Hormone News and Research RSS Feed - Hormone News and Research

A hormone is a chemical released by one or more cells that affects cells in other parts of the organism. Only a small amount of hormone is required to alter cell metabolism. It is essentially a chemical messenger that transports a signal from one cell to another.
Cholesterol-fighting drug molecule can kill prostate cancer cells

Cholesterol-fighting drug molecule can kill prostate cancer cells

Standard treatment for prostate cancer can include chemotherapy that targets receptors on cancer cells. However, drug-resistant cancer cells can emerge during chemotherapy, limiting its effectiveness as a cancer-fighting agent. Researchers at the University of Missouri have proven that a compound initially developed as a cholesterol-fighting molecule not only halts the progression of prostate cancer, but also can kill cancerous cells. [More]
Study offers clearer understanding of how obese people can sustain weight loss

Study offers clearer understanding of how obese people can sustain weight loss

Maintaining a stable weight loss is the biggest struggle for obese individuals, yet new research from University of Copenhagen have allowed researchers new insights into the complex processes involved in obesity and especially weight loss in obesity. It is now possible to offer overweight people a clearer understanding of how to sustain weight loss. [More]
Mouse-based study shows exercise decreases cancer incidence, slows tumor growth

Mouse-based study shows exercise decreases cancer incidence, slows tumor growth

When you're pounding along an icy pavement or sweating through a gym workout, you try to remind yourself of the many health benefits of exercise. Between gasps, you can say that a healthy, fit lifestyle helps prevents obesity, a worldwide problem of increasing magnitude that has been linked to cardiovascular disease and diabetes. [More]
Infant daughters may show early signs of PCOS from mothers

Infant daughters may show early signs of PCOS from mothers

The infant daughters of women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) show a higher level of an enzyme that activates testosterone and may be an early sign of developing the complex genetic disease, according to a new Northwestern Medicine study. [More]
Argentinian researchers develop plastic ovitrap to monitor, control Aedes aegypti mosquito

Argentinian researchers develop plastic ovitrap to monitor, control Aedes aegypti mosquito

Argentinian researchers from the Centro de Investigaciones de Plagas e Insecticidas have developed a new trap that can be used to effectively monitor and control the Aedes aegypti mosquito, which is the primary transmitter of Zika, dengue, chikungunya, and yellow fever. The trap is described in the Journal of Medical Entomology. [More]
WHO marks annual World Health Day, calls for global action on diabetes

WHO marks annual World Health Day, calls for global action on diabetes

The number of people living with diabetes has almost quadrupled since 1980 to 422 million adults, with most living in developing countries. Factors driving this dramatic rise include overweight and obesity, WHO announced ahead of World Health Day. [More]
Respiratory filter mask helps reduce impact of pollution on people with heart failure

Respiratory filter mask helps reduce impact of pollution on people with heart failure

The use of a respiratory filter mask, a common practice in China and Japan, among other countries, helps minimize the impact of pollution on people with heart failure during rush-hour traffic in cities such as São Paulo, Brazil. [More]
Liraglutide drug makes highly desirable foods less appealing to people

Liraglutide drug makes highly desirable foods less appealing to people

Understanding the motivations that drive humans to eat is an important consideration in the development of weight loss therapies. Now a study led by researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center helps explain how the diabetes and weight loss drug liraglutide acts on brain receptors to make enticing foods seems less desirable. [More]
Adding liraglutide to diet and exercise plan may help people lose weight, reduce diabetes risk

Adding liraglutide to diet and exercise plan may help people lose weight, reduce diabetes risk

For people with prediabetes who are overweight or obese, adding 3.0 mg of liraglutide for three years to a diet and exercise plan may lead to major health improvements, new industry-sponsored research suggests. The results will be presented Monday, April 4, at ENDO 2016, the annual meeting of the Endocrine Society, in Boston. [More]
Surgery better than widely used drugs for treating hyperparathyroidism

Surgery better than widely used drugs for treating hyperparathyroidism

While most cases of osteoporosis are caused by normal aging, another leading cause of the bone-loss disease is a condition called hyperparathyroidism, in which the parathyroid glands release an excessive amount of a hormone that regulates the body's calcium levels. [More]
Very few patients use FDA-approved medications for weight loss, new study suggests

Very few patients use FDA-approved medications for weight loss, new study suggests

Despite guidelines that advocate the use of weight loss medications to treat obesity, and the availability of FDA approved medications, very few patients use this treatment option, a new study suggests. The results will be presented Sunday, April 3, at ENDO 2016, the annual meeting of the Endocrine Society, in Boston. [More]
ADHD stimulant drugs may lower bone density in children and adolescents

ADHD stimulant drugs may lower bone density in children and adolescents

Children and teenagers who take stimulant drugs to treat attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may have lower bone density than their peers who do not take these medications, a new study finds. [More]
Bariatric arterial embolization safe, effective in sustaining weight loss in severely obese people

Bariatric arterial embolization safe, effective in sustaining weight loss in severely obese people

Findings from the early phase of a clinical trial led by Johns Hopkins investigators indicates that a new, minimally invasive weight loss treatment known as bariatric arterial embolization is safe and effective in sustaining weight loss in severely obese people. [More]
Combining aromatase inhibitors with growth hormone may help short adolescent boys grow taller

Combining aromatase inhibitors with growth hormone may help short adolescent boys grow taller

Aromatase inhibitors, when used for up to three years in combination with growth hormone, may effectively and safely help very short adolescent boys grow taller, new research suggests. The study results will be presented Sunday, April 3, at ENDO 2016, the annual meeting of the Endocrine Society in Boston. [More]
Increased consumption of antibiotics in childhood may lead to adolescent prediabetes

Increased consumption of antibiotics in childhood may lead to adolescent prediabetes

Young children who take antibiotics may disrupt their gut's microbial ecosystem and be more likely to develop prediabetes in adolescence, new research from Greece reports. The study results will be presented in a poster Sunday, April 3, at ENDO 2016, the annual meeting of the Endocrine Society, in Boston. [More]
Oral Salmonella-based vaccine could prevent Type 1 diabetes

Oral Salmonella-based vaccine could prevent Type 1 diabetes

A combined vaccine therapy including live Salmonella is a safe and effective way to prevent diabetes in mice and may point to future human therapies, a new study finds. The results will be on Sunday, April 3, at ENDO 2016, the annual meeting of the Endocrine Society, in Boston. [More]
Blast-related concussions result in hormone changes that lead to poor quality of life among veterans

Blast-related concussions result in hormone changes that lead to poor quality of life among veterans

A study in military veterans finds that explosive blast-related concussions frequently result in hormone changes leading to problems such as sleep disturbances, fatigue, depression and poor quality of life. The research, to be presented Saturday at the Endocrine Society's 98th annual meeting in Boston, evaluated hormone levels in 41 male veterans who had been deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan. [More]
New research links polycystic ovary syndrome, obesity to asthma in reproductive-age women

New research links polycystic ovary syndrome, obesity to asthma in reproductive-age women

Among reproductive-age women, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) as well as overweight and obesity are independently linked with asthma, new preliminary research from Australia suggests. The results will be presented in a poster Saturday, April 2, at ENDO 2016, the annual meeting of the Endocrine Society, in Boston. [More]
New promising therapy may improve curative potential of islet transplant for Type 1 diabetes

New promising therapy may improve curative potential of islet transplant for Type 1 diabetes

New research suggests pretreating cells with a peptide hormone may improve the success rate of pancreatic islet cell transplants, a procedure that holds great promise for curing Type 1 diabetes. The results will be presented Saturday, April 2, at the Endocrine Society's annual meeting, ENDO 2016, in Boston. [More]
Brominated fire retardants overstimulate aldosterone in a way that may lead to cardiovascular disease

Brominated fire retardants overstimulate aldosterone in a way that may lead to cardiovascular disease

Brominated fire retardants, used in many consumer products and known to cause hormonal irregularities, overstimulates an adrenal gland hormone in a way that may lead to the development of cardiovascular disease, new research in human cells finds. Researchers will present their study results Saturday at the Endocrine Society's 98th annual meeting in Boston. [More]
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