Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) News and Research RSS Feed - Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) News and Research Twitter

Hypertension (or high blood pressure) is a condition where the pressure of the blood flowing through the arteries of the body is higher than it should be. Much like the pressure of the air in a tire, if the pressure of the blood is too high it can damage the arteries and organs of the body. Just like the tire, if the pressure suddenly becomes very high, catastrophic events can happen. Similarly, if the pressure remains somewhat elevated for a long enough period of time, premature wear and failure can occur.

Hypertension has its worst effects on the heart, kidneys, eyes, and brain. High blood pressure is a risk factor for heart attack, stroke, kidney failure, hemorrhages of the retina of the eye, and generalized atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries all over the body).
Study shows widespread underdiagnosis of hypertension and prehypertension in U.S. children

Study shows widespread underdiagnosis of hypertension and prehypertension in U.S. children

Hypertension and prehypertension in children often go undiagnosed, according to a new study published today in Pediatrics. [More]
Lisinopril oral solution approved for treatment of hypertension in children and adults

Lisinopril oral solution approved for treatment of hypertension in children and adults

Silvergate Pharmaceuticals, Inc., leader in the development and commercialization of innovative and safe medicines for children, today announced that the United States Food and Drug Administration approved Qbrelis (Lisinopril) Oral Solution, the first and only FDA-approved Lisinopril oral solution. [More]
Blood pressure hormone system important for cardiovascular health can promote obesity

Blood pressure hormone system important for cardiovascular health can promote obesity

New research by University of Iowa scientists helps explain how a hormone system often targeted to treat cardiovascular disease can also lower metabolism and promote obesity. [More]
Study identifies ten potentially modifiable risk factors for stroke

Study identifies ten potentially modifiable risk factors for stroke

Hypertension remains the single most important modifiable risk factor for stroke, and the impact of hypertension and nine other risk factors together account for 90% of all strokes, according to an analysis of nearly 27000 people from every continent in the world, published in The Lancet. [More]
Portal vein hypertension diminishes after hepatitis C recovery

Portal vein hypertension diminishes after hepatitis C recovery

This inflammatory viral infection of the liver causes inflexible scar tissue to form. This in turn impedes blood flow through the organ, with resulting hypertension in the portal vein. [More]
Low-salt diets may increase CVD risk and death compared to average salt consumption

Low-salt diets may increase CVD risk and death compared to average salt consumption

A large worldwide study has found that, contrary to popular thought, low-salt diets may not be beneficial and may actually increase the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and death compared to average salt consumption. [More]
World Kidney Day 2016 focuses on children

World Kidney Day 2016 focuses on children

On Thursday March 10th we are celebrating the 11th edition of World Kidney Day (WKD), a joint initiative organized by the International Society of Nephrology (ISN) and the International Federation of Kidney Foundations (IFKF). [More]
IQWiG: Benefit of proteome analysis for detection of diabetic nephropathy remains unclear

IQWiG: Benefit of proteome analysis for detection of diabetic nephropathy remains unclear

The German Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care examined the benefit of a diagnostic-therapeutic strategy using urinary proteome analysis for detection of diabetic nephropathy (DN) versus a conventional diagnostic strategy in patients with diabetes mellitus and arterial hypertension. After publication of the preliminary report in June 2015, interested persons and parties had the opportunity to comment on the preliminary results. [More]
Free public lecture at Greenwich discusses role of science and medicine in sport, exercise

Free public lecture at Greenwich discusses role of science and medicine in sport, exercise

The role of exercise in helping patients to recover from major surgery is among the topics being explored at a free University of Greenwich public lecture in Medway. [More]
New study reveals genetic causes of rare syndrome that manifests as high blood pressure

New study reveals genetic causes of rare syndrome that manifests as high blood pressure

The culmination of two decades of research, a new study reveals the genetic causes of a curious, rare syndrome that manifests as hypertension (high blood pressure) accompanied by short fingers (brachydactyly type E). [More]
Scientists identify gene that causes hereditary hypertension and brachydactyly type E

Scientists identify gene that causes hereditary hypertension and brachydactyly type E

Individuals with this altered gene have hereditary hypertension (high blood pressure) and at the same time a skeletal malformation called brachydactyly type E, which is characterized by unusually short fingers and toes. The effect on blood pressure is so serious that -- if left untreated -- it most often leads to death before age fifty. [More]
Spironolactone drug reduces side effects of corticosteroid-based dermatological creams

Spironolactone drug reduces side effects of corticosteroid-based dermatological creams

Basic research on blood pressure has led researchers from Inserm (Inserm Unit 1138, "Cordeliers Research Centre") to obtain unexpected results: drugs used to treat hypertension (high blood pressure) reduce side effects from corticosteroid-based creams used to treat certain skin diseases. [More]
Salt may help control infection

Salt may help control infection

Researchers at Vanderbilt University and in Germany have found that sodium - salt - accumulates in the skin and tissue in humans and mice to help control infection. [More]
Not all ARB drugs are equally effective at treating heart failure, reveals NSU researcher

Not all ARB drugs are equally effective at treating heart failure, reveals NSU researcher

Millions of people take angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) to help treat heart failure. But it turns out not all ARBs are created equally, according to one Nova Southeastern University researcher's findings. [More]
Kidney failure predictors in adolescents: an interview with Dr. Per-Ola Sundin

Kidney failure predictors in adolescents: an interview with Dr. Per-Ola Sundin

Diabetes, hypertension and other cardiovascular diseases as well as obesity are some of the markers of risk for kidney failure that we are aware of in adulthood. Markers of risk prior to adulthood for subsequent chronic kidney disease resulting in kidney failure are less well described. [More]
Medical researchers at Saint Louis University bring hope to those in pain and sickness

Medical researchers at Saint Louis University bring hope to those in pain and sickness

This year, Saint Louis University medical researchers advanced their fields, contributing to human knowledge and bringing hope to those in pain and sickness. [More]
Team-based care shown to be most effective way to control hypertension

Team-based care shown to be most effective way to control hypertension

Patients diagnosed with high blood pressure are given better control of their condition from a physician-pharmacist collaborative intervention than physician management alone, according to new research. [More]
Hypertensive patients who have psoriasis may need stricter blood pressure control

Hypertensive patients who have psoriasis may need stricter blood pressure control

People with hypertension who also have psoriasis may benefit from tighter blood pressure control, say researchers, particularly if their psoriasis is moderate or severe. [More]
Reducing heart failure deaths: an interview with Dimitrios Georgiopoulos, UK Medical Director, Novartis

Reducing heart failure deaths: an interview with Dimitrios Georgiopoulos, UK Medical Director, Novartis

Heart failure is a debilitating, and life-threatening, condition in which the heart cannot pump enough blood around the body. When heart failure continues to progress and worsen over time, the persistent condition is known as chronic heart failure. [More]
FDA approves Epaned for treatment of symptomatic and asymptomatic heart failure

FDA approves Epaned for treatment of symptomatic and asymptomatic heart failure

Silvergate Pharmaceuticals, Inc., focused on the development and commercialization of innovative and safe medicines for children, today announced that the United States Food and Drug Administration approved Epaned for the treatment of symptomatic heart failure and the treatment of asymptomatic left ventricular dysfunction (to decrease the rate of development of overt heart failure and to reduce hospitalization for heart failure). [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement