Immunology News and Research RSS Feed - Immunology News and Research

Immunology is the study of the body's immune system.
Researchers identify new targets for future CLL therapies

Researchers identify new targets for future CLL therapies

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is among the most frequent leukemias affecting adults in Western countries. It usually occurs in older patients, does not cause any symptoms for a long time and is often only discovered by accident. Despite treatment, relapses frequently occur. The immunologists Dr. Kristina Heinig and Dr. Uta Höpken (Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine, MDC, Berlin-Buch) and the hematologist Dr. Armin Rehm (MDC and Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin) have now discovered why this is so. [More]
BRI signs license agreement with SOBI for Kineret (anakinra)

BRI signs license agreement with SOBI for Kineret (anakinra)

Baylor Research Institute, the research arm of the Baylor Scott & White Health, announced that it has signed an agreement with Swedish Orphan Biovitrum AB (Sobi) to non-exclusively license Baylor's patents pertaining to the treatment of Systemic Onset Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (SJIA or SOJIA) using interleukin-1 (IL-1) beta antagonists. [More]
Study sheds new light on well-known mechanism required for immune response

Study sheds new light on well-known mechanism required for immune response

A new study published in the scientific journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America sheds new light on a well-known mechanism required for the immune response. Researchers at the IRCM, led by Tarik Möröy, PhD, identified a protein that controls the activity of the p53 tumour suppressor protein known as the "guardian of the genome". [More]
Researchers suggest new strategy to control cellular identity and fate

Researchers suggest new strategy to control cellular identity and fate

A team of scientists that included researchers from UCLA has discovered a novel mechanism of RNA regulation in embryonic stem cells. The findings are strong evidence that a specific chemical modification, or "tag," on RNA plays a key role in determining the ability of embryonic stem cells to adopt different cellular identities. [More]
Jakafi receives expanded approval from FDA for use in treatment of polycythemia vera

Jakafi receives expanded approval from FDA for use in treatment of polycythemia vera

Diplomat Pharmacy, Inc., the nation's largest independent specialty pharmacy, announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved an expanded indication of Jakafi (ruxolitinib). [More]
Cellular Research announces commercial availability of Precise targeted RNASeq assays

Cellular Research announces commercial availability of Precise targeted RNASeq assays

Cellular Research today announced the commercial launch of its Precise targeted RNASeq assays. The company also announced the commercial availability of application-focused panels for the Precise assays, including panels designed for oncology, induced pluripotent stem cells and immunology. [More]
Scientists seek to improve stem cell transplant outcomes using DNA sequencing, mathematical modeling

Scientists seek to improve stem cell transplant outcomes using DNA sequencing, mathematical modeling

Is the human immune system similar to the weather, a seemingly random yet dynamical system that can be modeled based on past conditions to predict future states? Scientists at VCU Massey Cancer Center's award-winning Bone Marrow Transplant (BMT) Program believe it is, and they recently published several studies that support the possibility of using next-generation DNA sequencing and mathematical modeling to not only understand the variability observed in clinical outcomes of stem cell transplantation, but also to provide a theoretical framework to make transplantation a possibility for more patients who do not have a related donor. [More]
New technology reveals cellular gene transcription process in detail

New technology reveals cellular gene transcription process in detail

A new technology that reveals cellular gene transcription in greater detail has been developed by Dr. Daniel Kaufmann of the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre and the research team he directed. "This new research tool offers us a more profound view of the immune responses that are involved in a range of diseases, such as HIV infection. At the level of gene transcription, this had been difficult, complex and costly to do with current technologies, such as microscopy," explained the University of Montreal professor. [More]
Study reports effective treatment approach to inhibit herpes virus infection

Study reports effective treatment approach to inhibit herpes virus infection

A multi-institutional study reports an effective treatment approach to inhibit and keep latent viruses like herpes simplex from reactivating and causing disease. The work, whose lead author is the late James Hill, PhD, LSU Health New Orleans Professor and Director of Pharmacology and Infectious Disease at the LSU Eye Center, is published in the December 3, 2014, issue of Science Translational Medicine. [More]
Researchers find way to prevent noise-induced hearing loss

Researchers find way to prevent noise-induced hearing loss

Researchers from Weill Cornell Medical College and the Gladstone Institutes have found a way to prevent noise-induced hearing loss in a mouse using a simple chemical compound that is a precursor to vitamin B3. This discovery has important implications not only for preventing hearing loss, but also potentially for treating some aging-related conditions that are linked to the same protein. [More]
Researchers explore how to turn on the activity of paternal gene

Researchers explore how to turn on the activity of paternal gene

Most genes are inherited as two working copies, one from the mother and one from the father. However, in a few instances, a gene is imprinted, which means that one copy is silenced. This is called genomic imprinting. If the active copy is mutated, then disease results, even though the silenced gene copy may be normal. [More]
New blood test could help detect cold-related asthma risk

New blood test could help detect cold-related asthma risk

People who have asthma generally suffer worse with colds caused by rhinoviruses than other people do. There are also asthmatics and patients with the severe lung condition COPD in whom the cold virus can trigger serious flare-ups of their condition. A team of researchers from the Institute of Pathophysiology and Allergy Research at the MedUni Vienna has now discovered how this risk group can be filtered out using a blood test. [More]
U of T professor wins GSK's 2014 Discovery Fast Track Challenge devoted for cancer research

U of T professor wins GSK's 2014 Discovery Fast Track Challenge devoted for cancer research

University of Toronto (U of T) Professor Tania Watts is a winner of GSK's 2014 Discovery Fast Track Challenge, which is designed to accelerate the translation of academic research into novel therapies. [More]
Alport syndrome: an interview with Dr Paul Grint, CMO, Regulus

Alport syndrome: an interview with Dr Paul Grint, CMO, Regulus

Alport Syndrome was first described by a physician called Cecil Alport, back in the late 1920s. It's a genetic disease that affects a certain type of collagen involved in the functioning of the kidney, the ear, and the eye. [More]
Phenotyping human diseases in mice: an interview with Professor Carola Vinuesa

Phenotyping human diseases in mice: an interview with Professor Carola Vinuesa

One of the main obstacles to finding effective therapies for human diseases has been our limited understanding of disease pathogenesis: we lack detailed knowledge of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that lead to the development of disease. [More]
Researchers discover why advanced melanoma patients respond to pembrolizumab drug

Researchers discover why advanced melanoma patients respond to pembrolizumab drug

Work supported by the Stand Up To Cance - Cancer Research Institute - Immunology Translational Research Dream Team, launched in 2012 to focus on how the patient's own immune system can be harnessed to treat some cancers have pioneered an approach to predict why advanced melanoma patients respond to a new life-saving melanoma drug. [More]
New research brings personalized cancer vaccine approach one step closer to reality

New research brings personalized cancer vaccine approach one step closer to reality

In the near future, physicians may treat some cancer patients with personalized vaccines that spur their immune systems to attack malignant tumors. New research led by scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has brought the approach one step closer to reality. [More]
CARsgen announces completion of series A financing

CARsgen announces completion of series A financing

CARsgen, a leader in the development of Chimeric Antigen Receptors T (CAR-T) cell immunotherapy to treat a variety of cancers, today announced the completion of a series A financing led by BVCF, a China-based healthcare private equity fund. [More]
UTSA's Bernard Arulanandam named fellow of AAAS

UTSA's Bernard Arulanandam named fellow of AAAS

Bernard Arulanandam, UTSA Jane and Roland Blumberg Professor in Biology and Assistant Vice President for Research Support, has been named a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Arulanandam was elected by his peers for the honor, recognizing his scientific and socially distinguished efforts to advance science and its applications. [More]
Eminent molecular cell biologist awarded GRC fellowship

Eminent molecular cell biologist awarded GRC fellowship

The Gutenberg Research College of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz has awarded the coveted GRC fellowship to Professor Krishnaraj Rajalingam. In the upcoming years, he will lead a research team at the Research Center for Immunotherapy at Mainz University. [More]