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Hypothyroidism occurs when the thyroid gland does not produce enough thyroid hormone to meet the body’s needs. Without enough thyroid hormone, many of the body’s functions slow down. About 5 percent of the U.S. population has hypothyroidism. Women are much more likely than men to develop hypothyroidism.
Low and high maternal thyroid hormone levels during pregnancy may affect infant's IQ

Low and high maternal thyroid hormone levels during pregnancy may affect infant's IQ

A new study finds that not only low but also high maternal thyroid hormone levels during early pregnancy may significantly lower the infant's IQ later in childhood. The study results, which will be presented Thursday at the Endocrine Society's 97th annual meeting in San Diego, suggest that the common practice of treating pregnant women who have mild thyroid hormone deficiency may pose unexpected risks to the developing baby's brain. [More]
Study finds link between fluoridated water and ADHD prevalence

Study finds link between fluoridated water and ADHD prevalence

"Artificial water fluoridation prevalence was significantly positively associated with ADHD prevalence," according to research published in Environmental Health (2/15), reports the Fluoride Action Network (FAN). [More]
Thyroid disease can affect woman's reproductive health

Thyroid disease can affect woman's reproductive health

Thyroid disease can have significant effects on a woman's reproductive health and screening for women presenting with fertility problems and recurrent early pregnancy loss should be considered, suggests a new review published today (23 January) in The Obstetrician & Gynaecologist. [More]
Alzheimer's drug Aricept (donepezil) linked to serious side effects

Alzheimer's drug Aricept (donepezil) linked to serious side effects

New warnings have been added to the prescribing information for the Alzheimer's drug Aricept (donepezil) advising of the risk of two rare but potentially serious conditions: muscle breakdown (rhabdomyolysis) and a neurological disorder called neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS). [More]
Research findings may lead to new treatment for hypothyroidism

Research findings may lead to new treatment for hypothyroidism

An international research team led by physician-scientists at Rush University Medical Center have gained new insights into hypothyroidism - a condition affecting about 10 million people in the U.S. - that may lead to new treatment protocols for the disease, particularly among the approximately 15 percent of patients for whom standard treatments are less effective. [More]
Long-term axitinib in RCC effective with ‘controllable’ toxicities

Long-term axitinib in RCC effective with ‘controllable’ toxicities

Axitinib treatment is effective in the long-term in Japanese patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma and has manageable toxicity, a phase II study suggests. [More]
Pembrolizumab shows promising results in patients with classical Hodgkin Lymphoma

Pembrolizumab shows promising results in patients with classical Hodgkin Lymphoma

Merck, known as MSD outside of Canada and the United States, announced today early study findings demonstrating that patients treated with pembrolizumab, the company's investigational anti-PD-1 cancer therapy, achieved an overall response rate of 66 percent, as assessed by International Harmonization Project response criteria (n=19/29: 95% CI, 46-82). [More]

Congenital hypothyroidism of central origin often requires treatment

Congenital hypothyroidism of central origin should not be dismissed as a mild condition and is worth screening for, say researchers. [More]
Initial congenital hypothyroidism severity predicts later cortical abnormalities

Initial congenital hypothyroidism severity predicts later cortical abnormalities

Research suggests that the persistent cognitive defects seen in children with congenital hypothyroidism, despite optimal care, are associated with altered cortical thickness. [More]
Absence of thyroid hormone during development can cause congenital deafness

Absence of thyroid hormone during development can cause congenital deafness

Fatigue, weight gain, chills, hair loss, anxiety, excessive perspiration - these symptoms are a few of the signs that the thyroid gland, which regulates the body's heart rate and plays a crucial role in its metabolism, has gone haywire. [More]

High levels of pervasive chemical in women may lead to adverse effects in offspring

In some women abnormally high levels of a common and pervasive chemical may lead to adverse effects in their offspring. [More]
Thyroxine may overcome mutated thyroid hormone receptor effects

Thyroxine may overcome mutated thyroid hormone receptor effects

Patients with a mutation in the thyroid hormone receptor α gene that affects both the thyroid hormone receptor α1 and α2 protein variants have similar characteristics to patients with mutations affecting only the α1 variant, report researchers. [More]
Hormonal imbalance is not the sole cause of childhood obesity, say experts

Hormonal imbalance is not the sole cause of childhood obesity, say experts

The number of children who are obese remains alarmingly high in the U.S. and, unfortunately, diseases associated with obesity are on the rise. [More]
People with significant hypothyroidism can experience impaired driving

People with significant hypothyroidism can experience impaired driving

People with significant hypothyroidism can experience impaired driving similar to those who are driving when intoxicated by alcohol, a new study finds. [More]
Grain legume crops overlooked as potentially valuable sources of micronutrients

Grain legume crops overlooked as potentially valuable sources of micronutrients

Popular diets across the world typically focus on the right balance of essential components like protein, fat, and carbohydrates. These items are called macronutrients, and we consume them in relatively large quantities. [More]
Clovis Oncology reports lucitanib Phase 1/2a monotherapy study results at ASCO

Clovis Oncology reports lucitanib Phase 1/2a monotherapy study results at ASCO

Clovis Oncology today announced results from an ongoing Phase 1/2a monotherapy study evaluating lucitanib, the Company's novel, potent inhibitor of the tyrosine kinase activity of fibroblast growth factor receptors 1 through 3 (FGFR1-3), vascular endothelial growth factor receptors 1 through 3 (VEGFR1-3) and platelet-derived growth factor receptors alpha and beta (PDGFRα-β). [More]
AstraZeneca’s EPANOVA receives FDA approval for treatment of adults with hypertriglyceridemia

AstraZeneca’s EPANOVA receives FDA approval for treatment of adults with hypertriglyceridemia

AstraZeneca today announced the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved EPANOVA (omega-3-carboxylic acids) as an adjunct to diet to reduce triglyceride levels in adults with severe hypertriglyceridemia (triglyceride levels greater than or equal to 500 mg/dL). [More]
Bristol-Myers Squibb to present new immunotherapy study data at ASCO Annual Meeting

Bristol-Myers Squibb to present new immunotherapy study data at ASCO Annual Meeting

Bristol-Myers Squibb Company today announced that new data from studies investigating its immunotherapies in adjuvant and advanced melanoma, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) will be presented at the 50th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) in Chicago from May 30-June 3. [More]
Free educational event for patients with Graves' disease and thyroid eye disease

Free educational event for patients with Graves' disease and thyroid eye disease

The Massachusetts Eye and Ear and the Graves' Disease & Thyroid Foundation will host a free educational event for patients living with Graves' disease and thyroid eye disease on Saturday, May 10 from 8:30 a.m. to noon at Mass. Eye and Ear's Meltzer Auditorium, 3rd floor, 243 Charles Street, Boston, Mass., 02114. [More]
Researcher explores public perceptions related to newborn screening programs

Researcher explores public perceptions related to newborn screening programs

While 94 per cent of Canadians surveyed said they would participate in public health programs that screen newborns for a specific number of genetic conditions, only 80 per cent said they would be willing to participate in screening that would sequence their newborns' genomes. [More]
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