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UNC-Chapel Hill, GSK partner to find cure for HIV/AIDS

UNC-Chapel Hill, GSK partner to find cure for HIV/AIDS

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, a leading global public research university with significant expertise in HIV basic and clinical research, and GSK, a global, research-based pharmaceutical and healthcare company with a legacy of success in developing treatments for HIV, today announced the creation of the dedicated HIV Cure center and a jointly owned new company that will focus on discovering a cure for HIV/AIDS. [More]
Roche announces FDA approval of cobas KRAS Mutation Test for diagnostic use

Roche announces FDA approval of cobas KRAS Mutation Test for diagnostic use

Roche today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the cobas KRAS Mutation Test for diagnostic use. The real-time PCR test is designed to identify KRAS mutations in tumor samples from metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients and aid clinicians in determining a therapeutic path for them. [More]
Researchers discover potential mechanism to combat haemorrhagic diseases

Researchers discover potential mechanism to combat haemorrhagic diseases

A potential mechanism to combat diseases caused by haemorrhagic fever viruses has been discovered by researchers at the University of Montreal's Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine. These diseases present a dramatic risk to human health as they often spread quickly and kill a high percentage of infected individuals, as demonstrated by the recent Ebola outbreaks. [More]
New edition of WHO Essential Medicines List includes new treatments for hepatitis C, cancers and multi-drug TB

New edition of WHO Essential Medicines List includes new treatments for hepatitis C, cancers and multi-drug TB

WHO today published the new edition of its Model List of Essential Medicines which includes ground-breaking new treatments for hepatitis C, a variety of cancers (including breast cancer and leukaemia) and multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (TB), among others. The move opens the way to improve access to innovative medicines that show clear clinical benefits and could have enormous public health impact globally. [More]
WHO calls on experts, social media to follow best practices in naming new human infectious diseases

WHO calls on experts, social media to follow best practices in naming new human infectious diseases

WHO today called on scientists, national authorities and the media to follow best practices in naming new human infectious diseases to minimize unnecessary negative effects on nations, economies and people. [More]
Discovery opens up new avenue for development of potential therapies to treat, prevent malaria

Discovery opens up new avenue for development of potential therapies to treat, prevent malaria

Scientists have identified a protein on the surface of human red blood cells that serves as an essential entry point for invasion by the malaria parasite. This discovery opens up a promising new avenue for the development of therapies to treat and prevent malaria. [More]
WHO issues best practices for naming new human infectious diseases

WHO issues best practices for naming new human infectious diseases

The World Health Organization (WHO) today called on scientists, national authorities and the media to follow best practices in naming new human infectious diseases to minimize unnecessary negative effects on nations, economies and people... [More]
SLU professor reveals why women have higher rates of strokes than men, suggests steps to reduce risk

SLU professor reveals why women have higher rates of strokes than men, suggests steps to reduce risk

Each year, around 55,000 more women than men will have a stroke. Longer lifespans, pregnancies and hormones all contribute to the disparity, as do illnesses that tend to strike women more frequently. Crunch the numbers and the math adds up to more strokes for women, making it important for women monitor their risk. [More]
NIH-sponsored Phase 1 clinical trial evaluates novel investigational West Nile virus vaccine

NIH-sponsored Phase 1 clinical trial evaluates novel investigational West Nile virus vaccine

A novel investigational West Nile virus vaccine discovered and developed by scientists at the Oregon National Primate Research Center at Oregon Health & Science University is being evaluated in an NIH-sponsored Phase 1, first-in-human, clinical trial at Duke University. Although several early-stage West Nile virus vaccine clinical trials have been completed to date, no human vaccine has been approved for commercial use. [More]
Cyclenium Pharma, Haplogen sign agreement to discover novel pharmaceutical candidates

Cyclenium Pharma, Haplogen sign agreement to discover novel pharmaceutical candidates

Cyclenium Pharma Inc., an emerging pharmaceutical company specializing in the research and development of novel drug candidates based on its proprietary macrocyclic chemistry technology, and Haplogen GmbH, a biotechnology company developing anti-infective drugs, today announced the signing of a research agreement aimed at the discovery of novel pharmaceutical candidates in multiple disease areas. [More]
BD reports revenues of $2.051 billion for second fiscal quarter 2015

BD reports revenues of $2.051 billion for second fiscal quarter 2015

BD (Becton, Dickinson and Company), a leading global medical technology company, today reported quarterly revenues of $2.051 billion for the second fiscal quarter ended March 31, 2015, representing a decrease of 1.0 percent from the prior-year period, or an increase of 4.9 percent on a foreign currency-neutral basis. [More]
Fecal transplantation cures C. diff infection, eliminates multi-drug resistant pathogens

Fecal transplantation cures C. diff infection, eliminates multi-drug resistant pathogens

A fecal microbiota transplant (FMT) not only cured a case of Clostridium difficile (C. diff) infection in a 66 year old man; it eliminated populations of multi-drug resistant organisms both in the patient's gastrointestinal tract, and several other body sites. [More]
Salk discovery may offer new avenues for generating novel therapies

Salk discovery may offer new avenues for generating novel therapies

Scientists at the Salk Institute have discovered a novel type of pluripotent stem cell--cells capable of developing into any type of tissue--whose identity is tied to their location in a developing embryo. This contrasts with stem cells traditionally used in scientific study, which are characterized by their time-related stage of development. [More]
New study finds high levels of HCV infection among HIV-infected people across Africa

New study finds high levels of HCV infection among HIV-infected people across Africa

A new study has found high levels of infection with hepatitis C (HCV) across Africa, particularly in people infected with HIV. [More]
Lymphatic pump treatment may fight pneumonia by enhancing efficacy of antibiotics

Lymphatic pump treatment may fight pneumonia by enhancing efficacy of antibiotics

Lymphatic pump treatment (LPT) shows promise in managing pneumonia when combined with antibiotic treatment, according to a new study published in The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association. [More]
Texas Biomed scientists awarded NIH grant to develop potential HPV-based HIV vaccine

Texas Biomed scientists awarded NIH grant to develop potential HPV-based HIV vaccine

Scientists at Texas Biomedical Research Institute have begun work on a nearly $3.4 million study funded by the National Institutes of Health over the next four years to create an attenuated, or weakened, virus that is a hybrid of the papilloma virus and the human immunodeficiency virus, with the potential to jumpstart a body's immune response to develop antibodies against both viruses. [More]
ITIM-containing receptor crucial for development of acute myeloid leukemia

ITIM-containing receptor crucial for development of acute myeloid leukemia

UT Southwestern Medical Center scientists have discovered that a certain class of receptors that inhibit immune response are crucial for the development of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the most common acute leukemia affecting adults. [More]
New device can turn smartphone into DNA-scanning fluorescent microscope

New device can turn smartphone into DNA-scanning fluorescent microscope

If you thought scanning one of those strange, square QR codes with your phone was somewhat advanced, hold on to your seat. Researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles have recently developed a device that can turn any smartphone into a DNA-scanning fluorescent microscope. [More]
Novel approaches to fight infections presented at the Pipeline Corner at ECCMID

Novel approaches to fight infections presented at the Pipeline Corner at ECCMID

The European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID) announced breaking developments in the global fight against infections – with new mechanisms and approaches presented by smaller companies in a dedicated pipeline session at the annual congress (ECCMID) in Copenhagen. [More]
Papers on antibiotic resistance, neglected diseases and future of the ocean to be discussed during G7 summit

Papers on antibiotic resistance, neglected diseases and future of the ocean to be discussed during G7 summit

Today the national science academies of the G7 countries handed three statements to their respective heads of government for discussion during the G7 summit at Schloss Elmau in early June 2015. The papers on antibiotic resistance, neglected and poverty-related diseases, and the future of the ocean were drawn up by the seven national academies under the aegis of the German National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina. [More]
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