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Study identifies novel gene that controls nerve conduction velocity linked with MS

Study identifies novel gene that controls nerve conduction velocity linked with MS

A new study published in The American Journal of Pathology identifies a novel gene that controls nerve conduction velocity. [More]
Scientists report first successful step toward vaccine that targets mutation in brain cancer

Scientists report first successful step toward vaccine that targets mutation in brain cancer

Astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas are subtypes of a brain cancer called 'glioma'. These incurable brain tumors arise from glial cells, a type of support cell found in the central nervous system. [More]
The Center for Applied Nanotechnology presents a ready-to-use reagent for the detection of poly-histidine tagged proteins in Blot assays

The Center for Applied Nanotechnology presents a ready-to-use reagent for the detection of poly-histidine tagged proteins in Blot assays

The nano-experts from the Center for Applied Nanotechnology (CAN) GmbH expand their product portfolio by CANdots® Series G - His Detect, which is a ready-to-use reagent for the detection of poly-histidine tagged proteins in Blot assays. It is easy to handle, highly sensitive as well as time saving compared to standard methods available on the market, e.g. ECL. [More]
Vanderbilt investigators report new insights into workings of calprotectin

Vanderbilt investigators report new insights into workings of calprotectin

On the front lines of our defenses against bacteria is the protein calprotectin, which "starves" invading pathogens of metal nutrients. Vanderbilt investigators now report new insights to the workings of calprotectin - including a detailed structural view of how it binds the metal manganese. [More]
Researchers characterize novel lysosomal PQ protein linked to cystinosis

Researchers characterize novel lysosomal PQ protein linked to cystinosis

Researchers at the Université Paris Descartes/CNRS and the Université libre de Bruxelles have made a major breakthrough in the study of cystinosis, a genetic disease that can lead to serious disorders, notably fatal kidney failure. [More]
New genetic insight into Alzheimer’s disease

New genetic insight into Alzheimer’s disease

A rare mutation in the gene encoding the triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 has a potent effect on the risk for late-onset Alzheimer’s disease, two studies published in The New England Journal of Medicine suggest. [More]
Polymorphism ’protective in pneumococcal disease’

Polymorphism ’protective in pneumococcal disease’

Patients with invasive pneumococcal disease who have the FcyRIIa-R/R131 polymorphism may have better survival outcomes than those without the genotype, suggest study findings. [More]
Novel sensor selectively screens single molecules passing through nanopores

Novel sensor selectively screens single molecules passing through nanopores

A novel type of sensor, based on nanometer-scale pores in a semiconductor membrane, is a step closer to practical use in applications such as analyzing the protein contents of a single cell. Researchers pioneering single-molecule nanopore sensor technology at the Technische Universit-t M-nchen (TUM) have shown its potential through a succession of experiments over the past few years. [More]
Certain strains of P. aeruginosa cause WBCs to produce high levels of histamine

Certain strains of P. aeruginosa cause WBCs to produce high levels of histamine

Could some cases of asthma actually be caused by an allergic reaction to a common environmental bacteria? New research findings published in the Journal of Leukocyte Biology suggests that this idea may not be as far-fetched as it seems. In a research report appearing in the February 2012 print issue, researchers show a link between common environmental bacteria and airway inflammation. [More]
Synthetic drugs treat Crohn's disease in mice

Synthetic drugs treat Crohn's disease in mice

A team of Weizmann Institute scientists has turned the tables on an autoimmune disease. In such diseases, including Crohn's and rheumatoid arthritis, the immune system mistakenly attacks the body's tissues. But the scientists managed to trick the immune systems of mice into targeting one of the body's players in autoimmune processes, an enzyme known as MMP9. [More]
Insight into acrolein-induced acute lung injury

Insight into acrolein-induced acute lung injury

Metabolon, Inc., the leader in metabolomics, biomarker discovery and biochemical analysis, announces the publication of "Integrative Metabolome and Transcriptome Profiling Reveals Discordant Energetic Stress Between Mouse Strains with Differential Sensitivity to Acrolein-Induced Acute Lung Injury" in The Molecular Nutrition and Food Research Journal. [More]
Key finding sheds new light on common bleeding disorders

Key finding sheds new light on common bleeding disorders

A simple cut to the skin unleashes a complex cascade of chemistry to stem the flow of blood. Now, scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have used evolutionary clues to reveal how a key clotting protein assembles. The finding sheds new light on common bleeding disorders. [More]
Scientists effectively combine two methods used as vehicles to carry DNA into cell nuclei

Scientists effectively combine two methods used as vehicles to carry DNA into cell nuclei

Scientists at Polytechnic Institute of New York University (NYU-Poly) and at the NYU College of Dentistry have discovered a biochemical version of a principle well known among confectioners. Call it the "peanut butter and chocolate" rule: Sometimes two things work better together than alone. [More]
EMBL scientists reveal new insights into bacterial enzymes that causes tuberculosis

EMBL scientists reveal new insights into bacterial enzymes that causes tuberculosis

In a paper published today in PNAS, scientists from the European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Hamburg, Germany, reveal new insights into the workings of enzymes from a group of bacteria including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacterium that causes tuberculosis. [More]
Scientists discover new anti-cancer mechanism

Scientists discover new anti-cancer mechanism

Scientists attached to VIB and K.U.Leuven have succeeded in decoding a potential new anti-cancer mechanism. The researchers discovered that normalizing abnormal tumor blood vessels through HRG prevents metastasis of tumor cells and enhances chemotherapy efficiency. [More]
HRG protein inhibits tumor growth and metastasis: Study

HRG protein inhibits tumor growth and metastasis: Study

Most cancer tissues are invaded by inflammatory cells that either stimulate or inhibit the growth of the tumor, depending on what immune cells are involved. Now a Swedish-Belgian research team has shown that a protein that naturally occurs in the body, HRG, inhibits tumor growth and metastasis into secondary organs by activating specific immune cells. [More]

DSM, PolyTherics enter agreement for HiPEG IFN alpha-2a product development

DSM BioSolutions, DSM's microbial fermentation CMO business unit and PolyTherics Limited an innovator in precision engineering of proteins, today announced that they have entered into an agreement for the process development and manufacture of PolyTherics' lead biobetter product, HiPEG IFN alpha-2a. [More]
Researchers to identify rare genetic mutation to produce histamine against TS

Researchers to identify rare genetic mutation to produce histamine against TS

A single, very unusual family with Tourette syndrome has led Yale School of Medicine researchers to identify a rare mutation in a gene that is required to produce histamine. The finding provides a new framework to understand many years of data on the role of histamine function in the brain and points to a potentially novel approach to treatment of tics and Tourette. [More]
New ways for earlier diagnosis of osteoarthritis

New ways for earlier diagnosis of osteoarthritis

Researchers at King's College London's Department of Twin Research and Genetic Epidemiology, based at St Thomas' Hospital have discovered new ways of measuring biological markers in the blood which could be used to diagnose osteoarthritis earlier. [More]
Tips offered in April 2010 issue of American Journal Of Pathology

Tips offered in April 2010 issue of American Journal Of Pathology

A group led by Dr. Massimo Loda at the Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA has generated a preclinical model of human prostate cancer that mimics the genetic and growth behavior of primary tumors. Their report can be found in the April 2010 issue of the American Journal of Pathology. [More]