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Immunology is the study of the body's immune system.
New study finds no increase in food-specific IgE levels linked to food allergies

New study finds no increase in food-specific IgE levels linked to food allergies

A new study using 5,000 stored blood samples found no increase in the presence of food-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) — a blood marker associated with food allergy — in children's blood between the 1980s and the 2000s. [More]
Immunology experts aim to develop point-of-care test for early detection of Lyme disease

Immunology experts aim to develop point-of-care test for early detection of Lyme disease

As part of the EU "ID Lyme" project, the infection immunology working group at the Institute for Hygiene and Applied Immunology at the Center for Pathophysiology, Infectiology and Immunology at the Medical University of Vienna is working on developing of a new test for early detection of Lyme disease (borreliosis). [More]
Study shows cancer cell death via necroptosis can drive pancreatic tumor growth

Study shows cancer cell death via necroptosis can drive pancreatic tumor growth

The most aggressive form of pancreatic cancer - often described as one of the hardest malignancies to diagnose and treat -- thrives in the presence of neighboring tumor cells undergoing a particular form of "orchestrated cell death." This is according to a major study recently published in the journal Nature. [More]
Researchers observe worrisome increase in anaphylaxis rate

Researchers observe worrisome increase in anaphylaxis rate

Anaphylaxis, known to be a sudden and potentially life-threatening allergic reaction, seems to be increasing among children, according to a new study led by a team at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre. [More]
Infected mice can be better models for human diseases

Infected mice can be better models for human diseases

Vaccines and therapeutics developed using mice often don't work as expected in humans. New research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis points to the near-sterile surroundings of laboratory mice as a key reason. [More]
Blocking IL-1 signalling molecule could alleviate asthma symptoms

Blocking IL-1 signalling molecule could alleviate asthma symptoms

Scientists have made a discovery that could lead to improved treatment for asthma sufferers.They have found that blocking a certain signalling molecule can alleviate symptoms such as mucus production, swelling (edema), and constriction of the airways in the lungs. [More]
Better way to model human immune system

Better way to model human immune system

Scientists at the University of Minnesota have developed a new way to study mice that better mimics the immune system of adult humans and which could significantly improve ways to test potential therapeutics. Published online today in the journal Nature, the researchers describe the limitations of laboratory mice for immunology research and reveal the benefits of what they are calling "dirty mice." [More]
PerkinElmer’s Phenoptics solution has potential to predict biomarker for anti-PD1 therapies for Merkel cell carcinoma

PerkinElmer’s Phenoptics solution has potential to predict biomarker for anti-PD1 therapies for Merkel cell carcinoma

PerkinElmer, Inc., a global leader focused on improving the health and safety of people and the environment, today announced that its Phenoptics™ quantitative pathology research system was an important component in skin cancer research published online in the April 19 edition of the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
LAP defects may lead to lupus-like autoimmune disorder

LAP defects may lead to lupus-like autoimmune disorder

A casual observation about size differences in mice has led to the discovery that defects in a process for digesting dead cells called LC3-associated phagocytosis (LAP) may lead to a lupus-like autoimmune disorder. St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists led the research, which appears as an advance online publication today in the scientific journal Nature. [More]
Hormonal contraception may increase susceptibility of women to genital infection

Hormonal contraception may increase susceptibility of women to genital infection

Women account for approximately half of all individuals living with HIV worldwide, and researchers wanted to identify the risk factors that increase susceptibility of women to genital infection. [More]
Study describes precise mechanisms that enable TB bacteria to persist in the body

Study describes precise mechanisms that enable TB bacteria to persist in the body

Bacteria that cause tuberculosis trick immune cells meant to destroy them into hiding and feeding them instead. This is the result of a study led by researchers from NYU Langone Medical Center and published online April 18 in Nature Immunology. [More]
OASIS study to investigate link between SIDS and alteration on newborn hearing screen test

OASIS study to investigate link between SIDS and alteration on newborn hearing screen test

Seattle Children's is partnering on the launch of a study called the 'Oto-Acoustic Signals in SIDS'study that will investigate a possible association between Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) and hearing alteration on the newborn hearing screen test. [More]
Researchers develop new method for identifying DNA mutations in single cancer cell

Researchers develop new method for identifying DNA mutations in single cancer cell

Researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have announced a new method for detecting DNA mutations in a single cancer cell versus current technology that analyzes millions of cells which they believe could have important applications for cancer diagnosis and treatment. The results are published in the April 18 online issue of Nature Methods. [More]
Oxidized mitochondrial nucleoids released from neutrophils may contribute to SLE pathogenesis

Oxidized mitochondrial nucleoids released from neutrophils may contribute to SLE pathogenesis

Researchers at the Baylor Institute for Immunology Research have discovered that the neutrophils of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients release oxidized DNA from their mitochondria that can stimulate an unwanted immune response. [More]
Researchers reveal how relatively unknown pathogen led to current Zika outbreak

Researchers reveal how relatively unknown pathogen led to current Zika outbreak

An analysis comparing the individual differences between over 40 strains of Zika virus (30 isolated from humans, 10 from mosquitoes, and 1 from monkeys) has identified significant changes in both amino acid and nucleotide sequences during the past half-century. [More]
New study to explore outcomes of pregnancy in Brazilian women with Zika virus

New study to explore outcomes of pregnancy in Brazilian women with Zika virus

An observational study of pregnant women in Brazil to further understand Zika virus and its impact on reproductive health and fetus development have been launched. William Britt, M.D., professor of pediatric infectious diseases at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, leads the study, which complements his current research in Brazil on cytomegalovirus infection during pregnancy. [More]
First-ever nivolumab drug trial for rare, malignant SCCA shows positive results

First-ever nivolumab drug trial for rare, malignant SCCA shows positive results

A rare malignancy known as squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal (SCCA) is on the increase, and now researchers have reported results of the first-ever phase II clinical trial results for treatment with the immunotherapy drug nivolumab. [More]
Mouse model can help identify new, more effective melanoma-preventing agents

Mouse model can help identify new, more effective melanoma-preventing agents

Application of sun protection factor 30 (SPF30) sunscreen prior to exposure to ultraviolet-B (UVB) light delayed melanoma onset in a mouse model of the disease, according to data from a team at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute. This data suggest that the mouse model can be used to identify new, more effective melanoma-preventing agents, according to principal investigator Christin Burd, PhD. [More]
MGH-led study confirms safety of allergy immunotherapy

MGH-led study confirms safety of allergy immunotherapy

A team of Massachusetts General Hospital investigators has found no evidence of infections related to administration of allergy immunotherapy, the common practice of injecting minimal quantities of allergens beneath the skin to reduce the allergic response. [More]
Study supports screening for HLA-B*5801 gene variant in Asian, black patients with gout

Study supports screening for HLA-B*5801 gene variant in Asian, black patients with gout

A multi-institutional study led by a Massachusetts General Hospital investigator finds significant racial disparities in the risk that patients being treated for gout will develop a serious, sometimes life-threatening adverse reaction to the most commonly prescribed medication. The increased risk closely correlates with the frequency of a gene variant previously associated with that adverse reaction, supporting recommendations to screen for that variant in patients from those populations. [More]
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