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New ‘5-D fingerprint’ technique could precisely measure properties of individual protein molecules

New ‘5-D fingerprint’ technique could precisely measure properties of individual protein molecules

In research that could one day lead to advances against neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, University of Michigan engineering researchers have demonstrated a technique for precisely measuring the properties of individual protein molecules floating in a liquid. [More]
Chronic kidney disease patients have high out-of-pocket healthcare expenditures, study finds

Chronic kidney disease patients have high out-of-pocket healthcare expenditures, study finds

Patients who have chronic kidney disease but are not on dialysis have higher out-of-pocket healthcare expenses than even stroke and cancer patients, according to a study by researchers at Loyola University Chicago and Loyola Medicine. [More]
New report highlights trends in heart disease care in the U.S.

New report highlights trends in heart disease care in the U.S.

Over 93 percent of heart attack patients are receiving stents within the guideline-recommended threshold of 90 minutes after arriving at the hospital, with the median time to stenting only 59 minutes, according to a broad report on trends in heart disease care from the American College of Cardiology's National Cardiovascular Data Registry published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. [More]
Heart CT scans can help personalize treatment for patients with mild high blood pressure

Heart CT scans can help personalize treatment for patients with mild high blood pressure

Using data from a national study, Johns Hopkins researchers determined that using heart CT scans can help personalize treatment in patients whose blood pressure falls in the gray zone of just above normal or mild high blood pressure. [More]
Recognition given to Edwards Lifesciences for hemodynamic monitoring product

Recognition given to Edwards Lifesciences for hemodynamic monitoring product

Edwards Lifesciences Corporation, the global leader in patient-focused innovations for structural heart disease and critical care monitoring, has received CE Mark for its HemoSphere advanced monitoring platform, which provides greater clarity on a patient’s hemodynamic status to enable clinicians to make timely, potentially life-saving decisions. [More]
New study reports link between truck driver’s poor health and crash risk

New study reports link between truck driver’s poor health and crash risk

As commuters shimmy past large, lumbering trucks on the road, they may glance over and wonder, "How safe is that driver next to me?" If the truck driver is in poor health, the answer could be: Not very. [More]
Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator improves survival rate in older patients, study finds

Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator improves survival rate in older patients, study finds

Of patients over age 65 who received an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) after surviving sudden cardiac arrest or a near-fatal arrhythmia, almost 80 percent survived two years--a higher rate than found in past trials performed to demonstrate the efficacy of the devices in this situation, according to a study today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. [More]
Tobacco control policies can provide economic and public health benefits, report reveals

Tobacco control policies can provide economic and public health benefits, report reveals

Policies to control tobacco use, including tobacco tax and price increases, can generate significant government revenues for health and development work, according to a new landmark global report from the World Health Organization and the National Cancer Institute of the United States of America. [More]
Skidmore College scientist discovers health benefits of balanced, protein-pacing, low-calorie diet

Skidmore College scientist discovers health benefits of balanced, protein-pacing, low-calorie diet

Research by Skidmore College exercise scientist Paul Arciero has found that a balanced, protein-pacing, low-calorie diet that includes intermittent fasting not only achieves long-term weight loss, but also helps release toxins in the form of PCBs from the body fat stores, in addition to enhancing heart health and reducing oxidative stress. [More]
Study reveals brain activity may be key to link between stress and heart disease

Study reveals brain activity may be key to link between stress and heart disease

Increased activity in a deep-lying region of the brain called the amygdala is associated with a higher risk of heart attack and stroke, according to a study published in The Lancet.

The amygdala is known to process emotions such as fear and anger and the finding sheds light on the possible mechanism by which stress can lead to cardiovascular disease (CVD), say the study authors. [More]
Experts suggest new five-stage system of classifying patients at risk for heart attack

Experts suggest new five-stage system of classifying patients at risk for heart attack

Experts at Johns Hopkins and New York's Mount Sinai Health System have published a suggested new plan for a five-stage system of classifying the risk of heart attack in those with heart disease, one they say puts much-needed and long-absent focus on the risks faced by millions of Americans who pass so-called stress tests or have less obvious or earlier-stage danger signs. [More]
VTCRI scientist receives $2.1 million grant for research to combat heart disease

VTCRI scientist receives $2.1 million grant for research to combat heart disease

Steven Poelzing, an associate professor at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, has received a $2.1 million grant from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health for research to combat the nation's No. 1 killer — heart disease. [More]
Researchers develop new imaging and catheterization technique to treat adults with lymphatic plastic bronchitis

Researchers develop new imaging and catheterization technique to treat adults with lymphatic plastic bronchitis

Researchers who developed a safe and effective procedure to remove thick clogs in children's airways are now reporting similar success in adult patients. In this rare condition, called plastic bronchitis, patients develop thick, caulk-like casts that form in the branching paths of their airways. [More]
SLU expert suggests viewing exercise as daily contribution that offers cumulative health benefits

SLU expert suggests viewing exercise as daily contribution that offers cumulative health benefits

Have you already faltered on your New Year's resolution to exercise regularly in 2017? Joined a gym, but only worked out two days so far? New workout gear still neatly folded with tags attached? Don't give up your admirable ambition just yet. Instead, consider a new attitude to refocus your approach toward your exercise goal. [More]
Study finds decline in rate of prostate cancer treatment after change in screening recommendations

Study finds decline in rate of prostate cancer treatment after change in screening recommendations

As some national guidelines now recommend against routine prostate cancer screening, the overall rate of men receiving treatment for the disease declined 42 percent, a new study finds. [More]
High intake of dietary cholesterol and eggs not linked to elevated risk of memory disorders

High intake of dietary cholesterol and eggs not linked to elevated risk of memory disorders

A new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows that a relatively high intake of dietary cholesterol, or eating one egg every day, are not associated with an elevated risk of dementia or Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Thought leaders at U-CARS meeting to explore issues related to heart recovery and regeneration

Thought leaders at U-CARS meeting to explore issues related to heart recovery and regeneration

For many years, the answer to that question was unequivocally "No." But as the University of Utah School of Medicine's annual Utah Cardiac Recovery Symposium will explore on Jan. 12-13, advances in treating heart failure are giving physicians, surgeons and researchers reason to hope the deadly disease might one day be defeated. [More]
Elevated levels of brain protein linked to longer recovery period after concussion

Elevated levels of brain protein linked to longer recovery period after concussion

Elevated levels of the brain protein tau following a sport-related concussion are associated with a longer recovery period and delayed return to play for athletes, according to a study published in the January 6, 2017 issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Stanford researchers launch major update to popular research app for sharing heart health data

Stanford researchers launch major update to popular research app for sharing heart health data

Resolved to improve your heart health in the new year? A newly updated app could keep you on track. [More]
Physical activity linked to decreased risk of heart disease and death from all causes in older adults

Physical activity linked to decreased risk of heart disease and death from all causes in older adults

Being physically inactive--sitting for long periods of time--can be so harmful to your health that experts sometimes call it "sitting disease." In fact, worldwide, physical inactivity is estimated to cause some 3.2 million deaths a year. [More]
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