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ATOMS device shows efficacy in treating male stress urinary incontinence

ATOMS device shows efficacy in treating male stress urinary incontinence

In the largest study yet to assess the long-term safety and efficacy of the adjustable transobturator male system to treat incontinence in men following invasive prostate treatment, the overall success and dry rates were 90% and 64%, respectively, after a median of 31 months. [More]
Drug approved for other purposes can promote recovery from acute nerve damage, study shows

Drug approved for other purposes can promote recovery from acute nerve damage, study shows

Researchers at the University of Rochester Medical Center believe they have identified a new means of enhancing the body's ability to repair its own cells, which they hope will lead to better diagnosis and treatment of traumatic nerve injuries, like those sustained in car accidents, sports injuries, or in combat. [More]
Women who have not given birth also experience urinary incontinence, study finds

Women who have not given birth also experience urinary incontinence, study finds

Women who have not given birth often end up under the radar for research on urinary incontinence. In a study of this group, however, one in five women over 45 years say they experience this type of incontinence. [More]
Researchers find timing, duration of androgen exposure can influence genital defects in female mice

Researchers find timing, duration of androgen exposure can influence genital defects in female mice

University of Florida researchers have identified cells targeted by a male hormone and found that an excess of that hormone at a specific time can cause genital defects in female mice. [More]
Revised prostate cancer guidelines did not reduce usage of PSA tests, study finds

Revised prostate cancer guidelines did not reduce usage of PSA tests, study finds

Controversy over prostate cancer screening guidelines that discourage use of PSA tests did not significantly reduce use of the test, a five-year review of more than 275,000 visits at UT Southwestern Medical Center showed. [More]
RTI extends research support to improve treatment for pelvic floor disorders in women

RTI extends research support to improve treatment for pelvic floor disorders in women

RTI International will continue supporting research efforts to improve clinical care for women with pelvic floor disorders as part of the Pelvic Floor Disorders Network. [More]
IMRT reduces risk of side effects, improves quality of life for endometrial and cervical cancer patients

IMRT reduces risk of side effects, improves quality of life for endometrial and cervical cancer patients

Patients with cervical and endometrial cancer have fewer gastrointestinal and genitourinary side effects and experience better quality of life when treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) than with conventional radiation therapy (RT), according to research presented today at the 58th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology. [More]
New device could help improve outcomes of pelvic tumour surgeries

New device could help improve outcomes of pelvic tumour surgeries

Tumour surgery in the pelvis (urogenital and anal area) can lead to injuries of the regional nervous centre and therefore to bowel and bladder incontinence and sexual function disorders. [More]
Mobile app helps reduce symptoms of urinary incontinence in women

Mobile app helps reduce symptoms of urinary incontinence in women

Urinary leakage whilst coughing and jumping is common in women. Using a self-administered treatment via a mobile app called Tät for three months reduced symptoms, led to fewer leakages and improved quality of life. [More]
Female triathletes suffer from high rate of stress urinary and anal incontinence, study finds

Female triathletes suffer from high rate of stress urinary and anal incontinence, study finds

A study led by Loyola Medicine researchers found that female triathletes are at higher risk for pelvic floor disorders, among other health issues. [More]
New study shows female urologists perform more surgeries on women than male counterparts

New study shows female urologists perform more surgeries on women than male counterparts

Although female certified urologists are still a minority within the specialty, they perform many more procedures on women than their male colleagues, who perform more procedures on men than their female colleagues. [More]
New CCN article offers guidance on providing optimal care to critically ill obese patients

New CCN article offers guidance on providing optimal care to critically ill obese patients

The U.S. obesity epidemic means more critically ill patients have weight-associated conditions affecting their illness or are at greater risk of specific complications during their hospital stay. [More]
Study finds preoperative falls common among adults of all age groups

Study finds preoperative falls common among adults of all age groups

In a large study of 15,000 adults undergoing elective surgery, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis found that falling up to six months before an operation is common and often causes serious injuries — not only in elderly patients but across all age groups. Surprisingly, the frequency of falls among middle-aged patients was slightly higher than those who were age 65 or older. [More]
NYU Lutheran helps patients fight prostate cancer with latest diagnostic and robotic surgery technology

NYU Lutheran helps patients fight prostate cancer with latest diagnostic and robotic surgery technology

Leading NYU Lutheran's fight is Marc Bjurlin, DO, the hospital's newly appointed director of urologic oncology and clinical assistant professor of urology at NYU School of Medicine. [More]
MRI-guided focal laser ablation could be feasible, safe in prostate cancer patients

MRI-guided focal laser ablation could be feasible, safe in prostate cancer patients

Prostate cancer patients may soon have a new option to treat their disease: laser heat. UCLA researchers have found that focal laser ablation - the precise application of heat via laser to a tumor - is both feasible and safe in men with intermediate risk prostate cancer. [More]
Mayo Clinic offers new treatment for patients with long-term fecal incontinence

Mayo Clinic offers new treatment for patients with long-term fecal incontinence

A clinical team on Mayo Clinic's Florida campus is the first to offer four patients with long-term fecal incontinence a new and potentially long-lasting treatment — a small band of interlinked magnetic titanium beads on a titanium string that successfully mimics the function of the anal sphincter. [More]
Rome IV criteria helps diagnose, treat gastrointestinal conditions in children

Rome IV criteria helps diagnose, treat gastrointestinal conditions in children

A child feels nauseated all the time, but no medical test can find what is wrong. Or a child vomits regularly, but there's no illness or eating disorder to explain it. These, and other stomach and bowel-related problems with no obvious causes, are called functional gastrointestinal disorders. [More]
Antimuscarinic drugs effective in improving OAB symptoms

Antimuscarinic drugs effective in improving OAB symptoms

In a recent study of patients with overactive bladder (OAB), a 30 mg extended release formulation of propiverine hydrochloride was at least as effective and safe as a 4 mg extended release formulation of tolterodine tartrate. [More]
Clinicians perform UK’s first MRI-guided focused ultrasound treatment for prostate cancer

Clinicians perform UK’s first MRI-guided focused ultrasound treatment for prostate cancer

INSIGHTEC congratulates the medical team at Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust for performing the first MR-guided focused ultrasound treatment in the United Kingdom for prostate cancer. [More]
Depressed cancer patients less likely to recover well after treatment

Depressed cancer patients less likely to recover well after treatment

People with depression are significantly less likely to recover well after treatment for colorectal cancer compared to those without depression, according to new research by Macmillan Cancer Support and the University of Southampton. [More]
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