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Aged Garlic Extract beneficial for preventing heart disease

Aged Garlic Extract beneficial for preventing heart disease

The supplement Aged Garlic Extract can reverse the buildup of deadly plaque in arteries and help prevent the progression of heart disease, according to a new study scheduled for publication in the Journal of Nutrition. [More]
IDEAL study holds new hope for children exposed to methamphetamine in the womb

IDEAL study holds new hope for children exposed to methamphetamine in the womb

Despite continuing reports that methamphetamine abuse during pregnancy can lead to behavioral and emotional problems in children, pregnant women continue to abuse the illicit drug. Nearly one-fourth of pregnant women seeking treatment at federal facilities were methamphetamine users. [More]
FDA approves Allergan's sNDA to update label for DALVANCE (dalbavancin) for injection

FDA approves Allergan's sNDA to update label for DALVANCE (dalbavancin) for injection

Allergan plc, a leading global pharmaceutical company, today announced the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the company's supplemental new drug application (sNDA) to update the label for DALVANCE (dalbavancin) for injection. [More]
Immunotherapy could be the future of cancer treatments

Immunotherapy could be the future of cancer treatments

For decades most cancers have been treated with the standard of care treatments which typically include surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy. Now there is talk that immunotherapy represents "the future of cancer treatments." [More]
Experts create new guidelines to improve treatments for cancer patients

Experts create new guidelines to improve treatments for cancer patients

A committee of national experts, led by a Cleveland Clinic researcher, has established first-of-its-kind guidelines to promote more accurate and individualized cancer predictions, guiding more precise treatment and leading to improved patient survival rates and outcomes. [More]
Common mortality causes prevail in epilepsy patients

Common mortality causes prevail in epilepsy patients

A prospective, community-based study confirms that patients with epilepsy usually die of the same causes as other people. [More]
Profectus begins Phase 1 clinical study of VesiculoVax-vectored Ebola virus vaccine

Profectus begins Phase 1 clinical study of VesiculoVax-vectored Ebola virus vaccine

Profectus BioSciences, Inc., a clinical-stage vaccine company developing novel vaccines for the prevention and treatment of infectious diseases and the treatment of cancer, announced today the initiation of a Phase 1 clinical study of Profectus' VesiculoVax-vectored Ebola virus vaccine. [More]
Researchers suggest ways to make TB drugs more efficacious against mutations

Researchers suggest ways to make TB drugs more efficacious against mutations

Biophysicists have discovered why the bacteria that cause tuberculosis (TB) are naturally somewhat resistant to antibiotics known as fluoroquinolones. Their findings, based on mapping the detailed three-dimensional structure of the drugs interacting with an essential enzyme in the TB germ, also reveal why some TB drugs are more potent than others and suggest how drug developers can make fluoroquinolones more efficacious against mutations that make the lung disease drug resistant. [More]
Antivirulence antibiotics could evade resistance longer than traditional antibiotics

Antivirulence antibiotics could evade resistance longer than traditional antibiotics

We've all seen the headlines. "Man found to be shedding virulent strain of polio"; "Virulent flu strain in Europe hits the economy"; "Most virulent strain of E. coli ever seen contains DNA sequences from plague bacteria." [More]
Gene linked to autism lays groundwork for crucial brain structure during prenatal development

Gene linked to autism lays groundwork for crucial brain structure during prenatal development

A gene linked to mental disorders helps lays the foundation for a crucial brain structure during prenatal development, according to Salk Institute research published January 14, 2016 in Cell Reports. [More]
Large-scale clinical trial to evaluate dengue vaccine launched in Brazil

Large-scale clinical trial to evaluate dengue vaccine launched in Brazil

A large-scale clinical trial to evaluate whether a candidate vaccine can prevent the mosquito-borne illness dengue fever has been launched in Brazil. The vaccine, TV003, was developed by scientists in the laboratory of Stephen Whitehead, Ph.D., at NIH's National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID). [More]
Researchers engineer antibodies that could potently neutralize two deadliest strains of Ebola virus

Researchers engineer antibodies that could potently neutralize two deadliest strains of Ebola virus

Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases have engineered the first antibodies that can potently neutralize the two deadliest strains of the virus that causes Ebola hemorrhagic fever. [More]
UM SOM to team up with industry to develop vaccine for preventing deadly bacterial infections

UM SOM to team up with industry to develop vaccine for preventing deadly bacterial infections

The Center for Vaccine Development at the University of Maryland School of Medicine will participate in a partnership with industry to develop a vaccine to prevent a group of deadly bacterial infections that occur commonly among hospital patients. [More]
Study finds communication gap between doctors and parents in management of children's food allergies

Study finds communication gap between doctors and parents in management of children's food allergies

When a child has a food allergy, it's critical for pediatricians and allergists to show parents when and how to use an epinephrine auto-injector and to provide a written emergency food allergy action plan for home and school. It is essential in case of a life-threatening reaction. [More]
UHN's multi-disciplinary team successfully completes Canada's first transplant of the upper limb

UHN's multi-disciplinary team successfully completes Canada's first transplant of the upper limb

In a Canadian first, a multi-disciplinary team, led by Dr. Steven McCabe, has successfully completed the country's first transplant of the upper limb. [More]
Long-term use of opioids increases risk of new-onset depression

Long-term use of opioids increases risk of new-onset depression

Opioids may cause short-term improvement in mood, but long-term use imposes risk of new-onset depression, a Saint Louis University study shows. [More]
New gene-filtering tool aims to predict disease-causing mutations

New gene-filtering tool aims to predict disease-causing mutations

Despite their bad reputations, the vast majority of mutations are not harmful. Even in very rare genetic disorders, only one or two genetic variations ­— out of tens of thousands — is actually the cause of disease. Distinguishing between harmful and harmless mutations has long been a challenge. [More]
Pre-existing nutritional deficits, immune dysfunction may increase hepatitis E risk during pregnancy

Pre-existing nutritional deficits, immune dysfunction may increase hepatitis E risk during pregnancy

Researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have found a link between pre-existing nutritional deficits and immune dysfunction and the risk of hepatitis E infection during pregnancy. [More]
Malaysian scientists join forces with Harvard experts to help revolutionize lung disease treatment

Malaysian scientists join forces with Harvard experts to help revolutionize lung disease treatment

Malaysian scientists are joining forces with Harvard University experts to help revolutionize the treatment of lung diseases -- the delivery of nanomedicine deep into places otherwise impossible to reach. [More]
Researchers use quick screening method to identify, test promising anti-Ebola drugs

Researchers use quick screening method to identify, test promising anti-Ebola drugs

A quick screening method has been used for the first time in a standard open laboratory to identify and test promising anti-Ebola drugs. This approach increases the possibility of finding new therapies faster. [More]
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