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A hormone is a chemical released by one or more cells that affects cells in other parts of the organism. Only a small amount of hormone is required to alter cell metabolism. It is essentially a chemical messenger that transports a signal from one cell to another.
Endocrine Society members advocate science-based policies to address danger of EDCs

Endocrine Society members advocate science-based policies to address danger of EDCs

To protect human health, Endocrine Society members called on the European Commission to adopt science-based policies for regulating endocrine-disrupting chemicals in an opinion piece published today in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology. [More]
NLCs packed with melatonin could increase effectiveness of tamoxifen drug

NLCs packed with melatonin could increase effectiveness of tamoxifen drug

Tiny bubbles filled with the sleep hormone melatonin can make breast cancer treatment more effective, which means people need a lower dose, giving them less severe side effects. [More]
Molecular imaging technique could help optimize radiotherapy dose to combat NETs

Molecular imaging technique could help optimize radiotherapy dose to combat NETs

Aggressive neuroendocrine cancer is something of a dark horse--a rare, elusive and persevering force linked to discouraging long-term survival rates. [More]
Liraglutide drug effectively decreases cardiovascular disease risk in type 2 diabetes patients

Liraglutide drug effectively decreases cardiovascular disease risk in type 2 diabetes patients

Researchers have shown that the glucose-lowering drug liraglutide safely and effectively decreases the overall risk of heart attack, stroke, or cardiovascular death for people with type 2 diabetes. [More]
Genetic blood test can help predict patient’s respone to neuroendocrine cancer therapy

Genetic blood test can help predict patient’s respone to neuroendocrine cancer therapy

Malignant neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are relatively rare, notoriously difficult to treat, and associated with poor long-term survival. According to research presented at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, an investigative blood test could predict how patients will respond to peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) before they commit to a course of treatment. [More]
Study opens up possibility of developing potential hormone therapies for SSc skin disease

Study opens up possibility of developing potential hormone therapies for SSc skin disease

The results of a study presented today at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress showed for the first time a beneficial effect of oestrogens in experimental models of skin fibrosis that are representative of the disease process in systemic sclerosis (SSc). [More]
PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway plays key role in prostate tumor growth and progression

PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway plays key role in prostate tumor growth and progression

The research article - Targeting the PI3K/AKT/mTOR Pathway in Prostate Cancer Development and Progression: Insight to Therapy, by Dr Claudio Festuccia and published in Clinical Cancer Drugs, volume 3, issue 1 - discusses experimental and clinical data on the pharmacological inhibition of the Akt/mTOR pathways. [More]
Diabetes-heart disease combination can increase death risk

Diabetes-heart disease combination can increase death risk

The combination of type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease can be deadly. New research from a global study led by a physician from UConn Health has found that patients with Type 2 diabetes admitted into the hospital for congestive heart failure face a one in four chance of dying over the next 18 months. [More]
Low birth weight, stress during pregnancy can lead to long-term health issues in women

Low birth weight, stress during pregnancy can lead to long-term health issues in women

Low birth weight or stress during pregnancy can lead to long-term health problems in women, according to a study published today in The Journal of Physiology. [More]
New research offers more insights into development of Kennedy's disease

New research offers more insights into development of Kennedy's disease

Kennedy's disease leads to progressive muscle wastage. It is a condition that affects only men and it appears between 40 and 50 years of age. There is no specific treatment available. [More]
Intrinsic subtyping of breast cancer can aid prognosis, treatment of tumor patients

Intrinsic subtyping of breast cancer can aid prognosis, treatment of tumor patients

Published in JAMA Oncology, Principal Investigator of Vall d´Hebron Institute of Oncology´s Translational Genomics Group, Team Leader of translational genomics and targeted therapeutics in solid tumors at the August Pi I Sunyer Biomedical Research Institute, and Head of Medical Oncology at the Hospital Clínic in Barcelona, Aleix Prat has led a study showing the intrinsic subtyping of breast cancer by means of a genomic test as the most important prognostic factor in advanced or metastatic hormone-sensitive breast cancer. [More]
NMR-based metabolomics: an interview with Prof. Claudio Luchinat

NMR-based metabolomics: an interview with Prof. Claudio Luchinat

We started from theoretical inorganic to bioinorganic chemistry, so looking at metals in proteins, enzymes and so on. About 30% of all the proteins that we have are metalloproteins, so it’s a huge contribution that inorganic chemistry is providing for life. [More]
Researchers identify promising new compound for targeting triple-negative breast cancer

Researchers identify promising new compound for targeting triple-negative breast cancer

Researchers at the University of Michigan have identified a promising new compound for targeting one of the most aggressive types of breast cancer. [More]
Multi-center study may help reassure breast cancer patients taking tamoxifen drug

Multi-center study may help reassure breast cancer patients taking tamoxifen drug

A study led by Loyola Medicine researchers may help reassure patients who worry the breast cancer drug tamoxifen could increase their risk of uterine cancer. [More]
Disruptive sleep patterns could raise heart disease risk in shift workers and insomniacs

Disruptive sleep patterns could raise heart disease risk in shift workers and insomniacs

People who suffer from a lack of sleep and disordered sleep cycles could be increasing their chances of developing cardiovascular disease, according to a study in the American Heart Association’s Journal Hypertension. [More]
Taking hormone therapy drugs for additional five years improves outcomes in breast cancer patients

Taking hormone therapy drugs for additional five years improves outcomes in breast cancer patients

Breast cancer patients significantly benefit by taking hormone therapy drugs called aromatase inhibitors for an additional five years, according to a major study presented at the Plenary Session of the American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting in Chicago and published in the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
Genes of healthy leanness could lead to new approach to treating obesity-related diabetes

Genes of healthy leanness could lead to new approach to treating obesity-related diabetes

People with type 2 diabetes could be helped by the discovery of a gene linked to leanness. [More]
Clinical study shows improved outcomes for NET patients treated with Lutathera over Octreotide LAR

Clinical study shows improved outcomes for NET patients treated with Lutathera over Octreotide LAR

NETTER-1 study, showing clinically meaningful and significant results for Lutathera (77Lu-DOTA0-Tyr3-Octreotate) in patients with metastatic midgut neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). The data will be presented Monday, June 6, during the American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting in Chicago. [More]
Study finds link between stress hormone and stage of schizophrenia

Study finds link between stress hormone and stage of schizophrenia

JCU Associate Professor Zoltan Sarnyai said it was the first meta-analysis study to compare the level of cortisol in a waking patient's body with the stage of schizophrenia they are suffering. [More]
New research reveals advances that could change gynecologic cancer standard-of-care treatments

New research reveals advances that could change gynecologic cancer standard-of-care treatments

Advances that could change gynecologic cancer standard-of-care treatments are the centerpiece of key studies being presented by researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center's Department of Gynecologic Oncology and Reproductive Medicine at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. [More]
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