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Immunology is the study of the body's immune system.
Injecting vaccine-like compound into mice effective in protecting from malaria

Injecting vaccine-like compound into mice effective in protecting from malaria

A study led by Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researchers found that injecting a vaccine-like compound into mice was effective in protecting them from malaria. [More]
GW researcher awarded grant to develop a model system to study PN infection

GW researcher awarded grant to develop a model system to study PN infection

According to a recent World Health Organization report of the leading causes of death worldwide, one-third of all deaths are due to infectious and parasitic diseases. There are currently no vaccines for parasitic nematode (PN), or worm infections in humans, and development of new drugs and vaccines will stall until researchers have a better understanding of PN biology. [More]
Researchers find that animal's ability to endure internal parasite strongly influences reproductive success

Researchers find that animal's ability to endure internal parasite strongly influences reproductive success

In the first evidence that natural selection favors an individual's infection tolerance, researchers from Princeton University and the University of Edinburgh have found that an animal's ability to endure an internal parasite strongly influences its reproductive success. [More]
New method of growing human cells may help develop tailor-made therapies for GI conditions

New method of growing human cells may help develop tailor-made therapies for GI conditions

A method of growing human cells from tissue removed from a patient's gastrointestinal (GI) tract eventually may help scientists develop tailor-made therapies for inflammatory bowel disease and other GI conditions. [More]
Researchers plan to develop vaccine into a type of antibody serum therapy

Researchers plan to develop vaccine into a type of antibody serum therapy

By many estimates, an Ebola vaccine could be available in humans as early as next year. But will it be the right one? There are a number of vaccines in development and each is in a race to prove that it is most effective, safe and that it will protect the largest number of people. [More]
Gut microbiome analysis has potential to be a new tool for noninvasive colorectal cancer screening

Gut microbiome analysis has potential to be a new tool for noninvasive colorectal cancer screening

Analysis of the gut microbiome more successfully distinguished healthy individuals from those with precancerous adenomatous polyps and those with invasive colorectal cancer compared with assessment of clinical risk factors and fecal occult blood testing, according to data published in Cancer Prevention Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. [More]
Triple therapy for glioblastoma has prolonged survival of mice with brain cancers

Triple therapy for glioblastoma has prolonged survival of mice with brain cancers

A triple therapy for glioblastoma, including two types of immunotherapy and targeted radiation, has significantly prolonged the survival of mice with these brain cancers, according to a new report by scientists at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center. [More]
ACAAI offers practical solutions to improve asthma problem in older women

ACAAI offers practical solutions to improve asthma problem in older women

Women over the age of 65 face numerous barriers to good health: an increased risk for obesity, greater struggles against poverty and higher rates of asthma with worse health outcomes. [More]
Study: Spicy capsaicin can reduce risk of colorectal tumors

Study: Spicy capsaicin can reduce risk of colorectal tumors

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report that dietary capsaicin - the active ingredient in chili peppers - produces chronic activation of a receptor on cells lining the intestines of mice, triggering a reaction that ultimately reduces the risk of colorectal tumors. [More]
New guidelines help allergist steer patient out of yellow zone and back into green

New guidelines help allergist steer patient out of yellow zone and back into green

If you have asthma, you may have an asthma action plan with a "stoplight system" to help you recognize and respond to changes and understand when symptoms are getting worse and need more attention. [More]
Tips from ACAAI to help kids enjoy healthy, symptom-free days in classroom

Tips from ACAAI to help kids enjoy healthy, symptom-free days in classroom

Your kids may be enjoying the lazy days of summer, but if they have asthma, allergies, or both, they need to be prepared for back-to-school. And so do their classrooms. More than 10 million kids under age 18 have asthma, and 11 percent suffer from respiratory allergies. About 6 percent have also been diagnosed with food allergies. [More]
Researchers develop vaccine against potentially deadly tick-transmitted disease

Researchers develop vaccine against potentially deadly tick-transmitted disease

Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine researchers have made an important advancement toward developing a vaccine against the debilitating and potentially deadly tick-transmitted disease, human granulocytic anaplasmosis (HGA). [More]
Five-year $10.7M grant to study control, prevention of sexually-transmitted infections

Five-year $10.7M grant to study control, prevention of sexually-transmitted infections

The University of Maryland Schools of Dentistry (UM SOD) and Medicine (UM SOM) jointly announced today that they have received a five-year $10.7 million grant award from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) of the National Institutes of Health to study the causes, prevention and treatment of sexually-transmitted diseases (STDs). [More]
EMD Serono begins MSB0010718C Phase II study in mMCC patients

EMD Serono begins MSB0010718C Phase II study in mMCC patients

EMD Serono, Inc., a subsidiary of Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany, today announced the initiation of an international Phase II study designed to assess the efficacy and safety of MSB0010718C, an investigational fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibody that binds to programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1). [More]
New stem-cell discovery may lead to more streamlined process for tissue regeneration

New stem-cell discovery may lead to more streamlined process for tissue regeneration

A new stem-cell discovery might one day lead to a more streamlined process for obtaining stem cells, which in turn could be used in the development of replacement tissue for failing body parts, according to UC San Francisco scientists who reported the findings in the current edition of Cell. [More]
Norovirus vaccines: an interview with Dr Benjamin Lopman, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, USA

Norovirus vaccines: an interview with Dr Benjamin Lopman, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, USA

Noroviruses are a group of viruses. They're the leading cause of gastroenteritis, which causes diarrhea and vomiting. They affect the whole age range from young children to the elderly, and, in the US, they cause about 20 million cases annually. [More]
Researchers provide global genotype prevalence estimates for HCV

Researchers provide global genotype prevalence estimates for HCV

In one of the largest prevalence studies to date, researchers from the U.K. provide national, regional, and global genotype prevalence estimates for the hepatitis C virus (HCV). Findings published in Hepatology, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, indicate that genotype 1 is the most prevalent worldwide, with over 83 million patients infected of which one-third reside in East Asia. [More]
Researchers exploring ways to stimulate patients' immune system to attack tumors

Researchers exploring ways to stimulate patients' immune system to attack tumors

Researchers at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Norris Cotton Cancer Center are exploring ways to wake up the immune system so it recognizes and attacks invading cancer cells. Tumors protect themselves by tricking the immune system into accepting everything as normal, even while cancer cells are dividing and spreading. [More]
Immunologic mechanism makes broadly neutralizing antibodies in people infected with HIV

Immunologic mechanism makes broadly neutralizing antibodies in people infected with HIV

Scientists at Duke Medicine have found an immunologic mechanism that makes broadly neutralizing antibodies in people who are HIV-1 infected. [More]
Researchers working to develop new drugs for treating chronic inflammatory diseases

Researchers working to develop new drugs for treating chronic inflammatory diseases

Science and industry are collaborating to develop future pharmaceuticals for treating chronic inflammatory diseases. The medicines will combat immunological processes that have gone wrong. [More]