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New method helps characterize immune cells in tumor tissues

New method helps characterize immune cells in tumor tissues

Despite recent achievements in the development of cancer immunotherapies, only a small group of patients typically respond to them. Predictive markers of disease course and response to immunotherapy are urgently needed. [More]
The Wistar Institute and partners receive HIV cure research grant to test novel immunotherapies

The Wistar Institute and partners receive HIV cure research grant to test novel immunotherapies

The Wistar Institute is pleased to announce that the National Institutes of Health has awarded a nearly $23 million Martin Delaney Collaboratories for HIV Cure Research grant to the BEAT-HIV: Delaney Collaboratory to Cure HIV-1 Infection by Combination Immunotherapy, a consortium of top HIV researchers led by co-principal investigators Luis J. Montaner, D.V.M., D.Phil., director of the HIV-1 Immunopathogenesis Laboratory at The Wistar Institute Vaccine Center, and James L. Riley, Ph.D., research associate professor at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
UCLA scientists identify mechanisms of tumor resistance to immunotherapy in advanced melanoma

UCLA scientists identify mechanisms of tumor resistance to immunotherapy in advanced melanoma

UCLA researchers have for the first time identified mechanisms that determine how advanced melanoma can become resistant to immune checkpoint inhibitors, a discovery that could lead to the development of new and improved treatments for the deadliest type of skin cancer. [More]
Scientists develop new vaccine to stimulate both innate and specific adaptive response

Scientists develop new vaccine to stimulate both innate and specific adaptive response

Though a variety of immunotherapy-based strategies are being used against cancer, they are often hindered by the inability of the immune response to enter the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment and to effectively mount a response to cancer cells. [More]
Kataegis linked to better prognosis for breast cancer patients

Kataegis linked to better prognosis for breast cancer patients

Kataegis is a recently discovered phenomenon in which multiple mutations cluster in a few hotspots in a genome. The anomaly was previously found in some cancers, but it has been unclear what role kataegis plays in tumor development and patient outcomes. [More]
Bioengineers develop 2-in-1 nanomedicine for treating cancer

Bioengineers develop 2-in-1 nanomedicine for treating cancer

For cancer therapy, treatment resistance poses a major hurdle. Even aggressive treatments such as immunotherapies or nanomedicines may fail to eliminate all cancer cells, allowing new mutations to develop that may cause relapse. [More]
Scientists find link between makeup of individual's microbiome and head and neck cancer

Scientists find link between makeup of individual's microbiome and head and neck cancer

In a sample study, researchers at Johns Hopkins say they have found an association between the makeup of an individual's microbiome and head and neck cancer, a finding that potentially advances the quest for faster and more accurate cancer diagnosis and therapy. [More]
Taking ipilimumab, nivolumab drugs may increase risk of developing rheumatologic diseases

Taking ipilimumab, nivolumab drugs may increase risk of developing rheumatologic diseases

Case reports on 13 cancer patients suggest that a small number of cancer patients taking the immunotherapy drugs ipilimumab and nivolumab may be at some higher-than-normal risk of developing autoimmune joint and tissue diseases, including inflammatory arthritis, according to a preliminary study by Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers. [More]
New CAR-based therapy using combined cancer target could be effective for solid tumors

New CAR-based therapy using combined cancer target could be effective for solid tumors

Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs), engineered from a patient's own immune cells, have been successful for treating blood cancers, but using CARs for solid tumors has been limited by side effects to normal tissues containing the protein targeted by the engineered cells. [More]
VUMC researchers aim to decode genetic underpinnings of human immune system

VUMC researchers aim to decode genetic underpinnings of human immune system

Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center this month began recruiting volunteers to participate in a clinical trial aimed at decoding the human "immunome," the genetic underpinnings of the immune system. [More]
Study ignores possibility that drugs, chemicals affect sexes differently

Study ignores possibility that drugs, chemicals affect sexes differently

Many of the medicines we take were only ever tested on men during clinical studies. This poses a distinct danger that females are receiving suboptimal care—and that treatments specifically benefiting women are going undiscovered. [More]
FDG-PET imaging tracks ability of atezolizumab to bolster immunity against NSCLC

FDG-PET imaging tracks ability of atezolizumab to bolster immunity against NSCLC

Non-small cell lung cancers have a collective reputation for not responding very well to chemotherapy. Researchers at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) are presenting a means of evaluating an immunotherapy that fights off NSCLC by strengthening a patient's own immune system. [More]
EPFL researchers reprogram TAMs to prevent tumor metastasis

EPFL researchers reprogram TAMs to prevent tumor metastasis

One of the major obstacles with treating cancer is that tumors can conscript the body's immune cells and make them work for them. Researchers at EPFL have now found a way to reclaim the corrupted immune cells, turn them into signals for the immune system to attack the tumor, and even prevent metastasis. [More]
Researchers find link between specific genetic pathway and development of mouth ulcers in lupus patients

Researchers find link between specific genetic pathway and development of mouth ulcers in lupus patients

The results of a study presented today at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress showed for the first time an association between a specific genetic pathway and the development of mouth ulcers in patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE). [More]
Dr. Pinchas Tsukerman earns prestigious Kaye Innovation Award for research on cancer immunotherapy

Dr. Pinchas Tsukerman earns prestigious Kaye Innovation Award for research on cancer immunotherapy

The importance of the body's immune system in protecting against the creation of cancerous tumors has been known for a long time. But despite the existence of a competent immune system, some individuals develop tumors, in part because tumors have ways to evade destructive immunity or induce immune-suppression. [More]
Avoiding allergens could be best approach to prevent food allergies

Avoiding allergens could be best approach to prevent food allergies

Around two million people in Austria suffer from an allergy. 400,000 of them are allergic to birch pollen and have associated food allergies, particularly to apples, peaches, hazelnuts, carrots and celery. According to experts, around 80,000 people are thought to have a primary food allergy in childhood. [More]
Existing immunotherapy drug pembrolizumab shows promise for specific sarcoma subtypes

Existing immunotherapy drug pembrolizumab shows promise for specific sarcoma subtypes

An existing cancer immunotherapy drug reduces tumor size in some types of rare connective tissue cancers, called sarcomas, report researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute. [More]
Combination immunotherapy may be better than one to combat metastatic melanoma

Combination immunotherapy may be better than one to combat metastatic melanoma

A new metastatic melanoma study suggests that a combination of two immunotherapies may be better than one. [More]
Gene dysregulation makes immune therapies less effective against metastatic melanoma

Gene dysregulation makes immune therapies less effective against metastatic melanoma

Patients who don't respond to treatments that use their own immune cells to destroy tumors, called tumor infiltrating lymphocytes, share changes in mechanisms that switch genes on or off in those cells, according to study results presented at the annual meeting of the American Society for Clinical Oncology on June 4 in Chicago. [More]
New mouse model allows researchers to evaluate CD40-antibody drugs effectively

New mouse model allows researchers to evaluate CD40-antibody drugs effectively

Cancer immunotherapies--drugs that work by making a patient's immune system better at spotting and destroying tumor cells--are increasingly generating headlines. A number of these drugs are now being used for the treatment of melanoma, lung, and kidney cancers, and are showing promise in clinical trials with other diseases as well. [More]
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