Hemochromatosis News and Research RSS Feed - Hemochromatosis News and Research

Hemochromatosis is the most common form of iron overload disease. Primary hemochromatosis, also called hereditary hemochromatosis, is an inherited disease. Secondary hemochromatosis is caused by anemia, alcoholism, and other disorders.

Juvenile hemochromatosis and neonatal hemochromatosis are two additional forms of the disease. Juvenile hemochromatosis leads to severe iron overload and liver and heart disease in adolescents and young adults between the ages of 15 and 30. The neonatal form causes rapid iron buildup in a baby’s liver that can lead to death.
Argininosuccinic aciduria (ASA) and gene therapy: an interview with Dr Julien Baruteau, UCL Institute for Women's Health, London

Argininosuccinic aciduria (ASA) and gene therapy: an interview with Dr Julien Baruteau, UCL Institute for Women's Health, London

This rare genetic condition can theoretically affect patients at any age but symptoms are more often observed in childhood and even uncommonly during the first days of life. [More]
NAFLD is an independent predictor of cardiovascular risk

NAFLD is an independent predictor of cardiovascular risk

A study presented today at the International Liver CongressTM 2013 - which evaluated the relationship between non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), early predictors of atherosclerosis and the 10-year Framingham risk score (FRS) - showed that NAFLD increases the risk of early atherosclerotic lesions independent of established cardiovascular (CV) risk factors. [More]
Two studies shed light on molecular biology of three blood disorders

Two studies shed light on molecular biology of three blood disorders

Two studies led by investigators at Weill Cornell Medical College shed light on the molecular biology of three blood disorders, leading to novel strategies to treat these diseases. [More]
Researchers to develop new diagnostic tools and treatments for people with rare diseases

Researchers to develop new diagnostic tools and treatments for people with rare diseases

A multi-million Euro initiative is bringing together researchers from across the world to develop new diagnostic tools and new treatments for people with rare diseases and to connect research data in this area on a global scale. [More]
Liver transplantations for NASH-Cirrhosis increase dramatically

Liver transplantations for NASH-Cirrhosis increase dramatically

Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) occurs when fat builds up in the liver. This accumulation of fat damages the liver and leads to cirrhosis. NASH is rapidly increasing in the U.S. mainly related to the epidemics of obesity and diabetes. [More]
Cancer researchers create catalog of possible targets for new treatments

Cancer researchers create catalog of possible targets for new treatments

As cancer researchers continue to identify genetic mutations driving different cancer subtypes, they are also creating a catalog of possible targets for new treatments. [More]

Public health officials should address needs of people with blood disorders

Public health should focus not only on reducing the burden of common diseases but also address the needs of people with blood disorders , experts say in a supplement to December's American Journal of Preventive Medicine. [More]
Scientists identify 28 blood pressure-associated genetic variants

Scientists identify 28 blood pressure-associated genetic variants

A new report from scientists at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and their colleagues in centers around the world finds that common variants in 28 regions of DNA are associated with blood pressure in human patients. [More]

FDA clears Resonance Health's MRI-Q System for cardiac T2* iron assessment

Resonance Health Ltd, a medical device company specializing in imaging core laboratory services has received FDA clearance to market its MRI-Q System. [More]
Xenon founder receives Canada Wightman Award for leadership in medical science

Xenon founder receives Canada Wightman Award for leadership in medical science

Dr. Michael Hayden, a Xenon founder and Chief Scientific Officer, has received the Canada Gairdner Wightman Award for leadership in medical science in Canada. [More]
Hepcidin hormone may be potential therapeutic tool for anemic blood disorders

Hepcidin hormone may be potential therapeutic tool for anemic blood disorders

A hormone made by the body may be a potential therapeutic tool for the treatment of two anemic blood disorders beta-thalassemia and hemochromatosis. The new research was led by scientists at Weill Cornell Medical College and published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation and the journal Blood. [More]
Wrong diagnosis makes comedian spend his life savings

Wrong diagnosis makes comedian spend his life savings

A British comedian ended up spending his life savings after he was wrongly told by doctors he only had three months to live. [More]

First woman dean of Duke University awarded 2010 Vanderbilt Prize in Biomedical Science

Nancy Andrews, M.D., Ph.D., a groundbreaking researcher and the first woman dean of Duke University School of Medicine, has been awarded the 2010 Vanderbilt Prize in Biomedical Science. [More]

Health risk assessments

At various points in our lives, we're curious about our health risks, wondering about our susceptibility for everything from high cholesterol to a deadly inherited disease. We might want to learn more about our risks when we reach a certain age or experience a bout of bad health; when we hear about a friend or co-worker coping with a dreaded illness; or read the latest headlines about disease research. [More]
St. Luke's joins Dr. John Goss in celebration of his 1,000th liver transplantation procedure

St. Luke's joins Dr. John Goss in celebration of his 1,000th liver transplantation procedure

St. Luke's Episcopal Hospital (St. Luke's) joins John Goss, M.D., in celebrating his milestone as he recently performed his 1,000th liver transplantation procedure. The largest liver transplant program in Houston's world-renowned Texas Medical Center, St. Luke's performs approximately 75 liver transplants annually. Additionally, St. Luke's liver transplant survival rate is the highest in the nation, with a one-year adult patient survival rate of 96.5 percent compared to the national expected survival rate of 89.38 percent. [More]

Gene patenting policies affect patient access to testing for disease-causing genes: Study

Policies allowing genes to be patented can make it more difficult for patients to access testing for important disease-causing gene mutations, according to a series of papers in a special online supplement published by Genetics in Medicine, the official peer-reviewed journal of The American College of Medical Genetics. [More]
Human lymphocytes produce hepcidin that regulate iron levels in the body: Study

Human lymphocytes produce hepcidin that regulate iron levels in the body: Study

For some years now a small group of scientists have been pioneering a revolutionary idea - that the vertebrate immune system could have a role in the regulation of iron in the body. And now, a work soon to be published in the journal Immunology, shows that human lymphocytes (white blood cells) actually produce hepcidin, the most important protein in the regulation of iron levels in the body. [More]
EHSI incorporates outpatient treatment options into MedAnywhere HHC Module

EHSI incorporates outpatient treatment options into MedAnywhere HHC Module

Emerging Healthcare Solutions, Inc. revealed today that they are working to incorporate outpatient treatment options into the new MedAnywhere medical iPhone app and that the first module to be added to development will be for cost saving Hemochromatosis management. [More]
Pathway Genomics' personal Genetic Health Report now available

Pathway Genomics' personal Genetic Health Report now available

Pathway Genomics Inc., a U.S. based genetic testing company, announced the immediate availability of its personal Genetic Health Report. This customized and innovative personal genetic health report contains information on more than 70 health conditions, including pharmacogenetics (prescription medication response), propensity for complex disease, and carrier status (pre-pregnancy health). [More]

Researchers discover new target for drugs to prevent common iron deficiency

The discovery of a major player in the body's regulation of iron levels should provide a new target for drugs that prevent common iron deficiency as well as rare, potentially deadly iron overload, researchers said. [More]