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Immunology is the study of the body's immune system.
Experimental vaccine candidate can stimulate immune system activity to prevent HIV infection

Experimental vaccine candidate can stimulate immune system activity to prevent HIV infection

New research led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI), International AIDS Vaccine Initiative (IAVI) and The Rockefeller University shows in mice that an experimental vaccine candidate designed at TSRI can stimulate the immune system activity necessary to stop HIV infection. The findings could provide key information for the development of an effective AIDS vaccine. [More]
Pediatric study looks at evidence-based predictors of biphasic allergic reactions

Pediatric study looks at evidence-based predictors of biphasic allergic reactions

Children are more likely to have a repeat, delayed anaphylactic reaction from the same allergic cause, depending on the severity of the initial reaction. The first pediatric study to look at the predictors for this phenomenon was published today in Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. [More]
Sequence of immunizations could be the promising route to HIV vaccine

Sequence of immunizations could be the promising route to HIV vaccine

The secret to preventing HIV infection lies within the human immune system, but the more-than-25-year search has so far failed to yield a vaccine capable of training the body to neutralize the ever-changing virus. New research from The Rockefeller University, and collaborating institutions, suggests no single shot will ever do the trick. Instead, the scientists find, a sequence of immunizations might be the most promising route to an HIV vaccine. [More]
International researchers identify previously unknown genetic immunodeficiency

International researchers identify previously unknown genetic immunodeficiency

An analysis of five families has revealed a previously unknown genetic immunodeficiency, says an international team led by researchers from Boston Children's Hospital. The condition, linked to mutations in a gene called DOCK2, deactivates many features of the immune system and leaves affected children open to a unique pattern of aggressive, potentially fatal infections early in life. [More]
HUJI professor honored with Helmholtz International Fellow Award for epigenetics research

HUJI professor honored with Helmholtz International Fellow Award for epigenetics research

The Israeli immunologist and cancer researcher Professor Yehudit Bergman of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel, has been honored with the Helmholtz International Fellow Award for her excellent research. In a prize ceremony at the MDC Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine in the Helmholtz Association in Berlin, Germany, MDC's interim director Professor Thomas Sommer presented the certificate to her on Thursday, June 18th, 2015. [More]
Experimental AIDS vaccine candidate stimulates immune system to block infection in animal model

Experimental AIDS vaccine candidate stimulates immune system to block infection in animal model

New research led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute, International AIDS Vaccine Initiative and The Rockefeller University shows that an experimental vaccine candidate can stimulate the immune system to block HIV infection in mice. [More]
Scientists reveal new combination method that efficiently destroys cancer cells

Scientists reveal new combination method that efficiently destroys cancer cells

Scientists at the Institut Pasteur and Inserm have successfully increased the infiltration of immune cells into tumors, thus inducing the immune system to block tumor growth. In an article published in Nature Immunology, the scientists show that, in combination with existing immunotherapies, this process efficiently destroys cancer cells. [More]
Public health experts outline strategies for managing MERS-CoV outbreak

Public health experts outline strategies for managing MERS-CoV outbreak

The ongoing outbreak in the Republic of Korea (South Korea) is an important reminder that the Middle East respiratory virus (MERS-CoV) requires constant vigilance and could spread to other countries including the United States. However, MERS can be brought under control with effective public health strategies, say two Georgetown University public health experts. [More]
NIH-funded study identifies DOCK2 deficiency

NIH-funded study identifies DOCK2 deficiency

Researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health have identified a new immune disorder--DOCK2 deficiency--named after the mutated gene responsible for the disease. [More]
ExCellThera's stem cell expansion approach may benefit AML patients undergoing transplants

ExCellThera's stem cell expansion approach may benefit AML patients undergoing transplants

Patients suffering from acute myeloid leukemia, who require stem cell transplantation as part of their treatment,may now benefit from a new best-in-class process that improves the viability and success of cord blood stem cell transplantation. [More]
Rare form of autoimmune syndrome may be tied to mutations in AIRE gene

Rare form of autoimmune syndrome may be tied to mutations in AIRE gene

A hereditary autoimmune disease that was thought to be exceedingly rare may have a less severe form that affects one in 1,000 people or even more, according to new research conducted at the Weizmann Institute of Science, in Israel, and the University of Bergen, in Norway. [More]
RPCI receives NCI grant to continue research program on photodynamic therapy for head and neck cancers

RPCI receives NCI grant to continue research program on photodynamic therapy for head and neck cancers

Roswell Park Cancer Institute has received continuation of a prestigious program project grant from the National Cancer Institute for research through the Roswell Park Photodynamic Therapy Center. [More]
La Jolla Institute researchers identify molecular pathway that maintains Treg cells' function

La Jolla Institute researchers identify molecular pathway that maintains Treg cells' function

Regulatory T cells (Treg cells) are part of the system of checks and balances that prevents the immune response from going overboard and causing autoimmune disease. Although critically important for shaping the immune response and maintaining self-tolerance, how they hold on to their immune-suppressive powers had remained unclear. [More]
Regulatory T cells critical for the immune system's ability to fight off future pathogen attacks

Regulatory T cells critical for the immune system's ability to fight off future pathogen attacks

Just as militaries need to have trained, experienced soldiers ready for future wars, making sure that the immune system has enough battle-ready T cells on hand is important for fast-acting, more effective vaccines, according to Penn State researchers. [More]
Breastfeeding Medicine editorial examines risks associated with Internet-purchased breast milk

Breastfeeding Medicine editorial examines risks associated with Internet-purchased breast milk

The practice of breast milk sharing among mothers has evolved into an Internet-based marketplace in which this valuable commodity is being bought and sold not only to feed babies, but as a "natural superfood" for body builders and athletes. [More]
Researchers discover that extreme exercise can lead to blood poisoning

Researchers discover that extreme exercise can lead to blood poisoning

Researchers have discovered that extreme exercise can cause intestinal bacteria to leak into the bloodstream, leading to blood poisoning. [More]
Researchers locate promising target for potential vaccine against malaria

Researchers locate promising target for potential vaccine against malaria

Researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have located a new - and likely more promising, they say - target for a potential vaccine against malaria, a mosquito-borne illness that kills as many as 750,000 people each year. [More]
CINtec PLUS Cytology test more effective than HC2 HPV test in identifying women with precancerous lesions

CINtec PLUS Cytology test more effective than HC2 HPV test in identifying women with precancerous lesions

Ventana Medical Systems, Inc., a member of the Roche Group, today announced the publication of further results from the Primary ASC-US LSIL Marker Study (PALMS) in this month's issue of Cancer Cytopathology. The PALMS study, which enrolled more than 27,000 women from five European countries, was designed to evaluate the diagnostic performance of the CINtec PLUS Cytology test in detecting pre-cancerous cervical disease compared to HPV testing and more traditional screening methods like Pap cytology. [More]
New study on athletes’ immune function aims to prevent illness, optimize performance

New study on athletes’ immune function aims to prevent illness, optimize performance

With the Gold Coast Commonwealth Games looming in 2018, a key concern for athletes will be how to prevent illness from interfering with their training and performance. [More]
MedUni Vienna uses new MR technique to classify adenomas

MedUni Vienna uses new MR technique to classify adenomas

Adenomas are rare liver tumours, a certain percentage of which can become malignant. Using a new MR (magnetic resonance) technique at MedUni Vienna, it is now possible to classify adenomas without subjecting patients to invasive tissue sampling procedures. [More]
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