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A hormone is a chemical released by one or more cells that affects cells in other parts of the organism. Only a small amount of hormone is required to alter cell metabolism. It is essentially a chemical messenger that transports a signal from one cell to another.
Understanding crosstalk between cells in the pancreas can help treat diabetes

Understanding crosstalk between cells in the pancreas can help treat diabetes

Sometimes, listening in on a conversation can tell you a lot. For Mark Huising, an assistant professor in the Department of Neurobiology, Physiology and Behavior at the UC Davis College of Biological Sciences, that crosstalk is between the cells that control your body's response to sugar, and understanding the conversation can help us understand, and perhaps ultimately treat, diabetes. [More]
Scientists report that mouse with weak bones appears to have strong metabolism

Scientists report that mouse with weak bones appears to have strong metabolism

One mouse with weak bones appears to have a strong metabolism, even on a high-fat diet, scientists report. While weaker bones are clearly not a good thing, scientists suspect that, somewhere in the conversation between the genetically engineered mouse's skeleton and the rest of its body, there may be an answer that helps obese individuals avoid some of the worst ravages of this health epidemic. [More]
Men who use finasteride to treat benign prostate enlargement experience worsening ED

Men who use finasteride to treat benign prostate enlargement experience worsening ED

Men with benign prostate enlargement who used finasteride (also known as proscar and propecia) to treat their condition, experienced worsening erectile dysfunction (ED) that did not resolve with continued treatment. In addition, they experienced a reduction in their testosterone levels leading to hypogonadism (little to no production of sex hormones). [More]
NSAIDs significantly inhibit ovulation in women with mild musculoskeletal pain

NSAIDs significantly inhibit ovulation in women with mild musculoskeletal pain

The results of a study presented today at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress (EULAR 2015) show that diclofenac, naproxen and etoricoxib significantly inhibit ovulation in women with mild musculoskeletal pain. Of the women receiving NSAIDs, only 6.3 percent (diclofenac), 25 percent (naproxen) and 27.3 percent (etoricoxib) ovulated, compared with 100 percent of the control group. [More]
Adding high salt to high-fat diet prevents weight gain in mice

Adding high salt to high-fat diet prevents weight gain in mice

In a study that seems to defy conventional dietary wisdom, University of Iowa scientists have found that adding high salt to a high-fat diet actually prevents weight gain in mice. [More]
Researchers find persistent gender bias in provision of growth hormone treatment for idiopathic short stature

Researchers find persistent gender bias in provision of growth hormone treatment for idiopathic short stature

Short boys are three times more likely than short girls to receive recombinant human growth hormone treatment for idiopathic short stature (ISS), even though in a general pediatric population, equal proportions of both genders fall under the height threshold designating ISS. Researchers who analyzed records of over 283,000 U.S. children and adolescents found a clear-cut and persistent gender bias in the provision of treatment. [More]
Paediatric outpatient study compares effectiveness of three alternative treatments for type 1 diabetes

Paediatric outpatient study compares effectiveness of three alternative treatments for type 1 diabetes

A Montréal research team, co-supervised by Dr. Rémi Rabasa-Lhoret from the IRCM and Dr. Laurent Legault from the Montreal Children's Hospital, undertook the first paediatric outpatient study to compare three alternative treatments for type 1 diabetes. [More]
Brain changes reflect higher risk of cerebrovascular disease in women who experience more hot flashes

Brain changes reflect higher risk of cerebrovascular disease in women who experience more hot flashes

Women who experience more hot flashes, particularly while sleeping, during the menopause transition are more likely to have brain changes reflecting a higher risk for cerebrovascular disease, such as stroke and other brain blood flow problems, according to a pilot study led by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine published online today in Menopause and funded by the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Treating obesity with GLP-1 hormone helps prevent loss of bone mass associated with weight loss

Treating obesity with GLP-1 hormone helps prevent loss of bone mass associated with weight loss

Using the intestinal hormone GLP-1 in obesity treatment prevents the loss of bone mass otherwise frequently associated with major weight loss. This is the finding of a new study from the University of Copenhagen, Hvidovre and Glostrup Hospital. According to the researchers behind the study, the results may have a significant bearing on future obesity treatment. [More]
Catalan researchers first to use liposomes to fight against diabetes

Catalan researchers first to use liposomes to fight against diabetes

For the first time liposomes that imitate cells in the process of natural death have been used to treat Diabetes. Researchers at Germans Trias Research Institute (at UAB-Campus of International Excellence Sphere) generated liposomes in collaboration with professionals from the ICN2. PLOS ONE Journal publishes the work. [More]
FDA agrees to Oncogenex' proposed amendment to Phase 3 AFFINITY protocol

FDA agrees to Oncogenex' proposed amendment to Phase 3 AFFINITY protocol

OncoGenex Pharmaceuticals, Inc. announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has agreed to the Company's proposed amendment to the Phase 3 AFFINITY protocol and statistical analysis plan. [More]
New study finds growing use of CAM therapies among menopausal women

New study finds growing use of CAM therapies among menopausal women

The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasing for the treatment of menopausal symptoms but often without the guidance of a clinician. That's according to a new study reported online today in Menopause, the journal of the North American Menopause Society. [More]
New study shows that estrogen receptors vanish in cervical cancer tumors

New study shows that estrogen receptors vanish in cervical cancer tumors

Scientists have prior evidence that the hormone estrogen is a major driver in the growth of cervical cancer, but a new study examining genetic profiles of 128 clinical cases reached a surprising conclusion: Estrogen receptors all but vanish in cervical cancer tumors. [More]
WHO's updated essential medicines list includes progesterone contraceptive vaginal ring

WHO's updated essential medicines list includes progesterone contraceptive vaginal ring

The World Health Organization released its 2015 updated essential medicines list and for the first time included the progesterone contraceptive vaginal ring (CVR), a contraceptive safe and effective for lactating women in the postpartum period. [More]
ITbM researchers find new molecules that change circadian rhythm in mammals

ITbM researchers find new molecules that change circadian rhythm in mammals

A team of chemists and biologists at the Institute of Transformative Bio-Molecules, Nagoya University have succeeded in finding new molecules that change the circadian rhythm in mammals by applying synthetic chemistry methods, which makes use of highly selective metal catalysts. [More]
Study opens door to deeper understanding of genetic, molecular aspects underlying sleep disorders

Study opens door to deeper understanding of genetic, molecular aspects underlying sleep disorders

Washington State University Spokane scientists have grown a tiny group of brain cells that can be induced to fall asleep, wake up and even show rebound sleep after "staying up late." [More]
Advanced prostate cancer patients who have AR-V7 gene variant respond to chemotherapy

Advanced prostate cancer patients who have AR-V7 gene variant respond to chemotherapy

In a small clinical trial, scientists at Johns Hopkins' Kimmel Cancer Center and James Buchanan Brady Urological Institute found that men with advanced prostate cancer and detection of androgen receptor splice variant-7 (AR-V7) respond to chemotherapy just as well as men who lack the variant. [More]
Study shows how GLP-1 receptor agonists modify the brain's response to food

Study shows how GLP-1 receptor agonists modify the brain's response to food

Gut hormone-based medications used to treat diabetes, such as GLP-1 receptor agonists, have also been shown to reduce body weight. Researchers have been working to understand how. This study, presented today at the American Diabetes Association's 75th Scientific Sessions, sheds light on how GLP-1 receptor agonists alter the brain's response to food, possibly reducing cravings and increasing satisfaction while eating. [More]
Glucose-control drug sitagliptin does not raise risk of cardiovascular events

Glucose-control drug sitagliptin does not raise risk of cardiovascular events

A clinical trial of the glucose-control drug sitagliptin among patients with type 2 diabetes and established cardiovascular disease has found it did not raise the risk of major adverse cardiovascular events. [More]
Sanofi announces results from Phase IIIb ELIXA study of Lyxumia in adults with diabetes and high CV risk

Sanofi announces results from Phase IIIb ELIXA study of Lyxumia in adults with diabetes and high CV risk

Sanofi announced today the presentation of full results of the Phase IIIb ELIXA study, which was designed to assess the cardiovascular (CV) safety of Lyxumia (lixisenatide) in adults with type 2 diabetes and high CV risk. [More]
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