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Height affects risk of major non-communicable diseases

Height affects risk of major non-communicable diseases

Height is largely genetically determined, but in recent decades the height of children and adults has steadily increased throughout the world: In adulthood the children are almost always significantly taller than their parents. [More]
New study finds steep decline in basic science publications

New study finds steep decline in basic science publications

A new study has found a steep decline in the number of scholarly papers about basic science published in leading medical journals in the last 20 years. [More]
Discovery could lead to new leukaemia therapies

Discovery could lead to new leukaemia therapies

Human blood cells have olfactory receptors that respond to Sandalore. This could provide a starting point for new leukaemia therapies, as researchers from Bochum report in in the journal "Cell Death Discovery". [More]
New drug cocktail may show promise in NSCLC patients

New drug cocktail may show promise in NSCLC patients

A drug approved by the Food and Drug Administration for melanoma in combination with a common cholesterol-lowering drug may show promise in controlling cancer growth in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), according to new research from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. [More]
New article provides guidance on managing critically ill patients at risk for alcohol withdrawal

New article provides guidance on managing critically ill patients at risk for alcohol withdrawal

Alcohol withdrawal adds challenges to caring for critically ill patients, and nurses must be diligent at each stage of care to minimize complications, according to an article in the February issue of Critical Care Nurse. [More]
MYB-QKI fusion gene that drives pediatric low-grade gliomas poses a triple threat

MYB-QKI fusion gene that drives pediatric low-grade gliomas poses a triple threat

Oncology researchers have discovered that an abnormal fused gene that drives pediatric brain tumors poses a triple threat, operating simultaneously through three distinct biological mechanisms—the first such example in cancer biology. [More]
New way of using MRI scanners to diagnose multiple sclerosis

New way of using MRI scanners to diagnose multiple sclerosis

A new way of using MRI scanners to look for evidence of multiple sclerosis in the brain has been successfully tested by researchers at The University of Nottingham and Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust. [More]
Researchers use new method to assess quality of colonoscopies performed in outpatient facilities

Researchers use new method to assess quality of colonoscopies performed in outpatient facilities

Colonoscopies are now a routine preventive diagnostic test for millions of Americans each year. While rates are low, complications like perforation, bleeding, and anesthesia-related heart failure can occur. Yale School of Medicine researchers have now developed a quality measure that uses follow-up hospital visits to track the variation in colonoscopy quality among outpatient facilities. [More]
Coordinated specialty care more cost-effective for young people with first episode psychosis

Coordinated specialty care more cost-effective for young people with first episode psychosis

New analysis from a mental health care study shows that "coordinated specialty care" (CSC) for young people with first episode psychosis is more cost-effective than typical community care. Cost-effectiveness analysis in health care is a way to compare the costs and benefits of two or more treatment options. [More]
Study examines ways to develop predictive tool for cesarean delivery in nulliparous patients

Study examines ways to develop predictive tool for cesarean delivery in nulliparous patients

In a study to be presented on Feb. 4 in an oral concurrent session at 1:15 p.m. EST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting, in Atlanta, researchers will present findings from a study titled, How to Predict Cesarean Delivery in the Nulliparous Patient: Results from the Prospective Multi-center Genesis Study. [More]
CellSonic treatments reduce problems of muscles recovering after exertion

CellSonic treatments reduce problems of muscles recovering after exertion

Since non-invasive shockwaves were used forty years ago to remove kidney stones and became standard procedure in all hospitals worldwide for having no side effects, they have been used in many other applications. [More]
Mount Sinai researchers report new method to restore microbiome of newborns delivered via C-section

Mount Sinai researchers report new method to restore microbiome of newborns delivered via C-section

Scientists from the Icahn Institute for Genomics and Multiscale Biology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, collaborating with NYU Langone Medical Center and a multi-center team of researchers, demonstrated for the first time that the microbiome of newborn babies delivered via cesarean section (C-section) can be partially restored to resemble that of vaginally delivered infants. [More]
Researchers identify definitive genetic defect in angiocentric gliomas

Researchers identify definitive genetic defect in angiocentric gliomas

Diagnosis and treatment decisions for a recently recognized type of children's brain tumor should be improved by the discovery of the genetic mechanism that causes it, say researchers who identified the unusual DNA abnormality in angiocentric gliomas. [More]
Electronic medical data could help verify link between maternal obesity and diabetes to autism

Electronic medical data could help verify link between maternal obesity and diabetes to autism

Scientists show they can use electronic medical records and birth information to verify and strengthen an already suspected link between autistic children and pregnant mothers with obesity and diabetes. [More]
Higher aerobic fitness levels may improve chances of survival after first heart attack

Higher aerobic fitness levels may improve chances of survival after first heart attack

People who are fit are more likely to survive their first heart attack, according to a study of nearly 70,000 patients of Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit. [More]
Frequent consumption of nuts may reduce risk of breast, colon, pancreatic and lung cancer

Frequent consumption of nuts may reduce risk of breast, colon, pancreatic and lung cancer

Adding nuts to your diet is associated to a reduction in the risk of cancer. This is the main conclusion of multiple studies that have shown that eating 2 or 3 servings per week (57-84 g) of nuts is associated to a reduction in the risk of some types of cancer (breast, colon, pancreatic and lung cancer). [More]
Confronting the global concern of pressure ulcers

Confronting the global concern of pressure ulcers

Almost 700,000 people in the UK are affected by pressure ulcers every year, making this global issue a substantial concern for health professionals and care units worldwide. [More]
Frequent traumatic experiences throughout infancy increase risk of psychosis during adulthood

Frequent traumatic experiences throughout infancy increase risk of psychosis during adulthood

A research carried out with participation of the University of Granada proves that suffering repeated traumatic experiences throughout infancy and adolescence multiplies by 7 the risk of suffering psychosis during adulthood. [More]
Proton beam therapy safe for treating childhood brain cancer medulloblastoma

Proton beam therapy safe for treating childhood brain cancer medulloblastoma

Proton beam therapy--a more precise form of radiotherapy--to treat the childhood brain cancer medulloblastoma appears to be as safe as conventional radiotherapy with similar survival rates, according to new research published in The Lancet Oncology journal today. [More]
Research offers novel insights into root causes of schizophrenia

Research offers novel insights into root causes of schizophrenia

Schizophrenia is a mysterious and devastating disorder that afflicts one percent of the adult population worldwide. Its symptoms — hallucinations, emotional withdrawal, and cognitive impairment — are chronic and typically emerge just as individuals are entering adulthood. Today's medications treat just one of these symptoms (psychosis); treatments for the underlying disease and its many other symptoms have been hard to develop, because no one really understands what causes the disorder. [More]
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