Hypertension News and Research RSS Feed - Hypertension News and Research

Study finds that BMI in healthy adolescents has significant association with blood pressures

Study finds that BMI in healthy adolescents has significant association with blood pressures

A recent study published in the American Journal of Hypertension has found that body mass index (BMI) in healthy adolescents has a statistically significant association with both systolic blood pressures (SBP) and diastolic blood pressures (DBP), and highlights the significance of the global trend of rapidly increasing adolescent obesity. [More]
New report: Prevalence of CKD in the U.S. projected to increase 16.7% by 2030

New report: Prevalence of CKD in the U.S. projected to increase 16.7% by 2030

The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) will rise in the United States, according to a new report led by RTI International and published in the American Journal of Kidney Diseases during March's National Kidney Month. [More]
Teen-LABS study explores safety, health effects of surgical weight loss procedures

Teen-LABS study explores safety, health effects of surgical weight loss procedures

Cardiovascular risks of severe pediatric obesity, assessed among adolescents participating in the "Teen Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery" (Teen-LABS) study, were published this week in JAMA Pediatrics. Teen-LABS is a multi-center clinical study funded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases at the National Institutes of Health that is examining the safety and health effects of surgical weight loss procedures. [More]
Higher intake of lycopene may lower risk of renal cell carcinoma in postmenopausal women

Higher intake of lycopene may lower risk of renal cell carcinoma in postmenopausal women

A higher intake by postmenopausal women of the natural antioxidant lycopene, found in foods like tomatoes, watermelon and papaya, may lower the risk of renal cell carcinoma, a type of kidney cancer. [More]
Researchers successfully convert adult human skin cells into neurons that control appetite

Researchers successfully convert adult human skin cells into neurons that control appetite

Researchers have for the first time successfully converted adult human skin cells into neurons of the type that regulate appetite, providing a patient-specific model for studying the neurophysiology of weight control and testing new therapies for obesity. [More]
Young women veterans referred for cardiac tests more likely to be depressed than men veterans

Young women veterans referred for cardiac tests more likely to be depressed than men veterans

Women veterans who had specialized heart tests were younger and more likely to be obese, depressed and suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder than men veterans, according to a study published in an American Heart Association journal. [More]
Chiasma closes $70 million Series E financing round

Chiasma closes $70 million Series E financing round

Chiasma, Inc., a U.S. privately-held biopharma company developing octreotide capsules, its lead product for the orphan condition acromegaly, today announced the closing of a $70 million Series E financing round. [More]
Patients with symptoms of mental illness less likely to receive advice from health care providers

Patients with symptoms of mental illness less likely to receive advice from health care providers

More than half of patients with symptoms of mental illness - and nearly one-third of those who also had diabetes - said their health care providers had never told them to exercise or reduce their intake of dietary fat, according to a new study published in Diabetes Educator. [More]
'Walking football' could have a multitude of health benefits, say researchers

'Walking football' could have a multitude of health benefits, say researchers

The new sporting craze of 'Walking Football' may enable people to continue playing football into their 60s and 70s while reaping a multitude of health benefits, according to Aston University researchers. [More]
Two widely used targeted therapy drugs not effective in preventing return of kidney cancer

Two widely used targeted therapy drugs not effective in preventing return of kidney cancer

Two widely used targeted therapy drugs— approved by the FDA for use in metastatic kidney cancer —are no more effective than a placebo in preventing return of the disease to increase life spans of patients suffering from advanced kidney cancer after surgery, according to new results to be presented by a researcher at the University of Pennsylvania's Abramson Cancer Center during the 2015 Genitourinary Cancers Symposium. [More]
Penn State researchers explore hydrogen sulfide's probable role in regulating blood pressure

Penn State researchers explore hydrogen sulfide's probable role in regulating blood pressure

Widely considered simply a malodorous toxic gas, hydrogen sulfide is now being studied for its probable role in regulating blood pressure, according to researchers. [More]
Large majority of coronary patients fail to meet lifestyle, risk factor targets

Large majority of coronary patients fail to meet lifestyle, risk factor targets

The large majority of coronary patients in Europe are failing to achieve their lifestyle, risk factor and therapeutic targets as set out in the latest prevention guidelines. [More]
Research finding could lead to new therapeutic target for treating hypertension in males

Research finding could lead to new therapeutic target for treating hypertension in males

Higher levels of a "danger" molecule may be one reason males tend to become hypertensive earlier and more severely than females, scientists say. [More]
Eisai announces FDA approval of LENVIMA (lenvatinib) for treatment of RAI-refractory DTC

Eisai announces FDA approval of LENVIMA (lenvatinib) for treatment of RAI-refractory DTC

Eisai Inc. announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the company's receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor LENVIMA (lenvatinib) for the treatment of locally recurrent or metastatic, progressive, radioactive iodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (RAI-R DTC). [More]
PAH survival unaffected by rheumatoid arthritis origin

PAH survival unaffected by rheumatoid arthritis origin

Patients with rheumatoid arthritis-associated pulmonary arterial hypertension have comparable survival to those with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, researchers report. [More]
Radionuclide angiography-assessed RVEF predicts PAH outcomes

Radionuclide angiography-assessed RVEF predicts PAH outcomes

Baseline right ventricular ejection fraction as evaluated by conventional planar equilibrium radionuclide angiography is significantly associated with outcomes in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension, research suggests. [More]
Mechanistic subtypes of IPAH revealed

Mechanistic subtypes of IPAH revealed

Researchers have provided evidence for distinct processes underlying vasodilator-responsive and nonresponsive idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension. [More]
Retinal function affected early in Type 1, 2 diabetes

Retinal function affected early in Type 1, 2 diabetes

Visual dysfunction manifests early in Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes, research shows, with functional impairment detected in patients with nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy lacking clinical signs and symptoms of diabetic macular oedema. [More]
Lenvatinib trial offers hope for thyroid cancer patients

Lenvatinib trial offers hope for thyroid cancer patients

A new targeted therapy called lenvatinib has been shown to improve progression-free survival among patients with advanced thyroid cancer that is not responsive to iodine-131. [More]
Scientists find that treating the uninjured side of brain can maximize stroke recovery

Scientists find that treating the uninjured side of brain can maximize stroke recovery

To maximize stroke recovery, researchers may want to focus more on ways to support the side of the brain where the injury didn't occur, scientists report. [More]