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Study shows Latinos age more slowly at molecular level than other ethnic groups

Study shows Latinos age more slowly at molecular level than other ethnic groups

A new paper co-authored by a UC Santa Barbara researcher reveals that Latinos age at a slower rate than other ethnic groups. The findings, published in the current issue of Genome Biology, may one day help scientists understand how to slow the aging process for everyone. [More]
Morbidly obese individuals more likely to experience heart failure, say researchers

Morbidly obese individuals more likely to experience heart failure, say researchers

A study by Johns Hopkins researchers of more than 13,000 people has found that even after accounting for such risk factors as high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes, so-called morbid obesity appears to stand alone as a standout risk for heart failure, but not for other major types of heart disease. [More]
Exact magnitude of stillbirths, maternal and neonatal mortality underreported, WHO reveals

Exact magnitude of stillbirths, maternal and neonatal mortality underreported, WHO reveals

The day of birth is potentially the most dangerous time for mothers and babies. Every year, worldwide, 303 000 women die during pregnancy and childbirth, 2.7 million babies die during the first 28 days of life and 2.6 million babies are stillborn. [More]
Latinos age more slowly than other ethnic groups, reveals UCLA study

Latinos age more slowly than other ethnic groups, reveals UCLA study

A UCLA study is the first to show that Latinos age at a slower rate than other ethnic groups. The findings, published in the current issue of Genome Biology, may one day help scientists understand how to slow the aging process for everyone. [More]
Replacing one sugar-sweetened beverage with water may help reduce body weight

Replacing one sugar-sweetened beverage with water may help reduce body weight

Think one little sugary soda won't make a difference on your waistline? Think again. If people replace just one calorie-laden drink with water, they can reduce body weight and improve overall health, according to a Virginia Tech researcher. [More]
Increased parental longevity linked to lower risk of cardiovascular conditions in offspring

Increased parental longevity linked to lower risk of cardiovascular conditions in offspring

In middle aged populations, the risks of cardiovascular conditions are progressively lower the longer a person's parents lived past 69 years old, according to a study of 186,000 participants using a voluntary database published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. [More]
DASH diet could be effective, non-pharmacologic approach to prevent gout flares

DASH diet could be effective, non-pharmacologic approach to prevent gout flares

New research indicates that a healthy diet can effectively lower blood levels of uric acid, a known trigger of gout. The findings are published in Arthritis & Rheumatology, a journal of the American College of Rheumatology . [More]
Long-term brain-machine interface use could lead to recovery in paraplegic patients

Long-term brain-machine interface use could lead to recovery in paraplegic patients

During the 2014 FIFA World Cup opening ceremony, a young Brazilian man, paralyzed from the chest down, delivered the opening kickoff. He used a brain-machine interface, allowing him to control the movements of a lower-limb robotic exoskeleton. [More]
Strict blood pressure control may help protect against early death in CKD patients

Strict blood pressure control may help protect against early death in CKD patients

For individuals with chronic kidney disease, strict blood pressure control may help protect against premature death. That's the conclusion of a recent analysis of clinical trial data. The findings appear in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. [More]
NYU Lutheran offers comprehensive cardiac care for unborn babies

NYU Lutheran offers comprehensive cardiac care for unborn babies

Caring for an infant begins long before birth. Expectant moms are advised to avoid smoking and drinking, watch what they eat, and follow a host of other recommendations that are in the best interest of themselves and their little one on the way. [More]
DASH-style diet could help lower risk of developing chronic kidney disease

DASH-style diet could help lower risk of developing chronic kidney disease

People who ate a diet high in nuts and legumes, low-fat dairy, whole grains, fruits, and vegetables and low in red and processed meat, sugar-sweetened beverages and sodium were at a significantly lower risk of developing chronic kidney disease over the course of more than two decades, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests. [More]
Experts develop new genomic testing method for pulmonary hypertension caused by genetic mutation

Experts develop new genomic testing method for pulmonary hypertension caused by genetic mutation

Pulmonology and genetics experts from two Utah healthcare organizations have collaboratively developed a new diagnostic genomic testing method for a rare form of pulmonary hypertension caused by a genetic mutation they discovered three years ago. [More]
Report reveals staggering cost of undiagnosed obstructive sleep apnea in the U.S.

Report reveals staggering cost of undiagnosed obstructive sleep apnea in the U.S.

Today the American Academy of Sleep Medicine released a new analysis, titled "Hidden health crisis costing America billions," that reveals the staggering cost of undiagnosed obstructive sleep apnea. [More]
Disordered airway microbiome at birth may be linked to severe neonatal lung disease

Disordered airway microbiome at birth may be linked to severe neonatal lung disease

In contrast to the general belief that the airways of an infant are sterile until after birth, University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers and colleagues have found that the infant airway is already colonized with bacteria or bacterial DNA when a baby is born -- and this is true for infants born as early as 24 weeks gestation. [More]
Researchers estimate $40 billion in annual costs to care for elderly stroke survivors

Researchers estimate $40 billion in annual costs to care for elderly stroke survivors

It's assumed that family and friends will help out in the event of a medical crisis, but that's not always feasible. And when stroke survivors need more than 20 hours of care per week, as a study in the August edition of Stroke shows, it's a large burden for their loved ones. [More]
Lisinopril oral solution approved for treatment of hypertension in children and adults

Lisinopril oral solution approved for treatment of hypertension in children and adults

Silvergate Pharmaceuticals, Inc., leader in the development and commercialization of innovative and safe medicines for children, today announced that the United States Food and Drug Administration approved Qbrelis (Lisinopril) Oral Solution, the first and only FDA-approved Lisinopril oral solution. [More]
Blood pressure hormone system important for cardiovascular health can promote obesity

Blood pressure hormone system important for cardiovascular health can promote obesity

New research by University of Iowa scientists helps explain how a hormone system often targeted to treat cardiovascular disease can also lower metabolism and promote obesity. [More]
Testing lung health online: an interview with Professor Stephen Holgate

Testing lung health online: an interview with Professor Stephen Holgate

In our latest report – The Battle for Breath – the impact of lung disease in the UK, figures suggest that 1 in 5 (around 12.7 million) have been diagnosed with a lung condition in the UK. If you’re over the age of 70, this rises to 1 in 3. [More]
Researchers identify biomarkers to improve prognosis of CKD

Researchers identify biomarkers to improve prognosis of CKD

Currently, there is no effective method to predict the prognosis of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. [More]
Maternal placental syndromes increase short-term risk of developing cardiovascular disease

Maternal placental syndromes increase short-term risk of developing cardiovascular disease

The short-term risk of developing cardiovascular disease following a first pregnancy is higher for women experiencing placental syndromes and a preterm birth or an infant born smaller than the usual size, a University of South Florida study reports. [More]
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