Infectious Diseases News and Research RSS Feed - Infectious Diseases News and Research

Gladstone researchers identify way to prevent MS development in mice

Gladstone researchers identify way to prevent MS development in mice

Scientists from the Gladstone Institutes have discovered a way to prevent the development of multiple sclerosis (MS) in mice. Using a drug that blocks the production of a certain type of immune cell linked to inflammation and autoimmunity, the researchers successfully protected against the onset of MS in an animal model of the disease. [More]
Consortium of researchers awarded NIH grant to establish District of Columbia Center for AIDS Research

Consortium of researchers awarded NIH grant to establish District of Columbia Center for AIDS Research

An interdisciplinary, city-wide consortium of researchers, led by Alan E. Greenberg, MD, MPH, professor and chair, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics at Milken Institute School of Public Health (Milken Institute SPH) at the George Washington University, has received a grant from the National Institutes of Health for an expected $7.5 million over five years to fund the newly established District of Columbia Center for AIDS Research. [More]
TAXIS Pharmaceuticals' TXA709 compound shows promise in combating antibiotic resistance

TAXIS Pharmaceuticals' TXA709 compound shows promise in combating antibiotic resistance

TAXIS Pharmaceuticals, a drug-discovery company focused on developing a new class of antibiotic agents to treat life-threatening, multidrug-resistant bacterial infections, today announced the presentation of data demonstrating the promise of its lead clinical candidate, TXA709, in combating antibiotic resistance. [More]
Preclinical data from Synthetic Biologics' SYN-005 for Pertussis treatment presented at ECCMID 2015

Preclinical data from Synthetic Biologics' SYN-005 for Pertussis treatment presented at ECCMID 2015

Synthetic Biologics, Inc., a developer of pathogen-specific therapies for serious infections and diseases, with a focus on protecting the microbiome, announced that preclinical data from its novel SYN-005 program for the treatment of Pertussis were presented in two posters at ECCMID 2015 (European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases), on April 25, 2015, in Copenhagen, Denmark. [More]
Merrimack completes submission of MM-398 NDA for treatment of post-gemcitabine metastatic pancreatic cancer

Merrimack completes submission of MM-398 NDA for treatment of post-gemcitabine metastatic pancreatic cancer

Merrimack Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and Baxter International Inc. today jointly announced that Merrimack has completed the rolling submission of the New Drug Application (NDA) for MM-398 (irinotecan liposome injection), also known as "nal-IRI," to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. [More]
National Immunization Awareness Week launched by the Honourable Rona Ambrose, Minister of Health

National Immunization Awareness Week launched by the Honourable Rona Ambrose, Minister of Health

Today, the Honourable Rona Ambrose, Minister of Health, and Dr. Gregory Taylor, Canada's Chief Public Health Officer, launched National Immunization Awareness Week, which runs from April 25 to May 2. They encouraged Canadians to stay healthy by making sure their vaccinations are up to date. [More]
Combination treatment effective for HCV genotype-1 mono-infected patients

Combination treatment effective for HCV genotype-1 mono-infected patients

Results presented today at The International Liver Congress 2015 show that the sofosbuvir (SOF)/daclatasvir (DCV) treatment combination is effective amongst hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype-1 mono-infected patients. These results are significant because whilst other combinations have been widely reported on, there have been few data until now regarding the use of SOF/DCV combination in real world situations. [More]
Enrollment begins for first major cardiovascular prevention trial for people infected with HIV

Enrollment begins for first major cardiovascular prevention trial for people infected with HIV

The first clinical trial to investigate whether treatment with a statin drug can reduce the increased cardiovascular disease risk in people infected with HIV has begun enrolling patients. Based at Massachusetts General Hospital, the six-year, $40 million REPRIEVE (Randomized Study to Prevent Vascular Events in HIV) trial will be conducted at around 100 sites in the U.S., Canada, Puerto Rico and Thailand with funding from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute in collaboration with the AIDS Clinical Trials Group and support from the National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. [More]

Mobidiag to present two new diagnostic platforms for infectious diseases at ECCMID 2015

Mobidiag Ltd, a Finnish molecular diagnostics company specializing in the development of innovative diagnostics solutions for infectious diseases, today announced the first public presentation of two new diagnostic platforms – Novodiag and Amplidiag Easy – at ECCMID 2015 in Copenhagen on April 25-28. [More]
Findings suggest development of 'post-infection' vaccine to reduce TB rates in China

Findings suggest development of 'post-infection' vaccine to reduce TB rates in China

A major contributor to the number of tuberculosis infections and cases in China will likely be the elderly over the next few decades, requiring a refocus in efforts to control a disease affecting millions of people in the country, according to preliminary new research presented today at the Fourth Global Forum on TB Vaccines in Shanghai. [More]
Rising shortages of key antibiotics raise serious concerns about effects on patient care

Rising shortages of key antibiotics raise serious concerns about effects on patient care

Shortages of key antibiotics, including gold-standard therapies and drugs used to treat highly resistant infections, are on the rise, according to a new study of shortages from 2001 to 2013 published in Clinical Infectious Diseases and available online. The trends raise serious concerns about the effects on patient care, particularly for infections without effective alternative treatment options. [More]
Ebola survivors face long-term adverse health effects: Study

Ebola survivors face long-term adverse health effects: Study

Ebola survivors experienced negative health effects that persisted more than two years after the 2007-2008 Bundibugyo ebolavirus (BDBV) outbreak in Uganda that claimed 39 lives. These findings are detailed in a paper published online today in Lancet ID. [More]
Study finds increasing size of elderly population as major contributor to TB infection in China

Study finds increasing size of elderly population as major contributor to TB infection in China

A major contributor to the number of tuberculosis infections and cases in China will likely be the elderly over the next few decades, requiring a refocus in efforts to control a disease affecting millions of people in the country, according to preliminary new research presented today at the Fourth Global Forum on TB Vaccines in Shanghai. [More]
Data from pacritinib Phase 3 PERSIST-1 trial in patients with myelofibrosis to be highlighted at ASCO

Data from pacritinib Phase 3 PERSIST-1 trial in patients with myelofibrosis to be highlighted at ASCO

CTI BioPharma Corp. and Baxter International Inc. today announced that data from the randomized Phase 3 PERSIST-1 trial evaluating the investigational agent pacritinib in patients with myelofibrosis will be highlighted in a late-breaking oral presentation at the upcoming American Society of Clinical Oncology 2015 Meeting (May 29-June 2, 2015 in Chicago, Ill). [More]

Researchers report advancement in development of Ebola vaccine trials

As the current Ebola outbreak wanes, scientists have to make the most of every opportunity to prepare for future outbreaks. One such opportunity involves the identification of a safe and effective Ebola vaccine. Texas supercomputers have aided researchers in modelling which types of clinical trials will provide the best information. That's according to University of Texas at Austin researchers Steve Bellan and Lauren Meyers, who are studying Ebola vaccine trials with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [More]
GenVec, Laboratory of Malaria Immunology and Vaccinology sign research collaboration agreement

GenVec, Laboratory of Malaria Immunology and Vaccinology sign research collaboration agreement

GenVec, Inc. today announced that it has signed a research collaboration agreement with the Laboratory of Malaria Immunology and Vaccinology of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health. [More]
New mathematical model to predict pharmacodynamic activity may help improve drug discovery

New mathematical model to predict pharmacodynamic activity may help improve drug discovery

A new mathematical model that uses drug-target kinetics to predict how drugs work in vivo may provide a foundation to improve drug discovery, which is frequently hampered by the inability to predict effective doses of drugs. [More]
UNM Cancer Center enrolls first patient in phase 3 international clinical trial for kidney cancer vaccine

UNM Cancer Center enrolls first patient in phase 3 international clinical trial for kidney cancer vaccine

The University of New Mexico Cancer Center recently enrolled its first patient in a phase 3 international clinical trial to test a personalized vaccine against metastatic kidney cancer. Kidney cancer has proven particularly difficult to treat with chemotherapy, and numerous attempts to create a kidney cancer vaccine have not improved survival rates. [More]
New Commission outlines current state of research into sepsis

New Commission outlines current state of research into sepsis

Leading doctors today [Monday 20 April, 2015] warn that medical and public recognition of sepsis--thought to contribute to between a third and a half of all hospital deaths--must improve if the number of deaths from this common and potentially life-threatening condition are to fall. [More]
Malaria parasites with Ap2mu gene mutation less sensitive to antimalarial drug artemisinin

Malaria parasites with Ap2mu gene mutation less sensitive to antimalarial drug artemisinin

Early indicators of the malaria parasite in Africa developing resistance to the most effective drug available have been confirmed, according to new research published in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement