Huntington's Disease News and Research RSS Feed - Huntington's Disease News and Research

Huntington's disease (HD) results from genetically programmed degeneration of brain cells, called neurons, in certain areas of the brain. This degeneration causes uncontrolled movements, loss of intellectual faculties, and emotional disturbance. HD is a familial disease, passed from parent to child through a mutation in the normal gene. Each child of an HD parent has a 50-50 chance of inheriting the HD gene. If a child does not inherit the HD gene, he or she will not develop the disease and cannot pass it to subsequent generations. A person who inherits the HD gene will sooner or later develop the disease. Whether one child inherits the gene has no bearing on whether others will or will not inherit the gene. Some early symptoms of HD are mood swings, depression, irritability or trouble driving, learning new things, remembering a fact, or making a decision. As the disease progresses, concentration on intellectual tasks becomes increasingly difficult and the patient may have difficulty feeding himself or herself and swallowing. The rate of disease progression and the age of onset vary from person to person. A genetic test, coupled with a complete medical history and neurological and laboratory tests, helps physicians diagnose HD. Presymptomic testing is available for individuals who are at risk for carrying the HD gene. In 1 to 3 percent of individuals with HD, no family history of HD can be found.
Imperial College London researchers discover new inherited form of obesity, type 2 diabetes

Imperial College London researchers discover new inherited form of obesity, type 2 diabetes

Scientists have discovered a new inherited form of obesity and type 2 diabetes in humans. A large number of genes are involved in regulating body weight, and there are now over 30 genes known in which people with harmful changes in DNA sequence become extremely overweight. Similarly, there are a number of genes that can, when altered, cause type 2 diabetes. These conditions are inherited through families in exactly the same way as disorders such as cystic fibrosis or Huntington's disease. [More]
New Internet tool may help analyze genes based on their evolutionary profile

New Internet tool may help analyze genes based on their evolutionary profile

Two major revolutions, one genomic and one in informatics, are completely changing the face of biomedical research. Every day all over the world, millions of genetic sequences -- from disease-related genes to complete genomes of plants, animals, bacteria and viruses -- are resolved, identified and dissected. [More]
Discovery may accelerate development of new drugs to treat Huntington's disease

Discovery may accelerate development of new drugs to treat Huntington's disease

By identifying in spinal fluid how the characteristic mutant proteins of Huntington's disease spread from cell to cell, UC Irvine scientists and colleagues have created a new method to quickly and accurately track the presence and proliferation of these neuron-damaging compounds -- a discovery that may accelerate the development of new drugs to treat this incurable disease. [More]
Benitec, ReNeuron collaborate to launch new exploratory cellular therapy program

Benitec, ReNeuron collaborate to launch new exploratory cellular therapy program

Benitec Biopharma is pleased to announce the launch of a new exploratory cellular therapy program including exosome-based delivery utilising the Company's proprietary ddRNAi technology. Entry into these areas have been facilitated by the commencement of a collaboration with UK-based stem cell therapeutics company, ReNeuron. [More]
TSRI study confirms role of Rhes protein in Huntington's disease

TSRI study confirms role of Rhes protein in Huntington's disease

Huntington's disease attacks the part of the brain that controls movement, destroying nerves with a barrage of toxicity, yet leaves other parts relatively unscathed. [More]
Omeros signs exclusive license agreement with Fagron affiliates for commercialization of OMS103

Omeros signs exclusive license agreement with Fagron affiliates for commercialization of OMS103

Omeros Corporation, a biopharmaceutical company committed to discovering, developing and commercializing small-molecule and protein therapeutics for both large-market as well as orphan indications, today announced that it has entered into an exclusive license agreement with affiliates of Fagron NV for the commercialization of OMS103, Omeros' product for arthroscopic surgery. [More]
TSRI scientists awarded $2.1 million grant to study protein closely linked to Parkinson's disease

TSRI scientists awarded $2.1 million grant to study protein closely linked to Parkinson's disease

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have been awarded $2.1 million from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke of The National Institutes of Health (NIH) to study a protein that has been closely linked in animal models to Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease. [More]
People with cognitive impairment have altered responses to pain

People with cognitive impairment have altered responses to pain

People with dementia and other forms of cognitive impairment (CI) have altered responses to pain, with many conditions associated with increased pain sensitivity, concludes a research review in PAIN, the official publication of the International Association for the Study of Pain. [More]
UC San Diego Health System designated as Center of Excellence for Huntington's disease

UC San Diego Health System designated as Center of Excellence for Huntington's disease

The Huntington's Disease Clinical Research Center at UC San Diego Health System has been designated a Center of Excellence by the Huntington's Disease Society of America. UC San Diego was one of only 29 centers nationwide to receive this prestigious designation, which recognizes centers for their elite multidisciplinary approach to Huntington's disease care and research. [More]
Omeros receives EMA CHMP positive opinion for Omidria for cataract, IOL replacement surgery

Omeros receives EMA CHMP positive opinion for Omidria for cataract, IOL replacement surgery

Omeros Corporation, a biopharmaceutical company committed to discovering, developing and commercializing small-molecule and protein therapeutics for both large-market as well as orphan indications targeting inflammation, coagulopathies and disorders of the central nervous system, today announced that the European Medicines Agency's (EMA's) Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) has adopted a positive opinion for Omidria® (phenylephrine and ketorolac injection) 1%/0.3%. [More]
Study finds similarity in clinical progression between human patients and Huntington's disease monkeys

Study finds similarity in clinical progression between human patients and Huntington's disease monkeys

Transgenic Huntington's disease monkeys show similarity to humans with Huntington's in their progressive neurodegeneration and decline of motor control, scientists from Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Emory University, report. [More]
Researchers identify gene variant that affects onset of Huntington's disease

Researchers identify gene variant that affects onset of Huntington's disease

Researchers at Sweden's Karolinska Institutet and the University of British Columbia, Canada, have identified a gene variant that influences whether Huntington's disease breaks out earlier or later than expected. The findings, which are published in the scientific journal Nature Neuroscience, can contribute to improved diagnosis and disease-modifying therapies. [More]
New understanding of how Huntington's disease gene works

New understanding of how Huntington's disease gene works

Huntington's disease is caused by a mutation in the Huntington's disease gene, but it has long been a mystery why some people with the exact same mutation get the disease more severely and earlier than others. A closer look at the DNA around the Huntington's disease (HD) gene offers researchers a new understanding of how the gene is controlled and how this affects the disease. [More]
Neurocrine reports net loss of $1.2 million for first quarter 2015

Neurocrine reports net loss of $1.2 million for first quarter 2015

Neurocrine Biosciences, Inc. today announced its financial results for the quarter ended March 31, 2015. For the first quarter of 2015, the Company reported a net loss of $1.2 million, or $0.01 loss per share, compared to a net loss of $11.8 million, or $0.17 loss per share, for the same period in 2014. [More]
Sangamo BioSciences to present data on ZFP Therapeutic platform at ASGCT meeting

Sangamo BioSciences to present data on ZFP Therapeutic platform at ASGCT meeting

Sangamo BioSciences, Inc. announced that data from clinical, preclinical and research-stage programs focused on the development of ZFP Therapeutics will be presented at the 18th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy [More]
Fifth patient dosed in Benitec's TT-034 Phase I/IIa clinical trial for prevention of HCV infection

Fifth patient dosed in Benitec's TT-034 Phase I/IIa clinical trial for prevention of HCV infection

Benitec Biopharma, a biopharmaceutical company focused on providing potentially curative therapies with its proprietary gene-silencing technology called ddRNAi or "expressed RNAi," is pleased to advise that the fifth patient in the company's 'first in man', Phase I/IIa dose escalation clinical trial of TT-034 for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, has today, been dosed at the Duke Clinical Research Unit. [More]
Study could lead to new therapeutic targets for treating Huntington's disease

Study could lead to new therapeutic targets for treating Huntington's disease

An international study led by researchers from Université Laval and CHU de Québec-Université Laval has identified significant vascular changes in the brains of people with Huntington's disease. This breakthrough, the details of which are published in the most recent issue of Annals of Neurology, will have significant implications for our understanding of the disease and could open the door to new therapeutic targets for treating this fatal neurodegenerative condition. [More]
Plymouth researchers receive grant to develop effective therapy for Huntington's disease

Plymouth researchers receive grant to develop effective therapy for Huntington's disease

Huntington's disease is an hereditary disorder of the nervous system caused by a faulty gene on chromosome four. The faulty gene leads to nerve damage in the area of the brain resulting in gradual physical, mental and emotional changes. Those born to a parent with Huntington's disease have a 50:50 chance of developing it, and there is currently no cure. [More]
Study: Broken communication in brain regions appears to worsen Huntington's disease

Study: Broken communication in brain regions appears to worsen Huntington's disease

Indiana University researchers have found that broken communication in a specific part of the brain plays a role in the involuntary physical movements that affect individuals with Huntington's disease. [More]
Omeros announces commercial availability of Omidria in U.S.

Omeros announces commercial availability of Omidria in U.S.

Omeros Corporation, a biopharmaceutical company committed to discovering, developing and commercializing small-molecule and protein therapeutics for large-market as well as orphan indications targeting inflammation, coagulopathies and disorders of the central nervous system, announced today the nationwide commercial availability of Omidria (phenylephrine and ketorolac injection) 1%/0.3%. [More]
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