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SLU researcher discovers new information about how antibiotics stop staph infections

SLU researcher discovers new information about how antibiotics stop staph infections

In research published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, assistant professor of biochemistry and molecular biology at Saint Louis University Mee-Ngan F. Yap, Ph.D., discovered new information about how antibiotics like azithromycin stop staph infections, and why staph sometimes becomes resistant to drugs. [More]
Taking antibiotics for diarrhea may put travelers at increased risk for contracting superbugs

Taking antibiotics for diarrhea may put travelers at increased risk for contracting superbugs

Taking antibiotics for diarrhea may put travelers visiting developing parts of the world at higher risk for contracting superbugs and spreading these daunting drug-resistant bacteria to their home countries, according to a new study published in Clinical Infectious Diseases and now available online. [More]
NCCS launches human clinical trial of new cancer vaccine

NCCS launches human clinical trial of new cancer vaccine

The National Cancer Centre Singapore has launched a clinical trial of a new cancer vaccine administered to human patients for the first time in the world. Cancer immunotherapy (the harnessing of the body's defence system to fight the patient's cancer, has emerged as one of the most exciting medical breakthroughs in the past two years. [More]
LA BioMed's physician-researchers named among Southern California Super Doctors for 2015

LA BioMed's physician-researchers named among Southern California Super Doctors for 2015

Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute's physician-researchers continue to rate among the nation's and the region's best doctors, with 44 of them listed among Southern California Super Doctors for 2015 or set to be listed among America's Top Doctors when it issues its 2015 publication later this year. [More]
Astute Medical, bioMérieux sign agreement to develop NephroCheck Test for acute kidney injury

Astute Medical, bioMérieux sign agreement to develop NephroCheck Test for acute kidney injury

bioMérieux, a world leader in the field of in vitro diagnostics, and Astute Medical, Inc., a company dedicated to improving the diagnosis of high-risk medical conditions and diseases through the identification and validation of protein biomarkers, today announced that they have signed a global, semi-exclusive agreement regarding the development of a test for the early risk assessment of acute kidney injury (AKI). [More]
Saint Louis University researchers find way to prevent type I diabetes in animal model

Saint Louis University researchers find way to prevent type I diabetes in animal model

In new research published in Endocrinology, Thomas Burris, Ph.D., chair of pharmacological and physiological science at Saint Louis University, reports that his team has found a way to prevent type I diabetes in an animal model. [More]
People hospitalized for pneumonia at greater risk of developing cardiovascular disease

People hospitalized for pneumonia at greater risk of developing cardiovascular disease

Your chance of having a heart attack or stroke increases significantly if you have been hospitalized for pneumonia, according to a paper published today in the influential JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association). [More]
Changes in current Ebola virus epidemic could potentially interfere with experimental treatments

Changes in current Ebola virus epidemic could potentially interfere with experimental treatments

Researchers have tracked the genetic mutations that have occurred in the Ebola virus during the last four decades. Their findings, published in mBio, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology, identified changes in the current West African outbreak strain that could potentially interfere with experimental, sequence-based therapeutics. [More]
Study on influenza B viruses could help make flu vaccination programs more effective

Study on influenza B viruses could help make flu vaccination programs more effective

An analysis of 10 years' worth of data on human influenza B viruses has shed new light on the pathogen which can cause the seasonal flu. Findings from this study could help make flu immunization programs more effective; by better targeting vaccines or by eventually eliminating one of the flu lineages completely. [More]
WHO calls for urgent action to reduce premature deaths from noncommunicable diseases

WHO calls for urgent action to reduce premature deaths from noncommunicable diseases

Urgent government action is needed to meet global targets to reduce the burden of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), and prevent the annual toll of 16 million people dying prematurely - before the age of 70 - from heart and lung diseases, stroke, cancer and diabetes, according to a new WHO report. [More]
Increase in Lassa fever cases could be due to human-to-human transmission, research reveals

Increase in Lassa fever cases could be due to human-to-human transmission, research reveals

One in five cases of Lassa fever - a disease that kills around 5,000 people a year in West Africa - could be due to human-to-human transmission, with a large proportion of these cases caused by 'super-spreaders', according to research published today in the journal PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases. [More]
BellBrook Labs announces launch of new Transcreener UDP TR-FRET Assay

BellBrook Labs announces launch of new Transcreener UDP TR-FRET Assay

BellBrook Labs, a leader in high throughput screening assays for drug discovery, announced the launch of a TR-FRET (time resolved Forster resonance energy transfer) version of the company's Transcreener UDP Assay, a high throughput screening assay for glycosyltransferases and other UDP-producing enzymes. [More]
GSU researchers discover how steroids use a novel 'trick' to suppress inflammation

GSU researchers discover how steroids use a novel 'trick' to suppress inflammation

A new "trick" steroids use to suppress inflammation, which could be used to make new anti-inflammatory drugs without the harmful side effects of steroids, has been discovered by researchers at Georgia State University. [More]
NIAID awards contracts to support early-stage human clinical trials of infectious disease treatments

NIAID awards contracts to support early-stage human clinical trials of infectious disease treatments

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, has awarded contracts to three organizations to support early-stage human clinical trials of investigational infectious disease treatments. The new awards for the Phase I Clinical Trial Units for Therapeutics increases the number of funded organizations under the program from two to three, expanding capacity for conducting early safety testing of novel investigational drugs. [More]
Universal vaccine against flu may be on the horizon, say researchers

Universal vaccine against flu may be on the horizon, say researchers

The fact that this year's flu shot is not a good match against this year's influenza strain is well known, and has happened before. [More]
Major investment boosts Scotland's gene research

Major investment boosts Scotland's gene research

A major investment in gene sequencing technology will secure Scotland's place as a world leader in a genomics revolution that is set to transform healthcare. [More]
MGB Biopharma provides update on business performance for 2014

MGB Biopharma provides update on business performance for 2014

MGB Biopharma, a biopharmaceutical company developing a truly novel class of anti-infectives, provides an update on its business performance for 2014. MGB Biopharma is developing a pipeline of novel antimicrobials that puts it at the forefront of addressing the major global problem of antimicrobial resistance. [More]
Injectable hormonal contraceptive appears to increase HIV risk in women

Injectable hormonal contraceptive appears to increase HIV risk in women

Women using depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA), commonly known as Depo-Provera or the birth control shot, have a moderately increased risk of becoming infected with HIV, a large meta-analysis of 12 studies involving more than 39 500 women published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases has found. Other forms of hormonal contraception, including oral contraceptive pills, do not appear to increase this risk. [More]
LJI researcher awarded $1.6 million grant to study factors that trigger onset of type 1 diabetes

LJI researcher awarded $1.6 million grant to study factors that trigger onset of type 1 diabetes

The American Diabetes Association has awarded La Jolla Institute researcher Stephanie Stanford, Ph.D., a $1.6 million grant to investigate the genetic and environmental factors that trigger the onset of type 1 diabetes. [More]
H&P Labs announces licensing agreement to develop oral drug therapy against Ebola

H&P Labs announces licensing agreement to develop oral drug therapy against Ebola

H&P Labs Inc. announced an agreement with Harvard University and Brigham and Women's Hospital to license two classes of compounds in order to develop an oral drug therapy against Ebola. [More]