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Histamine is a biogenic amine chemical involved in local immune responses as well as regulating physiological function in the gut and acting as a neurotransmitter.
Neurocrine completes enrollment in Phase III clinical trial of NBI-98854 in tardive dyskinesia patients

Neurocrine completes enrollment in Phase III clinical trial of NBI-98854 in tardive dyskinesia patients

Neurocrine Biosciences, Inc. announced today that it has recently completed subject randomization of the Phase III clinical trial (Kinect 3 Study) of its proprietary Vesicular Mono-Amine Transporter 2 (VMAT2) compound NBI-98854 in tardive dyskinesia patients. [More]
Mice without specific brain chemical develop characteristics similar to bipolar disorder, shows study

Mice without specific brain chemical develop characteristics similar to bipolar disorder, shows study

Mice that have a particular brain chemical switched off become hyperactive and sleep for just 65 per cent of their normal time. [More]
Researchers identify link between autoimmune diseases, medications and Long QT syndrome

Researchers identify link between autoimmune diseases, medications and Long QT syndrome

Mohamed Boutjdir, PhD, professor of medicine, cell biology, and physiology and pharmacology at SUNY Downstate Medical Center, has led a study with international collaborators identifying the mechanism by which patients with various autoimmune and connective tissue disorders may be at risk for life-threatening cardiac events if they take certain anti-histamine or anti-depressant medications. [More]
Symptoms and characteristics of cluster headache

Symptoms and characteristics of cluster headache

June is National Migraine and Headache Awareness Month. The global burden of headache is extremely large, putting headache among the top 10 causes of disability worldwide. [More]
Tioga Pharmaceuticals announces commencement of asimadoline Phase 2 study for treatment of pruritus

Tioga Pharmaceuticals announces commencement of asimadoline Phase 2 study for treatment of pruritus

Tioga Pharmaceuticals, a clinical stage biotechnology company, today announced the initiation of a Phase 2 clinical study of asimadoline, a novel, well-studied kappa-opioid receptor specific agonist, for the treatment of pruritus or itching. The double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical study is designed to evaluate the safety, tolerability, and clinical efficacy of asimadoline in patients with pruritus due to atopic dermatitis and is being conducted at 20 clinical study centers in the United States. [More]
Montefiore physician offers tips for seasonal allergy sufferers

Montefiore physician offers tips for seasonal allergy sufferers

This winter was one of the coldest on record, but spring allergy season is already beginning and it's time for sufferers to start preparing now. [More]
Anticholinergic medications associated with pneumonia risk in older people

Anticholinergic medications associated with pneumonia risk in older people

Taking commonly used medications with anticholinergic effects is associated with a significantly higher risk for developing pneumonia in a study of more than 3,000 older Group Health patients living in the community--not in nursing homes. [More]
UConn chemists develop more advanced peanut allergy test

UConn chemists develop more advanced peanut allergy test

Current peanut allergy tests are not very reliable when it comes to diagnosing the severity of an individual's allergic reaction, which can range from hives to life-threatening anaphylactic shock. [More]
Researchers identify a single protein as root cause of multiple allergic reactions

Researchers identify a single protein as root cause of multiple allergic reactions

Johns Hopkins and University of Alberta researchers have identified a single protein as the root of painful and dangerous allergic reactions to a range of medications and other substances. If a new drug can be found that targets the problematic protein, they say, it could help smooth treatment for patients with conditions ranging from prostate cancer to diabetes to HIV [More]
Vitamin C may reduce exercise-induced bronchoconstriction and respiratory symptoms

Vitamin C may reduce exercise-induced bronchoconstriction and respiratory symptoms

Physical activity increases oxidative stress, and therefore, as an antioxidant vitamin C might have particularly evident effects on people who are participating in vigorous exercise. In several studies, vitamin C administration attenuated the increases in oxidative stress markers caused by exercise. Furthermore, vitamin C is involved in the metabolism of histamine, prostaglandins, and cysteinyl leukotrienes, all of which appear to be mediators in the pathogenesis of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. [More]
Antacid medicines improve overall survival in patients with head and neck cancer

Antacid medicines improve overall survival in patients with head and neck cancer

Patients with head and neck cancer who used antacid medicines to control acid reflux had better overall survival, according to a new study from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center. [More]
VE-PTP potential treatment target for retinal and choroidal vascular diseases

VE-PTP potential treatment target for retinal and choroidal vascular diseases

Targeting vascular endothelial-protein tyrosine phosphatase, which negatively regulates TIE2 activation, could help to stabilise retinal and choroidal blood vessels, researchers report. [More]
Cimetidine drug could be one of many common over-the-counter medicines to treat cancer

Cimetidine drug could be one of many common over-the-counter medicines to treat cancer

A popular indigestion medication can increase survival in colorectal cancer, according to research published in ecancermedicalscience. But in fact, scientists have studied this for years - and a group of cancer advocates want to know why this research isn't more widely used. [More]
New Mayo Clinic study shows impact of long-term use of proton pump inhibitors

New Mayo Clinic study shows impact of long-term use of proton pump inhibitors

Before reaching for that daily antacid, you might consider what it's doing to the trillions of bugs living in your gut. A new Mayo Clinic study in the open access journal Microbiome shows that people who regularly take proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have less diversity among their gut bacteria, putting them at increased risk for infections like clostridium difficile and pneumonia, in addition to vitamin deficiencies and bone fractures. [More]
Type 3 interferons and T helper 2 cells: an interview with Grant Gallagher, Managing Director, HUMIGEN

Type 3 interferons and T helper 2 cells: an interview with Grant Gallagher, Managing Director, HUMIGEN

The type 3 interferons - usually called the “lambda” interferons, or “IFNL” - are the most recently identified IFNs. We (myself and Sergei Kotenko) originally identified the receptor and then the three ligands (IFNL1,2,3; very recently a fourth, IFNL4, was discovered); the key paper was published in 2003. [More]
Neurocrine Biosciences' NBI-98854 drug gets breakthrough designation for tardive dyskinesia

Neurocrine Biosciences' NBI-98854 drug gets breakthrough designation for tardive dyskinesia

Neurocrine Biosciences, Inc. announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted Breakthrough Therapy Designation for its Vesicular Monoamine Transporter 2 inhibitor, NBI-98854, in tardive dyskinesia. [More]
Research findings open up new avenues for development of chronic itch treatments

Research findings open up new avenues for development of chronic itch treatments

Areas of the brain that respond to reward and pleasure are linked to the ability of a drug known as butorphanol to relieve itch, according to new research led by Gil Yosipovitch, MD, Professor and Chairman of the Department of Dermatology at Temple University School of Medicine, and Director of the Temple Itch Center. [More]
Researchers aim to safely and quickly suppress food allergies in human

Researchers aim to safely and quickly suppress food allergies in human

In mice, the answer appears to be "yes," but making sure the same can happen in humans is a task that Fred Finkelman, MD, professor of medicine and pediatrics in the University of Cincinnati's (UC) College of Medicine and a researcher at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, is attempting to tackle. [More]
Northwestern Medicine allergist offers tips to fight allergies

Northwestern Medicine allergist offers tips to fight allergies

Nasal congestion, sneezing, and itchy and watery eyes — for the nearly 50 million Americans with seasonal allergies, these are the true rites of spring [More]
Researchers identify target molecules for development of new allergy drugs

Researchers identify target molecules for development of new allergy drugs

Researchers have identified several target molecules which are suitable for the development of new allergy drugs. The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, the most prestigious journal in the field of allergology, has recently published an extensive review article on the prospects of drug therapy for allergy. Completed in a large-scale EU project, the lead author of the review article is Professor Ilkka Harvima of the University of Eastern Finland and Kuopio University Hospital. [More]
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