Hematology News and Research RSS Feed - Hematology News and Research

Hematology, also spelled haematology, is the branch of biology (physiology), pathology, clinical laboratory, internal medicine, and pediatrics that is concerned with the study of blood, the blood-forming organs, and blood diseases. Hematology includes the study of etiology, diagnosis, treatment, prognosis, and prevention of blood diseases.
Simple, coordinated approach can improve chances of survival for high-risk AML patients

Simple, coordinated approach can improve chances of survival for high-risk AML patients

New research shows that quickly identifying patients with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and speeding the process to find them a stem cell donor and performing the transplant earlier, can significantly improve their chances of surviving for at least two years after diagnosis without a relapse. [More]
Combination treatment produces better outcomes in erythropoietin-refractory MDS patients, study shows

Combination treatment produces better outcomes in erythropoietin-refractory MDS patients, study shows

Patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) suffer from a reduction in the number of different types of blood cells, including red blood cells leading to the development of anemia. [More]
Researchers develop portable sensor for fast, accurate assessment of blood's clotting ability

Researchers develop portable sensor for fast, accurate assessment of blood's clotting ability

Case Western Reserve University researchers have developed a portable sensor that can assess the clotting ability of a person's blood 95 times faster than current methods—using only a single drop of blood. [More]
Hemophilia B patients produce near-normal levels of clotting factor IX after gene therapy, study shows

Hemophilia B patients produce near-normal levels of clotting factor IX after gene therapy, study shows

Researchers are reporting the highest and most sustained levels to date of the essential blood-clotting factor IX in patients with the inherited bleeding disorder hemophilia B. [More]
Clonal hematopoiesis may help predict cancer patients at risk for fatal form of leukemia

Clonal hematopoiesis may help predict cancer patients at risk for fatal form of leukemia

Patients successfully treated for breast, colon and other cancers can go on to develop an often-fatal form of leukemia, sometimes years after completion of treatment, due to a genetic mutation leading to secondary malignancies known as therapy-related myeloid neoplasms (t-MNs). [More]
MSHS introduces DigniCap scalp cooling system to reduce chemotherapy-induced hair loss

MSHS introduces DigniCap scalp cooling system to reduce chemotherapy-induced hair loss

The Mount Sinai Health System announced the launch of the DigniCap scalp cooling system, which was recently cleared by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to reduce the likelihood of chemotherapy-induced hair loss in women with breast cancer, in three of its cancer center locations. [More]
Penn researchers use CRISPR/Cas9 gene targeting approach to treat hemophilia B in mice

Penn researchers use CRISPR/Cas9 gene targeting approach to treat hemophilia B in mice

CRISPR/Cas9, a powerful genome editing tool, is showing promise for efficient correction of disease-causing mutations. [More]
Preventative strategy in stem cell transplant recipients may help thwart C. diff infections

Preventative strategy in stem cell transplant recipients may help thwart C. diff infections

It may be possible to safely prevent one of the most common - and costly to treat - infections contracted by hospitalized patients undergoing bone marrow transplantation for the treatment of blood cancers, according to a study from the Abramson Cancer Center at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Researchers reveal mechanism for side effects of drug used for treating hematological malignancies

Researchers reveal mechanism for side effects of drug used for treating hematological malignancies

A team of Japanese researchers revealed the mechanism for side effects such as fever and bone pain caused by G-CSF, which is widely used for peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cell harvesting (PBSCH). [More]
New color-coding tool sheds light on blood disorders, cancers by tracking clonal stem cells

New color-coding tool sheds light on blood disorders, cancers by tracking clonal stem cells

A new color-coding tool is enabling scientists to better track live blood stem cells over time, a key part of understanding how blood disorders and cancers like leukemia arise, report researchers in Boston Children's Hospital's Stem Cell Research Program. [More]
Study offers genetic explanation why cancer occurs commonly in males than females

Study offers genetic explanation why cancer occurs commonly in males than females

In a new study, a group of Boston scientists, including researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, offer a genetic explanation for the age-old conundrum of why cancer is more common in males than females. [More]
Scientists develop genetically engineered T cells with fusion inhibitor to disrupt HIV's harpoon

Scientists develop genetically engineered T cells with fusion inhibitor to disrupt HIV's harpoon

When HIV attacks a T cell, it attaches itself to the cell's surface and launches a "harpoon" to create an opening to enter and infect the cells. [More]
T cell channel could be potential new target for treating head and neck cancers

T cell channel could be potential new target for treating head and neck cancers

Researchers at the University of Cincinnati have discovered that an ion channel, active within T cells (white blood cells), could be targeted to reduce the growth of head and neck cancers. [More]
UT Physicians expands Sickle Cell Center to accommodate growing number of patients

UT Physicians expands Sickle Cell Center to accommodate growing number of patients

For people living with sickle cell disease, chronic pain becomes an all too familiar part of everyday life. The UT Physicians Comprehensive Sickle Cell Center is working to help change that. [More]
Researchers create first mouse model for common form of infant leukemia

Researchers create first mouse model for common form of infant leukemia

After nearly two decades of unsuccessful attempts, researchers from the University of Chicago Medicine and the Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center have created the first mouse model for the most common form of infant leukemia. [More]
ASH partners with other organizations to address knowledge gaps in AML care

ASH partners with other organizations to address knowledge gaps in AML care

The American Society of Hematology has partnered with several organizations on independent educational programming designed to help address knowledge gaps in the diagnosis and treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). [More]
FDA approves new combo treatment for patients with advanced sarcomas

FDA approves new combo treatment for patients with advanced sarcomas

There are approximately 15,000 sarcoma cases annually in the United States, comprising more than 60 types of soft tissue sarcomas and 20 types of bony sarcomas. [More]
Immunotherapy drug approved by FDA as first-line treatment for non-small cell lung cancer

Immunotherapy drug approved by FDA as first-line treatment for non-small cell lung cancer

Pembrolizumab, an immunotherapy drug that was extensively evaluated by UCLA cancer researcher Dr. Edward Garon, has been approved by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration as first-line treatment for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). [More]
FDA approves new therapy for initial treatment of soft tissue sarcoma

FDA approves new therapy for initial treatment of soft tissue sarcoma

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today granted accelerated approval to Lartruvo (olaratumab) with doxorubicin to treat adults with certain types of soft tissue sarcoma (STS), which are cancers that develop in muscles, fat, tendons or other soft tissues. [More]
Chemotherapy leads to drug-resistance in bladder cancer patients

Chemotherapy leads to drug-resistance in bladder cancer patients

Chemotherapy is indicated as the first line of treatment for advanced bladder cancer. New research by Weill Cornell Medicine and University of Trento scientists shows that while chemotherapy kills the most common type of bladder cancer, urothelial cancer, chemotherapy also shapes the genetic evolution of remaining urothelial cancer cell clones to become drug-resistant. [More]
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