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Researchers one step closer to finding treatment for dengue fever

Researchers one step closer to finding treatment for dengue fever

There have been several news reports that the world's first dengue vaccine will be available next year. However, the latest clinical trials show that the vaccine only provides a protection of around 50 per cent for DENV-2 and DENV-1, which are commonly found in Singapore. [More]
Combination therapy effective in treating drug-resistant malaria

Combination therapy effective in treating drug-resistant malaria

Resistance to artemisinin, the main drug to treat malaria, is now widespread throughout Southeast Asia, among the Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum) parasites that cause the disease and is likely caused by a genetic mutation in the parasites. [More]
BD reports 5.1% increase in third fiscal quarter revenues

BD reports 5.1% increase in third fiscal quarter revenues

BD (Becton, Dickinson and Company), a leading global medical technology company, today reported quarterly revenues of $2.157 billion for the third fiscal quarter ended June 30, 2014, representing an increase of 5.1 percent from the prior-year period, or 4.6 percent on a foreign currency-neutral basis. [More]
Viewpoints: Medicare's future finances; 'promising deal' on VA; Texas 'war on abortion'

Viewpoints: Medicare's future finances; 'promising deal' on VA; Texas 'war on abortion'

Medicare got some good news Monday, when the trustees who oversee its finances announced that the fund that pays for hospital care will remain solvent until 2030, four years longer than its forecast from last year. [More]
Five-year $10.7M grant to study control, prevention of sexually-transmitted infections

Five-year $10.7M grant to study control, prevention of sexually-transmitted infections

The University of Maryland Schools of Dentistry (UM SOD) and Medicine (UM SOM) jointly announced today that they have received a five-year $10.7 million grant award from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) of the National Institutes of Health to study the causes, prevention and treatment of sexually-transmitted diseases (STDs). [More]
Little-known supportive cells in brain may play major role in cognitive function

Little-known supportive cells in brain may play major role in cognitive function

When you're expecting something-like the meal you've ordered at a restaurant-or when something captures your interest, unique electrical rhythms sweep through your brain. [More]
"Fist bumping" transmits significantly fewer bacteria than handshaking

"Fist bumping" transmits significantly fewer bacteria than handshaking

"Fist bumping" transmits significantly fewer bacteria than either handshaking or high-fiving, while still addressing the cultural expectation of hand-to-hand contact between patients and clinicians, according to a study published in the August issue of the American Journal of Infection Control, the official publication of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC). [More]
Norovirus vaccines: an interview with Dr Benjamin Lopman, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, USA

Norovirus vaccines: an interview with Dr Benjamin Lopman, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, USA

Noroviruses are a group of viruses. They're the leading cause of gastroenteritis, which causes diarrhea and vomiting. They affect the whole age range from young children to the elderly, and, in the US, they cause about 20 million cases annually. [More]
Trials show immunizations are effective in adults

Trials show immunizations are effective in adults

As kids prepare to head back to school, required immunizations are typically on the to-do list, but getting potentially lifesaving vaccines should not end when adulthood begins, says one University of Alabama at Birmingham infectious diseases expert. [More]
Funding for antibiotic research in the UK are inadequate, study reveals

Funding for antibiotic research in the UK are inadequate, study reveals

Less than 1% of research funding awarded by public and charitable bodies to UK researchers in 2008–13 was awarded for research on antibiotics, according to new research published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases. [More]
Immunologic mechanism makes broadly neutralizing antibodies in people infected with HIV

Immunologic mechanism makes broadly neutralizing antibodies in people infected with HIV

Scientists at Duke Medicine have found an immunologic mechanism that makes broadly neutralizing antibodies in people who are HIV-1 infected. [More]
Researchers uncover how malaria parasite becomes resistant to fosmidomycin drug

Researchers uncover how malaria parasite becomes resistant to fosmidomycin drug

Researchers have uncovered a way the malaria parasite becomes resistant to an investigational drug. The discovery, at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, also is relevant for other infectious diseases including bacterial infections and tuberculosis. [More]
Clinic-based audio project gives HIV patients a chance to share experiences with diagnosis

Clinic-based audio project gives HIV patients a chance to share experiences with diagnosis

The voice on the recording was low and calm as the speaker recounted the telephone call that brought the news he was infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) that causes AIDS: "My heart just stopped for a little bit and next thing you know I was on the floor flat on my face boohooing, crying like a baby." [More]
Sinovac selected to supply seasonal influenza vaccine to Beijing citizens

Sinovac selected to supply seasonal influenza vaccine to Beijing citizens

Sinovac Biotech Ltd., a leading provider of biopharmaceutical products in China, announced today that it has been selected by the Beijing Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to be a supplier of the seasonal influenza vaccine to the citizens of Beijing for 2014. [More]
New momentum: WHO welcomes progress in tackling viral hepatitis

New momentum: WHO welcomes progress in tackling viral hepatitis

On World Hepatitis Day, 28 July, WHO welcomes new progress in tackling one of the world's most serious diseases. Viral hepatitis - a group of infectious diseases known as hepatitis A, B, C, D, and E - affects millions of people worldwide, causing acute and chronic liver disease and killing close to 1.4 million people every year. [More]
Pilot study shows that anti-cancer drug can activate hidden HIV

Pilot study shows that anti-cancer drug can activate hidden HIV

A pilot study by HIV researchers from Aarhus University and Aarhus University Hospital in Denmark has shown that an anti-cancer drug can activate hidden HIV. [More]
SIV can be entrenched in tissues before virus is detectable in blood plasma

SIV can be entrenched in tissues before virus is detectable in blood plasma

Scientists have generally believed that HIV and its monkey equivalent, SIV, gain a permanent foothold in the body very early after infection, making it difficult to completely eliminate the virus even after antiretroviral therapy has controlled it. [More]
Study finds microglia increase neuronal firing and enhance brain cell survival after injury

Study finds microglia increase neuronal firing and enhance brain cell survival after injury

A type of immune cell widely believed to exacerbate chronic adult brain diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and multiple sclerosis (MS), can actually protect the brain from traumatic brain injury (TBI) and may slow the progression of neurodegenerative diseases, according to Cleveland Clinic research published today in the online journal Nature Communications. [More]
Students playing high school lacrosse are exposed to more injuries during practice

Students playing high school lacrosse are exposed to more injuries during practice

With over 170,000 students now playing high school lacrosse, more and more are being exposed to injuries during practice and competition, according to a new study from the Colorado School of Public Health and the Center for Injury Research and Policy at Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio. [More]
Scientists identify genes that may help predict steroid responsiveness in people with EoE

Scientists identify genes that may help predict steroid responsiveness in people with EoE

Results from a clinical trial show that high doses of the corticosteroid fluticasone propionate safely and effectively induce remission in many people with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), a chronic inflammatory disease of the esophagus characterized by high levels of white blood cells called eosinophils. [More]