Hormone News and Research RSS Feed - Hormone News and Research

A hormone is a chemical released by one or more cells that affects cells in other parts of the organism. Only a small amount of hormone is required to alter cell metabolism. It is essentially a chemical messenger that transports a signal from one cell to another.
Researchers explore brain estrogens to mitigate learning and memory problems

Researchers explore brain estrogens to mitigate learning and memory problems

New studies being launched by neurobiologist Luke Remage-Healey at the University of Massachusetts Amherst will investigate how estrogens produced in the brains of young birds enhance their ability to learn songs during a critical window during development. [More]
Chemclin's Vitamin D assay helps in quantitative determination of 25-OH Vitamin D in human serum

Chemclin's Vitamin D assay helps in quantitative determination of 25-OH Vitamin D in human serum

Chemclin's new Vitamin D assay provides components for in-vitro quantitative determination of 25-Hydroxy Vitamin D (25-OH Vitamin D) in human serum by a competitive chemiluminescent assay method. [More]
Randox's Acusera Immunoassay Speciality 1 quality control receives FDA clearance

Randox's Acusera Immunoassay Speciality 1 quality control receives FDA clearance

In Q3 of 2013, Randox announced that the Food and Drug Administration has approved the company's Acusera Immunoassay Speciality 1 quality control for use in US laboratories. [More]
Early-career physicians receive National Psoriasis Foundation fellowship to study psoriasis

Early-career physicians receive National Psoriasis Foundation fellowship to study psoriasis

Twelve residents and medical students each received a one-year, $50,000 National Psoriasis Foundation fellowship to study psoriasis. [More]
Drug for reduction of abdominal fat in HIV patients may also reduce fatty liver disease

Drug for reduction of abdominal fat in HIV patients may also reduce fatty liver disease

The only drug to receive FDA approval for reduction of the abdominal fat deposits that develop in some patients receiving antiviral therapy for HIV infection may also reduce the incidence of fatty liver disease in such patients. [More]
Growth hormone reduces liver fat in HIV-infected patients with excess abdominal fat

Growth hormone reduces liver fat in HIV-infected patients with excess abdominal fat

In a preliminary study, HIV-infected patients with excess abdominal fat who received the growth hormone-releasing hormone analog tesamorelin for 6 months experienced modest reductions in liver fat, according to a study in the July 23/30 issue of JAMA, a theme issue on HIV/AIDS. [More]
Researchers use safer method to stimulate ovulation in women undergoing IVF treatment

Researchers use safer method to stimulate ovulation in women undergoing IVF treatment

Researchers have successfully used a new and potentially safer method to stimulate ovulation in women undergoing IVF treatment. [More]
Marmoset's unique rapid reproductive system sheds new light on evolution and primate biology

Marmoset's unique rapid reproductive system sheds new light on evolution and primate biology

A team of scientists from around the world led by Baylor College of Medicine and Washington University in St. Louis has completed the genome sequence of the common marmoset - the first sequence of a New World Monkey - providing new information about the marmoset's unique rapid reproductive system, physiology and growth, shedding new light on primate biology and evolution. [More]
Common genetic variation in gene may modify cardiovascular benefit of aspirin

Common genetic variation in gene may modify cardiovascular benefit of aspirin

Aspirin is the gold standard for antiplatelet therapy and a daily low-dose aspirin is widely prescribed for the prevention of cardiovascular disease. [More]
13 researchers awarded National Psoriasis Foundation fellowship to study psoriasis

13 researchers awarded National Psoriasis Foundation fellowship to study psoriasis

Twelve residents and medical students each received a one-year, $50,000 National Psoriasis Foundation fellowship to study psoriasis. The fellowships aim to increase the number of scientists studying and treating psoriatic disease by encouraging promising doctors to dedicate their careers to the study of psoriasis as physician researchers. [More]
Mother's nurturing role directly molds early neural activity of her offsprings' brain

Mother's nurturing role directly molds early neural activity of her offsprings' brain

By carefully watching nearly a hundred hours of video showing mother rats protecting, warming, and feeding their young pups, and then matching up what they saw to real-time electrical readings from the pups' brains, researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center have found that the mother's presence and social interactions - her nurturing role - directly molds the early neural activity and growth of her offsprings' brain. [More]
Study examines mechanism of bone-protective properties of California dried plums

Study examines mechanism of bone-protective properties of California dried plums

Fifty-seven million Americans suffer from low bone density or osteoporosis, a disease which causes bones to become so weak and brittle that even a minor fall or other stresses may cause fractures. [More]
Study pinpoints molecular cause of cachexia, hints at a potential treatment

Study pinpoints molecular cause of cachexia, hints at a potential treatment

New research raises the prospect of more effective treatments for cachexia, a profound wasting of fat and muscle occurring in about half of all cancer patients, raising their risk of death, according to scientists from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. [More]
New research opens up potential new therapeutic targets for hard-to-treat food allergy

New research opens up potential new therapeutic targets for hard-to-treat food allergy

New research in Nature Genetics identifies a novel genetic and molecular pathway in the esophagus that causes eosinophillic esophagitis (EoE), opening up potential new therapeutic strategies for an enigmatic and hard-to-treat food allergy. [More]
Women experiencing stressful events the day before eating high-fat meal can slow body's metabolism

Women experiencing stressful events the day before eating high-fat meal can slow body's metabolism

A new study in women suggests that experiencing one or more stressful events the day before eating a single high-fat meal can slow the body's metabolism, potentially contributing to weight gain. [More]
Portable, microchip-based test for diagnosing type-1 diabetes

Portable, microchip-based test for diagnosing type-1 diabetes

An inexpensive, portable, microchip-based test for diagnosing type-1 diabetes could improve patient care worldwide and help researchers better understand the disease, according to the device's inventors at the Stanford University School of Medicine. [More]
2D IR spectroscopy reveals intermediate structure during amylin aggregation pathway

2D IR spectroscopy reveals intermediate structure during amylin aggregation pathway

Amyloid diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, type 2 diabetes, cataracts, and the spongiform encephalopathies, all share the common trait that proteins aggregate into long fibers which then form plaques. [More]
Mice fed with omega 3 fatty acids have healthier joints

Mice fed with omega 3 fatty acids have healthier joints

Mice consuming a supplement of omega 3 fatty acids had healthier joints than those fed diets high in saturated fats and omega 6 fatty acids, according to Duke Medicine researchers. [More]
New drug delivered through skin effective in treatment of breast cancer

New drug delivered through skin effective in treatment of breast cancer

A drug that has proven effective in the prevention and treatment of breast cancer, but with serious side-effects, may be delivered effectively through the skin using a new topical drug-delivery system. [More]
New class of anti-arthritic drugs reduce arthritic joint inflammation and periodontitis

New class of anti-arthritic drugs reduce arthritic joint inflammation and periodontitis

Inflammatory diseases can occur simultaneously in distinct sites in the same patient, complicating treatment because a medication effective for one disorder may exacerbate the other. [More]