Huntington's Disease News and Research RSS Feed - Huntington's Disease News and Research

Huntington's disease (HD) results from genetically programmed degeneration of brain cells, called neurons, in certain areas of the brain. This degeneration causes uncontrolled movements, loss of intellectual faculties, and emotional disturbance. HD is a familial disease, passed from parent to child through a mutation in the normal gene. Each child of an HD parent has a 50-50 chance of inheriting the HD gene. If a child does not inherit the HD gene, he or she will not develop the disease and cannot pass it to subsequent generations. A person who inherits the HD gene will sooner or later develop the disease. Whether one child inherits the gene has no bearing on whether others will or will not inherit the gene. Some early symptoms of HD are mood swings, depression, irritability or trouble driving, learning new things, remembering a fact, or making a decision. As the disease progresses, concentration on intellectual tasks becomes increasingly difficult and the patient may have difficulty feeding himself or herself and swallowing. The rate of disease progression and the age of onset vary from person to person. A genetic test, coupled with a complete medical history and neurological and laboratory tests, helps physicians diagnose HD. Presymptomic testing is available for individuals who are at risk for carrying the HD gene. In 1 to 3 percent of individuals with HD, no family history of HD can be found.
Omeros receives EMA CHMP positive opinion for Omidria for cataract, IOL replacement surgery

Omeros receives EMA CHMP positive opinion for Omidria for cataract, IOL replacement surgery

Omeros Corporation, a biopharmaceutical company committed to discovering, developing and commercializing small-molecule and protein therapeutics for both large-market as well as orphan indications targeting inflammation, coagulopathies and disorders of the central nervous system, today announced that the European Medicines Agency's (EMA's) Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) has adopted a positive opinion for Omidria® (phenylephrine and ketorolac injection) 1%/0.3%. [More]
Study finds similarity in clinical progression between human patients and Huntington's disease monkeys

Study finds similarity in clinical progression between human patients and Huntington's disease monkeys

Transgenic Huntington's disease monkeys show similarity to humans with Huntington's in their progressive neurodegeneration and decline of motor control, scientists from Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Emory University, report. [More]
Researchers identify gene variant that affects onset of Huntington's disease

Researchers identify gene variant that affects onset of Huntington's disease

Researchers at Sweden's Karolinska Institutet and the University of British Columbia, Canada, have identified a gene variant that influences whether Huntington's disease breaks out earlier or later than expected. The findings, which are published in the scientific journal Nature Neuroscience, can contribute to improved diagnosis and disease-modifying therapies. [More]
New understanding of how Huntington's disease gene works

New understanding of how Huntington's disease gene works

Huntington's disease is caused by a mutation in the Huntington's disease gene, but it has long been a mystery why some people with the exact same mutation get the disease more severely and earlier than others. A closer look at the DNA around the Huntington's disease (HD) gene offers researchers a new understanding of how the gene is controlled and how this affects the disease. [More]
Neurocrine reports net loss of $1.2 million for first quarter 2015

Neurocrine reports net loss of $1.2 million for first quarter 2015

Neurocrine Biosciences, Inc. today announced its financial results for the quarter ended March 31, 2015. For the first quarter of 2015, the Company reported a net loss of $1.2 million, or $0.01 loss per share, compared to a net loss of $11.8 million, or $0.17 loss per share, for the same period in 2014. [More]
Sangamo BioSciences to present data on ZFP Therapeutic platform at ASGCT meeting

Sangamo BioSciences to present data on ZFP Therapeutic platform at ASGCT meeting

Sangamo BioSciences, Inc. announced that data from clinical, preclinical and research-stage programs focused on the development of ZFP Therapeutics will be presented at the 18th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy [More]
Fifth patient dosed in Benitec's TT-034 Phase I/IIa clinical trial for prevention of HCV infection

Fifth patient dosed in Benitec's TT-034 Phase I/IIa clinical trial for prevention of HCV infection

Benitec Biopharma, a biopharmaceutical company focused on providing potentially curative therapies with its proprietary gene-silencing technology called ddRNAi or "expressed RNAi," is pleased to advise that the fifth patient in the company's 'first in man', Phase I/IIa dose escalation clinical trial of TT-034 for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, has today, been dosed at the Duke Clinical Research Unit. [More]
Study could lead to new therapeutic targets for treating Huntington's disease

Study could lead to new therapeutic targets for treating Huntington's disease

An international study led by researchers from Université Laval and CHU de Québec-Université Laval has identified significant vascular changes in the brains of people with Huntington's disease. This breakthrough, the details of which are published in the most recent issue of Annals of Neurology, will have significant implications for our understanding of the disease and could open the door to new therapeutic targets for treating this fatal neurodegenerative condition. [More]
Plymouth researchers receive grant to develop effective therapy for Huntington's disease

Plymouth researchers receive grant to develop effective therapy for Huntington's disease

Huntington's disease is an hereditary disorder of the nervous system caused by a faulty gene on chromosome four. The faulty gene leads to nerve damage in the area of the brain resulting in gradual physical, mental and emotional changes. Those born to a parent with Huntington's disease have a 50:50 chance of developing it, and there is currently no cure. [More]
Study: Broken communication in brain regions appears to worsen Huntington's disease

Study: Broken communication in brain regions appears to worsen Huntington's disease

Indiana University researchers have found that broken communication in a specific part of the brain plays a role in the involuntary physical movements that affect individuals with Huntington's disease. [More]
Omeros announces commercial availability of Omidria in U.S.

Omeros announces commercial availability of Omidria in U.S.

Omeros Corporation, a biopharmaceutical company committed to discovering, developing and commercializing small-molecule and protein therapeutics for large-market as well as orphan indications targeting inflammation, coagulopathies and disorders of the central nervous system, announced today the nationwide commercial availability of Omidria (phenylephrine and ketorolac injection) 1%/0.3%. [More]
Neurocrine Biosciences, Mitsubishi Tanabe to develop and commercialize NBI-98854 in select Asian markets

Neurocrine Biosciences, Mitsubishi Tanabe to develop and commercialize NBI-98854 in select Asian markets

Neurocrine Biosciences, Inc. today announced that it has entered into an exclusive collaboration and licensing agreement for the development and commercialization of its VMAT2 inhibitor, NBI-98854, in Japan and other select Asian markets with Mitsubishi Tanabe Pharma Corporation. [More]
Northwestern Medicine opens multidisciplinary treatment center for patients battling Huntington's disease

Northwestern Medicine opens multidisciplinary treatment center for patients battling Huntington's disease

Northwestern Medicine recently launched a multidisciplinary center dedicated to the comprehensive treatment of patients battling Huntington's disease. The new center will focus on both patient care and research of the inherited disease that causes the progressive breakdown of nerve cells in the brain. [More]
Broad Institute of MIT researcher honored for groundbreaking research using new gene editing tool

Broad Institute of MIT researcher honored for groundbreaking research using new gene editing tool

The newest gene editing tool - called CRISPR-Cas9 - is leading to new research possibilities in cell biology and neuroscience. This includes the ability to make transgenic animal models more quickly, which helps researchers better study diseases that affect thousands of people each year. [More]

IUPUI professor receives grant to model human motor movements for Huntington's research

Yaroslav Molkov, assistant professor of mathematics in the School of Science at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, in collaboration with researchers at Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, has received a grant to use computational modeling to map a motor control system to study Huntington's disease. [More]
Fourth patient dosed in Benitec Biopharma's Phase I/IIa hepatitis C trial

Fourth patient dosed in Benitec Biopharma's Phase I/IIa hepatitis C trial

Benitec Biopharma, a biopharmaceutical company focused on providing potentially curative therapies with its proprietary gene-silencing technology called ddRNAi or "expressed RNAi," today announced that the fourth patient in the company's Phase I/IIa dose escalation clinical trial of its lead program TT-034 for treating hepatitis C was dosed at the Duke Clinical Research Unit. [More]
Brain scientists map changes in communication between nerve cells in rats

Brain scientists map changes in communication between nerve cells in rats

Lights, sound, action: we are constantly learning how to incorporate outside sensations into our reactions in specific situations. In a new study, brain scientists have mapped changes in communication between nerve cells as rats learned to make specific decisions in response to particular sounds. The team then used this map to accurately predict the rats' reactions. These results add to our understanding of how the brain processes sensations and forms memories to inform behavior. [More]
New genetic discovery may lead to effective treatments for Huntington's disease

New genetic discovery may lead to effective treatments for Huntington's disease

A new genetic discovery in the field of Huntington's disease (HD) could mean a more effective way in determining severity of this neurological disease when using specific treatments. This study may provide insight for treatments that would be effective in slowing down or postponing the death of neurons for people who carry the HD gene mutation, but who do not yet show symptoms of the disease. [More]
FDA accepts Sangamo BioSciences' IND for SB-BCLmR-HSPC genome editing approach

FDA accepts Sangamo BioSciences' IND for SB-BCLmR-HSPC genome editing approach

Sangamo BioSciences, Inc. announced today that an Investigational New Drug (IND) application for the company's SB-BCLmR-HSPC genome editing approach, which is designed to provide a one-time lasting therapy for beta-thalassemia, has been accepted by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and is now active. [More]
Movement tracking device can effectively help assess progression of Parkinson's disease

Movement tracking device can effectively help assess progression of Parkinson's disease

A device that measures movement and balance can effectively help assess and track the progression of Parkinson's disease, even when medications are used to reduce Parkinson's symptoms, UT Southwestern Medical Center research found. [More]
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