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Cedars-Sinai study identifies metabolic enzyme that alerts the body to invading bacteria

Cedars-Sinai study identifies metabolic enzyme that alerts the body to invading bacteria

Biomedical investigators at Cedars-Sinai have identified an enzyme found in all human cells that alerts the body to invading bacteria and jump-starts the immune system. [More]
TB burden in India may be two to three times higher than current estimates, study suggests

TB burden in India may be two to three times higher than current estimates, study suggests

The number of cases of tuberculosis (TB) in India may be up to two to three times higher than current estimates, suggests a new study. [More]
High exposure to unconventional natural gas wells linked to migraine headaches, sinus and fatigue

High exposure to unconventional natural gas wells linked to migraine headaches, sinus and fatigue

New research suggests that Pennsylvania residents with the highest exposure to active natural gas wells operated by the hydraulic fracturing ("fracking") industry are nearly twice as likely to suffer from a combination of migraine headaches, chronic nasal and sinus symptoms and severe fatigue. [More]
Cloned Zika virus could be used for development of attenuated vaccine

Cloned Zika virus could be used for development of attenuated vaccine

Stopping the explosive spread of Zika virus - which can lead to birth defects in babies born to infected mothers - depends on genetic insights gleaned through new tools and models. [More]
NIH researchers discover rare, lethal inflammatory disease that affects young children

NIH researchers discover rare, lethal inflammatory disease that affects young children

National Institutes of Health researchers have discovered a rare and sometimes lethal inflammatory disease - otulipenia - that primarily affects young children. They have also identified anti-inflammatory treatments that ease some of the patients' symptoms: fever, skin rashes, diarrhea, joint pain and overall failure to grow or thrive. [More]
QUT molecular microbiologist developing new therapies to beat bacterial superbugs

QUT molecular microbiologist developing new therapies to beat bacterial superbugs

QUT molecular microbiologist Makrina Totsika is at the forefront of research to develop new therapies to beat multi-drug resistant bacteria. [More]
Sick animals disconnect from social groups leading to decrease in disease transmission, study shows

Sick animals disconnect from social groups leading to decrease in disease transmission, study shows

Sick wild house mice spend time away from their social groups, leading to a decrease in their potential for disease transmission according to a new study by evolutionary biologists from the University of Zurich in collaboration with the ETH Zurich. [More]
Geographers map internal migration across three continents to help combat infectious diseases

Geographers map internal migration across three continents to help combat infectious diseases

Geographers at the University of Southampton have completed a large scale data and mapping project to track the flow of internal human migration in low and middle income countries. [More]
NYIT researcher aims to study link between wound healing problems and methamphetamine use

NYIT researcher aims to study link between wound healing problems and methamphetamine use

A chance observation in a Southern California fast food restaurant led Luis Martinez, Ph.D., to wonder about the connections behind wound healing problems and methamphetamine use. [More]
Novel marine natural product appears to reduce pancreatic tumor size

Novel marine natural product appears to reduce pancreatic tumor size

Scientists at Florida Atlantic University's Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute found that a deep-water marine sponge collected off of Fort Lauderdale's coast contains leiodermatolide, a natural product that has the ability to inhibit the growth of cancer cells as well as block cancer cells from dividing using extremely low concentrations of the compound. [More]
UNC bioethicist addresses roadblocks to HIV research on pregnant women

UNC bioethicist addresses roadblocks to HIV research on pregnant women

UNC School of Medicine's Anne Lyerly is addressing the urgent need for effective HIV prevention and treatment for the estimated 1.5 million women worldwide with HIV who give birth each year. [More]
Scientists find way to boost efficiency with which CRISPR-Cas9 cuts and disables genes

Scientists find way to boost efficiency with which CRISPR-Cas9 cuts and disables genes

CRISPR-Cas9 is the go-to technique for knocking out genes in human cell lines to discover what the genes do, but the efficiency with which it disables genes can vary immensely. [More]
New book from Cold Spring Harbor examines major antibiotics and mechanisms of resistance

New book from Cold Spring Harbor examines major antibiotics and mechanisms of resistance

One of the greatest medical accomplishments of the past century was the introduction of antibiotics into the clinic. [More]
Salk researchers identify new mechanism for Alzheimer's risk gene

Salk researchers identify new mechanism for Alzheimer's risk gene

For decades, scientists have known that people with two copies of a gene called apolipoprotein E4 (ApoE4) are much more likely to have Alzheimer's disease at age 65 than the rest of the population. [More]
Mice study finds new approach to halt cycle of chronic inflammation in lupus

Mice study finds new approach to halt cycle of chronic inflammation in lupus

Molecules that scavenge debris from dying cells appear to halt the cycle of chronic inflammation in lupus, while also enhancing the body's ability to combat flu, according to Duke Health studies in mice. [More]
AMP releases new report that addresses challenges in defining clinical utility of molecular diagnostics

AMP releases new report that addresses challenges in defining clinical utility of molecular diagnostics

The Association for Molecular Pathology, the premier global, non-profit organization serving molecular diagnostic professionals, today announced a new report that addresses the challenges in defining the clinical utility of molecular diagnostics for inherited diseases and cancer. [More]
Penicillin allergy testing: an interview with Dr. Eric Macy

Penicillin allergy testing: an interview with Dr. Eric Macy

Penicillin was one of the first antibiotics developed and has saved millions of lives. First used in the early 1940s, penicillin is still one of the most widely used and least toxic family of antibiotics. [More]
Study estimates health care costs of gastrointestinal illnesses in Switzerland

Study estimates health care costs of gastrointestinal illnesses in Switzerland

In Switzerland, between 300,000 and 700,000 patients per year visit a doctor due to acute diarrhoea. Until now, the financial burden on the Swiss health care system had been completely unclear. [More]
NIH funds collaborative project to develop better vaccine adjuvants for many diseases

NIH funds collaborative project to develop better vaccine adjuvants for many diseases

Dr. Qizhi Cathy Yao, professor of surgery, molecular virology and microbiology, and pathology & immunology at Baylor College of Medicine, has been awarded a National Institutes of Health grant to fund a collaborative project with Molecular Express, Inc. [More]
Opioid naive individuals at low risk of developing persistent opioid use after surgery, research shows

Opioid naive individuals at low risk of developing persistent opioid use after surgery, research shows

Researchers from the University Health Network's Department of Anesthesia and Pain Management and the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences have determined that patients who have not had an opioid prescription within a year prior to their procedure are at low risk of developing persistent opioid use after major surgery. [More]
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