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Americans believe cancer to be major health care challenge, Mayo Clinic survey reveals

Americans believe cancer to be major health care challenge, Mayo Clinic survey reveals

While Zika remains a hot topic in the news, a new survey by Mayo Clinic reveals that Americans believe the country's most significant health care challenge is cancer. [More]

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health lists 100 objects that shape public health

In recognition of its Centennial, the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health has compiled a list of 100 objects that tell some of the most compelling stories of public health over the last century and help us appreciate its vast reach. [More]
Study shows pig farm workers as main source of LA-MRSA in Norwegian herds of swine

Study shows pig farm workers as main source of LA-MRSA in Norwegian herds of swine

Norway is the only country to have implemented a "search and destroy" strategy against LA-MRSA among pig herds to date. [More]
SLUCare cancer doctor offers advice to manage anxiety after cancer diagnosis

SLUCare cancer doctor offers advice to manage anxiety after cancer diagnosis

The first few days after a cancer diagnosis can feel overwhelming. At the very moment when you must make key decisions about your treatment and care, your brain may feel overloaded processing the distressing news you've just received. [More]
Research reveals how Zika virus arrests fetal brain development in pigtail macaque

Research reveals how Zika virus arrests fetal brain development in pigtail macaque

For the first time, abnormal brain development following a Zika infection during pregnancy has been documented experimentally in the offspring of a non-human primate. [More]
Rare pattern of gut microbes in newborns linked to higher risk of later allergies and asthma

Rare pattern of gut microbes in newborns linked to higher risk of later allergies and asthma

The microbes living in a baby's gut during its first month of life may directly impact the developing immune system, leading to a higher risk of allergies and asthma later in childhood, according to a study by researchers at UC San Francisco and the Henry Ford Health System in Detroit. [More]
Study shows increasing healthcare costs for infections linked to premise plumbing pathogens

Study shows increasing healthcare costs for infections linked to premise plumbing pathogens

A new analysis of 100 million Medicare records from U.S. adults aged 65 and older reveals rising healthcare costs for infections associated with opportunistic premise plumbing pathogens--disease-causing bacteria, such as Legionella--which can live inside drinking water distribution systems, including household and hospital water pipes. [More]
National Peruvian programme positively affects child development in rural and impoverished regions

National Peruvian programme positively affects child development in rural and impoverished regions

Scientists from the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute and the Peruvian Instituto de Investigación Nutricional adapted the urban-based Peruvian National Early Child Development Programme and brought it to the doorstep of people living in the rural Cajamarca region. [More]
Researchers discover how immune cells transition from silent to merciless killing machines

Researchers discover how immune cells transition from silent to merciless killing machines

Neutrophils are the superheroes of the body's immune system. Normally mild-mannered, they travel through the bloodstream until they reach an emergency situation, such as a cut or infection, where they switch into battle-mode to engulf and destroy foreign invaders. [More]
Novel Trojan Horse antibody strategy may target Ebola's Achilles' heel

Novel Trojan Horse antibody strategy may target Ebola's Achilles' heel

In research published online today in Science, a team of scientists describe a new therapeutic strategy to target a hidden Achilles' heel shared by all known types of Ebola virus. [More]
Changing dosing regimen could improve efficacy of malaria vaccine candidate, study shows

Changing dosing regimen could improve efficacy of malaria vaccine candidate, study shows

Researchers at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research and collaborators recently published results of a phase II study which demonstrated that by changing the dosing regimen, the efficacy of malaria vaccine candidate, RTS,S/AS01, was improved to approximately 87%, compared with 63% using the current standard regimen. [More]
TB lesions may remain in lungs long after completion of treatment

TB lesions may remain in lungs long after completion of treatment

Patients with active tuberculosis of the lungs, the infectious form of the disease known as pulmonary tuberculosis (TB), are typically treated with several medications for a period of six months. [More]
Experts recommend removal of restrictions in accessing new hepatitis C therapies for drug users

Experts recommend removal of restrictions in accessing new hepatitis C therapies for drug users

Global health experts are today are calling for the removal of restrictions preventing people who use drugs from accessing new hepatitis C cures. So long as these restrictions exist, the goal of disease elimination will remain out of reach, they say. [More]
Caltech scientists uncover three-dimensional structure of disease-fighting protein

Caltech scientists uncover three-dimensional structure of disease-fighting protein

The polymeric immunoglobulin receptor, or pIgR, is a multitasking protein produced in the lining of mucosal surfaces, such as the intestines. It plays a pivotal role in the body's immune functions by sequestering bacteria and by assisting antibodies—large proteins that can identify and neutralize specific bacteria and viruses. [More]
Dengue vaccine may worsen infections if used in areas with low rates of disease

Dengue vaccine may worsen infections if used in areas with low rates of disease

The world's only licensed vaccine for dengue may worsen subsequent dengue infections if used in areas with low rates of dengue infection, suggests new research. [More]
New discovery offers way to develop vaccine against highly infectious bacteria

New discovery offers way to develop vaccine against highly infectious bacteria

Biochemists at the University of California San Diego have uncovered patterns in the outer protein coat of group A Streptococcus that could finally lead to a vaccine against this highly infectious bacteria--responsible for more than 500,000 deaths a year, including toxic shock syndrome and necrotizing fasciitis or "flesh-eating disease." [More]
Edinburgh Research & Innovation announces new AIMday programme to tackle challenges of infectious diseases

Edinburgh Research & Innovation announces new AIMday programme to tackle challenges of infectious diseases

With viruses such as Ebola, MERS-CoV and Zika making global headlines, and the progressive development of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) worldwide, Edinburgh Research & Innovation (ERI), the commercialisation arm of the University of Edinburgh, has announced a new AIMday (Academic Industry Meeting day) for companies looking to find expertise and innovative solutions to dealing with the challenges of microbial infection. [More]
Approved dengue vaccine may increase infection in certain settings, research suggests

Approved dengue vaccine may increase infection in certain settings, research suggests

The only approved vaccine for dengue may actually increase the incidence of dengue infections requiring hospitalization rather than preventing the disease if health officials aren't careful about where they vaccinate, new public health research published Sept. 2 in Science suggests. [More]
Mayo Clinic offers CDC’s Zika virus screening test

Mayo Clinic offers CDC’s Zika virus screening test

Mayo Clinic will offer the Zika virus antibody test developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [More]
Hospitalizations for injection drug use-related infective endocarditis increasing among young Americans

Hospitalizations for injection drug use-related infective endocarditis increasing among young Americans

Hospitalizations for infective endocarditis, a heart valve infection often attributed to injection drug use, have increased significantly among young adult Americans--particularly in whites and females--according to a new study by researchers from Tufts Medical Center and Tufts University School of Medicine. [More]
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