus nerve stimulation effective in inhibiting cortical spreading depression

Vagus nerve stimulation effective in inhibiting cortical spreading depression

A poster presentation at the International Headache Congress in Valencia, Spain reports that VNS inhibits cortical spreading depression (CSD), which is known to be the cause of migraine aura and a trigger for headache. [More]
Automated analysis of vital signs could help prevent trauma patients from life-threatening bleeding

Automated analysis of vital signs could help prevent trauma patients from life-threatening bleeding

Automated analysis of the vital signs commonly monitored in patients being transported to trauma centers could significantly improve the ability to diagnose those with life-threatening bleeding before they arrive at the hospital, potentially saving their lives. [More]
Workplace mindfulness-based intervention reduces stress levels of employees

Workplace mindfulness-based intervention reduces stress levels of employees

A study by researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center found that a workplace mindfulness-based intervention reduced stress levels of employees exposed to a highly stressful occupational environment. [More]
Wearable diagnostic machines presented at Elsevier's 4th International Conference on Bio-Sensing Technology

Wearable diagnostic machines presented at Elsevier's 4th International Conference on Bio-Sensing Technology

Wearable E-skin that can measure heart rate and blood pressure, and paper diagnostic machines the size of a credit card that can give instant readings on blood and saliva samples are two new bio-sensing technologies presented at Elsevier's 4th International Conference on Bio-Sensing Technology in Lisbon, Portugal on 12 May 2015. [More]
Kent researchers assess how smartphone uses interfere with treadmill exercise

Kent researchers assess how smartphone uses interfere with treadmill exercise

Kent State University researchers Jacob Barkley, Ph.D., and Andrew Lepp, Ph.D., as well as Kent State alumni Michael Rebold, Ph.D., and Gabe Sanders, Ph.D., assessed how common smartphone uses - texting and talking - interfere with treadmill exercise. [More]
Cardiome signs commercialization agreement with AOP for ESMOCARD products

Cardiome signs commercialization agreement with AOP for ESMOCARD products

Cardiome Pharma Corp. today announced that the company has entered a commercialization agreement with AOP Orphan Pharma to sell AOP's cardiovascular products, ESMOCARD and ESMOCARD LYO (esmolol hydrochloride) in Italy, France, Spain and Belgium. [More]
Workplace mindfulness-based intervention reduces stress levels and risk of burnout

Workplace mindfulness-based intervention reduces stress levels and risk of burnout

A study by researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center found that a workplace mindfulness-based intervention reduced stress levels of employees exposed to a highly stressful occupational environment. [More]
Orexigen Therapeutics provides update on business and financial results for Q1 2015

Orexigen Therapeutics provides update on business and financial results for Q1 2015

Orexigen Therapeutics, Inc. today announced business and financial results for the first quarter ended March 31, 2015. [More]
RIT's Behnaz Ghoraani awarded NIH grant to develop new atrial fibrillation solution

RIT's Behnaz Ghoraani awarded NIH grant to develop new atrial fibrillation solution

Behnaz Ghoraani, engineering faculty at Rochester Institute of Technology, was recently awarded a $456,000 grant from the National Institutes for Health for the project "Catheter guidance algorithm for identification of atrial fibrillation ablation." [More]
Relaxation response has significant impact on patients with gastrointestinal disorders

Relaxation response has significant impact on patients with gastrointestinal disorders

A pilot study has found that participating in a nine-week training program including elicitation of the relaxation response had a significant impact on clinical symptoms of the gastrointestinal disorders irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease and on the expression of genes related to inflammation and the body's response to stress. [More]
New technologies for preventing preterm labor, inducing labor process heading to marketplace

New technologies for preventing preterm labor, inducing labor process heading to marketplace

Preventing preterm labor with light and inducing labor using a side effect-free drug are two new technologies based on Florida State University research that are heading to the marketplace. [More]
Lung cancer surgery patients at higher risk of developing venous thromboembolism

Lung cancer surgery patients at higher risk of developing venous thromboembolism

New evidence suggests that lung cancer surgery patients are at higher risk of developing venous thromboembolism, including deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), than previously thought, with elevated risks of complications or death. When thromboemboli occur, they may be asymptomatic or attributed to post-surgical pain or complications, and may reflect both the lung cancer itself as well as compromised lung function after surgery. [More]
Atrial fibrillation linked to only one type of heart attack

Atrial fibrillation linked to only one type of heart attack

Refining the results of a 2013 study, researchers have found that atrial fibrillation, or irregular heartbeat, is associated with only one type of heart attack - the more common of the two types. [More]
Ultrasound settings can change beat frequency of cardiac cells

Ultrasound settings can change beat frequency of cardiac cells

Ultrasound—the technology used for sonograms and examining the heart—can increase the rate at which heart cells beat, researchers from Drexel University report. [More]
New research shows how fat controls energy levels in the brain

New research shows how fat controls energy levels in the brain

An enzyme secreted by the body's fat tissue controls energy levels in the brain, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The findings, in mice, underscore a role for the body's fat tissue in controlling the brain's response to food scarcity, and suggest there is an optimal amount of body fat for maximizing health and longevity. [More]
Studies examine positive and negative outcomes of using health apps

Studies examine positive and negative outcomes of using health apps

Health apps have the potential to make a broad impact on the health of the general population, argues one expert in The BMJ this week. But another explains that there is not enough evidence to support such claims and suggests that health apps may even be harmful. [More]
Gratitude in heart attack patients improves cardiac health

Gratitude in heart attack patients improves cardiac health

Recognizing and giving thanks for the positive aspects of life can result in improved mental, and ultimately physical, health in patients with asymptomatic heart failure, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. [More]
Ultrafine particle exposure may affect cardiac function

Ultrafine particle exposure may affect cardiac function

The adverse health effects caused by fine particles have been known for some time. In addition, ultrafine particles appear to play a significant role in cardiac function - even if an individual is exposed to these for only a few minutes, as scientists of Helmholtz Zentrum München have now been able to show. [More]
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