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Advances in brain research since patient HM: an interview with Dr Jacopo Annese

Advances in brain research since patient HM: an interview with Dr Jacopo Annese

Jacopo Annese, President and CEO of the Institute for Brain and Society, a non-profit organization dedicated to democratizing neuroscience and making neuroscience tools and knowledge about the brain more available to the public, discusses his work on the Human Brain Library. [More]
Three like-minded nonprofits collaborate to launch immunotherapy clinical trial for pediatric brain tumors

Three like-minded nonprofits collaborate to launch immunotherapy clinical trial for pediatric brain tumors

A Kids' Brain Tumor Cure Foundation, Solving Kids' Cancer and the Ty Louis Campbell Foundation announce their joint financial support of a Phase 1 clinical trial to test the safety and efficacy of combination checkpoint inhibitors in the treatment of children with brain tumors. [More]
Non-coding RNAs play key role in maintaining proper balance between fighting infection and inflammation

Non-coding RNAs play key role in maintaining proper balance between fighting infection and inflammation

Special RNA molecules called long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are key controllers for maintaining immune health when fighting infection or preventing inflammatory disorders, according to research led by Jorge Henao-Mejia, MD, PhD, an assistant professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Study explores how parental use of religious coping strategies in NICU affects family's interactions

Study explores how parental use of religious coping strategies in NICU affects family's interactions

Understanding how parents cope while their child is in the neonatal intensive care unit could lead to better support for the family and a more successful transition to home when the baby is healthy, according to Penn State College of Medicine and Penn State Harrisburg researchers. [More]
People with psychosis engage in low levels of physical activity, study reveals

People with psychosis engage in low levels of physical activity, study reveals

A large international study of more than 200,000 people in nearly 50 countries has revealed that people with psychosis engage in low levels of physical activity, and men with psychosis are over two times more likely to miss global activity targets compared to people without the illness. [More]
Avoiding foods high in AGEs could help protect from developing diabetes

Avoiding foods high in AGEs could help protect from developing diabetes

Simple changes in how we cook could go a long way towards preventing diabetes, say researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. [More]
Higher continuity of care for seniors linked to lower risk of visiting emergency department

Higher continuity of care for seniors linked to lower risk of visiting emergency department

Seniors with traditional Medicare coverage who have more continuity of care - defined as consistently seeing the same physician in an outpatient setting - have lower chances of visiting an emergency department, according to the results of a study published online earlier this month in Annals of Emergency Medicine. [More]
Research supports potential role for cognitive activity in prevention of Alzheimer's disease

Research supports potential role for cognitive activity in prevention of Alzheimer's disease

Are there any ways of preventing or delaying the development of Alzheimer's disease or other forms of age-associated dementia? While several previously published studies have suggested a protective effect for cognitive activities such as reading, playing games or attending cultural events, questions have been raised about whether these studies reveal a real cause-and-effect relationship or if the associations could result from unmeasured factors. [More]
HMS study reveals key instigator of nerve cell damage in ALS patients

HMS study reveals key instigator of nerve cell damage in ALS patients

Scientists from Harvard Medical School have identified a key instigator of nerve cell damage in people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS, a progressive and incurable neurodegenerative disorder. [More]
New noninvasive treatment option improves quality of life in patients with essential tremor

New noninvasive treatment option improves quality of life in patients with essential tremor

Treatment with MRI-guided focused ultrasound significantly improves tremors and quality of life in patients with essential tremor (ET), the most common movement disorder, according to a study published in the August 25 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
Diabetes drug linked to decreased weight gain in children with autism spectrum disorder

Diabetes drug linked to decreased weight gain in children with autism spectrum disorder

The diabetes medication metformin hydrochloride was associated with decreased weight gain in a small clinical trial of children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder who were taking atypical antipsychotics to treat symptoms of irritability and agitation, according to an article published online by JAMA Psychiatry. [More]
Childhood brain injury increases chances of mental illness, poor school attainment and premature death

Childhood brain injury increases chances of mental illness, poor school attainment and premature death

Childhood brain injuries, including concussions, are associated with an increased risk of subsequent mental illness, poor school attainment and premature death, according to a study published today in PLOS Medicine. [More]
Malformations in the brains of fetuses caused by Zika virus go beyond microcephaly

Malformations in the brains of fetuses caused by Zika virus go beyond microcephaly

A recent study published by Brazilian researchers from the D'Or Institute for Research and Education, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Institute for Research Professor Amorim Neto, alongside Tel Aviv University and the Boston Children's Hospital in the US, indicates that microcephaly, a very usual feature in cases of Zika virus gestational infection, is just one of several observed brain changes. [More]
New research discovers how opposite-sex hormonal therapy influences the brain

New research discovers how opposite-sex hormonal therapy influences the brain

Women and men often show marked differences as regards mental illnesses. In order to learn more about this phenomenon, a project supported by the Austrian Science Fund FWF explored how opposite-sex hormonal therapy applied to transgender individuals influences the brain. [More]
European scientists invent new microscope for rapid detection of deadly infections

European scientists invent new microscope for rapid detection of deadly infections

A group of European scientists have invented a microscope that will allow the fastest ever detection of life-threatening infections caused by bacteria, such as E. coli or Staphylococcus, and conditions such as Meningitis, saving millions of lives every year. [More]
Acupuncture may be viable option to manage pain in children with complex medical conditions

Acupuncture may be viable option to manage pain in children with complex medical conditions

It appears that acupuncture may be a viable option for pain management when it comes to pediatric patients who have complex medical conditions, according to new research published by Gillette Children's Specialty Healthcare in St. Paul, Minnesota. [More]
NYU Lutheran offers many treatment options for kidney stone sufferers

NYU Lutheran offers many treatment options for kidney stone sufferers

Frederick A. Gulmi, MD, chief of urology at NYU Lutheran, cautions anyone who has never had a bout with kidney stones. [More]
Breast cancer patients in the U.S. now have new surgical option that offers flexible alternative for cancer detection

Breast cancer patients in the U.S. now have new surgical option that offers flexible alternative for cancer detection

Breast cancer patients in the U.S. will have a new surgical option that eliminates exposure to radioactive materials and offers a less invasive, more flexible alternative for cancer detection. Receiving FDA approval in April and a distribution deal this month, the new device will be used to locate early stage tumors that cannot yet be felt. [More]
Penn scientists develop combined medical and surgical care plan for managing Crohn's disease

Penn scientists develop combined medical and surgical care plan for managing Crohn's disease

The first published combined medical and surgical care plan for managing septic perianal Crohn's disease, a serious complication that occurs in around 40 percent of Crohn's disease patients, has been developed by researchers at Penn State College of Medicine. [More]
Penn researchers develop model to predict sudden cardiac death risk

Penn researchers develop model to predict sudden cardiac death risk

Each year more than 300,000 Americans will succumb to out-of-hospital sudden cardiac death (SCD) -- the immediate and unexpected cessation of the heart's ability to function properly -- one of the leading causes of death in the United States. [More]
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