Immunization News and Research RSS Feed - Immunization News and Research

Cosentyx (secukinumab) safe, effective for treating psoriasis patients

Cosentyx (secukinumab) safe, effective for treating psoriasis patients

Novartis today announced new two-year results demonstrating sustained efficacy with Cosentyx (secukinumab) with an acceptable safety profile for the treatment of psoriasis patients. The data comes from the extension study of the pivotal Phase III FIXTURE and ERASURE trials. [More]
New UNICEF report highlights urgency of reducing Ebola cases

New UNICEF report highlights urgency of reducing Ebola cases

Ebola has had a devastating impact on children, who make up about 20 per cent of infections in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. To protect them and their communities, it is critical to defeat this scourge, while working to restore basic services, UNICEF said in a report released today. [More]
Cyclone Pam: WHO coordinates response efforts to bring health support to cyclone-hit Vanuatu

Cyclone Pam: WHO coordinates response efforts to bring health support to cyclone-hit Vanuatu

The World Health Organization in the Western Pacific Region is coordinating response efforts with Vanuatu's Ministry of Health and other humanitarian partners to bring much-needed health support to the Pacific island country, following the devastation caused by Cyclone Pam. [More]
People’s health at the centre of new global blueprint to reduce disaster risks

People’s health at the centre of new global blueprint to reduce disaster risks

Ten years since adopting the Hyogo Framework for Action shortly after the Indian Ocean Tsunami, government representatives have gathered in Sendai to negotiate a new framework for global action to reduce the risks of disasters. For the first time, protecting people's health is at the centre of such a framework. [More]
World Health Organisation (WHO) joins with ESCMID to fight global infections

World Health Organisation (WHO) joins with ESCMID to fight global infections

The European Society for Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID) has been joined by the World Health Organisation (WHO) to launch the 7th annual ‘International Day for Fighting Infection’ (April 24th, 2015). [More]
60,000 children in need of immediate assistance after Cyclone Pam in Vanuatu; at least 72,000 out of school

60,000 children in need of immediate assistance after Cyclone Pam in Vanuatu; at least 72,000 out of school

With Tropical Cyclone Pam ripping through Vanuatu from late Friday night (13th March) into the early hours of Saturday morning, UNICEF Pacific reminds that 45% of the population is children and they are particularly vulnerable in any emergency. [More]
Guanabenz drug prevents myelin loss, alleviates symptoms of MS in animal models

Guanabenz drug prevents myelin loss, alleviates symptoms of MS in animal models

An FDA-approved drug for high blood pressure, guanabenz, prevents myelin loss and alleviates clinical symptoms of multiple sclerosis (MS) in animal models, according to a new study. [More]
NIAID partners with Liberian government to test ZMapp drug for Ebola virus disease

NIAID partners with Liberian government to test ZMapp drug for Ebola virus disease

In partnership with the Liberian government, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases today launched a clinical trial to obtain safety and efficacy data on the investigational drug ZMapp as a treatment for Ebola virus disease. The study, which will be conducted in Liberia and the United States, is a randomized controlled trial enrolling adults and children with known Ebola virus infection. [More]
Study reveals causes of community-acquired pneumonia in children

Study reveals causes of community-acquired pneumonia in children

With the chill of winter comes a spike in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), which spreads more easily as people retreat indoors and come into close contact. The lung infection triggers persistent coughing, chest pain, fever, and difficulty breathing, and is particularly hard on the very young and the very old. In fact, pneumonia is the leading cause of hospitalization among U.S. children, with estimated medical costs of $1 billion annually. [More]
Study points respiratory viruses as the most common cause of childhood pneumonia

Study points respiratory viruses as the most common cause of childhood pneumonia

Respiratory viruses, not bacterial infections, are the most commonly detected causes of community-acquired pneumonia in children, according to new research released Feb. 26 in the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
Researchers examine individuals' confidence or reluctance in vaccination decision-making

Researchers examine individuals' confidence or reluctance in vaccination decision-making

Researchers explore individuals' confidence or reluctance to vaccinate their families and the associated effects on global health, in a collection published on February 25, 2015 by the open-access journal, PLOS Currents: Outbreaks. The collection is accompanied by the editorial "Hesitancy, trust and individualism in vaccination decision-making" by Jonathan E. Suk et al. from the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control. [More]
Gates Foundation awards $2.5 million to support development of vaccine-filled microneedles

Gates Foundation awards $2.5 million to support development of vaccine-filled microneedles

The Georgia Institute of Technology and Micron Biomedical have been awarded $2.5 million in grants from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to advance the development of dissolvable microneedle patches for polio immunization. The patches will be studied to evaluate their potential role as part of the worldwide efforts to eradicate polio. [More]
International phase 2/3 trial shows Gardasil 9 vaccine protects against nine HPV types

International phase 2/3 trial shows Gardasil 9 vaccine protects against nine HPV types

Approximately 12,000 women are diagnosed with cervical cancer each year in the United States and another 4,000 die annually from the disease. However, most cervical cancers are preventable through immunization against the human papillomavirus (HPV). A pivotal international phase 2/3 clinical trial involving Moffitt Cancer Center faculty demonstrated that vaccination with Gardasil 9 protects against nine HPV types, seven of which cause most cases of cervical, vulvar, and vaginal disease. [More]

PIDS statement on ongoing measles outbreak

The Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society, an organization of physicians, scientists, and other medical professionals dedicated to treating and preventing infectious diseases, issued a statement on Feb. 5 about the ongoing measles outbreak, urging vaccination to halt the spread of the disease and to prevent future outbreaks. [More]
Davita Kidney Care exceeds its own previous immunization rates for dialysis patients, teammates

Davita Kidney Care exceeds its own previous immunization rates for dialysis patients, teammates

DaVita Kidney Care, a division of DaVita HealthCare Partners Inc. (NYSE: DVA) and a leading provider of kidney care services, today announced that the company is a leader in immunizations for kidney care providers and has exceeded its own previous immunization rates for both dialysis patients and teammates. [More]
Antibodies used in research lab should be made by recombinant DNA technology, say authors

Antibodies used in research lab should be made by recombinant DNA technology, say authors

Antibodies are now established as therapeutics and indispensable in the research lab. In con-trast to high-quality therapeutics, commercial antibodies used in research often do not proper-ly function, as an international group of authors around Andreas Plückthun of UZH have warned. [More]
Winners of Verizon Powerful Answers Award bring solutions to redefine the world

Winners of Verizon Powerful Answers Award bring solutions to redefine the world

Four great ideas were named first place winners of the Verizon Powerful Answers Award, a year-long global challenge to discover and help bring to market technology-based solutions with the potential to change our world. [More]
New Johns Hopkins research suggests that vitamin A may protect children against malaria

New Johns Hopkins research suggests that vitamin A may protect children against malaria

Children under age 5 living in sub-Saharan Africa were 54 percent less likely to develop malaria if they had been given a single large dose of vitamin A, new research led by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health suggests. [More]
Immunization can prevent measles

Immunization can prevent measles

The recent measles outbreak linked to Disney amusement parks in southern California should not be a concern for anyone who has had measles in the past or who has received two doses of the measles vaccine. [More]
UAB doctor says measles can be halted with safe, effective measles vaccine

UAB doctor says measles can be halted with safe, effective measles vaccine

An ongoing, multistate measles outbreak linked to a California amusement park has already caused 68 confirmed cases between Jan. 1 and 23, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement