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Majority of Canadian women lack knowledge of heart disease symptoms and risk factors

Majority of Canadian women lack knowledge of heart disease symptoms and risk factors

A new survey, ordered by the University of Ottawa Heart Institute, shows that a majority of Canadian women lack knowledge of heart disease symptoms and risk factors, and that a significant proportion is even unaware of their own risk status. [More]
Surgeon explains who needs screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms

Surgeon explains who needs screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms

Bulges in body's major blood vessel can cause potentially lethal ruptures, blood clots. An abdominal aortic aneurysm is a potentially life-threatening condition: If the body's major blood vessel ruptures, it can prove deadly. [More]
Study finds no sign that health law has created crush of Medical demand

Study finds no sign that health law has created crush of Medical demand

The industry study finds that visits to doctors are down slightly over 2013. Another study looks at how nurses could do more in managing chronic illnesses to relieve stress on doctors. [More]
Study finds little progress in reducing disparities among people with disabilities

Study finds little progress in reducing disparities among people with disabilities

Psychological distress in people with disabilities is associated with increased prevalence of other chronic conditions and reduced access to health care and preventive care services, finds a new study in the Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved. [More]
Weak hospice oversight makes safety problems hard to identify

Weak hospice oversight makes safety problems hard to identify

The typical hospice undergoes a full government inspection about once every six years, according to The Washington Post, making it one of the least scrutinized areas of U.S. health care. [More]
Women living with diabetes, high cholesterol less likely to reach treatment goals

Women living with diabetes, high cholesterol less likely to reach treatment goals

Queen's University assistant professor Pendar Farahani (Department of Medicine and Department of Public Health Sciences) is advocating the use of gender-based treatment for mitigating the cardiovascular risk factors related to diabetes. [More]
Treatment with diabetes drug liraglutide improves cardiovascular risk factors

Treatment with diabetes drug liraglutide improves cardiovascular risk factors

Treatment with the diabetes drug liraglutide, in combination with diet and exercise, led to a significant reduction in weight and improved a number of cardiovascular risk factors, including high blood pressure and high cholesterol, according to a multicenter study. [More]
Compound developed as cholesterol-fighting molecule can kill cancerous cells

Compound developed as cholesterol-fighting molecule can kill cancerous cells

Researchers at the University of Missouri have proven that a compound initially developed as a cholesterol-fighting molecule not only halts the progression of breast cancer, but also can kill the cancerous cells. [More]
Researchers identify muscle-building mechanism that could be important in addressing sarcopenia

Researchers identify muscle-building mechanism that could be important in addressing sarcopenia

Sarcopenia - the significant loss of muscle mass and function that can occur as we age - is associated with many chronic conditions such as diabetes, high cholesterol and obesity. [More]
Low cholesterol may increase mortality risk in patients with kidney cancer

Low cholesterol may increase mortality risk in patients with kidney cancer

People are often told to reduce their cholesterol to improve their heart health, but new research suggests that low cholesterol may increase kidney cancer patients' risk of dying from their disease. The findings, which are published in BJU International, indicate that cholesterol testing may help doctors as they monitor and treat patients with kidney cancer. [More]
High-protein diets lower stroke risk

High-protein diets lower stroke risk

People with diets higher in protein, especially from fish, may be less likely to have a stroke than those with diets lower in protein, according to a meta-analysis published in the June 11, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
New prescription weight-loss medication combines antidepressant with addiction medication

New prescription weight-loss medication combines antidepressant with addiction medication

A new prescription weight-loss medication that combines a popular antidepressant with a medication for addiction will be reviewed by the Federal Drug Administration (FDA) for potential approval. [More]
FDA grants orphan drug designation to EffRx Pharmaceuticals' EX404 for treatment of PCOS

FDA grants orphan drug designation to EffRx Pharmaceuticals' EX404 for treatment of PCOS

EffRx Pharmaceuticals SA, a specialty pharmaceutical company, today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted orphan drug designation to its proprietary metformin-based product candidate, EX404, for the treatment of pediatric polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). [More]
Researchers emphasize critical need to utilize multi-pronged approach to treat diabetes mellitus

Researchers emphasize critical need to utilize multi-pronged approach to treat diabetes mellitus

Charles H. Hennekens, M.D., Dr.P.H., the first Sir Richard Doll professor and senior academic advisor to the dean in the Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine at Florida Atlantic University; Marc A. Pfeffer, M.D., Dzau professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School; John W. Newcomer, M.D., executive vice dean of FAU's College of Medicine and interim vice president for research at FAU; Paul S. Jellinger, M.D., affiliate professor at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine; and Alan Garber, M.D., Ph.D., professor of medicine at Baylor, have published a commentary in the American Journal of Managed Care titled "Treatment of Diabetes Mellitus: The Urgent Need for Multifactorial Interventions." [More]
Cerenis’ SAMBA and MODE Phase II Studies Meet Primary Endpoints for Treatment of FPHA, HoFH

Cerenis’ SAMBA and MODE Phase II Studies Meet Primary Endpoints for Treatment of FPHA, HoFH

Cerenis Therapeutics, the biopharmaceutical company, today announced that two of its Phase II studies, SAMBA and MODE (Modifying Orphan Disease Evaluation), with CER-001, an engineered human apoA-I-containing pre-β HDL mimetic, met their primary clinical endpoints in patients with Familial Primary Hypoalphalipoproteinemia (FPHA) and Homozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia (HoFH), respectively. [More]
People with high levels of cynical distrust more likely to develop dementia, says study

People with high levels of cynical distrust more likely to develop dementia, says study

People with high levels of cynical distrust may be more likely to develop dementia, according to a study published in the May 28, 2014, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Researchers recommend greater emphasis on cardiology in HIV treatment and research

Researchers recommend greater emphasis on cardiology in HIV treatment and research

Even if treated, hypertension and high cholesterol are increasingly common for people with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), according to a new study from researchers at Mount Sinai St. Luke's and Mount Sinai Roosevelt hospitals in New York and the University of California, Davis. [More]

Delayed care for Veterans is a hot topic on Sunday news shows, in headlines

Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel said what is now a scandal should have been ex amined years ago. Meanwhile, USA Today and the Arizona Republic have more tales of delayed care. [More]
First Edition: May 12, 2014

First Edition: May 12, 2014

Today's headlines include news about the inner-workings of some state-based health exchanges. Reporting for Kaiser Health News, in collaboration with NPR, Richard Knox writes: "Previous drug treatments didn't clear the virus from Bianco's system. But it's almost certain that potent new drugs for hep-C could cure him. [More]
Coronary artery calcium score may help guide aspirin therapy, finds new research

Coronary artery calcium score may help guide aspirin therapy, finds new research

For over 30 years, aspirin has been known to prevent heart attacks and strokes, but who exactly should take a daily aspirin remains unclear. New research published today in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes shows that your coronary artery calcium (CAC) score, a measurement of plaque in the arteries that feed the heart, may help determine whether or not you are a good candidate for aspirin. [More]