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A hormone is a chemical released by one or more cells that affects cells in other parts of the organism. Only a small amount of hormone is required to alter cell metabolism. It is essentially a chemical messenger that transports a signal from one cell to another.
Researchers help to gain greater insight into biological clock that sets pace for daily life

Researchers help to gain greater insight into biological clock that sets pace for daily life

Casey Diekman, assistant professor of mathematical sciences at New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT), is helping to gain greater insight into the biological clock that sets the pace for daily life. [More]
EPO administered to preterm infants linked with reduced risk of brain injury

EPO administered to preterm infants linked with reduced risk of brain injury

High-dose erythropoietin (EPO; a hormone) administered within 42 hours of birth to preterm infants was associated with a reduced risk of brain injury, as indicated by magnetic resonance imaging, according to a study in the August 27 issue of JAMA. [More]
Jardiance (empagliflozin) tablets now available in U.S. for people with diabetes

Jardiance (empagliflozin) tablets now available in U.S. for people with diabetes

Jardiance (empagliflozin) tablets are now available by prescription in pharmacies across the United States, including Walgreens, Rite Aid, Kroger and many other leading chain and independent retailers, according to Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and Eli Lilly and Company. [More]
Female rats whose great grandparents exposed to toxins become more vulnerable to stress

Female rats whose great grandparents exposed to toxins become more vulnerable to stress

Scientists have known that toxic effects of substances known as endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), found in both natural and human-made materials, can pass from one generation to the next, but new research shows that females with ancestral exposure to EDC may show especially adverse reactions to stress. [More]
Acromegaly and antisense therapy: an interview with Mark Diamond, CEO Antisense Therapeutics

Acromegaly and antisense therapy: an interview with Mark Diamond, CEO Antisense Therapeutics

Acromegaly is a chronic, life-threatening disease triggered by a benign tumour of the pituitary gland causing excessive growth hormone release. Oversupply of growth hormone stimulates liver, fat and kidney cells to produce excess levels of Insulin-Like Growth Factor I (IGFI), which causes abnormal growth of the bones of the hands, face and feet and bodily organs. [More]
UT Southwestern researchers discover crucial link between high insulin levels and obesity pathways

UT Southwestern researchers discover crucial link between high insulin levels and obesity pathways

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have identified a crucial link between high levels of insulin and pathways that lead to obesity, a finding that may have important implications when treating diabetes. [More]
Blood test could help gauge psychosis risk

Blood test could help gauge psychosis risk

Researchers have developed a multiplex blood assay that may aid the identification of high-risk individuals who will progress to psychosis. [More]
Amygdala stimulates stress responses in adults, say researchers

Amygdala stimulates stress responses in adults, say researchers

In contrast to evidence that the amygdala stimulates stress responses in adults, researchers at Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Emory University have found that the amygdala has an inhibitory effect on stress hormones during the early development of nonhuman primates. [More]
Study links high cortisol in infants with socioeconomic status of mothers during pregnancy

Study links high cortisol in infants with socioeconomic status of mothers during pregnancy

Women who are poor experience higher cortisol levels in pregnancy and give birth to infants with elevated levels of the stress hormone, putting them at greater risk for serious disease later in life, according to a new research from the University of Colorado Denver. [More]
Scientists suggest that type-1 and type-2 diabetes are result of same mechanism

Scientists suggest that type-1 and type-2 diabetes are result of same mechanism

Work by scientists at the Universities of Manchester and Auckland suggest that both major forms of diabetes are the result of the same mechanism. [More]
Researchers shed light on the dual action of aspirin

Researchers shed light on the dual action of aspirin

Hugely popular non-steroidal anti-inflammation drugs like aspirin, naproxen (marketed as Aleve) and ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) all work by inhibiting or killing an enzyme called cyclooxygenase - a key catalyst in production of hormone-like lipid compounds called prostaglandins that are linked to a variety of ailments, from headaches and arthritis to menstrual cramps and wound sepsis. [More]
Penn researchers analyze clinical practice guidelines

Penn researchers analyze clinical practice guidelines

The common thought in the medical community is that the randomized, controlled trial is the gold standard in medical research. [More]
Researchers identify microRNAs that differentiate male and female fruit flies

Researchers identify microRNAs that differentiate male and female fruit flies

Men and women differ in plenty of obvious ways, and scientists have long known that genetic differences buried deep within our DNA underlie these distinctions. In the past, most research has focused on understanding how the genes that encode proteins act as sex determinants. [More]
Amgen’s AMG 416 Phase 3 placebo-controlled study meets primary and secondary endpoints

Amgen’s AMG 416 Phase 3 placebo-controlled study meets primary and secondary endpoints

Amgen (NASDAQ: AMGN) today announced that a second placebo-controlled Phase 3 study evaluating AMG 416 for the treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), receiving hemodialysis, met its primary and all secondary endpoints. [More]
Lilly and Boehringer Ingelheim's Basaglar (insulin glargine injection) gets FDA's tentative approval

Lilly and Boehringer Ingelheim's Basaglar (insulin glargine injection) gets FDA's tentative approval

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today granted tentative approval for Basaglar (insulin glargine injection), which is indicated to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes and in combination with mealtime insulin in adults and pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes. [More]
Women seek hormonal treatments for menopausal symptoms from anti-aging clinicians

Women seek hormonal treatments for menopausal symptoms from anti-aging clinicians

Feeling that conventional doctors did not take their suffering seriously, women instead sought out hormonal treatments for menopausal symptoms from anti-aging clinicians, according to a Case Western Reserve University study that investigated the appeal of anti-aging medicine. [More]
Vitamin D deficiency affects fertility in women undergoing IVF

Vitamin D deficiency affects fertility in women undergoing IVF

Women with a vitamin D deficiency were nearly half as likely to conceive through in vitro fertilization (IVF) as women who had sufficient levels of the vitamin, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. [More]
Low intake of dietary salt could be dangerous

Low intake of dietary salt could be dangerous

Findings from a large, four-year study suggest that an inadequate amount of salt in the diet could increase the risk of poor cardiovascular outcomes and death. [More]
Even with no explicit memory of childhood trauma, PTSD can develop in adulthood

Even with no explicit memory of childhood trauma, PTSD can develop in adulthood

There are many forms of memory and only some of these may be critical for the development of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), reports a new study by researchers at the University at Albany and the University of California Los Angeles. [More]
Recurrence of breast cancer cut by ½ in overweight women who regularly use NSAIDs

Recurrence of breast cancer cut by ½ in overweight women who regularly use NSAIDs

Recurrence of hormone-related breast cancer was cut by half in overweight and obese women who regularly used aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), according to data published in Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. [More]