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Roche launches new protein melting application for real-time PCR LightCycler 1536 instrument

Roche launches new protein melting application for real-time PCR LightCycler 1536 instrument

Roche announced today the introduction of a new protein melting application for its high-throughput, real-time PCR LightCycler 1536 instrument. The fully automated platform now allows life science researchers to perform thermal shift assays (TSAs) in 1536-well applications quickly and consistently. [More]
New HCV therapies cost-effective in specific groups of HCV-infected patients

New HCV therapies cost-effective in specific groups of HCV-infected patients

A study led by Boston Medical Center researchers demonstrates that while new therapies to treat Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) are highly effective, they are cost-effective and provide the greatest value in specific groups of HCV-infected patients. [More]
Study provides insights into climate, social factors that trigger dengue outbreaks

Study provides insights into climate, social factors that trigger dengue outbreaks

Researchers at Upstate Medical University, in collaboration with a team of international investigators studying dengue fever, have discovered new information on climate drivers of the disease and social risk factors that may be contributing to its spread, according to two scientific papers recently published in BMC Infectious Disease and BMC Public Health, open access, peer-reviewed online journals. [More]
Study finds link between neurodegenerative disorders and inflammation

Study finds link between neurodegenerative disorders and inflammation

Researchers from McMaster University and the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York have discovered that a protein associated with neurodegenerative diseases like ALS also plays an important role in the body's natural antiviral response. [More]
Effective therapy enables immune system recovery in majority of children

Effective therapy enables immune system recovery in majority of children

Most children with HIV who have low levels of a key immune cell eventually recover levels of this cell after they begin treatment, according to a new study conducted by researchers at UCLA and other institutions in the U.S. and Brazil. [More]
Naldemedine meets primary and secondary endpoints in phase III study for OIC treatment

Naldemedine meets primary and secondary endpoints in phase III study for OIC treatment

Naldemedine, an investigational peripherally acting mu-opioid receptor antagonist (PAMORA) under development by Shionogi & Co., Ltd., met its primary and secondary endpoints in a phase III study (COMPOSE I) for the treatment of opioid-induced constipation (OIC) in adult patients with chronic non-cancer pain receiving opioid therapy. [More]
Experimental nanoparticle therapy speeds healing of all sorts of wounds

Experimental nanoparticle therapy speeds healing of all sorts of wounds

An experimental therapy developed by researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University cut in half the time it takes to heal wounds compared to no treatment at all. Details of the therapy, which was successfully tested in mice, were published online in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology. [More]
Study suggests new approach to help prevent meningococcal outbreaks

Study suggests new approach to help prevent meningococcal outbreaks

Nasal drops of harmless bacteria can inhibit a related bug that sometimes causes meningococcal disease, according to new findings published online in Clinical Infectious Diseases. The study--conducted among college students, a group at higher risk for this often serious illness--suggests a new approach that could help suppress outbreaks of the disease, if supported by future research. [More]
Research: Common bacteria poised to become antibiotic-resistant superbugs

Research: Common bacteria poised to become antibiotic-resistant superbugs

Antibiotic resistance is poised to spread globally among bacteria frequently implicated in respiratory and urinary infections in hospital settings, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. [More]
Two experimental Ebola vaccines appear to be safe in PREVAIL clinical trial in Liberia

Two experimental Ebola vaccines appear to be safe in PREVAIL clinical trial in Liberia

Two experimental Ebola vaccines appear to be safe based on evaluation in more than 600 people in Liberia who participated in the first stage of the Partnership for Research on Ebola Vaccines in Liberia (PREVAIL) Phase 2/3 clinical trial, according to interim findings from an independent Data and Safety Monitoring Board review. [More]
Study finds C. difficile infection increases hospital readmission rates

Study finds C. difficile infection increases hospital readmission rates

Patients with Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) are twice as likely to be readmitted to the hospital as patients without the deadly diarrheal infection, according to a study published in the April issue of the American Journal of Infection Control, the official publication of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology. [More]
Promising clinical trial results for ebola vaccines

Promising clinical trial results for ebola vaccines

Interim findings from a clinical trial (PREVAIL) in which two experimental Ebola vaccines were given to more than 600 people in Liberia indicate that the vaccines are safe for use in humans. Based on these positive results, the vaccines may continue into the next stage of clinical evaluation; a phase 3 trial sponsored by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health. [More]
New Ebola vaccine shows promise in first phase 1 clinical trial

New Ebola vaccine shows promise in first phase 1 clinical trial

Results from the first phase 1 trial of an Ebola vaccine based on the current (2014) strain of the virus are today published in The Lancet. Until now, all tested Ebola virus vaccines have been based on the virus strain from the Zaire outbreak in 1976. The results suggest that the new vaccine is safe, and provokes an immune response in recipients, although further long-term testing will be needed to establish whether it can protect against the Ebola virus. [More]
Aridis Pharmaceuticals begins Aerucin Phase 1 clinical study for treatment of acute pneumonia

Aridis Pharmaceuticals begins Aerucin Phase 1 clinical study for treatment of acute pneumonia

Aridis Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a biopharmaceutical company applying proprietary technologies to produce novel therapies for infectious diseases, announced today the initiation of a Phase 1 clinical study of Aerucin, the Company's fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) against Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria, which is being developed as an adjunctive treatment for acute pneumonia. [More]
Study: HBV exposure increases immune system maturation of infants

Study: HBV exposure increases immune system maturation of infants

A Singapore led study has shown that Hepatitis B Virus Infection (HBV) exposure increases the immune system maturation of infants, which may give a better survival advantage to counteract bacterial infection during early life. These findings radically modify the way that HBV vertical infection of neonates (mother-to-child) is portrayed, and present a paradigm shift in the approach to treatment of patients with chronic hepatitis B. [More]
FDA approves Quadracel vaccine to protect young children from life-threatening diseases

FDA approves Quadracel vaccine to protect young children from life-threatening diseases

Sanofi Pasteur, the vaccines division of Sanofi, announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved use of Quadracel (Diphtheria and Tetanus Toxoids and Acellular Pertussis Absorbed and Inactivated Poliovirus; DTaP-IPV) vaccine for active immunization against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis and poliomyelitis in children 4 through 6 years of age. [More]
Researchers discover new way to attract, kill pregnant malaria-transmitting mosquitoes

Researchers discover new way to attract, kill pregnant malaria-transmitting mosquitoes

The battle against malaria is also a battle against its natural host, the mosquito, which means disrupting the insect's lifecycle is every bit as important as putting nets over beds. Now, an international research team has discovered what attracts mosquitos to lay their eggs in specific places. [More]
Mayo Clinic Center for Tuberculosis introduces new medical journal

Mayo Clinic Center for Tuberculosis introduces new medical journal

The Mayo Clinic Center for Tuberculosis, a regional training and consultation center at Mayo Clinic's campus in Rochester, Minn, is today launching a new medical journal, the Journal of Clinical Tuberculosis and Other Mycobacterial Diseases. [More]
Norovirus vaccine may be available in the future

Norovirus vaccine may be available in the future

A multivalent candidate vaccine elicits broad antibody responses to a range of norovirus strains, including strains not included in the vaccine or previously encountered by participants, according to a new study published this week in PLOS Medicine. [More]
Cepheid's Xpert Ebola diagnostic test granted FDA Emergency Use Authorization

Cepheid's Xpert Ebola diagnostic test granted FDA Emergency Use Authorization

Cepheid today announced it has received Emergency Use Authorization from the U.S. Food & Drug Administration for Xpert Ebola, a molecular diagnostic test for Ebola Zaire Virus that delivers results in less than two hours. [More]
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