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TXA drug reduces blood transfusion, saves costs

TXA drug reduces blood transfusion, saves costs

Using an inexpensive drug for every hip or knee replacement since 2013 has helped St. Michael's Hospital reduce its number of red blood cell transfusions performed during these surgeries by more than 40 per cent without negatively affecting patients, according to new research. [More]
Study: High school athletes use smokeless tobacco at a higher rate compared to non-athletes

Study: High school athletes use smokeless tobacco at a higher rate compared to non-athletes

High school athletes who play on sports teams smoke tobacco products at a lower rate than non-athletes, but use smokeless tobacco at a higher rate, according to a study published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in today's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR). [More]
Mitochondrial Pyruvate Carrier could potentially be a new drug target to treat diabetes

Mitochondrial Pyruvate Carrier could potentially be a new drug target to treat diabetes

High blood sugar is a defining characteristic of Type 2 diabetes and the cause of many of the condition's complications, including kidney failure, heart disease, and blindness. Most diabetes medications aim to maintain normal blood sugar (glucose) levels and prevent high blood sugar by controlling insulin. [More]
Preserving natural structure of dietary fibre during food production can help lower blood sugar levels

Preserving natural structure of dietary fibre during food production can help lower blood sugar levels

A new study led by scientists at King's College London shows that preserving the natural structure of dietary fibre during food production can help to slow the rise in blood sugar levels after a meal. [More]
Household food insecurity increases likelihood of metabolic diseases in children

Household food insecurity increases likelihood of metabolic diseases in children

New research indicates that household food insecurity dramatically increases the likelihood of metabolic diseases in children, with many showing chronic disease markers before they graduate from high school. [More]
Inhalation exposure to PM2.5 pollution triggers liver fibrosis

Inhalation exposure to PM2.5 pollution triggers liver fibrosis

A research team led by Kezhong Zhang, Ph.D., at the Wayne State University School of Medicine's Center for Molecular Medicine and Genetics, has discovered that exposure to air pollution has a direct adverse health effect on the liver and causes liver fibrosis, an illness associated with metabolic disease and liver cancer. [More]
Smoking prevalence remains same but proportion of smokers with no intention of quitting increases

Smoking prevalence remains same but proportion of smokers with no intention of quitting increases

Smoking prevalence has stayed the same but the proportion with no intention of quitting has risen in the last seven years, according to results from the latest EUROASPIRE surveys presented for the first time today at ESC Congress 2015 by Professor Kornelia Kotseva, chair of the EUROASPIRE Steering Committee and senior clinical research fellow at Imperial College London, UK. [More]
Treatment with life-saving medications increases in IHD but levels still suboptimal

Treatment with life-saving medications increases in IHD but levels still suboptimal

Treatment with life-saving medications has increased over the past ten years in ischaemic heart disease but levels are still suboptimal, according to the first results of the Chronic Ischaemic Cardiovascular Disease (CICD) Pilot Registry presented today at ESC Congress 2015 and published in European Heart Journal. [More]
A unique perspective on health and exercise

A unique perspective on health and exercise

For over 30 years, Terrie Williams has been studying exercise physiology in wild animals: African lions and wild dogs, dolphins and whales, coyotes and mountain lions, as well as a few human athletes. [More]
Report: 3 out of 4 U.S. adults have hearts older than their actual age

Report: 3 out of 4 U.S. adults have hearts older than their actual age

Your heart may be older than you are – and that's not good. According to a new CDC Vital Signs report, 3 out of 4 U.S. adults have a predicted heart age that is older than their actual age. This means they are at higher risk for heart attacks and stroke. [More]
Sanofi terminates option and license agreement for Ardelyx's portfolio of NaP2b inhibitors

Sanofi terminates option and license agreement for Ardelyx's portfolio of NaP2b inhibitors

Ardelyx, Inc., a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company focused on gastrointestinal and cardio-renal diseases, today announced that Sanofi notified Ardelyx of its termination of the option and license agreement for Ardelyx's portfolio of NaP2b inhibitors effective September 30, 2015. [More]
IV drug abusers who undergo infective endocarditis surgery face higher risk of reoperation or death

IV drug abusers who undergo infective endocarditis surgery face higher risk of reoperation or death

Injection drug users who undergo surgery for infective endocarditis (IE) have a significantly higher risk of reoperation or death between 3 and 6 months after surgery compared to patients who develop endocarditis who are not IV drug abusers, according to an article in the September 2015 issue of The Annals of Thoracic Surgery. [More]
Training session can improve cardiologists’ ability to detect basic and advanced murmurs

Training session can improve cardiologists’ ability to detect basic and advanced murmurs

Cardiologists failed to identify more than half of basic and about 35 percent of advanced pre-recorded murmurs, but skills improved after a 90 minute training session, according to research presented today at the European Society of Cardiology Congress 2015. [More]
Gene therapy restores visual function in mouse model of LCA1

Gene therapy restores visual function in mouse model of LCA1

Mice lacking the protein retGC1, which is deficient in humans suffering Leber congenital amaurosis-1 (LCA1), a disorder that causes severe visual impairment beginning in infancy, received gene therapy to replace retGC1 and showed fully restored visual function that persisted for at least 6 months. [More]
UC Davis Health System research shows that increasing minimum wage may reduce smoking rates

UC Davis Health System research shows that increasing minimum wage may reduce smoking rates

In addition to restricting when and where tobacco is used at work, UC Davis Health System research shows that employers can do something else to reduce smoking: raise wages. [More]
Abbott reports positive results of ABSORB Japan study comparing efficacy of fully dissolving heart stent to XIENCE

Abbott reports positive results of ABSORB Japan study comparing efficacy of fully dissolving heart stent to XIENCE

Abbott (NYSE: ABT) announced today positive one-year clinical results from ABSORB Japan, a multi-center, randomized trial comparing the safety and effectiveness of Abbott's fully dissolving Absorb™ heart stent to XIENCE ®, Abbott's market-leading, permanent drug eluting stent. [More]
Prasugrel linked to high-bleeding-risk in patients with stable coronary artery disease

Prasugrel linked to high-bleeding-risk in patients with stable coronary artery disease

Prasugrel-based dual antiplatelet therapy is associated with increased major bleeding after stent implantation for high-risk patients with stable coronary artery disease, according to a secondary analysis of the BASKET-PROVE II trial presented at ESC Congress for the first time today. [More]
Study: Inner-city neighbourhoods may affect risk of dying from cardiovascular disease

Study: Inner-city neighbourhoods may affect risk of dying from cardiovascular disease

The inner-city neighbourhood in which someone lives may affect his or her risk of developing or dying from cardiovascular disease, a new research paper suggests. [More]
Young diabetic women have six-fold heart attack risk

Young diabetic women have six-fold heart attack risk

Women aged 45 years and under with diabetes have a six-fold risk of heart attack, according to research presented at ESC Congress today.1 The study in more than 7 000 women also found that young women who had a heart attack (myocardial infarction, MI) were more likely to be smokers than older women with MI. [More]
Study: Depressed patients three times more likely to experience frequent chest pain

Study: Depressed patients three times more likely to experience frequent chest pain

Depressed patients have more frequent chest pain even in the absence of coronary artery disease, according to results from the Emory Cardiovascular Biobank presented at ESC Congress today by Dr Salim Hayek, a cardiologist at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, Georgia, US. [More]
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