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Study shows birth defects in immune system function may contribute to malnutrition

Study shows birth defects in immune system function may contribute to malnutrition

Malnourished children are most likely to die from common infections, not starvation alone, and immune disorder may be part of the cause, according to a review led by Queen Mary University of London. [More]
Fasting-mimicking diet may help decrease multiple sclerosis symptoms

Fasting-mimicking diet may help decrease multiple sclerosis symptoms

Evidence is mounting that a diet mimicking the effects of fasting has health benefits beyond weight loss, with a new USC-led study indicating that it may reduce symptoms of multiple sclerosis. [More]
New therapy may reduce stroke risk in severe sickle cell disease patients

New therapy may reduce stroke risk in severe sickle cell disease patients

Eleven-year-old Martin Mwita, of Omaha, has made more than 300 visits to health care facilities since he was a baby. Because of sickle cell disease, he's suffered three strokes and countless other health episodes. [More]
Self-care can help nurses manage compassion fatigue

Self-care can help nurses manage compassion fatigue

The heart of healthcare is stressed. With longer shifts, staffing shortages and healthcare changes taxing our nurses, it's no surprise that up to 80 percent report suffering compassion fatigue at some point in their careers, according to recent studies. [More]
Study explores differences in neuroimaging utilization for stroke from population perspective

Study explores differences in neuroimaging utilization for stroke from population perspective

A person is admitted to the hospital with a stroke, but not much is known about whether or not that patient will undergo neuroimaging. [More]
New, screen-printed, flexible MRI coils could lead to shorter scan time periods

New, screen-printed, flexible MRI coils could lead to shorter scan time periods

New, screen-printed, flexible MRI coils may be able to reduce the amount of time it takes to get an MRI scan. [More]
Specific immune system genes may determine how long people can live with glioblastoma

Specific immune system genes may determine how long people can live with glioblastoma

Researchers have identified a group of immune system genes that may play a role in how long people can live after developing a common type of brain cancer called glioblastoma multiforme, a tumor of the glial cells in the brain. [More]
CGT, CTM CRC collaborate to test patented scaffold technology for commercial scale cell expansion systems

CGT, CTM CRC collaborate to test patented scaffold technology for commercial scale cell expansion systems

The Cell and Gene Therapy Catapult and the CRC for Cell Therapy Manufacturing, the Australian centre for translation of cell therapy technologies, today announce a project to test at scale CTM CRC’s patented scaffold technology. [More]
ART trial: Adacolumn shows clinical benefit in refractory ulcerative colitis patients

ART trial: Adacolumn shows clinical benefit in refractory ulcerative colitis patients

Data from the 48-week ART trial, presented today at the Digestive Disease Week meeting, showed that remission and response rates were 37.2% and 53.2% respectively at week 12, in patients with moderate-to-severe, steroid-dependent active ulcerative colitis (UC) with insufficient response or intolerance to immunosuppressants and / or biologics when treated with between five and eight sessions with Adacolumn. [More]
Clinical study supports safety, efficacy of GI Windows’ IAS as treatment option for Type 2 diabetes

Clinical study supports safety, efficacy of GI Windows’ IAS as treatment option for Type 2 diabetes

GI Windows, Inc., a clinical-stage medical device company, today announced the presentation of six-month results of the first-ever clinical study evaluating the endoscopic creation of a dual-path enteral diversion using the company’s Incision-less Anastomosis System (IAS) at Digestive Disease Week® 2016 (DDW), in San Diego, Calif. [More]
Majority of young adults with abdominal obesity unaware of CKD risk

Majority of young adults with abdominal obesity unaware of CKD risk

Many young adults with abdominal obesity exhibit a readily detectable risk factor for chronic kidney disease (CKD), yet the vast majority don't know they're at risk, according to a study of nationwide health data led by Albert Einstein College of Medicine researchers that was published online today in the journal PLOS ONE. [More]
ART alone not sufficient to reduce arterial inflammation among HIV-infected patients, study finds

ART alone not sufficient to reduce arterial inflammation among HIV-infected patients, study finds

Initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) soon after diagnosis of an HIV infection did not prevent the progression of significant arterial inflammation in a small group of previously untreated patients. [More]
Combining sonoporation with chemotherapy drug may help improve pancreatic cancer treatment

Combining sonoporation with chemotherapy drug may help improve pancreatic cancer treatment

Researchers at Haukeland University Hospital in Bergen, Norway have combined a laboratory ultrasound technique called "sonoporation" with the commercially-available chemotherapy compound Gemcitabine to increase the porosity of pancreatic cells with microbubbles and to help get the drug into cancer cells where it is needed. [More]
Pre-treatment with antihistamines may suppress gastrointestinal symptoms of food allergy

Pre-treatment with antihistamines may suppress gastrointestinal symptoms of food allergy

Simultaneous pre-treatment with antihistamines that block both the H1 and H4 antihistamine receptors suppressed the gastrointestinal symptoms of food allergy in mice, according to researchers at National Jewish Health. [More]
First large-scale proteogenomic study helps pinpoint genes that drive breast cancer

First large-scale proteogenomic study helps pinpoint genes that drive breast cancer

Building on data from The Cancer Genome Atlas project, a multi-institutional team of scientists has completed the first large-scale "proteogenomic" study of breast cancer, linking DNA mutations to protein signaling and helping pinpoint the genes that drive cancer. [More]
The National MDS Study aims to identify causes, genetic makeup of fatal blood diseases

The National MDS Study aims to identify causes, genetic makeup of fatal blood diseases

The National Myelodysplastic Syndromes Natural History Study is underway, the ECOG-ACRIN Cancer Research Group and its collaborators announced today. [More]
Common pain and anti-inflammation drugs may slow cancer growth

Common pain and anti-inflammation drugs may slow cancer growth

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have found that one of the most widely prescribed pain and anti-inflammation drugs slows the growth rate of a specific kind of cancer in animal models and suggests the medication could have the same effect on other types of tumors. [More]
Hospital-initiated smoking cessation interventions may improve patient outcomes, decrease re-hospitalization

Hospital-initiated smoking cessation interventions may improve patient outcomes, decrease re-hospitalization

A new study from the University of Ottawa Heart Institute, in collaboration with the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, has established that greater adoption of hospital-initiated tobacco cessation interventions improve patient outcomes and decrease further healthcare utilization. [More]
Early diagnosis of lung cancer can increase survival rate by 73%

Early diagnosis of lung cancer can increase survival rate by 73%

The UK Lung cancer screening trial (UKLS) has been successfully completed and demonstrated that patients with a high risk of developing lung cancer can be identified with early stage disease and have up to a 73% chance of surviving for five years or more. The UKLS trial was conducted by experts in the University of Liverpool. [More]
UofL expands oncology research with addition of 33,000 human tissue samples

UofL expands oncology research with addition of 33,000 human tissue samples

The University of Louisville has expanded its oncology research strength through the addition of approximately 33,000 human tissue samples and specimens. The samples were transferred by Catholic Health Initiatives to further the shared commitment and collaboration in advancing research and action in the fight against cancer. [More]
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