Hemorrhagic Fever News and Research RSS Feed - Hemorrhagic Fever News and Research

Viral hemorrhagic fevers (VHFs) refer to a group of illnesses that are caused by several distinct families of viruses. In general, the term "viral hemorrhagic fever" is used to describe a severe multisystem syndrome (multisystem in that multiple organ systems in the body are affected). Characteristically, the overall vascular system is damaged, and the body's ability to regulate itself is impaired. These symptoms are often accompanied by hemorrhage (bleeding); however, the bleeding is itself rarely life-threatening. While some types of hemorrhagic fever viruses can cause relatively mild illnesses, many of these viruses cause severe, life-threatening disease.
Study sheds light on several aspects of Ebola virus flare-ups in Liberia

Study sheds light on several aspects of Ebola virus flare-ups in Liberia

Ebola virus samples taken from patients in Liberia in June 2015 are strikingly similar in their genetic makeup to other Ebola virus sequences from Western Africa, according to research published online today in the journal Science Advances. The study sheds light on several aspects of the "flare-ups" that have occurred in Liberia since the country was initially declared free of Ebola virus disease. [More]

Alternative policy for Ebola entry screening at U.S. airports

As of January 31, 2016, a total of 28,639 cases and 11,316 deaths have been attributed to Ebola, figures that are assumed to significantly underestimate the actual scope of the 2014 Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever outbreak in West Africa. In the United States, there were also two imported cases and two locally acquired cases reported in September/October 2014. [More]
Findings could be final puzzle piece in developing effective dengue vaccine

Findings could be final puzzle piece in developing effective dengue vaccine

In a small clinical trial led by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, researchers say that a promising single-dose dengue vaccine, developed by scientists at the National Institutes of Health, was 100 percent effective in preventing human volunteers from contracting the virus, the most prevalent mosquito-borne virus in the world. [More]
Single antibody could hold promise as potential treatment for human cases of EVD

Single antibody could hold promise as potential treatment for human cases of EVD

A single monoclonal antibody isolated from a human survivor of Ebola virus disease (EVD) completely protected monkeys from lethal infection with the virus, according to research published in today's online edition of the journal Science. [More]
Researchers identify, isolate and characterize two Ebola virus neutralizing monoclonal antibodies

Researchers identify, isolate and characterize two Ebola virus neutralizing monoclonal antibodies

The Institute for Research in Biomedicine, affiliated to the UniversitĂ  della Svizzera italiana, and Humabs BioMed SA, a Swiss antibody therapeutics company, have identified, isolated and characterized two Ebola virus neutralizing monoclonal antibodies from the blood of a survivor of an Ebola infection. [More]
Profectus begins Phase 1 clinical study of VesiculoVax-vectored Ebola virus vaccine

Profectus begins Phase 1 clinical study of VesiculoVax-vectored Ebola virus vaccine

Profectus BioSciences, Inc., a clinical-stage vaccine company developing novel vaccines for the prevention and treatment of infectious diseases and the treatment of cancer, announced today the initiation of a Phase 1 clinical study of Profectus' VesiculoVax-vectored Ebola virus vaccine. [More]
Researchers engineer antibodies that could potently neutralize two deadliest strains of Ebola virus

Researchers engineer antibodies that could potently neutralize two deadliest strains of Ebola virus

Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases have engineered the first antibodies that can potently neutralize the two deadliest strains of the virus that causes Ebola hemorrhagic fever. [More]
Ebola health-care workers develop guidelines for treating children during future outbreaks

Ebola health-care workers develop guidelines for treating children during future outbreaks

When the Ebola virus outbreak erupted in West Africa in 2014, children infected with the virus -- particularly those under age 5 -- faced overwhelming challenges. Not only was there a high death rate among young children infected with the disease, they often were isolated from their families, leaving them feeling distressed and without the intensive care they needed. [More]
People with viral infections and identical gene mutations may be prone to hyperinflammatory disorder

People with viral infections and identical gene mutations may be prone to hyperinflammatory disorder

A group of people with fatal H1N1 flu died after their viral infections triggered a deadly hyperinflammatory disorder in susceptible individuals with gene mutations linked to the overactive immune response, according to a study in The Journal of Infectious Diseases. [More]
Researchers successfully test new method for rapid diagnosis of Ebola in Guinea

Researchers successfully test new method for rapid diagnosis of Ebola in Guinea

An international team of researchers, including Ahmed Abd El Wahed, scientist at the University of Göttingen and the German Primate Center, has tested a new method for rapid diagnosis of Ebola in a field trial in Guinea. The test procedure was carried out using a portable suitcase laboratory. The mobile suitcase lab is operated with solar power and enables simple on-site diagnostics in remote areas without the need of an equipped laboratory. [More]
Blocking calcium-signaling pathway could inhibit Ebola virus and other sources of deadly infections

Blocking calcium-signaling pathway could inhibit Ebola virus and other sources of deadly infections

The Ebola virus acts fast. The course of infection, from exposure to recovery, or death, can take as little as two weeks. That may not leave enough time for the immune system to mount an effective response. [More]
Genomic analysis confirms sexual transmission of Ebola virus in Liberia

Genomic analysis confirms sexual transmission of Ebola virus in Liberia

A suspected case of sexual transmission of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in Liberia was confirmed using genomic analysis, thanks to in-country laboratory capabilities established by U.S. Army scientists in collaboration with the Liberian Institute for Biomedical Research (LIBR). [More]
First-ever genomic study shows dengue may survive year-round in southern China

First-ever genomic study shows dengue may survive year-round in southern China

The first-ever comprehensive genomic analysis of the virus that causes dengue fever suggests that it may survive year-round in southern China. [More]
Antiviral agent protects rhesus monkeys from deadly Ebola virus

Antiviral agent protects rhesus monkeys from deadly Ebola virus

Rhesus monkeys were completely protected from the deadly Ebola virus when treated three days after infection with a compound that blocks the virus's ability to replicate. These encouraging preclinical results suggest the compound, known as GS-5734, should be further developed as a potential treatment, according to research findings to be presented tomorrow at the IDWeek conference. [More]
NS1 protein can be considered as vital target for development of new drugs to treat dengue: Study

NS1 protein can be considered as vital target for development of new drugs to treat dengue: Study

Dengue is a mosquito-borne tropical disease currently endemic in more than 10 countries. According to the World Health Organization, 390 million people are infected by dengue every year. [More]
Real-time blood test based on DNA sequencing can rapidly diagnose Ebola and other acute infections

Real-time blood test based on DNA sequencing can rapidly diagnose Ebola and other acute infections

Using technical advances not yet developed when the 2014 Ebola outbreak began, UC San Francisco-led scientists completed a proof-of-principle study on a real-time blood test based on DNA sequencing that can be used to rapidly diagnose Ebola and other acute infections. The researchers said that the test can be used even where lab space and medical infrastructure are scarce. [More]
Researchers develop chip-based instrument for reliable detection of Ebola virus

Researchers develop chip-based instrument for reliable detection of Ebola virus

A team led by researchers at UC Santa Cruz has developed chip-based technology for reliable detection of Ebola virus and other viral pathogens. The system uses direct optical detection of viral molecules and can be integrated into a simple, portable instrument for use in field situations where rapid, accurate detection of Ebola infections is needed to control outbreaks. [More]
Genetic mutations in deadly Ebola virus appear to block antibody-based treatments

Genetic mutations in deadly Ebola virus appear to block antibody-based treatments

Genetic mutations called "escape variants" in the deadly Ebola virus appear to block the ability of antibody-based treatments to ward off infection, according to a team of U.S. Army scientists and collaborators. Their findings, published online this week in the journal Cell Reports, have implications for the continued development of therapeutics to treat Ebola virus disease, which has claimed the lives of over 11,000 people in West Africa since last year. [More]
Experimental Ebola virus vaccine protects cynomolgus macaques against current EBOV outbreak strain

Experimental Ebola virus vaccine protects cynomolgus macaques against current EBOV outbreak strain

National Institutes of Health scientists report that a single dose of an experimental Ebola virus (EBOV) vaccine completely protects cynomolgus macaques against the current EBOV outbreak strain, EBOV-Makona, when given at least seven days before exposure, and partially protects them if given three days prior. [More]
Penn Medicine devises new approach to develop vaccines against lethal diseases

Penn Medicine devises new approach to develop vaccines against lethal diseases

Researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have devised an entirely new approach to vaccines - creating immunity without vaccination. [More]
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