High Cholesterol News and Research RSS Feed - High Cholesterol News and Research

HealthMine survey: 74% of people say activity trackers help them cope with heart condition

HealthMine survey: 74% of people say activity trackers help them cope with heart condition

Consumers are beginning to embrace mobile tools for heart health—but not enough. A January HealthMine survey of 501 consumers with known heart disease and/or risk found that just 27% of people are using an activity tracker. Only 16% say they are using their tracker to manage their heart condition/risk. Yet 74% of those who do use an activity tracker report the device is helping them cope with their heart condition. [More]
Amgen announces approval of cholesterol-lowering medication Repatha (evolocumab) Injection in Japan

Amgen announces approval of cholesterol-lowering medication Repatha (evolocumab) Injection in Japan

Amgen today announced that the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare has approved the cholesterol-lowering medication Repatha (evolocumab) Injection, the first proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) inhibitor to be approved in Japan. [More]
Family income matters more than race in predicting obesity in children

Family income matters more than race in predicting obesity in children

For a long time researchers have tracked high rates of obesity among black and Hispanic kids, but a closer look at communities shows family income matters more than race in predicting which kids are overweight. [More]
New mobile app empowers individuals to assess, enhance daily overall heart health

New mobile app empowers individuals to assess, enhance daily overall heart health

Leading cardiologist Valentin Fuster, MD, PhD, has developed a free mobile application called "Circle of Health" to empower individuals around the globe to take action to comprehensively assess and enhance their daily overall heart health. Cardiovascular diseases are the number one cause of mortality in the world. [More]
One of every three deaths in the U.S. linked to cardiovascular diseases

One of every three deaths in the U.S. linked to cardiovascular diseases

One of every three deaths in the U.S. in 2013 were from heart disease, stroke and other cardiovascular diseases, while heart disease and stroke were the No. 1 and No. 2 killers worldwide, according to American Heart Association's 2016 Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics Update. [More]
New biobank initiative may help unlock some of the mysteries linked to Down syndrome

New biobank initiative may help unlock some of the mysteries linked to Down syndrome

Nationwide Children's Hospital and research advocacy group DownSyndrome Achieves have joined forces to create the first biobank in the country dedicated to collecting and managing blood samples from people with Down syndrome. [More]
Children with allergic disease have higher risk of heart disease

Children with allergic disease have higher risk of heart disease

Children with allergic disease, particularly asthma and hay fever, have about twice the rate of high blood pressure and high cholesterol, setting them on a course for heart disease at a surprisingly early age, reports a new Northwestern Medicine study. [More]
Study: Mother Nature may help lower cholesterol levels in pregnant women

Study: Mother Nature may help lower cholesterol levels in pregnant women

When it comes to effective solutions for lowering cholesterol levels in pregnant women, Mother Nature may know best. [More]
Doctors in Mexico show benefits of healthy diet, exercise in heart failure patients

Doctors in Mexico show benefits of healthy diet, exercise in heart failure patients

Doctors in Mexico have shown the benefits of a healthy diet and exercise in patients with heart failure, in research presented at the Mexican Congress of Cardiology 2015. [More]
Urine-derived iPSCs model could help predict patient response to cholesterol-lowering drugs

Urine-derived iPSCs model could help predict patient response to cholesterol-lowering drugs

We all know how important it is to keep our levels of blood cholesterol - especially the 'bad' variety - in check with a healthy diet and regular exercise. Although cholesterol is a key structural component of cell membranes and is vital for the biosynthesis of certain hormones and vitamins, high levels can lead to the formation of arterial plaques, which are a major risk factor for coronary heart disease. [More]
Negative impact of high-fat diet on red blood cells may promote development of cardiovascular disease

Negative impact of high-fat diet on red blood cells may promote development of cardiovascular disease

University of Cincinnati researchers have discovered the negative impact a high fat diet has on red blood cells and how these cells, in turn, promote the development of cardiovascular disease. [More]
Research identifies liver pathway that contributes to negative effects of high-fat, high-cholesterol junk food diet

Research identifies liver pathway that contributes to negative effects of high-fat, high-cholesterol junk food diet

It's no secret that a high-fat, high-cholesterol "junk food" diet has been linked to major health problems, including high blood cholesterol and the buildup of plaques in the arteries, known as atherosclerosis. [More]
Small behavioral changes can improve heart health

Small behavioral changes can improve heart health

Improving your heart health may be as simple as making small behavioral changes - a new study of behavioral health interventions suggests that they are effective at helping people alter their lifestyles and lead to physical changes that could improve overall health. [More]
New vaccine appears to be more effective in reducing 'bad' LDL cholesterol

New vaccine appears to be more effective in reducing 'bad' LDL cholesterol

A new cholesterol-lowering vaccine leads to reductions in 'bad' LDL cholesterol in mice and macaques, according to research published in Vaccine. The authors of the study, from the University of New Mexico and the National Institutes of health in the United States, say the vaccine has the potential to be a more powerful treatment than statins alone. [More]
Circulating protein predicts risk of chronic kidney disease

Circulating protein predicts risk of chronic kidney disease

Make room, cholesterol. A new disease marker is entering the medical lexicon: suPAR, or soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor. [More]
Researchers find rise in state-level obesity-related health care costs

Researchers find rise in state-level obesity-related health care costs

Nearly 11 percent or $8 billion of the cost to treat severe obesity was paid for by Medicaid in 2013, ranging from a low of $5 million in Wyoming to $1.3 billion in California. Research led by Y. Claire Wang, ScD, associate professor of Health Policy and Management at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health, predicts these costs will only grow as Medicaid eligibility is extended to more people following the implementation of the Affordable Care Act's Medicaid expansion. [More]
Patients who take cholesterol medications before endovascular surgery experience better outcomes

Patients who take cholesterol medications before endovascular surgery experience better outcomes

Rupture of an abdominal aortic aneurysm is one of the most dramatic medical emergencies a person can face. It usually strikes without warning, killing approximately 50 percent of those who experience it before they reach a hospital. Of those who do get to a health facility alive, only about 50 percent survive. [More]
Changes in lifestyle could reduce Alzheimer's disease risk

Changes in lifestyle could reduce Alzheimer's disease risk

Changes in lifestyle could reduce the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. That was the conclusion of a study conducted by researchers of Heidelberg University's Network Aging Research, who examined the data from two independent epidemiological studies. Carriers of the ApoE4 genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's may be able to reduce their increased risk of cognitive decline by reducing their cholesterol level, especially if they also suffer from cardiovascular disease. [More]
Reducing sugar intake reverses chronic metabolic diseases in children

Reducing sugar intake reverses chronic metabolic diseases in children

Reducing consumption of added sugar, even without reducing calories or losing weight, has the power to reverse a cluster of chronic metabolic diseases, including high cholesterol and blood pressure, in children in as little as 10 days, according to a study by researchers at UC San Francisco and Touro University California. [More]
Many young women not receiving adequate counseling on heart disease

Many young women not receiving adequate counseling on heart disease

Only half of younger heart attack patients believed that they were at risk before the onset of an attack, and even fewer discussed health risks with their doctors, according to Yale School of Public Health researchers. The findings were more pronounced among women than men. [More]
Advertisement