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A hormone is a chemical released by one or more cells that affects cells in other parts of the organism. Only a small amount of hormone is required to alter cell metabolism. It is essentially a chemical messenger that transports a signal from one cell to another.
Study examines role of risk factors in development of ER-positive and ER-negative breast cancers

Study examines role of risk factors in development of ER-positive and ER-negative breast cancers

Karla Kerlikowske, MD, and team recently published a paper in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute that examined the role of common risk factors in the development of ER-positive and ER-negative breast cancers. [More]
Scientists gain new insights into molecular mechanisms of breast cancer development

Scientists gain new insights into molecular mechanisms of breast cancer development

Why does breast cancer develop and how come certain patients are resistant to established therapies? Researchers from the University of Basel have gained new insights into the molecular processes in breast tissue. [More]
Scientists use pluripotent stem cells to generate human stomach tissues in laboratory

Scientists use pluripotent stem cells to generate human stomach tissues in laboratory

Scientists report in Nature using pluripotent stem cells to generate human stomach tissues in a petri dish that produce acid and digestive enzymes. [More]
Chemo-brain persists after treatment in breast cancer patients, study shows

Chemo-brain persists after treatment in breast cancer patients, study shows

The largest study to date of a condition known as "chemo-brain" shows that women with breast cancer report it's a substantial problem after chemotherapy for as long as six months after treatment, according to investigators at University of Rochester's Wilmot Cancer Institute. [More]
Chemical modification improves release and availability of insulin, research shows

Chemical modification improves release and availability of insulin, research shows

Replacing a hydrogen atom by an iodine atom in insulin, the hormone retains its efficacy but is available more rapidly to the organism. [More]
TSRI researchers develop new approach to find how environmental estrogens impact public health

TSRI researchers develop new approach to find how environmental estrogens impact public health

Breast cancer researchers from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have developed a novel approach for identifying how chemicals in the environment—called environmental estrogens—can produce infertility, abnormal reproductive development, including “precocious puberty,” and promote breast cancer. [More]
NIH researchers identify molecular mechanisms that may underlie woman's susceptibility to PMDD

NIH researchers identify molecular mechanisms that may underlie woman's susceptibility to PMDD

National Institutes of Health researchers have discovered molecular mechanisms that may underlie a woman's susceptibility to disabling irritability, sadness, and anxiety in the days leading up to her menstrual period. [More]
TSRI scientists develop new approach for understanding diverse effects of endocrine-disruptors

TSRI scientists develop new approach for understanding diverse effects of endocrine-disruptors

Breast cancer researchers from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have developed a novel approach for identifying how chemicals in the environment--called environmental estrogens--can produce infertility, abnormal reproductive development, including "precocious puberty," and promote breast cancer. [More]
IQWiG investigates benefit of biomarker tests to support decision on adjuvant chemotherapy

IQWiG investigates benefit of biomarker tests to support decision on adjuvant chemotherapy

The German Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG) investigated the benefit of biomarker tests to support the decision for or against adjuvant systemic chemotherapy in certain breast cancer patients, that is, women with primary hormone receptor-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer and up to 3 affected lymph nodes. [More]
Johns Hopkins scientists find link between sleep/wake cycles and core body temperature

Johns Hopkins scientists find link between sleep/wake cycles and core body temperature

A clump of just a few thousand brain cells, no bigger than a mustard seed, controls the daily ebb and flow of most bodily processes in mammals -- sleep/wake cycles, most notably. [More]
Agendia data reveals impact of MammaPrint on adjuvant treatment decisions in breast cancer patients

Agendia data reveals impact of MammaPrint on adjuvant treatment decisions in breast cancer patients

Agendia, Inc., a world leader in personalized medicine and molecular cancer diagnostics, has presented new prospective data demonstrating the strong impact of its 70-Gene Breast Cancer Recurrence assay, MammaPrint, and the corresponding 80-Gene Molecular Subtyping Assay BluePrint, in clinical decision-making for patients with early-stage breast cancer in Germany. [More]
Oncotype DX test can help guide treatment decisions and enable personalized care before breast cancer surgery

Oncotype DX test can help guide treatment decisions and enable personalized care before breast cancer surgery

New data presented at the 2016 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium (SABCS) demonstrate that analyzing tumor biology with the Oncotype DX test can identify patients unlikely to benefit from chemotherapy prior to breast cancer surgery (neoadjuvant setting) and guide treatment decisions without compromising outcomes. [More]
Hormone receptor could be potential biomarker for gastric cancer, research shows

Hormone receptor could be potential biomarker for gastric cancer, research shows

Scientists at Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Miami, and Shantou University Medical College in China, have shown that the hormone receptor GHRH-R could be a potential biomarker for gastric cancer, enabling earlier diagnoses and better staging. [More]
Bionic pancreas system manages blood sugar levels in patients with type 1 diabetes living at home

Bionic pancreas system manages blood sugar levels in patients with type 1 diabetes living at home

The bionic pancreas system developed by Boston University investigators proved better than either conventional or sensor-augmented insulin pump therapy at managing blood sugar levels in patients with type 1 diabetes living at home, with no restrictions, over 11 days. [More]
Regular NSAID use linked to increased risk of endometrial cancer mortality

Regular NSAID use linked to increased risk of endometrial cancer mortality

Regular use of over-the-counter non-steroidal inflammatory drugs such as aspirin and ibuprofen is associated with an increased risk of dying in patients diagnosed with Type 1 endometrial cancers, according to a new population-based study led by The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute. [More]
Combined endocrine and targeted therapy could be effective in treating Asian breast cancer patients

Combined endocrine and targeted therapy could be effective in treating Asian breast cancer patients

Ribociclib significantly improves progression-free survival in Asian women with advanced breast cancer, according to a sub-analysis of the MONALEESA-2 trial presented at the ESMO Asia 2016 Congress in Singapore. [More]
Strong emotional reactions can trigger adrenaline release that causes goose bumps

Strong emotional reactions can trigger adrenaline release that causes goose bumps

When you find yourself in an eerie place or the beat drops just right during a favorite song, the chills start multiplying. You know the feeling. It is a shiver that seems to come from within and makes your hairs stand on end. [More]
Study suggests revolutionary way to make cancer cells more susceptible to existing chemotherapies

Study suggests revolutionary way to make cancer cells more susceptible to existing chemotherapies

The same signal that drives aggressive growth in a deadly cancer cell type also triggers coping mechanisms that make it "notoriously" hard to kill, according to a study published online December 15 in Cell. When stressed, this cell type - far more than most cancer cells - encases its genetic messages in protein globs called "stress granules" that lessen the effect of chemotherapies. [More]
New study suggests potential new approach to combat spread of malaria

New study suggests potential new approach to combat spread of malaria

Disruption of hormone signaling in mosquitoes may reduce their ability to transmit the parasite that causes malaria, according to a new study published in PLOS Pathogens. The findings suggest a potential new approach to combat spread of the disease. [More]
Study provides new insight into brain circuitry that regulates water and food intake

Study provides new insight into brain circuitry that regulates water and food intake

Using leading-edge technology, neuroscientists at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center gained new insight into the brain circuitry that regulates water and food intake. [More]
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