Hypertension News and Research RSS Feed - Hypertension News and Research

Study links poor semen quality to higher risk of various health conditions

Study links poor semen quality to higher risk of various health conditions

A study of more than 9,000 men with fertility problems has revealed a correlation between the number of different defects in a man's semen and the likelihood that the man has other health problems. [More]
Researchers discover link between obesity and hypertension

Researchers discover link between obesity and hypertension

The link between obesity and cardiovascular diseases is well acknowledged. Being obese or overweight is a major risk factor for the development of elevated blood pressure, and cardiovascular diseases. But it has net been known how obesity increases the risk of high blood pressure, making it difficult to develop evidence based therapies for obesity, hypertension and heart disease. [More]
BeyondSpring Pharmaceuticals plans to initiate Plinabulin Phase 3 pivotal trial in NSCLC patients

BeyondSpring Pharmaceuticals plans to initiate Plinabulin Phase 3 pivotal trial in NSCLC patients

BeyondSpring Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company focused on the development of innovative cancer therapies, today announced that it plans to initiate a Phase 3 pivotal trial of lead product candidate, Plinabulin, in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in the first quarter of 2015. [More]
Non-ergot derived dopamine agonists may be safe for the heart

Non-ergot derived dopamine agonists may be safe for the heart

Non-ergot derived dopamine agonists used to treat Parkinson's disease may be safe for the heart, according to preliminary research presented at EuroEcho-Imaging 2014 by Dr Hilal Erken Pamukcu, cardiologist at Ankara Diskapi Education and Research Hospital in Turkey. [More]
Tobacco smoke toxin could increase pain in people with spinal cord injury

Tobacco smoke toxin could increase pain in people with spinal cord injury

A neurotoxin called acrolein found in tobacco smoke that is thought to increase pain in people with spinal cord injury has now been shown to accumulate in mice exposed to the equivalent of 12 cigarettes daily over a short time period. [More]
Noninvasive PAH diagnosis on the horizon

Noninvasive PAH diagnosis on the horizon

Measuring the duration of vortical blood flow in the main pulmonary artery allows accurate estimation of pulmonary blood pressure and diagnosis of pulmonary arterial hypertension, say researchers. [More]
Experts report three key topics that may make difference in the battle against Alzheimer's disease

Experts report three key topics that may make difference in the battle against Alzheimer's disease

Detection, prevention, and preclinical treatment are three key areas that may make a difference in the battle to reduce the rapid rise of new Alzheimer's disease (AD) cases every year. These three topics are the focus of an important new supplement to the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease. [More]
Physical activity linked to children's brain and cognitive development, scholastic achievement

Physical activity linked to children's brain and cognitive development, scholastic achievement

Over the past thirty years, physical activity among children has declined markedly. The public health implications of this decline include a growing prevalence of obesity and chronic diseases such as diabetes and hypertension. A new issue of Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development expands the focus to ask whether physical activity is also related to children's brain and cognitive development and achievement in school. [More]
Researchers find way to prevent noise-induced hearing loss

Researchers find way to prevent noise-induced hearing loss

Researchers from Weill Cornell Medical College and the Gladstone Institutes have found a way to prevent noise-induced hearing loss in a mouse using a simple chemical compound that is a precursor to vitamin B3. This discovery has important implications not only for preventing hearing loss, but also potentially for treating some aging-related conditions that are linked to the same protein. [More]
People diagnosed with diabetes in midlife experience cognitive problems later

People diagnosed with diabetes in midlife experience cognitive problems later

People diagnosed with diabetes in midlife are more likely to experience significant memory and cognitive problems during the next 20 years than those with healthy blood sugar levels, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests. [More]
Sanford-Burnham, Mayo Clinic scientists to jointly find new treatment for resistant hypertension

Sanford-Burnham, Mayo Clinic scientists to jointly find new treatment for resistant hypertension

Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute at Lake Nona and Mayo Clinic today announced that a joint team of scientists has been selected as a winner of GlaxoSmithKline's 2014 Discovery Fast Track Challenge. [More]

Phytel Annual Client Conference kicks off

The Phytel Annual Client Conference (PACC) kicked off today with an invitation-only Executive Forum at the luxurious Omni Fort Worth Hotel, hosting twice as many healthcare leaders as the 2013 event. [More]
Promising new therapeutic strategy for chronic kidney disease

Promising new therapeutic strategy for chronic kidney disease

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) affects at least one in four Americans who are older than 60 and can significantly shorten lifespan. Yet the few available drugs for CKD can only modestly delay the disease's progress towards kidney failure. Now, however, a team led by researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, has found an aspect of CKD's development that points to a promising new therapeutic strategy. [More]
Pivotal Therapeutics announces accomplishments, financial results for Q3 2014

Pivotal Therapeutics announces accomplishments, financial results for Q3 2014

Pivotal Therapeutics Inc., ("Pivotal" or the "Company"), a specialty pharmaceutical company with a focus on Omega-3 therapies for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and overall health, announced its accomplishments and financial results for the three months ended September 30, 2014. [More]
Study reveals how one type of DNA damage may lead to several human diseases

Study reveals how one type of DNA damage may lead to several human diseases

Using a new imaging technique, National Institutes of Health researchers have found that the biological machinery that builds DNA can insert molecules into the DNA strand that are damaged as a result of environmental exposures. These damaged molecules trigger cell death that produces some human diseases, according to the researchers. [More]
Taking folic acid supplementation before conception reduces risk of SGA at birth

Taking folic acid supplementation before conception reduces risk of SGA at birth

Taking folic acid before conception significantly reduces the risk of small for gestational age (SGA) at birth, suggests a new study published today (26 November) in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. [More]
Plaque buildup in the arteries associated with mild cognitive impairment

Plaque buildup in the arteries associated with mild cognitive impairment

In a study of nearly 2,000 adults, researchers found that a buildup of plaque in the body's major arteries was associated with mild cognitive impairment. Results of the study conducted at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center will be presented next week at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America. [More]
Children with NAFLD at substantial risk for high blood pressure

Children with NAFLD at substantial risk for high blood pressure

High blood pressure and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are two emerging health problems related to the epidemic of childhood obesity. In a recent study, researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine sought to determine the prevalence of high blood pressure in children with NAFLD, which places them at risk for premature cardiovascular disease. [More]
Investigational drug maintains normal potassium levels in patients with chronic kidney disease

Investigational drug maintains normal potassium levels in patients with chronic kidney disease

Research published today found that the investigational drug patiromer decreased high potassium levels and maintained normal potassium levels in patients with chronic kidney disease. The results of a multicenter trial appear in the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
Obese people experience silent cardiac damage that fuels risk for heart failure

Obese people experience silent cardiac damage that fuels risk for heart failure

Using an ultrasensitive blood test to detect the presence of a protein that heralds heart muscle injury, researchers from Johns Hopkins and elsewhere have found that obese people without overt heart disease experience silent cardiac damage that fuels their risk for heart failure down the road. [More]