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Researchers say that promoting healthy gut microbiota can help treat metabolic syndrome

Researchers say that promoting healthy gut microbiota can help treat metabolic syndrome

Promoting healthy gut microbiota, the bacteria that live in the intestine, can help treat or prevent metabolic syndrome, a combination of risk factors that increases a person's risk for heart disease, diabetes and stroke, according to researchers at Georgia State University and Cornell University. [More]
Women with symptoms of serious psychological distress less likely to receive routine cancer screenings

Women with symptoms of serious psychological distress less likely to receive routine cancer screenings

Women with symptoms of serious mental illness are significantly less likely to receive three routine cancer screenings - Pap tests, mammograms and clinical breast exams - than women in the general population, despite being at elevated risk for medical comorbidities and early death, a new study indicates. [More]
Obese people experience silent cardiac damage that fuels risk for heart failure

Obese people experience silent cardiac damage that fuels risk for heart failure

Using an ultrasensitive blood test to detect the presence of a protein that heralds heart muscle injury, researchers from Johns Hopkins and elsewhere have found that obese people without overt heart disease experience silent cardiac damage that fuels their risk for heart failure down the road. [More]
Training medical students on handheld ultrasound device can enhance their physical diagnosis

Training medical students on handheld ultrasound device can enhance their physical diagnosis

A new study by researchers from Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai found that training medical students to use a handheld ultrasound device can enhance the accuracy of their physical diagnosis. [More]
CHOP presents new findings on pediatric cardiovascular disease at AHA Scientific Sessions

CHOP presents new findings on pediatric cardiovascular disease at AHA Scientific Sessions

Physician-researchers from the Cardiac Center at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia presented new findings on pediatric cardiovascular disease at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2014 in Chicago. [More]
Study shows how stem cells can help regenerate damaged muscle after heart attack

Study shows how stem cells can help regenerate damaged muscle after heart attack

Delivering stem cell factor directly into damaged heart muscle after a heart attack may help repair and regenerate injured tissue, according to a study led by researchers from Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai presented November 18 at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions 2014 in Chicago, IL. [More]
Changes in one gene can influence person's cholesterol levels from midlife through late life

Changes in one gene can influence person's cholesterol levels from midlife through late life

It's known that cholesterol levels typically rise as people age and that high cholesterol levels are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. What's less known is that cholesterol levels begin to decline the more a person ages. Recently, researchers from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston and the University of Kentucky found that differences in one gene can influence a person's cholesterol levels from midlife to late life. [More]
Cholesterol efflux appears to be superior indicator of cardiovascular risk

Cholesterol efflux appears to be superior indicator of cardiovascular risk

Groundbreaking research from UT Southwestern Medical Center shows that cholesterol efflux capacity (cholesterol efflux), which measures HDL cholesterol function, appears to be a superior indicator of cardiovascular risk and a better target for therapeutic treatments than standard measurements of HDL. Current measurement methods reflect only the circulating levels of HDL and not the functional properties of this lipoprotein. [More]
New study identifies crizotinib drug as possible new coating for drug-eluting stents

New study identifies crizotinib drug as possible new coating for drug-eluting stents

A new study has identified an FDA approved cancer drug, crizotinib, as a possible new coating for drug-eluting stents. Researchers found that crizotinib in mice helped prevent the narrowing of blood vessels after stenting without affecting the blood vessel lining. [More]
Nationwide STEMI rates drop, reveals Vanderbilt study

Nationwide STEMI rates drop, reveals Vanderbilt study

The most emergent form of heart attacks is decreasing nationwide, but this declining incidence could affect emergency departments' quality and timeliness of care. [More]
Cigna Foundation awards World of Difference grant to improve heart healthy behaviors in women

Cigna Foundation awards World of Difference grant to improve heart healthy behaviors in women

When it comes to hearts, men and women are not created equally. Women who have experienced a heart attack have a higher risk of a subsequent heart attack, or death, compared to men, according to the American Heart Association. [More]
Omega-3 fatty acids decrease risk of getting heart disease

Omega-3 fatty acids decrease risk of getting heart disease

Increasing the amount of omega-3s in your diet, whether from fish or flax, will likely decrease your risk of getting heart disease, according to Penn State nutritionists. [More]
Researchers present results of The Heart of New Ulm Project at AHA Scientific Sessions

Researchers present results of The Heart of New Ulm Project at AHA Scientific Sessions

Researchers from Allina Health and the Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation have presented on the results and implications of The Heart of New Ulm Project on heart disease risk factors at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions in Chicago, Ill. [More]
Study finds significant disparities in lung cancer treatment based on race, insurance status

Study finds significant disparities in lung cancer treatment based on race, insurance status

African Americans, Hispanics, and those who receive care at a community hospital are all significantly less likely than other patients to receive treatment for early stage non-small cell lung cancer, according to a report in the Journal of Thoracic Oncology. [More]
Scientists identify defects in colossal heart protein which leads to stroke, heart failure

Scientists identify defects in colossal heart protein which leads to stroke, heart failure

The landmark discovery of a tiny defect in a vital heart protein has for the first time enabled heart specialists to accurately pinpoint a therapeutic target for future efforts in developing a drug-based cure for cardiovascular diseases. [More]
Asthma associated with higher risk of heart attack or stroke

Asthma associated with higher risk of heart attack or stroke

Asthma that requires daily medication is associated with a significantly higher risk of heart attack or stroke, according to a new study from the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health. [More]
People who frequently cook meals at home eat healthier than those who cook less

People who frequently cook meals at home eat healthier than those who cook less

People who frequently cook meals at home eat healthier and consume fewer calories than those who cook less, according to new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research. [More]
Hispanics hospitalized less than other ethnic groups, study finds

Hispanics hospitalized less than other ethnic groups, study finds

For nearly three decades, researchers have pondered the Hispanic Mortality Paradox -- why Hispanics in the U.S. tend to outlive non-Hispanic whites by several years, despite having, in general, lower income and educational attainment levels that are associated with shorter lives. [More]
Vital exhaustion may increase risk of first-time cardiovascular disease by 36%

Vital exhaustion may increase risk of first-time cardiovascular disease by 36%

Fatigue, increased irritability, and feeling demoralized, may raise a healthy man or woman's risk of first-time cardiovascular disease by 36 percent, according to a study led by researchers at Mount Sinai St. Luke's and Mount Sinai Roosevelt hospitals presented on Nov. 17 at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2014 in Chicago, IL. [More]
Rare gene mutation linked to lower cholesterol levels, reduced risk of heart attack

Rare gene mutation linked to lower cholesterol levels, reduced risk of heart attack

Rare mutations that shut down a single gene are linked to lower cholesterol levels and a 50 percent reduction in the risk of heart attack, according to new research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, the Broad Institute at Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard, and other institutions. [More]