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Study finds that patients who lose weight have better joint replacement outcomes

Study finds that patients who lose weight have better joint replacement outcomes

While many overweight patients have the best intentions to lose weight after joint replacement, a study at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) finds that although some are able to achieve this goal, equal numbers of patients actually gain weight after hip or knee replacement. [More]
Bristol-Myers Squibb, Pfizer announce FDA approval of Eliquis for DVT prophylaxis

Bristol-Myers Squibb, Pfizer announce FDA approval of Eliquis for DVT prophylaxis

Bristol-Myers Squibb Company and Pfizer Inc. today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved a Supplemental New Drug Application (sNDA) for Eliquis (apixaban) for the prophylaxis of deep vein thrombosis (DVT), which may lead to pulmonary embolism (PE), in patients who have undergone hip or knee replacement surgery. [More]

New study explores outcomes of Charnley total hip replacement in patients under age 50

In a new study presented today at the 2014 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, researchers sought to evaluate the clinical, radiographic and functional outcomes of a Charnley total hip replacement (THR)─ a traditional hip prosthesis consisting of a polyethylene acetabular (plastic) cup and a metal femoral head─in patients under age 50 at a minimum of 35 years after the initial surgery. [More]
Study finds higher readmission rates for same-day total joint replacement surgery

Study finds higher readmission rates for same-day total joint replacement surgery

As the effectiveness of anesthesia, pain management and rehabilitation continues to improve, more orthopaedic procedures are being done on an outpatient basis. In a new research study presented today at the 2014 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, same-day total joint replacement (TJR) patient outcomes were comparable to those of patients admitted to the hospital and staying at least one night following surgery. [More]
Study questions conventional wisdom that patients should wait 6 weeks after hip replacement before driving

Study questions conventional wisdom that patients should wait 6 weeks after hip replacement before driving

After hip replacement surgery, many patients are anxious to resume driving, and a new study challenges the conventional wisdom that patients should wait six weeks before getting back behind the wheel. [More]
Women are most likely to experience serious pain following knee replacement than men

Women are most likely to experience serious pain following knee replacement than men

Middle-aged women with rheumatoid arthritis or arthritis resulting from an injury are among the patients most likely to experience serious pain following a knee replacement, researchers from Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) in New York have found. [More]
Protamine antidote can be effective in reversing low-molecular-weight heparin

Protamine antidote can be effective in reversing low-molecular-weight heparin

Low-molecular-weight heparin is commonly used in surgeries to prevent dangerous blood clots. But when patients experience the other extreme - uncontrolled bleeding - in response to low-molecular-weight heparin, there is no antidote. [More]

Scotland achieves reduction in post-code lottery for hip replacement surgery

A reduction in the post-code lottery for hip replacement surgery has been achieved in Scotland without recourse to the private sector, according to new research published in the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. [More]
Scientists develop stem cell based method for restoring strength to damaged skeletal muscles in elderly

Scientists develop stem cell based method for restoring strength to damaged skeletal muscles in elderly

​A study co-published in Nature Medicine this week by University of Toronto researcher Penney Gilbert has determined a stem cell based method for restoring strength to damaged skeletal muscles of the elderly. [More]

TV series House helps doctors diagnose Cobalt intoxication of patient with hip replacement

In today’s edition of The Lancet [Friday 7 February], doctors report the case of a patient with severe heart failure, who in May 2012 was referred to the Marburg University clinic in Germany. [More]
Addressing antibiotic resistance: an interview with Professor Otto Cars, Uppsala University, Sweden

Addressing antibiotic resistance: an interview with Professor Otto Cars, Uppsala University, Sweden

Antibiotic resistance is a consequence of antibiotic use. Bacteria adapt to the threat of antibiotics using mechanisms to overcome the drug. These bacteria, which we call resistant bacteria, then survive. [More]
Gastric bypass and cardiovascular disease risk: an interview with Dr. Brethauer, Cleveland Clinic

Gastric bypass and cardiovascular disease risk: an interview with Dr. Brethauer, Cleveland Clinic

Gastric bypass surgery is a type of bariatric operation that results in weight loss and stimulates metabolic effects that treat diabetes and other cardiovascular risk factors such as diabetes, high cholesterol, and hypertension. [More]
UCLA stem cell researchers track early development of human articular cartilage

UCLA stem cell researchers track early development of human articular cartilage

Stem cell researchers from UCLA's Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research have published the first study to identify the origin cells and track the early development of human articular cartilage, providing what could be a new cell source and biological roadmap for therapies to repair cartilage defects and osteoarthritis. These revolutionary therapies could reach clinical trials within three years. [More]
Research roundup: 'Substantial' Medicare savings from avoiding ERs; new ways for primary care; trends in kids' fast food consumption

Research roundup: 'Substantial' Medicare savings from avoiding ERs; new ways for primary care; trends in kids' fast food consumption

Some Medicare beneficiaries who place 911 calls to request an ambulance might safely be cared for in settings other than the emergency department at lower cost. Using 2005–09 Medicare claims data and a validated algorithm, we estimated that 12.9–16.2 percent of Medicare-covered 911 emergency medical services transports involved conditions that were probably nonemergent or primary care treatable. [More]
Hospital prices -- biggest driver of medical inflation -- remain opaque

Hospital prices -- biggest driver of medical inflation -- remain opaque

Nothing is more convoluted than hospital charges, which represent about a third of the nation's $2.7 trillion annual health care bill, reports The New York Times. Reuters finds that hospitals may quote prices for parking but not for procedures. Meanwhile, Kaiser Health News describes the trend in palliative care programs, designed to relieve pain and distress, regardless of how long a patient has to live. [More]
CJR surgeons to perform free joint replacement surgeries on 17 patients

CJR surgeons to perform free joint replacement surgeries on 17 patients

More than 2 million Americans suffer from debilitating hip, knee and joint conditions. Severe joint pain and arthritis can affect almost all aspects of an individual's life, often preventing them from working, enjoying the activities they love and performing simple, everyday tasks. [More]

Obesity does not significantly impact short-term complications, outcomes after TSA

Patients with obesity undergo a disproportionately higher number of elective orthopaedic surgeries in the U.S. Obesity has been linked to higher costs, complications, infections and revisions in total knee and total hip replacement surgeries. In a new study published in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, researchers looked at the impact of obesity on the costs and outcomes of total shoulder arthroplasty surgery. [More]

Socially isolated individuals more likely to experience ongoing pain following THR surgery

Researchers at Hospital for Special Surgery set out to test this hypothesis. They found that people who lacked good social ties were much more likely to experience serious, ongoing pain following total hip replacement surgery two or more years after the procedure. [More]
University of Sydney's free public talk to focus on halting superbug apocalypse

University of Sydney's free public talk to focus on halting superbug apocalypse

Everyday activities such as kissing, touching and sharing food can lead to the spread of a new kind of superbug that is as dangerous as it is resistant. [More]
A window to the brain: an interview with Professor Guillermo Aguilar, UC Riverside's Bourns College of Engineering (BCOE)

A window to the brain: an interview with Professor Guillermo Aguilar, UC Riverside's Bourns College of Engineering (BCOE)

It is literally a transparent window made of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), which we envision to become a suitable cranial implant that allows physicians for optical access to the tissue brain. It would serve the same mechanical function of current cranial implants made of other materials, such as titanium, except that it would enable optical access too, which could be very beneficial for post-operatory diagnostic or therapeutic procedures. [More]