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Researchers explore how low-level electrical stimulation reduces inflammation

Researchers explore how low-level electrical stimulation reduces inflammation

The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, the research arm of the North Shore-LIJ Health System, and SetPoint Medical Inc., a biomedical technology company, today released the results of research on the therapeutic potential of vagus nerve stimulation. In a paper published by Bioelectronic Medicine, Kevin J. Tracey, MD, and his colleagues at the Feinstein Institute, explore how low-level electrical stimulation interacts with the body's nerves to reduce inflammation, a fundamental goal of bioelectronic medicine. [More]
Cardiome signs commercialization agreement with AOP for ESMOCARD products

Cardiome signs commercialization agreement with AOP for ESMOCARD products

Cardiome Pharma Corp. today announced that the company has entered a commercialization agreement with AOP Orphan Pharma to sell AOP's cardiovascular products, ESMOCARD and ESMOCARD LYO (esmolol hydrochloride) in Italy, France, Spain and Belgium. [More]
New study reveals genetic causes of rare syndrome that manifests as high blood pressure

New study reveals genetic causes of rare syndrome that manifests as high blood pressure

The culmination of two decades of research, a new study reveals the genetic causes of a curious, rare syndrome that manifests as hypertension (high blood pressure) accompanied by short fingers (brachydactyly type E). [More]
New Johns Hopkins-led research suggests risk factors for developing acute kidney injury

New Johns Hopkins-led research suggests risk factors for developing acute kidney injury

Physicians treating hospitalized patients for conditions unrelated to the kidneys should pay close attention to common blood and urine tests for kidney function in order to prevent incidental injury to the organs that help cleanse the body of toxins, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health-led research suggests. [More]
Scientists find smooth muscle cells as major contributing factor to vascular stiffness

Scientists find smooth muscle cells as major contributing factor to vascular stiffness

Increased vascular stiffness has been identified as an important part of hypertension in aging adults. Previous studies of aortic stiffness have focused on changes in structural proteins that alter the properties of vascular walls causing them to become rigid. [More]
Scientists identify gene that causes hereditary hypertension and brachydactyly type E

Scientists identify gene that causes hereditary hypertension and brachydactyly type E

Individuals with this altered gene have hereditary hypertension (high blood pressure) and at the same time a skeletal malformation called brachydactyly type E, which is characterized by unusually short fingers and toes. The effect on blood pressure is so serious that -- if left untreated -- it most often leads to death before age fifty. [More]
Orexigen Therapeutics provides update on business and financial results for Q1 2015

Orexigen Therapeutics provides update on business and financial results for Q1 2015

Orexigen Therapeutics, Inc. today announced business and financial results for the first quarter ended March 31, 2015. [More]
SLU professor reveals why women have higher rates of strokes than men, suggests steps to reduce risk

SLU professor reveals why women have higher rates of strokes than men, suggests steps to reduce risk

Each year, around 55,000 more women than men will have a stroke. Longer lifespans, pregnancies and hormones all contribute to the disparity, as do illnesses that tend to strike women more frequently. Crunch the numbers and the math adds up to more strokes for women, making it important for women monitor their risk. [More]
Exalenz Bioscience investigates clinical utility of BreathID test to diagnose NASH

Exalenz Bioscience investigates clinical utility of BreathID test to diagnose NASH

Exalenz Bioscience, a leader in developing and marketing of non-invasive medical devices for diagnosing and monitoring a range of gastrointestinal and liver diseases, today announced the initiation of a clinical study evaluating the potential of its BreathID test to diagnose nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). [More]
Intervention to connect low-income uninsured patients to primary care could improve health, reduce costs

Intervention to connect low-income uninsured patients to primary care could improve health, reduce costs

An intervention to connect low-income uninsured and Medicaid patients to a reliable source of primary health care shows promise for reducing avoidable use of hospital emergency departments in Maryland. A University of Maryland School of Public Health study evaluating the results of the intervention was published this week in the May issue of the journal Health Affairs. [More]
New study identifies enzyme that causes obesity-related hypertension

New study identifies enzyme that causes obesity-related hypertension

Obesity is a serious health problem affecting approximately one-third of the adult population in the United States. Obese individuals have an increased risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease, including hypertension. A recent study led by a University of Missouri researcher has identified the enzyme responsible for obesity-related hypertension -- a finding that could lead to new treatment options. [More]
AMC Health to collaborate with URAC on national telehealth standards development initiative

AMC Health to collaborate with URAC on national telehealth standards development initiative

AMC Health, a leading provider of 'real-time' patient management solutions has announced that it will collaborate with URAC on its national telehealth standards development initiative. [More]
Study: Rheumatoid arthritis nearly doubles risk of surprise heart attack

Study: Rheumatoid arthritis nearly doubles risk of surprise heart attack

Patients with rheumatoid arthritis are at increased risk of a surprise heart attack, according to new research presented today at ICNC 12 by Dr Adriana Puente, a cardiologist in the National Medical Centre "20 de Noviembre" ISSSTE in Mexico City, Mexico. [More]
Global market for cardiac rhythm management devices worth $13 billion for 2015

Global market for cardiac rhythm management devices worth $13 billion for 2015

The global market for cardiac rhythm management devices such as pacemakers and defibrillators is worth about $13 billion for 2015, according to Kalorama Information. The market research publisher said the market has benefited from the demand to move to a more mobile, wireless and efficient system both within major health facilities and in the home treatment markets. There is also an increasing trend to upgrade to more portable devices and devices which have added benefits such as MRI compatibility. [More]
Polygamous marriage can increase heart disease risk in men by four times

Polygamous marriage can increase heart disease risk in men by four times

Polygamy increases the risk of heart disease by more than 4-fold, reveals research presented at the Asian Pacific Society of Cardiology Congress 2015 (APSC 2015) by Dr Amin Daoulah, a cardiologist at the King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. The risk and severity of heart disease increased with the number of wives. [More]

New clinical guide focuses on use and validity of public blood pressure kiosks

High blood pressure affects one in three adults in the United States, and blood pressure measurement is the first step toward accurate diagnosis and management of the disease. The Food and Drug Administration acknowledges shortcomings of many public blood pressure kiosks (i.e., those found in pharmacies and supermarkets) and recommends the public seek doctors' advice when using blood pressure kiosks. [More]
Ascendis reports results from Phase 1 single ascending dose study of TransCon Treprostinil

Ascendis reports results from Phase 1 single ascending dose study of TransCon Treprostinil

Ascendis Pharma A/S, a clinical stage biotechnology company that applies its TransCon technology to address significant unmet medical needs, announced today that its Phase 1 single ascending dose study of TransCon Treprostinil produced dose-dependent increases in plasma treprostinil levels in-line with expectations. [More]
Survey: 52% of acute coronary syndrome patients don't take their prescribed OAP therapy

Survey: 52% of acute coronary syndrome patients don't take their prescribed OAP therapy

People with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) who undergo an angioplasty procedure and receive a heart stent are prescribed an oral antiplatelet (OAP) therapy and aspirin to help prevent a heart attack, a blood clot in their heart stent (stent thrombosis), or even death. [More]
Simple device to treat sleep apnea may reduce diabetes risk

Simple device to treat sleep apnea may reduce diabetes risk

Using a simple device for eight hours a night to treat sleep apnea can help people with prediabetes improve their blood sugar levels and may reduce the risk of progressing to diabetes, according to a new study published online in the April 21, 2015, issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. [More]
Study shows NASH linked to 50% higher death rates compared with NAFLD

Study shows NASH linked to 50% higher death rates compared with NAFLD

Results from a large population-based cohort of almost a million people in the UK found that the chances of dying from non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), over a 14-year period, was approximately 50% higher than for those with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). [More]
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