Hematology News and Research RSS Feed - Hematology News and Research

Hematology, also spelled haematology, is the branch of biology (physiology), pathology, clinical laboratory, internal medicine, and pediatrics that is concerned with the study of blood, the blood-forming organs, and blood diseases. Hematology includes the study of etiology, diagnosis, treatment, prognosis, and prevention of blood diseases.
Adaptive Biotechnologies demonstrates use of high-throughput sequencing platform for MRD

Adaptive Biotechnologies demonstrates use of high-throughput sequencing platform for MRD

Adaptive Biotechnologies, the leader in combining next-generation sequencing (NGS) and expert bioinformatics to profile T- and B-cell receptors of the adaptive immune system, and collaborators will be presenting five studies demonstrating how Adaptive’s high-throughput sequencing platform enables diagnosis, detection and assessment of prognosis in hematological malignances and has increased sensitivity over flow cytometry. [More]
Autologous stem cell transplant safe, effective for HIV-associated lymphoma patients

Autologous stem cell transplant safe, effective for HIV-associated lymphoma patients

New research published online today in Blood Journal of the American Society of Hematology (ASH), challenges the generally held belief that individuals with HIV and aggressive lymphoma are not candidates for standard treatment. [More]
About 30% of iPSCs not safe for clinical use, report multi-institutional researchers

About 30% of iPSCs not safe for clinical use, report multi-institutional researchers

As the promise of using regenerative stem cell therapies draws closer, a consortium of biomedical scientists reports about 30 percent of induced pluripotent stem cells they analyzed from 10 research institutions were genetically unstable and not safe for clinical use. [More]
Carfilzomib therapy shows promise for pre-kidney transplant patients

Carfilzomib therapy shows promise for pre-kidney transplant patients

Early findings by researchers at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine suggest that the use of a second generation cancer drug, carfilzomib, may provide an improved approach for the reduction of antibodies in potential kidney transplant candidates. [More]
Researchers discover AF1q protein linked to multiple myeloma, EMD

Researchers discover AF1q protein linked to multiple myeloma, EMD

A group of researchers from the University of Louisville, Japan and Austria is the first to identify a protein, AF1q, associated with multiple myeloma and a condition that occurs in approximately one-fourth of very aggressive multiple myeloma, extramedullary disease or EMD. [More]
LITE Program receives 'Beyond the Cure' educational survivorship conference grant from NCCS

LITE Program receives 'Beyond the Cure' educational survivorship conference grant from NCCS

An effort by Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey to educate pediatric cancer survivors is receiving a boost from The National Children's Cancer Society in the form of a 'Beyond the Cure' educational survivorship conference grant. [More]
Two autologous stem-cell transplants improve survival of children with high-risk neuroblastoma

Two autologous stem-cell transplants improve survival of children with high-risk neuroblastoma

Children with high-risk neuroblastoma whose treatment included two autologous stem-cell transplants were more likely to be free of cancer three years later than patients who underwent a single transplant, a Phase 3 clinical trial has found. [More]
Multi-center study may help reassure breast cancer patients taking tamoxifen drug

Multi-center study may help reassure breast cancer patients taking tamoxifen drug

A study led by Loyola Medicine researchers may help reassure patients who worry the breast cancer drug tamoxifen could increase their risk of uterine cancer. [More]
Pembrolizumab drug shows significant clinical responses in metastatic head and neck cancer patients

Pembrolizumab drug shows significant clinical responses in metastatic head and neck cancer patients

Treating head and neck cancer patients with recurrent or metastatic disease with the PD-1 inhibitor pembrolizumab resulted in significant clinical responses in a fifth of the patients from a phase II clinical trial, researchers at the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania and other institutions reported at the 2016 American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting. [More]
Financial pressures prevent access to much-needed care for cancer patients

Financial pressures prevent access to much-needed care for cancer patients

Financial pressures kept cancer patients from filling prescription medications and attending their doctors' visits, University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers found in a new study. [More]
Improved research tool may open door to effective HIV vaccine designs

Improved research tool may open door to effective HIV vaccine designs

Vaccines are usually medicine's best defense against the world's deadliest microbes. However, HIV is so mutable that it has so far effectively evaded both the human immune system and scientists' attempts to make an effective vaccine to protect against it. [More]
Metformin along with chemotherapy/radiation improves outcomes in head and neck cancer patients

Metformin along with chemotherapy/radiation improves outcomes in head and neck cancer patients

Researchers at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine have found that adding increasing doses of an approved Type 2 diabetes drug, metformin, to a chemotherapy and radiation treatment regimen in head and neck cancer patients is not well tolerated if escalated too quickly, but allowing slower escalation could be beneficial. [More]
Autoimmune diseases among lung cancer patients may make them unsuitable for immunotherapy

Autoimmune diseases among lung cancer patients may make them unsuitable for immunotherapy

A significant proportion of lung cancer patients also have autoimmune disease, which may make them unsuitable for increasingly popular immunotherapy treatments, a team of researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center's Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center has found. [More]
Stimulating STING pathway to provoke life-extending immune response shows promise in AML

Stimulating STING pathway to provoke life-extending immune response shows promise in AML

A protein known as STING plays a crucial role in the immune system's ability to "sense" cancer by recognizing and responding to DNA from tumor cells. Injection of compounds that activate the STING pathway directly into solid tumors in mice has been shown in prior studies to result in very potent anti-tumor immune responses. [More]
Sylvester researchers test new KTE-C19 therapy for patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

Sylvester researchers test new KTE-C19 therapy for patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

Researchers at Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine are testing a novel cellular immunotherapy approach to treating patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma who have failed standard therapy. [More]
Clinical trials of anti-cancer agent PAC-1 continue to progress with anonymous funding

Clinical trials of anti-cancer agent PAC-1 continue to progress with anonymous funding

Clinical trials of the anti-cancer agent PAC-1 are continuing to expand, thanks to a $7 million angel investment from an anonymous contributor who originally invested $4 million to help get the compound this far in the drug-approval pipeline. [More]
Studies explore possible link between pediatric cancer and light therapy for newborn jaundice

Studies explore possible link between pediatric cancer and light therapy for newborn jaundice

Two new studies raise enough questions about a possible link between childhood cancer and light therapy for newborn jaundice that clinicians should exercise caution in prescribing the treatment for infants whose jaundice is likely to resolve on its own, a pediatric oncologist from Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center argues in an editorial published today by the journal Pediatrics. [More]
ULK1, ULK2 enzymes play key role in maintaining cellular homeostasis

ULK1, ULK2 enzymes play key role in maintaining cellular homeostasis

Researchers at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital have uncovered how two enzymes, ULK1 and ULK2, which are best known for their role in the degradation and recycling of proteins, control the trafficking of specific proteins. [More]
New lab blood test may help identify HELLP syndrome in pregnant women

New lab blood test may help identify HELLP syndrome in pregnant women

A laboratory blood test developed at Johns Hopkins for the diagnosis of a rare genetic red blood cell disorder also shows promise in identifying HELLP syndrome, a life-threatening high blood pressure condition affecting 1 percent of all pregnant women that causes hypertension along with end organ damage, researchers report in the May issue of the journal Experimental Hematology. [More]
Hydroxyurea treatment improves pulmonary function decline in children with sickle cell disease

Hydroxyurea treatment improves pulmonary function decline in children with sickle cell disease

For the first time, researchers were able to demonstrate that children diagnosed with sickle cell disease showed improvement in lung function after treatment with hydroxyurea, a treatment that is underused despite its demonstrated benefits. [More]
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