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MEDI4736 and tremelimumab combination shows acceptable safety, potential efficacy in NSCLC patients

MEDI4736 and tremelimumab combination shows acceptable safety, potential efficacy in NSCLC patients

Advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients have few effective treatment options and low 5-year survival rates. The checkpoint inhibitors MEDI4736 and tremelimumab have both demonstrated acceptable safety and potential efficacy when used as single-agents in several different types of cancer. [More]
Rapid-deployment plasma protocol helps treat trauma victims faster in the ER

Rapid-deployment plasma protocol helps treat trauma victims faster in the ER

Traumatic injury is the leading cause of death among people under age 45, but if trauma physicians could deliver plasma to these injury victims within minutes of their arrival in the emergency room, more of them would stand a better chance of survival. [More]
JAK2 inhibitor ruxolitinib shows promise in treating CMML patients

JAK2 inhibitor ruxolitinib shows promise in treating CMML patients

Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) is a rare type of myelodysplastic, myeloproliferative neoplasm characterized by increased numbers of peripheral monocytes and less than 20 percent blasts. CMML has few treatment options and patients only survive on average for 12 to 24 months. [More]
Green tea components may help prevent prostate cancer development in at-risk men

Green tea components may help prevent prostate cancer development in at-risk men

Prostate cancer is the second most common type of cancer in men and is predicted to result in an estimated 220,00 cases in the United States in 2015. In recent years, an emphasis has been placed on chemoprevention - the use of agents to prevent the development or progression of prostate cancer. [More]
Therapy for genetically-caused emphysema slows progression of lung disease

Therapy for genetically-caused emphysema slows progression of lung disease

A landmark clinical study in the Lancet provides convincing evidence that a frequently overlooked therapy for genetically-caused emphysema is effective and slows the progression of lung disease. [More]
Healthcare workers serve as vector for MRSA transmission in nursing home settings

Healthcare workers serve as vector for MRSA transmission in nursing home settings

Healthcare workers frequently contaminate their gloves and gowns during every day care of nursing homes residents with drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus or MRSA, according to a new study. The findings were published online today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. [More]
New study examines best practices in teaching medical students to better detect skin lesions

New study examines best practices in teaching medical students to better detect skin lesions

Each year, thousands of Canadians are given the news: they have skin cancer. It is the most common form of cancer in Canada and around the world, but if detected early, survival rates are extremely high. According to Liam Rourke, it doesn't happen nearly as often as it could. [More]
Surprising link found between creative problem-solving and increased activity in the cerebellum

Surprising link found between creative problem-solving and increased activity in the cerebellum

Investigators at Stanford University have found a surprising link between creative problem-solving and heightened activity in the cerebellum, a structure located in the back of the brain and more typically thought of as the body's movement-coordination center. [More]
Penn State to receive $1.84 million over five years to explore craniosynostosis

Penn State to receive $1.84 million over five years to explore craniosynostosis

Penn State will receive $1.84 million over five years as a subcontract on a National Institutes of Health grant through the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, N.Y., to explore craniosynostosis, a birth defect that includes facial and cranial dysmorphology. [More]
Researchers suggest new target for treating BRAF inhibitor-resistant melanoma tumors

Researchers suggest new target for treating BRAF inhibitor-resistant melanoma tumors

A new collaborative study led by researchers at Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute, published today in Cell Reports, provides new insight into the molecular changes that lead to resistance to a commonly prescribed group of drugs called BRAF inhibitors. [More]
Janssen, Bayer HealthCare initiate CALLISTO program to study rivaroxaban in patients with active cancer

Janssen, Bayer HealthCare initiate CALLISTO program to study rivaroxaban in patients with active cancer

Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and its development partner, Bayer HealthCare, today announced the initiation of CALLISTO, a new comprehensive clinical research program for their novel oral anticoagulant, rivaroxaban, in patients with active cancer. The studies are evaluating the medicine for the prevention and treatment of life-threatening blood clots in patients with a wide range of cancer types. [More]
ClearDATA closes $25 million Series C funding round

ClearDATA closes $25 million Series C funding round

ClearDATA announced today the close of an over-subscribed $25 million Series C funding round with contributions from Heritage Group, HLM Venture Partners and Flare Capital Partners, along with existing investors Norwest Venture Partners, Merck Global Health Innovation Fund and Excel Venture Management. [More]
SurgiQuest receives FDA clearance for AirSeal System for Transanal Endoscopic Surgery

SurgiQuest receives FDA clearance for AirSeal System for Transanal Endoscopic Surgery

SurgiQuest, Inc., a leading provider of innovative access technologies for minimally invasive surgery (MIS), today announced that its AirSeal System recently received 510(k) Clearance from the FDA for Transanal Endoscopic Surgery (TES). [More]
Clementia Pharmaceuticals commences multi-center study of patients with fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva

Clementia Pharmaceuticals commences multi-center study of patients with fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva

Clementia Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced that it has commenced enrollment in the second part (Part B) of its natural history study in patients with fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP), a rare, severely disabling congenital myopathy characterized by painful, recurrent episodes of soft tissue swelling (flare-ups) that result in the formation of new, abnormal (heterotopic) bone in muscles, tendons and ligaments. [More]
Study shows how people's expectation of pain affects the experience of pain

Study shows how people's expectation of pain affects the experience of pain

Picture yourself in a medical office, anxiously awaiting your annual flu shot. The nurse casually states, "This won't hurt a bit." But when the needle pierces your skin it hurts, and it hurts a lot. Your expectations have been violated, and not in a good way. [More]
Study explores accuracy of body weight perception and obesity in Chinese Americans

Study explores accuracy of body weight perception and obesity in Chinese Americans

Worldwide, obesity is becoming more prevalent. According to The World Health Organization, worldwide obesity has nearly doubled since 1980, and in 2008 25% of adults aged 20 and over were overweight, and another 11% were obese. Obesity has been identified as a major source of unsustainable health costs and numerous adverse outcomes, including morbidity and mortality due to hypertension, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and certain types of cancer. [More]
Congress needs to act to incentivize development of genomic data systems

Congress needs to act to incentivize development of genomic data systems

The latest generation of genomic testing offers a chance for significant improvements in patient care, disease prevention, and possibly even the cost-effectiveness of healthcare, but Congress needs to act to incentivize the development of the massive data systems that doctors and regulators will need in order to make these tests safe and effective for patients. [More]
Out-of-pocket healthcare spending in U.S. expected to reach $608 billion by 2015

Out-of-pocket healthcare spending in U.S. expected to reach $608 billion by 2015

The amount Americans spend on healthcare out of pocket reached $416 billion in 2014 and with growth of 8% will reach $608 billion by 2015. Americans spend on three categories out of pocket: directly on expenditures, co-pays as part of office visits and hospital visits and drug purchases, and on premiums. [More]
States may not save much money by ending adult dental coverage under Medicaid: Study

States may not save much money by ending adult dental coverage under Medicaid: Study

A new study suggests that states may not save as much money as anticipated by eliminating adult dental coverage under Medicaid. [More]
3-D imaging technique may be useful for measuring efficacy of injectable wrinkle reducers

3-D imaging technique may be useful for measuring efficacy of injectable wrinkle reducers

A three-dimensional imaging technique often used in the automotive and aerospace industries for accurate measurement may be useful to measure the efficacy of injectable wrinkle reducers such as Botox and Dysport, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
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