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Novel gene therapy can treat pulmonary hypertension linked with heart failure

Novel gene therapy can treat pulmonary hypertension linked with heart failure

Scientists have used a novel gene therapy to halt the progression of pulmonary hypertension, a form of high blood pressure in the lung blood vessels that is linked to heart failure, according to a study led by Roger J. Hajjar, MD, Professor of Medicine and Director of the Cardiovascular Research Center at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. [More]
Working in night shifts may increase risk of coronary heart disease

Working in night shifts may increase risk of coronary heart disease

Working at night is unhealthy for the heart and increases the risk of sustaining coronary heart disease, meaning a disease of the coronary arteries. This is the result of a current, and one of the largest American cooperation studies under the management of Eva Schernhammer of the epidemiology division of MedUni Wien, which was published in the top journal JAMA today. First author is Celine Vetter of Harvard University in Boston. [More]
Endocrine Society urges physicians to increase screening for primary aldosteronism

Endocrine Society urges physicians to increase screening for primary aldosteronism

The Endocrine Society today issued a Clinical Practice Guideline calling on physicians to ramp up screening for primary aldosteronism, a common cause of high blood pressure. [More]
Hydrocortisone drug can also prevent lung damage in premature babies

Hydrocortisone drug can also prevent lung damage in premature babies

Research from Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago conducted in mice shows the drug hydrocortisone -- a steroid commonly used to treat a variety of inflammatory and allergic conditions -- can also prevent lung damage that often develops in premature babies treated with oxygen. [More]
Meta-analysis supports combination therapy for PAH patients

Meta-analysis supports combination therapy for PAH patients

A meta-analysis shows that clinical worsening is significantly less likely in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension if they are given combination treatment, rather than monotherapy. [More]
Higher levels of neighborhood greenness linked to lower chronic disease risk

Higher levels of neighborhood greenness linked to lower chronic disease risk

A new study of a quarter-million Miami-Dade County Medicare beneficiaries showed that higher levels of neighborhood greenness, including trees, grass and other vegetation, were linked to a significant reduction in the rate of chronic illnesses, particularly in low-to-middle income neighborhoods. [More]
Study finds low prevalence of vascular risk among Southwest US population

Study finds low prevalence of vascular risk among Southwest US population

In a newly published, pilot study in the journal Ethnicity & Disease, researchers report a relatively low prevalence of vascular risk among participants of the Southwest Heart Mind Study, especially among those treated for hypertension and hyperlipidemia despite overweight and obesity. [More]
More cautious blood pressure-lowering strategy may be reasonable for elderly CKD patients

More cautious blood pressure-lowering strategy may be reasonable for elderly CKD patients

New research indicates that higher systolic blood pressure is linked with poor outcomes in patients with kidney disease, although the association diminishes with advanced age. The findings, which come from a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (CJASN), provide valuable information concerning patients who are often excluded from blood pressure-lowering clinical trials. [More]
Researchers reposition existing prazosin drug to combat glioblastoma

Researchers reposition existing prazosin drug to combat glioblastoma

Treatments available for glioblastoma—malignant brain tumors—have little effect. An international collaboration led by the Laboratoire Neurosciences Paris-Seine tested active ingredients from existing medications and eventually identified one compound of interest, prazosin, on these tumors. Not only did it seem to be effective in this type of cancer, but it also acted on a signaling pathway that is common with other cancers. [More]
Mother’s misperception of child's weight status linked to childhood obesity or malnutrition

Mother’s misperception of child's weight status linked to childhood obesity or malnutrition

A new study from the University of Houston Department of Health and Human Performance finds a child's risk for obesity or malnutrition may be tied to the mother's misperception of her child's weight status. A key to understanding this phenomenon may lie in how she regards her own weight status. Researchers say the situation shows that healthcare providers need to broaden their health care screenings. [More]
Expanded Medicaid coverage shows increase in health insurance rates among low-income adults

Expanded Medicaid coverage shows increase in health insurance rates among low-income adults

Researchers at UCLA have that found states that expanded Medicaid coverage under the Affordable Care Act saw a significant increase in rates of health insurance among low-income adults compared with states that did not expand the program. [More]
New therapy strategy for liver disease shows initial measureable success with norUrso

New therapy strategy for liver disease shows initial measureable success with norUrso

The new therapy strategy for primary sclerosing cholangitis, a liver disease that at present still cannot be cured with medication, shows initial measureable success with the nor-ursodeoxycholic acid (norUrso). [More]
Researchers identify biological pathway that explains why current asthma therapies fail in many cases

Researchers identify biological pathway that explains why current asthma therapies fail in many cases

Asthma is an enormous public health problem that continues to grow larger, in part because scientists don't fully understand how it is caused. Existing therapies don't cure the disease and often don't even significantly alleviate the symptoms. Now, scientists from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and Rutgers University have identified a biological pathway that potentially explains why current asthma therapies don't work well in many cases—and might be targeted to help those patients. [More]
Existing cancer drugs may be able to help people with enlarged heart cells

Existing cancer drugs may be able to help people with enlarged heart cells

UT Southwestern Medical Center cardiology researchers have identified molecular ties between the growth of cancer cells and heart cells that suggest existing cancer drugs may be able to help those with enlarged heart cells -- a condition that can lead to heart attacks and stroke. [More]
Minimally important dyspnoea, fatigue changes in PAH patients defined

Minimally important dyspnoea, fatigue changes in PAH patients defined

Researchers say that a change of around 1 unit in Borg dyspnoea or fatigue scores signifies an important change in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension. [More]
Scientists reveal mechanism involved in regulation of lymphangiogenesis

Scientists reveal mechanism involved in regulation of lymphangiogenesis

After an injury to tissues, such as in organ transplantation, the body grows new lymphatic vessels in a process known as lymphangiogenesis. A new study in Nature Communications reveals a mechanism involved in the regulation of this process, specifically in corneal transplants and infectious eye disease. [More]
Rush awarded $14.5 million NIA grant to study effects of MIND diet on Alzheimer's disease

Rush awarded $14.5 million NIA grant to study effects of MIND diet on Alzheimer's disease

Can a particular diet prevent Alzheimer's disease? The National Institute of Aging has invested heavily in Rush University Medical Center to try to find out. [More]
Aspirin resistance signals increased stroke severity

Aspirin resistance signals increased stroke severity

Stroke severity and infarct volume are significantly increased among patients who become resistant to aspirin, show study findings published in Neurology. [More]
Increased BMP7 levels predict PAH mortality

Increased BMP7 levels predict PAH mortality

Elevated levels of circulating bone morphogenetic protein 7 are associated with an increased mortality risk in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension, find Chinese researchers. [More]
BMPR2 mutations affect outcomes of PAH patients

BMPR2 mutations affect outcomes of PAH patients

Mutations in the bone morphogenetic protein receptor type II gene affect not only the risk of developing pulmonary arterial hypertension but also the severity and outcomes of the disease, shows a meta-analysis of individual patient data. [More]
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