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7 in 10 Americans support mandated coverage of birth control medications, shows survey

Nearly 7 in 10 Americans support mandated coverage of birth control medications, according to a new national survey by researchers at the University of Michigan Health System. [More]
Johns Hopkins scientists find a way to prevent atherosclerosis

Johns Hopkins scientists find a way to prevent atherosclerosis

Working with mice and rabbits, Johns Hopkins scientists have found a way to block abnormal cholesterol production, transport and breakdown, successfully preventing the development of atherosclerosis, the main cause of heart attacks and strokes and the number-one cause of death among humans. The condition develops when fat builds inside blood vessels over time and renders them stiff, narrowed and hardened, greatly reducing their ability to feed oxygen-rich blood to the heart muscle and the brain. [More]
Mayo Clinic research shows RA patients more likely to develop chronic kidney disease

Mayo Clinic research shows RA patients more likely to develop chronic kidney disease

Rheumatoid arthritis patients are likelier than the average person to develop chronic kidney disease, and more severe inflammation in the first year of rheumatoid arthritis, corticosteroid use, high blood pressure and obesity are among the risk factors, new Mayo Clinic research shows. [More]
Study describes how overeating causes brown fat cells to "whiten"

Study describes how overeating causes brown fat cells to "whiten"

Boston University researchers have learned new information about the consequences of overeating high-calorie foods. Not only does this lead to an increase in white fat cell production, the type prominent in obesity, but it also leads to the dysfunction of brown fat cells, the unique type of fat that generates heat and burns energy. [More]

Research shows that rheumatoid arthritis patients are at higher risk of kidney disease

Rheumatoid arthritis patients are likelier than the average person to develop chronic kidney disease, and more severe inflammation in the first year of rheumatoid arthritis, corticosteroid use, high blood pressure and obesity are among the risk factors, new Mayo Clinic research shows. [More]
Young adults participated in cardio fitness activities may preserve memory, thinking skills in middle age

Young adults participated in cardio fitness activities may preserve memory, thinking skills in middle age

Young adults who run or participate in other cardio fitness activities may preserve their memory and thinking skills in middle age, according to a new study published in the April 2, 2014, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Middle age was defined as ages 43 to 55. [More]
High levels of GDNF protein could help body resist weight gain despite high-fat diet

High levels of GDNF protein could help body resist weight gain despite high-fat diet

​More than one-third of people in the US are obese. Obesity and its related health problems-including high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, insulin resistance, and belly fat-affect so many, yet effective treatments are very few. [More]

Rite Aid announces acquisition of Health Dialog Services

Rite Aid Corporation announced today it has acquired Boston-based Health Dialog Services Corporation, a leading provider of health coaching, shared decision making and healthcare analytics from Bupa, a London-based international healthcare services group. Through the acquisition, Health Dialog will operate as a wholly owned subsidiary of Rite Aid. Details of the transaction were not disclosed. [More]

Research uncovers link between diet and blood cell markers of heart attack associated inflammation

New research further illuminates the heart-healthy benefits of the Mediterranean diet, tying the eating plan to lower levels of platelets and white blood cells, two markers of inflammation. Inflammation has an association with greater risk of heart attack and stroke. [More]

Men with long-term HIV infections at higher risk of developing plaque in their coronary arteries

Men with long-term HIV infections are at higher risk than uninfected men of developing plaque in their coronary arteries, regardless of their other risk factors for coronary artery disease, according to results of a study led by Johns Hopkins researchers. A report on the research appears in the April 1 issue of Annals of Internal Medicine. [More]
Young adults with cardiac risk factors have worse cognitive function in middle age

Young adults with cardiac risk factors have worse cognitive function in middle age

Young adults with such cardiac risk factors as high blood pressure and elevated glucose levels have significantly worse cognitive function in middle age, according to a new study by dementia researchers at UC San Francisco. [More]
Amgen reports positive findings from AMG 145 Phase 3 studies in patients at risk for cardiovascular disease

Amgen reports positive findings from AMG 145 Phase 3 studies in patients at risk for cardiovascular disease

Amgen (NASDAQ: AMGN) today announced new detailed data from three Phase 3 studies that showed treatment with its novel investigational cholesterol-lowering medication, evolocumab (AMG 145), resulted in a statistically significant reduction of 55-66 percent in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) compared to placebo in patients with high cholesterol. [More]
Popular cholesterol-lowering drugs may offer added benefit for men with erectile dysfunction

Popular cholesterol-lowering drugs may offer added benefit for men with erectile dysfunction

​Statins are associated with a significant improvement in erectile function, a fact researchers hope will encourage men who need statins to reduce their risk of heart attack to take them, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology's 63rd Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Women who drink too many diet drinks a day more likely to have heart problems

Women who drink too many diet drinks a day more likely to have heart problems

It appears healthy postmenopausal women who drink two or more diet drinks a day may be more likely to have a heart attack, stroke or other cardiovascular problems, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology's 63rd Annual Scientific Session. [More]

Celiac disease people may have near two-fold increased risk of coronary artery disease

People with celiac disease may have a near two-fold increased risk of coronary artery disease compared with the general population, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology's 63rd Annual Scientific Session. [More]

Women who have 4 or more live births more likely to show early signs of heart disease

Women who give birth to four or more children are much more likely to have evidence of plaque in their heart or thickening of their arteries - early signs of cardiovascular disease - compared with those having fewer pregnancies, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology's 63rd Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Findings underscore importance of universal pediatric cholesterol screening

Findings underscore importance of universal pediatric cholesterol screening

Roughly one out of three kids screened for high cholesterol between the ages of 9 and 11 has borderline or high cholesterol, potentially placing them at greater risk for future cardiovascular disease, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology's 63rd Annual Scientific Session. [More]

Heart attack survival rates lag behind in the South despite overall improvements nationwide

Although heart attack death has declined across all regions of the United States, it is proportionately higher in the South, possibly related to the uneven distribution of socioeconomic and traditional cardiovascular risk factors, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology's 63rd Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Marathon training associated with improved risk factors related to cardiovascular disease

Marathon training associated with improved risk factors related to cardiovascular disease

Marathon training is associated with improved risk factors related to cardiovascular disease among middle-aged recreational male runners, suggesting that race preparation may be an effective strategy for reducing heart disease risk, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology's 63rd Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Up to a third of obese kids 'metabolically healthy'

Up to a third of obese kids 'metabolically healthy'

Digits on a scale can help determine a child's weight, but their overall health status can be influenced by other factors such as physical activity, diet and screen time, according to new research from the University of Alberta and Alberta Health Services. [More]