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UTHealth receives $7.3 million grant to research on health information technology

UTHealth receives $7.3 million grant to research on health information technology

The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Biomedical Informatics has been awarded grants totaling $7.3 million to enhance health care and biomedical discovery through the use of health information technology. [More]
Rutgers researcher receives NIH grant to develop rapid test to diagnose Ebola

Rutgers researcher receives NIH grant to develop rapid test to diagnose Ebola

Rutgers researcher David Alland, working with the California biotechnology company Cepheid, has received a grant of nearly $640,000 from the National Institutes of Health to develop a rapid test to diagnose Ebola as well as other viruses that can cause symptoms similar to Ebola. [More]
Nivolumab drug highly effective for Hodgkin's lymphoma

Nivolumab drug highly effective for Hodgkin's lymphoma

A phase I clinical trial of nivolumab found that the immune-boosting drug is a highly effective therapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma. The multi-institution study, led by Mayo Clinic, indicated that the drug was safe and led to an 87 percent response rate in patients who had failed on other treatments. [More]
Research findings may lead to new ways to thwart drug resistance

Research findings may lead to new ways to thwart drug resistance

Penicillin, the wonder drug discovered in 1928, works in ways that are still mysterious almost a century later. One of the oldest and most widely used antibiotics, it attacks enzymes that build the bacterial cell wall, a mesh that surrounds the bacterial membrane and gives the cells their integrity and shape. Once that wall is breached, bacteria die -- allowing us to recover from infection. [More]
Researchers identify important neural mechanism responsible for certain chronic pain disorders

Researchers identify important neural mechanism responsible for certain chronic pain disorders

Pain typically has a clear cause-but not always. When a person touches something hot or bumps into a sharp object, it's no surprise that it hurts. But for people with certain chronic pain disorders, including fibromyalgia and phantom limb pain, a gentle caress can result in agony. [More]
Promising anti-malarial compound uses novel mechanism to kill malaria parasite

Promising anti-malarial compound uses novel mechanism to kill malaria parasite

An international research collaborative has determined that a promising anti-malarial compound tricks the immune system to rapidly destroy red blood cells infected with the malaria parasite but leave healthy cells unharmed. St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists led the study, which appears in the current online early edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. [More]
Two medical imaging techniques could predict effectiveness of TB drugs

Two medical imaging techniques could predict effectiveness of TB drugs

Two medical imaging techniques, called positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT), could be used in combination as a biomarker to predict the effectiveness of antibiotic drug regimens being tested to treat tuberculosis (TB) patients, according to researchers at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Study: PET scanning strategy could help predict effectiveness of TB drugs

Study: PET scanning strategy could help predict effectiveness of TB drugs

Sophisticated lung imaging can show whether or not a treatment drug is able to clear tuberculosis (TB) lung infection in human and macaque studies, according to researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and their international collaborators. [More]
Melbourne researcher wins Sornchai Looareesuwan Medal for research on malaria

Melbourne researcher wins Sornchai Looareesuwan Medal for research on malaria

Melbourne researcher Professor Alan Cowman has won the Sornchai Looareesuwan Medal 2014 for his significant contributions to understanding how the malaria parasite causes disease and for his search for potential malaria vaccines. [More]
CorMedix seeks QIDP designation from FDA for Neutrolin Catheter Lock Solution

CorMedix seeks QIDP designation from FDA for Neutrolin Catheter Lock Solution

CorMedix Inc., a pharmaceutical company focused on developing and commercializing therapeutic products for the prevention and treatment of cardiac, renal and infectious disease, has filed a request with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for designation of its lead product candidate, Neutrolin Catheter Lock Solution, as a qualified infectious disease product (QIDP) pursuant to the Generating Antibiotic Incentives Now (GAIN) title of the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act. [More]
Study reports effective treatment approach to inhibit herpes virus infection

Study reports effective treatment approach to inhibit herpes virus infection

A multi-institutional study reports an effective treatment approach to inhibit and keep latent viruses like herpes simplex from reactivating and causing disease. The work, whose lead author is the late James Hill, PhD, LSU Health New Orleans Professor and Director of Pharmacology and Infectious Disease at the LSU Eye Center, is published in the December 3, 2014, issue of Science Translational Medicine. [More]
Researchers publish first comprehensive characterization of genetic diversity in Sub-Saharan Africa

Researchers publish first comprehensive characterization of genetic diversity in Sub-Saharan Africa

Researchers from the African Genome Variation Project have published the first attempt to comprehensively characterise genetic diversity across Sub-Saharan Africa. The study of the world's most genetically diverse region will provide an invaluable resource for medical researchers and provides insights into population movements over thousands of years of African history. [More]
Pregnant women lacking vitamin E nearly twice as likely to have miscarriage

Pregnant women lacking vitamin E nearly twice as likely to have miscarriage

Pregnant women in Bangladesh with low levels of the most common form of vitamin E are nearly twice as likely to have a miscarriage than those with adequate levels of the vitamin in their blood, according to new research led by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. [More]
UCLA researchers devise plan to reduce HIV transmission in Africa

UCLA researchers devise plan to reduce HIV transmission in Africa

While Ebola has attracted much of the world's attention recently, a severe HIV epidemic rages on around the world and in sub-Saharan Africa in particular. Globally, more than 34 million people are infected with HIV; in sub-Saharan Africa alone, 3 million new infections occur annually. [More]
UNM Cancer Center program to help new scientists learn nuances of conducting science

UNM Cancer Center program to help new scientists learn nuances of conducting science

create a set of systems to track people, projects and money. But scientists' formal training doesn't always include business classes. To bridge this gap, Michelle Ozbun, PhD, at the University of New Mexico Cancer Center, is improving a program that helps new scientists learn nuances of conducting science. [More]
Ceres to develop new method for detecting the presence of Ebola virus in saliva

Ceres to develop new method for detecting the presence of Ebola virus in saliva

Ceres Nanosciences Inc. today announced the commencement of a development program, funded by the Gates Foundation, to use Ceres' Nanotrap particle technology to develop a new method of detecting the presence of the Ebola virus in saliva. [More]
EU-designed forecasting model developed to predict spread of Ebola

EU-designed forecasting model developed to predict spread of Ebola

Forecasters predicting the spread of Ebola are using one of the most sophisticated modeling systems in the world - the result of an EU research project. [More]
Researchers develop low-cost, electricity-free device for detecting DNA of infectious pathogens

Researchers develop low-cost, electricity-free device for detecting DNA of infectious pathogens

Diagnosing HIV and other infectious diseases presents unique challenges in remote locations that lack electric power, refrigeration, and appropriately trained health care staff. To address these issues, researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health have developed a low-cost, electricity-free device capable of detecting the DNA of infectious pathogens, including HIV-1. [More]
Antibiotic resistance: Theme for next Uppsala Health Summit

Antibiotic resistance: Theme for next Uppsala Health Summit

The theme for the next Uppsala Health Summit, to be held in Uppsala on 2-3 June 2015, is antibiotic resistance -- one of the biggest global health challenges of our day. [More]
Baxter seeks FDA approval of BAX 855 for treatment of people with hemophilia A

Baxter seeks FDA approval of BAX 855 for treatment of people with hemophilia A

Nektar Therapeutics reported that partner Baxter International Inc. today announced that the company has submitted a biologics license application (BLA) to the United States Food and Drug Administration for the approval of BAX 855, an investigational, extended half-life recombinant factor VIII (rFVIII) treatment for hemophilia A based on ADVATE [Antihemophilic Factor (Recombinant)]. [More]