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A hormone is a chemical released by one or more cells that affects cells in other parts of the organism. Only a small amount of hormone is required to alter cell metabolism. It is essentially a chemical messenger that transports a signal from one cell to another.
No significant research undertaken to prevent or treat PPCM in healthy pregnant women, study reveals

No significant research undertaken to prevent or treat PPCM in healthy pregnant women, study reveals

Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a rare disorder characterized by weakened pumping of the heart, or "left ventricular dysfunction," which results in otherwise healthy pregnant women experiencing heart failure shortly before or up to five months after they deliver healthy babies. Despite the seriousness of this condition, a new study published in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology revealed that no significant research has been undertaken to explore how to prevent or treat this disorder. [More]
Women with low levels of anti-stress hormone at increased risk of getting breast cancer

Women with low levels of anti-stress hormone at increased risk of getting breast cancer

A new study from Lund University in Sweden shows that women with low levels of an anti-stress hormone have an increased risk of getting breast cancer. The study is the first of its kind on humans and confirms previous similar observations from animal experiments. [More]
New review article explains link between PTSD and increased cardiovascular disease risk

New review article explains link between PTSD and increased cardiovascular disease risk

A growing number of patient studies show that people who suffered post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are at a higher risk of developing cardiovascular diseases, including stroke and heart attack. A new review article in American Journal of Physiology—Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology examines the recent scientific literature to explain how the two are linked. [More]
New non-invasive glucose monitoring device could transform lives of people with diabetes

New non-invasive glucose monitoring device could transform lives of people with diabetes

A new laser sensor that monitors blood glucose levels without penetrating the skin could transform the lives of millions of people living with diabetes. [More]
Study examines how low-methionine diet may help improve outcomes in triple-negative breast cancer patients

Study examines how low-methionine diet may help improve outcomes in triple-negative breast cancer patients

A diet that starves triple-negative breast cancer cells of an essential nutrient primes the cancer cells to be more easily killed by a targeted antibody treatment, UW Carbone Cancer Center scientists report in a recent publication. [More]
Study finds gene linked to age-related obesity, diabetes

Study finds gene linked to age-related obesity, diabetes

Practically everyone gets fatter as they get older, but some people can blame their genes for the extra padding. Researchers have shown that two different mutations in a gene called ankyrin-B cause cells to suck up glucose faster than normal, fattening them up and eventually triggering the type of diabetes linked to obesity. [More]
OncoGenex's custirsen Phase 3 ENSPIRIT trial for treatment of NSCLC patients continues as planned

OncoGenex's custirsen Phase 3 ENSPIRIT trial for treatment of NSCLC patients continues as planned

OncoGenex Pharmaceuticals, Inc. announced today that its Phase 3 ENSPIRIT trial evaluating custirsen in the treatment of advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is continuing as planned per the recommendation of an Independent Data Monitoring Committee (IDMC). This decision was based upon completion of the second and final planned interim futility analysis. [More]
Study offers new way to suppress growth factors related to cancer cell proliferation

Study offers new way to suppress growth factors related to cancer cell proliferation

Cancer cells need life-essential molecules to proliferate. These so-called growth factors are activated by ectodomain shedding of precursor proteins on the outside of the plasma membrane, mainly carried out by three human cleavage enzymes. A pharmaceutical blocking of these enzymes could hinder cancer from growing but would also inhibit other life-essential processes. [More]
UMass Amherst scientist to study how estrogen-mimicking chemicals in the womb can increase breast cancer risk

UMass Amherst scientist to study how estrogen-mimicking chemicals in the womb can increase breast cancer risk

Much attention has been paid to genetics in breast cancer as disease rates rise, but most women have no family history of the disease, suggesting that there is an environmental risk we don't yet understand, says environmental health scientist Laura Vandenberg in the School of Public Health and Health Sciences at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. [More]
IMBRUVICA (ibrutinib) approved in Europe for treatment of Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia

IMBRUVICA (ibrutinib) approved in Europe for treatment of Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia

Today AbbVie announced the European Commission granted marketing authorization for IMBRUVICA (ibrutinib) as the first treatment option available in all 28 member states of the European Union for the treatment of Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia (WM), a rare, slow growing blood cancer, in adult patients who have received at least one prior therapy, or in first line treatment for patients unsuitable for chemo-immunotherapy. [More]
Progesterone hormone can benefit breast cancer patients

Progesterone hormone can benefit breast cancer patients

AROUND half of all breast cancer patients could one day benefit from having the cheap and widely-available female hormone progesterone added to their treatment, according to Cancer Research UK funded research published in Nature today (Thursday). [More]
Simple blood test could detect early stages of type 1 diabetes

Simple blood test could detect early stages of type 1 diabetes

Scientists at the MRC's Clinical Sciences Centre in West London are the first to show that a small molecule circulates in the blood of people who are in the early stages of type 1 diabetes. A simple blood test could detect this biological marker years, maybe decades, before symptoms develop. [More]
Researchers identify link between hormonal factors and endometrial cancer risk among women with Lynch syndrome

Researchers identify link between hormonal factors and endometrial cancer risk among women with Lynch syndrome

For women with Lynch syndrome, an association was found between the risk of endometrial cancer and the age of first menstrual cycle, having given birth, and hormonal contraceptive use, according to a study in the July 7 issue of JAMA. Lynch syndrome is a genetic condition that increases the risk for various cancers. [More]
Study looks at effects of three levels of vitamin D supplementation in overweight, obese blacks

Study looks at effects of three levels of vitamin D supplementation in overweight, obese blacks

The current recommended minimum daily dose of vitamin D is not sufficient to restore healthy vitamin D levels in overweight or obese blacks, researchers report. [More]
15-20% women overdiagnosed in Norway's Breast Cancer Screening Programme

15-20% women overdiagnosed in Norway's Breast Cancer Screening Programme

For every life saved by Norway's Breast Cancer Screening Programme, five women are over-diagnosed, and have to go through an operation to remove a tumour that otherwise never would have caused problems. [More]
Researchers pinpoint two biomarkers elevated in severe form of coronary disease

Researchers pinpoint two biomarkers elevated in severe form of coronary disease

Insulin resistance affects tens of millions of Americans and is a big risk factor for heart disease. Yet, some people with the condition never develop heart disease, while some experience moderate coronary blockages. Others, though, get severe atherosclerosis - multiple blockages and deterioration of coronary arteries characterized by thick, hard, plaque-ridden arterial walls. [More]
Breakthrough discovery could help young girls suffering from rare form of epilepsy

Breakthrough discovery could help young girls suffering from rare form of epilepsy

An international team, led by a University of Adelaide genetics expert, has made a breakthrough discovery which is expected to help thousands of young girls worldwide who are suffering from a rare yet debilitating form of epilepsy. [More]
Testosterone, cortisol hormones may destabilise financial markets by making traders take more risks

Testosterone, cortisol hormones may destabilise financial markets by making traders take more risks

The hormones testosterone and cortisol may destabilise financial markets by making traders take more risks, according to a study. Researchers simulated the trading floor in the lab by having volunteers buy and sell assets among themselves. They measured the volunteers' natural hormone levels in one experiment and artificially raised them in another. [More]
Penn study suggests future precision medicine approach to treating diabetes, other metabolic disorders

Penn study suggests future precision medicine approach to treating diabetes, other metabolic disorders

In the first study of its kind, Penn researchers have shown how an anti-diabetic drug can have variable effects depending on small natural differences in DNA sequence between individuals. Mitchell Lazar, MD, PhD, Raymond Soccio, MD, PhD, and colleagues at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, aim to apply this knowledge to develop personalized approaches to treating diabetes and other metabolic disorders. [More]
Afamelanotide treatment improves quality of life in people with erythropoietic protoporphyria

Afamelanotide treatment improves quality of life in people with erythropoietic protoporphyria

A novel synthetic hormone that makes certain skin cells produce more melanin significantly increases pain-free sun exposure in people with erythropoietic protoporphyria, a rare, genetic disorder resulting in excruciating pain within minutes of sun exposure. [More]
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