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Study recommends normalizing blood pressure in pregnant women

Study recommends normalizing blood pressure in pregnant women

Throughout her career in Canada and the UK, Dr. Laura Magee has taken a restrained approach to use of blood pressure-lowering medication in her pregnant patients, fearing that lowering pressure could reduce the flow of blood and vital nutrients to their babies. [More]
Cardiologist promotes the importance of controlling high blood pressure

Cardiologist promotes the importance of controlling high blood pressure

During Heart Month, the Cardiovascular Institute of New Jersey at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School is promoting the importance of controlling high blood pressure, also called hypertension, in order to reduce the risk of coronary heart disease and other related chronic disorders in adults. [More]
CUMC evaluates impact, cost-effectiveness of implementing new hypertension guidelines

CUMC evaluates impact, cost-effectiveness of implementing new hypertension guidelines

Full implementation of new hypertension guidelines could prevent 56,000 cardiovascular disease events (mostly heart attacks and strokes) and 13,000 deaths each year, without increasing overall health care costs, an analysis conducted by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center found. [More]
Researchers probe possibility of reversing medications' adverse cognitive effects

Researchers probe possibility of reversing medications' adverse cognitive effects

Whether the adverse cognitive effects of medications can be reversed is of significant importance to an aging population, their caregivers and their families, as well as to an overburdened health care system. [More]
Kaleo, CHMI partner to reduce prescription drug-related deaths

Kaleo, CHMI partner to reduce prescription drug-related deaths

Kaleo, a privately-held pharmaceutical company, today announced a national strategic partnership with the Clinton Health Matters Initiative, an initiative of the Clinton Foundation, that will help support its goal of cutting prescription drug-related deaths in half, saving approximately 10,000 lives over five years. [More]
Excessive salt intake 'reprograms' the brain, leads to hypertension

Excessive salt intake 'reprograms' the brain, leads to hypertension

An international research team led by scientists at McGill University has found that excessive salt intake "reprograms" the brain, interfering with a natural safety mechanism that normally prevents the body's arterial blood pressure from rising. [More]
Twitter can indicate community's psychological well being, predict rates of heart disease

Twitter can indicate community's psychological well being, predict rates of heart disease

Twitter has broken news stories, launched and ended careers, started social movements and toppled governments, all by being an easy, direct and immediate way for people to share what's on their minds. Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania have now shown that the social media platform has another use: Twitter can serve as a dashboard indicator of a community's psychological well being and can predict rates of heart disease. [More]
Male stroke patients who live alone are at greater risk of premature death

Male stroke patients who live alone are at greater risk of premature death

Men who live alone have a considerably greater long-term risk of dying prematurely than other patients. This is shown in a doctoral thesis that followed 1,090 stroke cases in western Sweden. [More]
People hospitalized for pneumonia at greater risk of developing cardiovascular disease

People hospitalized for pneumonia at greater risk of developing cardiovascular disease

Your chance of having a heart attack or stroke increases significantly if you have been hospitalized for pneumonia, according to a paper published today in the influential JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association). [More]
Using breath tests to diagnose liver diseases: an interview with Larry Cohen

Using breath tests to diagnose liver diseases: an interview with Larry Cohen

It was back in the 1960s that scientists first started to understand that breath could be used to find out different things about diseases and other factors. I’m sure you’re familiar with alcohol breath testing, which was patented back in the ‘50s and has been used since the ‘60s. [More]
Concentric remodelling preserves right ventricular function in PAH

Concentric remodelling preserves right ventricular function in PAH

Systolic function is better preserved in patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension if they have a higher right ventricle mass-to-volume ratio, research shows. [More]
Peripheral muscles weakened in PAH patients

Peripheral muscles weakened in PAH patients

Patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension have peripheral muscle weakness that is independent of impairments in their respiratory muscles, research shows. [More]
CT measures can refine PAH prognosis

CT measures can refine PAH prognosis

Structural features identifiable on computed tomography pulmonary angiography can provide prognostic information for patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension, say UK researchers. [More]
First medical device approved for treatment of obesity

First medical device approved for treatment of obesity

The United States Food and Drug Administration approved EnteroMedic's VBLOC vagal blocking therapy, delivered via the Maestro System, which is the first medical device approved for obesity treatment that targets the nerve pathway between the brain and the stomach. [More]
Changes in health limitations, chronic conditions can predict mortgage distress

Changes in health limitations, chronic conditions can predict mortgage distress

The mortgage strain of American home ownership can lead to poor health but a new study finds that the inverse may also be true-- changes in health can serve as a predictor to mortgage distress. [More]
Endocrinology Network offers up-to-date coverage of SGLT2 inhibitors

Endocrinology Network offers up-to-date coverage of SGLT2 inhibitors

UBM Medica US announces that Endocrinology Network, a leading online community for endocrinologists and other clinicians who treat patients with T2DM offers comprehensive and up-to-date coverage of the sodium glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors. [More]
Vascular and Alzheimer's-related brain abnormalities cause dementia in older people

Vascular and Alzheimer's-related brain abnormalities cause dementia in older people

A growing body of research suggests that the most common cause of dementia in older people is a mix of vascular and Alzheimer's-related brain abnormalities, and that approximately half of people who die with Alzheimer's also have evidence of strokes in their brains. Furthermore, when strokes and hallmark Alzheimer's plaques and tangles are combined, it increases a person's likelihood of experiencing dementia. [More]
Medical co-morbidities associated with direct maternal deaths in the UK

Medical co-morbidities associated with direct maternal deaths in the UK

Medical co-morbidities, when women have one or more medical conditions, are found to be an important factor associated with direct maternal deaths, suggests a new study published today (9 January) in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (BJOG). [More]
Ascendis Pharma initiates TransCon Treprostinil Phase 1 study in healthy volunteers

Ascendis Pharma initiates TransCon Treprostinil Phase 1 study in healthy volunteers

Ascendis Pharma A/S, a clinical stage biotechnology company that applies its innovative TransCon technology to address significant unmet medical needs, today announced that it has initiated a Phase 1 single ascending dose study of TransCon Treprostinil in healthy volunteers. [More]
Study: Community-wide CVD prevention programs help reduce hospitalizations, death rates

Study: Community-wide CVD prevention programs help reduce hospitalizations, death rates

In a rural Maine county, sustained, community-wide programs targeting cardiovascular risk factors and behavior changes were associated with reductions in hospitalization and death rates over a 40-year period (1970-2010) compared with the rest of the state. Substantial improvements were seen in control of hypertension and cholesterol, and smoking cessation, according to a study in the January 13 issue of JAMA. [More]