Immunoglobulin News and Research RSS Feed - Immunoglobulin News and Research

Gut microbiota may play role in influencing food allergies

Gut microbiota may play role in influencing food allergies

Countless microorganisms live in the intestinal tract. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have been able to demonstrate that intestinal bacteria also play a role in determining the strength of anaphylactic reactions to food allergens. [More]
Intestinal microbiota may play role in food allergies

Intestinal microbiota may play role in food allergies

Countless microorganisms live in the intestinal tract. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich have been able to demonstrate that intestinal bacteria also play a role in determining the strength of anaphylactic reactions to food allergens. [More]
Caltech scientists uncover three-dimensional structure of disease-fighting protein

Caltech scientists uncover three-dimensional structure of disease-fighting protein

The polymeric immunoglobulin receptor, or pIgR, is a multitasking protein produced in the lining of mucosal surfaces, such as the intestines. It plays a pivotal role in the body's immune functions by sequestering bacteria and by assisting antibodies—large proteins that can identify and neutralize specific bacteria and viruses. [More]
Mayo Clinic offers CDC’s Zika virus screening test

Mayo Clinic offers CDC’s Zika virus screening test

Mayo Clinic will offer the Zika virus antibody test developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [More]

Abingdon Health gains TGA regulatory approval for Seralite- FLC product in Australia

Abingdon Health Ltd, is pleased to announce that it has gained regulatory approval by the Therapeutic Goods Administration in Australia for Seralite- FLC. [More]
Health care resource use and costs of H.P. Acthar® gel for multiple sclerosis relapse

Health care resource use and costs of H.P. Acthar® gel for multiple sclerosis relapse

Mallinckrodt plc, a leading global specialty biopharmaceutical company, today announced new retrospective health economic data on H.P. Acthar® Gel (repository corticotropin injection; RCI), which may be an option for the management of multiple sclerosis (MS) relapses. [More]
Study links alpha-defensin genes to IgA nephropathy risk

Study links alpha-defensin genes to IgA nephropathy risk

A gene which forms part of our body's first line of defence against infection may be associated with an increased risk with a type of kidney disease, research involving academics at The University of Nottingham has discovered. [More]
People with higher levels of IgG/IgM antibodies less likely to have heart attack

People with higher levels of IgG/IgM antibodies less likely to have heart attack

Measuring antibody levels in the blood could be used to detect a person's heart attack risk after researchers, part-funded by the British Heart Foundation, discovered that higher levels of these antibodies are linked to a lower heart attack risk. [More]
Researchers discover AF1q protein linked to multiple myeloma, EMD

Researchers discover AF1q protein linked to multiple myeloma, EMD

A group of researchers from the University of Louisville, Japan and Austria is the first to identify a protein, AF1q, associated with multiple myeloma and a condition that occurs in approximately one-fourth of very aggressive multiple myeloma, extramedullary disease or EMD. [More]
Tanaka develops world's first kit to directly detect ZIKA virus in blood

Tanaka develops world's first kit to directly detect ZIKA virus in blood

Tanaka Holdings Co., Ltd. announced today that Tanaka Kikinzoku Kogyo K.K., which operates the Tanaka Precious Metals manufacturing business, has developed the world's first kit able to directly detect the ZIKA virus in blood. The kit is capable of rapid ZIKV detection in just 10 to 15 minutes. [More]
Study provides insight to gene shuffling process

Study provides insight to gene shuffling process

Use of a new technique developed at the Babraham Institute has allowed researchers to take an in-depth look at the gene shuffling process that is responsible for our body's ability to recognise a vast range of foreign agents such as disease-causing microorganisms. [More]
Bacterial invasion of lungs can lead to inflammation in COPD

Bacterial invasion of lungs can lead to inflammation in COPD

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common smoking-related lung illness and the third leading cause of death in the United States. Scientists have long believed that inhaling toxic gases and particles from tobacco smoke causes inflammation of the small airways in the lungs, leading to the development of COPD. However, the theory doesn't explain why airway inflammation and disease progression continue even after the patient stops smoking. [More]
HDM SLIT tablet can reduce risk of moderate or severe asthma exacerbation

HDM SLIT tablet can reduce risk of moderate or severe asthma exacerbation

The addition of a house dust mite (HDM) sublingual allergen immunotherapy (SLIT) tablet to maintenance medications improved time to first moderate or severe asthma exacerbation during a period of inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) reduction among adults with HDM allergy-related asthma not well controlled by ICS, according to a study appearing in the April 26 issue of JAMA. [More]
Series of routine tests may not be beneficial to patients with age-related disorder

Series of routine tests may not be beneficial to patients with age-related disorder

A series of tests physicians routinely order to help diagnose and follow their patients with an elevated antibody level that is a marker for cancer risk, often do not benefit the patient but do increase health care costs, pathologists report. [More]
New study finds no increase in food-specific IgE levels linked to food allergies

New study finds no increase in food-specific IgE levels linked to food allergies

A new study using 5,000 stored blood samples found no increase in the presence of food-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) — a blood marker associated with food allergy — in children's blood between the 1980s and the 2000s. [More]
Study shows aging affects adaptive immune responses

Study shows aging affects adaptive immune responses

Today at the 45th Annual Meeting & Exhibition of the American Association for Dental Research, researcher Jeffrey Ebersole, University of Kentucky, Lexington, USA, will present a study titled "Systemic Antibody Responses to Oral Bacteria with Aging." The AADR Annual Meeting is being held in conjunction with the 40th Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research. [More]
STING agonists developed to induce cellular death in B cell malignancies

STING agonists developed to induce cellular death in B cell malignancies

In almost every mammalian cell, you will find the endoplasmic reticulum, a network of continuous membranes responsible for controlling metabolism as well as the folding, assembly and secretion of proteins. [More]
Omalizumab treatment significantly decreases colds in inner-city children with allergic asthma

Omalizumab treatment significantly decreases colds in inner-city children with allergic asthma

Treatment with omalizumab significantly decreases the number of colds in inner-city children with allergic asthma, researchers reported at a press conference today at the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology 2016 Annual Meeting in Los Angeles. Omalizumab, sold under the brand name Xolair, is an injectable antibody that can be used to treat asthma cases not controlled by inhaled corticosteroids. [More]
Study assesses health problems related to food hypersensitivity

Study assesses health problems related to food hypersensitivity

A study by researchers at the University of Southampton and Southampton General Hospital, is the first to assess the prevalence of two different types of food hypersensitivity and the risk factors associated with them. [More]
Phase III study: Ocrelizumab significantly reduces disease activity in PPMS patients

Phase III study: Ocrelizumab significantly reduces disease activity in PPMS patients

Ocrelizumab (OCR) is a humanized monoclonal antibody that selectively targets CD20+B cells. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled Phase III study (ORATORIO), OCR significantly reduced disease activity in patients with primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS). [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement