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Dementia patients, caregivers think better care, support more important than finding cure for disease

Dementia patients, caregivers think better care, support more important than finding cure for disease

More than $100 million in federal funding was spent last year toward searching for a cure for Alzheimer's disease. However, if given the choice, most people with dementia and those caring for them would like to see the money go elsewhere, according to a recent study led by University at Buffalo researcher Davina Porock. [More]
New study expands on the heart benefits of exercise

New study expands on the heart benefits of exercise

Exercise promotes heart health. However, many lifestyle factors cause heart disease, and regular activity may not be enough to prevent heart attacks. A new study in the American Journal of Physiology-Heart and Circulatory Physiology expands on the heart benefits of exercise, investigating whether regular exercise still helps the heart even after a heart attack occurs. [More]
Special issue of Ergonomics in Design explores health and safety effects of sedentary workplace

Special issue of Ergonomics in Design explores health and safety effects of sedentary workplace

Recent research has shown that the more time employees spend in their chairs, the more likely they are to develop serious health problems such as diabetes, heart disease, and obesity. The July special issue of Ergonomics in Design examines the health and safety effects of the sedentary workplace, the pros and cons of alternatives to sitting at work (for example, sit-stand and treadmill workstations, ball chairs), and proposed workplace design solutions. [More]
Integrated treatment required for diabetes-eating disorder combination

Integrated treatment required for diabetes-eating disorder combination

As they reach their teens, many with type 1 diabetes discover that the disease provides a secret weapon for losing weight. By restricting or reducing the amount of insulin they inject, they can eat just about anything they want and control their weight. [More]
Embracing new technologies to improve healthcare provision

Embracing new technologies to improve healthcare provision

A leading US pharmacy services provider and IT company have announced their collaboration to facilitate the provision of truly patient-centred primary care. [More]
New Penn study questions relevance of fish oil-derived SPMs and their anti-inflammatory effects in humans

New Penn study questions relevance of fish oil-derived SPMs and their anti-inflammatory effects in humans

The importance of a diet rich in fish oils - now a billion dollar food-supplement industry -- has been debated for over half a century. A few large clinical trials have supported the idea that fish oils confer therapeutic benefits to patients with cardiovascular disease. Researchers think that hearts and blood vessels may benefit in part from their anti-inflammatory properties. [More]
Pharmacist-included medical care teams help patients better control blood pressure

Pharmacist-included medical care teams help patients better control blood pressure

If you have hypertension, it pays to include a pharmacist in a medical care team. That's the upshot from research by the University of Iowa that found patients with uncontrolled hypertension had better blood pressure control when being cared for by pharmacists working in care teams (with a physician, for example) than patients who relied mostly on a doctor for medication guidance. [More]
IBM, CVS Health to transform care management services for patients with chronic disease

IBM, CVS Health to transform care management services for patients with chronic disease

CVS Health (NYSE: CVS) and IBM today announced they will use predictive analytics and Watson cognitive computing to transform care management services for patients with chronic disease. [More]
Balancing cellular aging and cancer risk through biotechnology

Balancing cellular aging and cancer risk through biotechnology

In a way, trying to repair age-related heart damage and trying to fight cancer are opposite problems. Your heart cells' ability to regenerate themselves and proliferate into new, young cells degrades as you get older. [More]
Study reveals that firms 'underinvest' in long-term research to develop cancer-fighting drugs

Study reveals that firms 'underinvest' in long-term research to develop cancer-fighting drugs

Pharmaceutical firms "underinvest" in long-term research to develop new cancer-fighting drugs due to the greater time and cost required to conduct such research, according to a newly published study co-authored by MIT economists. [More]
New study to explore mechanisms responsible for taste changes following RYGB, diet-induced obesity

New study to explore mechanisms responsible for taste changes following RYGB, diet-induced obesity

Currently, one of the most effective surgical methods for treating obesity is the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery, which limits the amount of food and drink that can be ingested at one time and the amount of calories and nutrients absorbed through the intestinal tract. An unintended side effect of RYGB is that it reduces the patient's taste for sweet and fatty foods—but there is no scientific explanation for why these taste changes occur. [More]
American College of Surgeons calls for meaningful data sharing for improved patient care

American College of Surgeons calls for meaningful data sharing for improved patient care

The American College of Surgeons strongly believes that patients and their families deserve to have meaningful information available to assist them in selecting the right surgeon. [More]
Ben Taub Hospital building national reputation for cardiovascular services

Ben Taub Hospital building national reputation for cardiovascular services

For most of the day, Graciela Del Angel felt shortness of breath and a tightness in her chest. Though her symptoms were uncomfortable, they became unbearable about midnight. By then, she had difficulty breathing and deep chest pains—all signs of a heart attack. [More]
Corgenix Medical to present several scientific abstracts at 2015 AACC Clinical Lab Expo

Corgenix Medical to present several scientific abstracts at 2015 AACC Clinical Lab Expo

Corgenix Medical Corporation, the U.S. - based operation of ORGENTEC Diagnostika, is presenting several scientific abstracts at the 2015 American Association for Clinical Chemistry Clinical Lab Expo in Atlanta. Three abstracts involve the ReEBOV Ebola rapid diagnostic test (RDT) with a fourth abstract involving the AtherOx™ Assay for assessing heart disease risk. [More]
Eddingpharm plans to begin Phase 1 study for BRINAVESS in China

Eddingpharm plans to begin Phase 1 study for BRINAVESS in China

Cardiome Pharma Corp. today announced that its Chinese development and commercialization partner, Eddingpharm, plans to initiate a Phase 1 study for BRINAVESSTM to support regulatory approval in China. The study will be conducted in healthy volunteers. [More]
Six hot line sessions set to reveal latest research in cardiovascular disease at ESC Congress 2015

Six hot line sessions set to reveal latest research in cardiovascular disease at ESC Congress 2015

Six hot line sessions at ESC Congress 2015 are set to reveal the latest in cardiovascular disease research across a range of conditions and comorbidities. Hot topics include atrial fibrillation, pacing, acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, pharmacology and coronary artery disease. [More]
Experts to highlight new diagnostic products, tools to identify heart attacks at 2015 AACC Annual Meeting

Experts to highlight new diagnostic products, tools to identify heart attacks at 2015 AACC Annual Meeting

The 2015 AACC Annual Meeting & Clinical Lab Expo, the leading annual event for laboratory medicine, will open on Sunday, July 26, in Atlanta, Georgia. This year's meeting will host more than 400 educational sessions on topics ranging from personalized medicine and infectious diseases to point-of-care and laboratory-developed tests, and will feature more than 200 new cutting edge diagnostic products. [More]
Late- and post-menopausal women have more fat around hearts compared to pre-menopausal counterparts

Late- and post-menopausal women have more fat around hearts compared to pre-menopausal counterparts

Late- and post-menopausal women have significantly greater volumes of fat around their hearts - a risk factor for heart disease - than their pre-menopausal counterparts, a University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health study has shown for the first time. [More]
Men gain weight after they become dads, new Northwestern Medicine study finds

Men gain weight after they become dads, new Northwestern Medicine study finds

All those leftover pizza crusts you snatch from your kids' plates add up. Men gain weight after they become fathers for the first time whether or not they live with their children, reports a large, new Northwestern Medicine study that tracked the weight of more than 10,000 men from adolescence to young adulthood. [More]
New study may help identify novel ways to treat immune thrombocytopenia

New study may help identify novel ways to treat immune thrombocytopenia

Immune thrombocytopenia, or ITP, is an autoimmune disease whereby the immune system sends antibodies to attack and destroy the body's platelets--blood cells responsible for controlling bleeding. [More]
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