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FEV1/FVC lower limit of normal aids surgery risk stratification in COPD

FEV1/FVC lower limit of normal aids surgery risk stratification in COPD

Researchers say that using the lower limit of normal of the forced expiration volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity ratio improves risk stratification in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease undergoing thoracic surgery. [More]
Research findings cast new light on biological process that can lead to diabetes

Research findings cast new light on biological process that can lead to diabetes

Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation scientists have pinpointed a cell that begins the process of scarring in fatty tissue. The findings cast new light on a biological process that occurs with obesity and can lead to diabetes. [More]
People who have higher HDL function experience fewer heart attacks later in life

People who have higher HDL function experience fewer heart attacks later in life

HDL is the 'good cholesterol' that helps remove fat from artery walls, reversing the process that leads to heart disease. Yet recent drug trials and genetic studies suggest that simply pushing HDL levels higher doesn't necessarily reduce the risk of heart disease. [More]

New testing method could help get faster results, reduce volume of urine needed for sample

If you've been to the doctor, you probably know what to do when you're handed a plastic cup and shown to the bathroom. Most patients hand over the sample and give little thought to what happens when it's shipped to the lab for analysis. Ken Marcus and his students are the exceptions. They have developed a new testing method that they believe will reduce costs, get faster results and lower the volume of urine needed for a sample. [More]
Canadian researchers shed light on molecular dynamics of chronic pain

Canadian researchers shed light on molecular dynamics of chronic pain

Chronic pain affects hundreds of millions of people worldwide and is a major cause of disability, causing more disability than cancer and heart disease. Canadian researchers, including Michael Salter at SickKids are shedding light on the molecular dynamics of chronic pain. They have uncovered a critical role for a class of cells present in the brain and spinal cord, called microglia, in pain. [More]
CVRx announces presentation of positive data from Barostim Therapy for Heart Failure clinical trial at HRS 2015

CVRx announces presentation of positive data from Barostim Therapy for Heart Failure clinical trial at HRS 2015

CVRx, Inc., a private medical device company, announced that positive results from the 'Barostim Therapy for Heart Failure' randomized, controlled clinical trial were presented at the 2015 annual Scientific Sessions of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) in a Late-Breaking Clinical Trial Session. Results were presented by Dr. Michael Zile from the Medical University of South Carolina. [More]
Study explores how our intestinal tract changes as we age

Study explores how our intestinal tract changes as we age

Scientists and clinicians on the Norwich Research Park have carried out the first detailed study of how our intestinal tract changes as we age, and how this determines our overall health. [More]
Hope For Heroes Foundation forms national alliance with USA Medical Card

Hope For Heroes Foundation forms national alliance with USA Medical Card

Hope For Heroes Foundation today announced the formation of a groundbreaking national alliance with USA Medical Card, a leading provider of free pharmacy discount cards. The new nationwide initiative benefiting Hope For Heroes will help fund programs that empower independence for our nation's disabled military veterans, police, firemen, and EMS professionals, and will help more people afford their prescriptions. [More]
CWRU's Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing receives grant to study multiple chronic conditions

CWRU's Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing receives grant to study multiple chronic conditions

Case Western Reserve University's Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing will begin training predoctoral and postdoctoral researchers to study people with multiple chronic illnesses in hopes of discovering better methods for managing such a complex combination of illnesses. [More]
Patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention at higher risk for sleep apnea

Patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention at higher risk for sleep apnea

Patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), a coronary artery widening procedureused to treat heart disease, are at high risk for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), according to new research presented at the 2015 American Thoracic Society International Conference. [More]
Pre-pregnancy maternal weight has significant impact on baby's immune system

Pre-pregnancy maternal weight has significant impact on baby's immune system

Almost 60 percent of women of childbearing age in the United States are overweight or obese. Obesity is a major public health issue, and has been linked to health problems like heart disease, cancer and hypertension. It can complicate pregnancy by increasing the mother's risk of having gestational diabetes, preeclampsia, preterm birth or a baby with birth defects. Maternal obesity is also linked to several adverse health outcomes for the infant that can persist into adulthood, such as type-2 diabetes, heart disease and mortality. [More]

UMD expert working to accelerate development of improved implantable cardiac devices

A University of Maryland expert in the model-based testing of embedded software is working to accelerate the development of improved implantable medical devices used in the treatment of heart disease. [More]
Too much or too little sleep may up stroke risk in hypertensive patients

Too much or too little sleep may up stroke risk in hypertensive patients

High blood pressure, or hypertension, affects one third of--or 70 million--US adults, and the healthcare costs associated with treating the disease are approximately $46 billion. [More]
Noninvasive findings reduce catheterisation need in suspected PAH

Noninvasive findings reduce catheterisation need in suspected PAH

Research shows that a risk score based on noninvasive measures can identify left heart failure in a “substantial percentage” of patients with suspected pulmonary arterial hypertension, reducing the need for right heart catheterisation. [More]
Handshakes better than your blood pressure at assessing your health

Handshakes better than your blood pressure at assessing your health

The firmness of your hand grip is better than your blood pressure at assessing your health, Hamilton researchers have found, and reduced muscular strength, measured by your grip, is consistently linked with early death, disability and illness. [More]
Sheffield scientists to showcase novel medical discoveries during International Clinical Trials Day

Sheffield scientists to showcase novel medical discoveries during International Clinical Trials Day

WORLD-leading researchers and scientists from Sheffield Teaching Hospitals Foundation Trust and the University of Sheffield will be giving people in Sheffield and beyond a unique insight into how they can contribute to groundbreaking medical discoveries during International Clinical Trials Day (Wednesday 20 May 2015). [More]
Canadian Pacific, Heart and Stroke Foundation team up to improve health of all Canadians

Canadian Pacific, Heart and Stroke Foundation team up to improve health of all Canadians

Canadian Pacific and the Heart and Stroke Foundation today are teaming up to save lives and improve the health of all Canadians through the funding of research excellence in Canada. The commitment of $3 million over three years towards cardiac research represents the largest partnership in the Foundation's history. [More]
Wearable diagnostic machines presented at Elsevier's 4th International Conference on Bio-Sensing Technology

Wearable diagnostic machines presented at Elsevier's 4th International Conference on Bio-Sensing Technology

Wearable E-skin that can measure heart rate and blood pressure, and paper diagnostic machines the size of a credit card that can give instant readings on blood and saliva samples are two new bio-sensing technologies presented at Elsevier's 4th International Conference on Bio-Sensing Technology in Lisbon, Portugal on 12 May 2015. [More]
Two physicians examine heart disease through a literary lens

Two physicians examine heart disease through a literary lens

Heart disease has topped mortality charts as the No. 1 killer of men and women for many decades, but a novel analysis of American literary fiction by two physicians finds the disorder’s presence in great novels has remained relatively modest. [More]
Childhood cancer survivors more likely to be obese than healthy peers

Childhood cancer survivors more likely to be obese than healthy peers

Childhood cancer survivors - especially those whose treatment included brain irradiation or chemotherapy with glucocorticoids - are 14 percent more likely to be obese than their healthy peers. [More]
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