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CDC recommends flu shot via injection for safe and effective prevention of diseases

CDC recommends flu shot via injection for safe and effective prevention of diseases

This year, everyone will have to roll up their sleeves and receive the flu shot via injection, as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention no longer recommends the nasal flu mist vaccine due to ineffectiveness. [More]
Medical experts offer new tips to avoid getting sick during flu season

Medical experts offer new tips to avoid getting sick during flu season

As flu season approaches, medical experts have some new recommendations - along with some old standards - on how to reduce your chances of getting sick. [More]
Parents do not perceive need to vaccinate children against influenza, study finds

Parents do not perceive need to vaccinate children against influenza, study finds

Despite the fact that influenza leads to more hospitalizations and deaths among children than any other vaccine-preventable disease, parents frequently decline vaccinating their children against influenza because they don't perceive the need, according to a new case-control study published in the October issue of the American Journal of Infection Control, the official publication of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology. [More]
New approach bolsters protein in blood vessels to protect against cerebral malaria

New approach bolsters protein in blood vessels to protect against cerebral malaria

Boosting a protective protein to stabilize blood vessels weakened by malaria showed improved survival beyond that of antimalarial drugs alone in pre-clinical research. [More]
Study offers unprecedented quantification of pathogens that cause childhood diarrhea

Study offers unprecedented quantification of pathogens that cause childhood diarrhea

New research offers unprecedented insights into the causes of childhood diarrhea, the second-leading cause of death of children worldwide, and suggests that the role of pathogens such as bacteria, viruses and parasites has been vastly underestimated. [More]
Association for Molecular Pathology announces winners of 2016 awards

Association for Molecular Pathology announces winners of 2016 awards

The Association for Molecular Pathology, the premier global, non-profit organization serving molecular diagnostics professionals, today announced the recipients of the Jeffrey A. Kant Leadership Award and the AMP Meritorious Service Award. Together with the AMP Award for Excellence in Molecular Diagnostics, these awards will be presented at the AMP 2016 Annual Meeting. [More]
Researchers identify new immune cell that protects mice from lung infections during chemotherapy

Researchers identify new immune cell that protects mice from lung infections during chemotherapy

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital investigators have identified a new form of an immune cell that protected mice from life-threatening lung infections under conditions that mimic cancer chemotherapy. [More]
Aspergillus fungus can easily adapt to changing environments, researchers find

Aspergillus fungus can easily adapt to changing environments, researchers find

The fungus Aspergillus fumigatus is capable of rapid genetic adaptation in both natural environments and in humans according to a study published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases by Radboud university medical center/CWZ and Wageningen University & Research. [More]
UNC secures $18 million NIH funding to form iTech for facilitating HIV research studies

UNC secures $18 million NIH funding to form iTech for facilitating HIV research studies

People under the age of 30 account for the majority, or 40 percent, of new HIV infections in the United States. [More]
Broadly neutralizing HIV antibodies open new avenues for development of effective vaccine

Broadly neutralizing HIV antibodies open new avenues for development of effective vaccine

A small number of people infected with HIV produce antibodies with an amazing effect: Not only are the antibodies directed against the own virus strain, but also against different sub-types of HIV that circulate worldwide. [More]
High levels of dietary zinc increases susceptibility to Clostridium difficile infections

High levels of dietary zinc increases susceptibility to Clostridium difficile infections

Too much dietary zinc increases susceptibility to infection by Clostridium difficile - "C. diff" - the most common cause of hospital-acquired infections. [More]
BD launches new, wireless rapid diagnostic system for detection of flu, RSV and group A strep

BD launches new, wireless rapid diagnostic system for detection of flu, RSV and group A strep

BD (Becton, Dickinson and Company), a leading global medical technology company, today announced the launch of its next generation wireless rapid diagnostic system for detection of influenza A and B, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and group A strep, with new traceability and secure patient health record documentation features and functionality. [More]
SLU receives HRSA grant for training family physicians and medical family therapists in behavioral health

SLU receives HRSA grant for training family physicians and medical family therapists in behavioral health

Saint Louis University has received a $1.87 million grant to strengthen behavioral health training for family physicians, who often are the primary physician seen by many adults and children, and for medical family therapists who practice alongside them. [More]
Progesterone treatment protects female mice against consequences of influenza infection

Progesterone treatment protects female mice against consequences of influenza infection

Over 100 million women are on hormonal contraceptives. All of them contain some form of progesterone, either alone or in combination with estrogen. [More]
Novel nanosensor could rapidly detect pathogens that cause foodborne illnesses

Novel nanosensor could rapidly detect pathogens that cause foodborne illnesses

It seems like almost every week another food product is being recalled because of contamination. [More]
First case-control study examines link between microcephaly and in utero Zika virus infection

First case-control study examines link between microcephaly and in utero Zika virus infection

The relation between Zika virus and microcephaly is widely assumed to be causal because of strong evidence of an association. However, evidence so far comes from case reports, case series, modelling studies, and preliminary reports from cohort studies – none of which have included appropriate control groups. [More]
New global health strategy aims to eliminate HCV as global public health threat by 2030

New global health strategy aims to eliminate HCV as global public health threat by 2030

Chronic infection by the hepatitis C virus (HCV) proved fatal for over 700,000 people worldwide in 2013, mainly as a result of liver damage. Although information on the epidemiology of transmission and infection is sparse, recent estimates put the global prevalence of HCV infection at 130-150 million people. [More]
Contaminated poultry may be source of human exposure to MRSA, research shows

Contaminated poultry may be source of human exposure to MRSA, research shows

A new study offers compelling evidence that a novel form of the dangerous superbug Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) can spread to humans through consumption or handling of contaminated poultry. [More]
New less invasive method could detect bacterial infection in young febrile infants

New less invasive method could detect bacterial infection in young febrile infants

Physicians from Children's Hospital of Michigan, Wayne State University, UC Davis Medical Center and Nationwide Children's Hospital, in collaboration with 19 other pediatric emergency departments around the country, have established a "proof of principle" for measuring patterns of ribonucleic acid (RNA) expression in the bloodstream that can enable clinicians to distinguish bacterial infections from other causes of fever in infants up to two months old. [More]
New study shows how increase in medication-resistant bacteria impedes treatment of kidney infections

New study shows how increase in medication-resistant bacteria impedes treatment of kidney infections

The increase in illnesses and deaths linked to medication-resistant bacteria has been well-documented by researchers and received extensive public attention in recent years. Now, UCLA-led research shows how these bacteria are making it more difficult to treat a common but severe kidney infection. [More]
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