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Study quantifies benefits of healthy city design

Study quantifies benefits of healthy city design

Previous studies have shown a correlation between the design of cities and growing epidemics of injuries and non-communicable diseases such as heart disease, diabetes and cancer. [More]
DNA damage caused by smoking may last a lifetime

DNA damage caused by smoking may last a lifetime

Results of a study published this week show that the effects of smoking on DNA are wide-reaching and some persist long after a person has stopped smoking. The information gained may help improve our understanding of smoking-related diseases. [More]
Duke, Wisconsin and UAB researchers create bioengineered patches to treat heart failure

Duke, Wisconsin and UAB researchers create bioengineered patches to treat heart failure

The heart cannot regenerate muscle tissue after a heart attack has killed part of the muscle wall, and that dead tissue can strain surrounding muscle, leading to a lethal heart enlargement. [More]
Bile acid transporter inhibitors can prevent NASH in mice, study shows

Bile acid transporter inhibitors can prevent NASH in mice, study shows

Drugs that interfere with bile acid recycling can prevent several aspects of NASH (nonalcoholic steatohepatitis) in mice fed a high-fat diet, scientists from Emory University School of Medicine and Children's Healthcare of Atlanta have shown. [More]
Three-dimensional heart patches may soon move closer to clinical application

Three-dimensional heart patches may soon move closer to clinical application

The promise of stem cells to treat cardiovascular disease may soon be a step closer to clinical application as scientists from three institutions seek to perfect and test three-dimensional "heart patches" in a large animal model — the last big hurdle before trials in human patients. [More]
Study suggests interactions between distant DNA regions may impact disease gene levels

Study suggests interactions between distant DNA regions may impact disease gene levels

A person's DNA sequence can provide a lot of information about how genes are turned on and off, but new research out of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine suggests the 3-D structure DNA forms as it crams into cells may provide an additional layer of gene control. [More]
Stressful event appears to erase benefits linked to healthy fat choices

Stressful event appears to erase benefits linked to healthy fat choices

The type of fat you eat matters, but a new study suggests that the benefits of good fats vanish when stress enters the picture. [More]
Scientists begin research work at new £650 million Francis Crick Institute building

Scientists begin research work at new £650 million Francis Crick Institute building

The first scientists have moved into the new £650 million Francis Crick Institute building in London and are starting work in their purpose-built labs. [More]
ACCA annual congress shines lights on managing risk in acute cardiovascular care

ACCA annual congress shines lights on managing risk in acute cardiovascular care

Acute Cardiovascular Care 2016 will put a spotlight on managing high risk patients. The annual congress of the Acute Cardiovascular Care Association, a registered branch of the European Society of Cardiology, is held 15 to 17 October at the Centro de Congressos de Lisboa in Lisbon, Portugal. [More]
Over a quarter of US adults aged 50 years or more are inactive

Over a quarter of US adults aged 50 years or more are inactive

Research conducted at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) showed that 1 in 4 US adults aged 50 years or over do not take regular exercise. [More]
Intensive treatment to lower systolic blood pressure could save many lives

Intensive treatment to lower systolic blood pressure could save many lives

Intensive treatment to lower systolic (top number) blood pressure to below 120 would save more than 100,000 lives per year in the United States, according to a study led by Loyola University Chicago researcher Holly Kramer, MD, MPH. [More]
Incorporating laughter into exercise program could provide health benefits to older adults

Incorporating laughter into exercise program could provide health benefits to older adults

Incorporating laughter into a physical activity program that is focused on strength, balance and flexibility could improve older adults' mental health, aerobic endurance and confidence in their ability to exercise, according to a study led by Georgia State University. [More]
Study shows faith-based community program as effective method for heart health education

Study shows faith-based community program as effective method for heart health education

HeartSmarts, a faith-based community education and outreach program, is an effective method for teaching underserved communities about heart health in New York City, according to a study published in the Journal of Religion and Health. [More]
Americans believe cancer to be major health care challenge, Mayo Clinic survey reveals

Americans believe cancer to be major health care challenge, Mayo Clinic survey reveals

While Zika remains a hot topic in the news, a new survey by Mayo Clinic reveals that Americans believe the country's most significant health care challenge is cancer. [More]
Cardiothoracic surgeons report high level of job satisfaction despite intense demands

Cardiothoracic surgeons report high level of job satisfaction despite intense demands

Despite the significant challenges associated with a career in cardiothoracic surgery, heart and lung surgeons report a very high level of job satisfaction, according to a survey published today in The Annals of Thoracic Surgery. [More]
International researchers discover 44 novel gene sites linked to hypertension

International researchers discover 44 novel gene sites linked to hypertension

In papers receiving advance online publication in Nature Genetics, two international multi-institutional research teams describe identifying a total of 44 novel gene sites associated with hypertension or high blood pressure. [More]
Researchers uncover specific sites in the genome linked to high blood pressure

Researchers uncover specific sites in the genome linked to high blood pressure

Three large, collaborating international consortia of researchers, including a team co-led by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital, have uncovered new genes and sites in the genome tied to elevated blood pressure, implicating certain biological pathways and pointing toward new therapeutic strategies for treating hypertension. [More]
Simplified approach to TAVI holds potential to save lives of many patients with rheumatic heart disease

Simplified approach to TAVI holds potential to save lives of many patients with rheumatic heart disease

A novel heart valve replacement method is revealed today that offers hope for the thousands of patients with rheumatic heart disease who need the procedure each year. The research is being presented at the SA Heart Congress 2016 [More]
UC researchers offer more insights into how lack of gut bacteria influences fat absorption

UC researchers offer more insights into how lack of gut bacteria influences fat absorption

A study led by University of Cincinnati lipid metabolism researchers lends additional insight into how bacteria in the gut, or lack thereof, influences intestinal mast cells (MMC) activation and perhaps fat absorption. [More]
Trial of high-dose flu vaccine aims to better protect heart failure patients

Trial of high-dose flu vaccine aims to better protect heart failure patients

A network of researchers in the United States and Canada will try to spare thousands of patients the dangers of heart attacks and hospitalizations over the next five years in a trial of a high-dose flu vaccine. [More]
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