Immunization News and Research RSS Feed - Immunization News and Research

CPhA urges federal government to enhance HPV vaccination programs for young Canadians

CPhA urges federal government to enhance HPV vaccination programs for young Canadians

The Canadian Pharmacists Association (CPhA) urges the federal government to enhance its national immunization strategy to ensure that all Canadians have the opportunity to protect themselves against the common strains of HPV (human papillomavirus) through immunization. [More]
TSRI-led study identifies new immune molecules that protect against Marburg virus

TSRI-led study identifies new immune molecules that protect against Marburg virus

A new study led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute identifies new immune molecules that protect against deadly Marburg virus, a relative of Ebola virus. The research provides ingredients needed to develop treatments for future Marburg outbreaks. [More]
GSK welcomes U.S. CDC's vote on use of meningococcal group B vaccines

GSK welcomes U.S. CDC's vote on use of meningococcal group B vaccines

GlaxoSmithKline announced today that the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) voted for a Category B recommendation for meningococcal group B vaccination, including BEXSERO (Meningococcal Group B Vaccine), in individuals aged 16 to 23 (with a preferred age of 16-18). [More]
New research examines antibiotic choice for treating children with community-acquired pneumonia

New research examines antibiotic choice for treating children with community-acquired pneumonia

New Vanderbilt-led research shows hospitals are doing a better job of using antibiotics less commonly associated with antibiotic resistance to treat children hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). [More]
Experimental vaccine candidate can stimulate immune system activity to prevent HIV infection

Experimental vaccine candidate can stimulate immune system activity to prevent HIV infection

New research led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI), International AIDS Vaccine Initiative (IAVI) and The Rockefeller University shows in mice that an experimental vaccine candidate designed at TSRI can stimulate the immune system activity necessary to stop HIV infection. The findings could provide key information for the development of an effective AIDS vaccine. [More]
Planning for first clinical trial of MERS-CoV vaccine candidate now underway

Planning for first clinical trial of MERS-CoV vaccine candidate now underway

Researchers from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet in Munich have demonstrated, in a preclinical setting, the protective effect of a candidate vaccine directed against the coronavirus that causes Middle East Respiratory Syndrome. Planning for the first clinical trial is now underway. [More]
Three studies describe advances toward development of antibodies to stop HIV

Three studies describe advances toward development of antibodies to stop HIV

A trio of studies being published today in the journals Science and Cell describes advances toward the development of an HIV vaccine. The three study teams all demonstrated techniques for stimulating animal cells to produce antibodies that either could stop HIV from infecting human cells in the laboratory or had the potential to evolve into such antibodies. [More]
Experimental AIDS vaccine candidate stimulates immune system to block infection in animal model

Experimental AIDS vaccine candidate stimulates immune system to block infection in animal model

New research led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute, International AIDS Vaccine Initiative and The Rockefeller University shows that an experimental vaccine candidate can stimulate the immune system to block HIV infection in mice. [More]
Regulatory T cells critical for the immune system's ability to fight off future pathogen attacks

Regulatory T cells critical for the immune system's ability to fight off future pathogen attacks

Just as militaries need to have trained, experienced soldiers ready for future wars, making sure that the immune system has enough battle-ready T cells on hand is important for fast-acting, more effective vaccines, according to Penn State researchers. [More]
WHO and World Bank Group: 400 million people do not have access to essential health services

WHO and World Bank Group: 400 million people do not have access to essential health services

A World Health Organization and World Bank Group report launched today shows that 400 million people do not have access to essential health services and 6% of people in low- and middle-income countries are tipped into or pushed further into extreme poverty because of health spending. [More]
Orange sweet potato reduces prevalence and duration of diarrhea in children

Orange sweet potato reduces prevalence and duration of diarrhea in children

A new study has found that orange sweet potato (OSP) reduced both the prevalence and duration of diarrhea in young children in Mozambique. [More]
Researchers examine proteins on surface of naive CD4+ T cells

Researchers examine proteins on surface of naive CD4+ T cells

The team headed by Dr. Kathrin Suttner, who, together with Prof. Dr. Carsten Schmidt-Weber, heads the airway immunology research group at the Helmholtz Zentrum München and Technische Universität München, concentrated its work on the so-called naive CD4+ T cells. [More]
Creative Diagnostics announces launch of antibody generation service based on DNA immunization technology

Creative Diagnostics announces launch of antibody generation service based on DNA immunization technology

Creative Diagnostics, the global diagnostics service and product supplier, is pleased to announce its launch of custom antibody production service based on DNA immunization technology. This DNA immunization technology allows high success rate in generation of high-affinity antibodies recognizing difficult-to-express proteins in their native confirmation, such as GPCRs, ion channels and other multiple membrane spanning proteins. [More]
Protective antibody response could be effective in preventing mother-to-child HIV transmission

Protective antibody response could be effective in preventing mother-to-child HIV transmission

How most babies are protected from acquiring HIV from their infected mothers has been a matter of scientific controversy. [More]

USciences confers honorary doctor of science degree to GSA CEO

University of the Sciences conferred an honorary doctor of science degree to James C. Appleby P'87, RPh, MPH, at its 194th Commencement Ceremony on May 20, 2015. Appleby is executive director and CEO of The Gerontological Society of America, the nation's leading interdisciplinary professional membership organization devoted to research, education, and practice in the field of aging. [More]
New mobile app may help adolescents make more informed decisions about sexual behavior

New mobile app may help adolescents make more informed decisions about sexual behavior

Teenagers, parents, educators and clinicians will have a new tool to help adolescents make more informed decisions about their sexual behavior. "Seventeen Days," a mobile app based on the interactive movie of the same name, will be available at no cost on iPhone, iPad and Android devices beginning June 4. [More]
Group Health Research Institute conducts first randomized trial to tackle vaccine hesitancy

Group Health Research Institute conducts first randomized trial to tackle vaccine hesitancy

Group Health Research Institute conducted the first randomized trial to test an intervention aimed at improving hesitancy about early childhood vaccines by working directly with doctors. Vax Northwest, a Washington state public-private partnership, developed the intervention. [More]
Chancellor Angela Merkel calls for new plan to tackle Ebola outbreak at 68th World Health Assembly

Chancellor Angela Merkel calls for new plan to tackle Ebola outbreak at 68th World Health Assembly

Angela Merkel, Chancellor of the Federal Republic of Germany addressed delegates on the first morning of the Sixty-eighth World Health Assembly. "The WHO is the only international organization that has universal political legitimacy on global health issues,” she said. [More]
New microneedle patch simplifies measles vaccination

New microneedle patch simplifies measles vaccination

A new microneedle patch being developed by the Georgia Institute of Technology and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) could make it easier to vaccinate people against measles and other vaccine-preventable diseases. [More]
PAML signs collaborative agreement with Axela

PAML signs collaborative agreement with Axela

PAML announced today that the laboratory has entered into a collaborative agreement with Axela, Inc. to develop multiplex assays focused on immune status for vaccine preventable diseases. PAML is one of the nation's leading medical reference laboratories, and Axela focuses on multiplexed nucleic acid and protein analysis for clinical diagnostics. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement