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Cattle-based vector control efforts may help eradicate malaria in India

Cattle-based vector control efforts may help eradicate malaria in India

The goal of eliminating malaria in countries like India could be more achievable if mosquito-control efforts take into account the relationship between mosquitoes and cattle, according to an international team of researchers. [More]
Researchers finding way to manipulate signals in bacteria to reduce infections

Researchers finding way to manipulate signals in bacteria to reduce infections

The University of Illinois at Chicago College of Pharmacy has received a five-year, $1.25 million federal grant to continue its research into how bacteria that cause streptococcal infections can be manipulated. [More]
CDC guidelines for PrEP use to prevent HIV transmission do not go far enough, UCLA study suggests

CDC guidelines for PrEP use to prevent HIV transmission do not go far enough, UCLA study suggests

A new study from the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health suggests modifying federal health guidelines related to the use of pre-exposure prophylaxis to prevent HIV transmission because current standards could miss some people who should be on it. [More]
Sudden drop in temperature kickstarts flu and other respiratory tract infections

Sudden drop in temperature kickstarts flu and other respiratory tract infections

You can pretty much put a mark in your calendar for when the annual flu epidemic begins. Using 20,000 virus samples and weather statistics, researchers have now discovered more details about how outdoor temperature and flu outbreaks are linked. [More]
Archaeologist discovers 800-year-old genomes from bacterial infection in Byzantine skeleton

Archaeologist discovers 800-year-old genomes from bacterial infection in Byzantine skeleton

Eight hundred years ago, in a hardscrabble farming community on the outskirts of what was once one of the fabled cities of the ancient world, Troy, a 30-year-old woman was laid to rest in a stone-lined grave. [More]
Common viruses pose serious challenges in long-term care facilities

Common viruses pose serious challenges in long-term care facilities

A widespread outbreak of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and human metapneumovirus (HMPV) at a long-term dementia care ward infected 73 percent of patients, demonstrating the serious challenges in mitigating the spread of infectious diseases in such settings. [More]
New US guidelines developed for the prevention of peanut allergy

New US guidelines developed for the prevention of peanut allergy

Recommendations for introducing peanut-containing foods to infants, compiled by an expert panel sponsored by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, were published this week. The guidelines are intended to help prevent the development of peanut allergy. They provide specific recommendations for infants with differing risk levels for developing peanut allergy. [More]
Anemia protects children against blood-stage malaria in Africa, UNC study finds

Anemia protects children against blood-stage malaria in Africa, UNC study finds

Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional deficiency in the world and causes long-term adverse consequences in children. [More]
Study identifies factors linked to disengagement from treatment for opioid use disorder

Study identifies factors linked to disengagement from treatment for opioid use disorder

Individuals with opioid use disorder who are treated with buprenorphine, a commonly prescribed drug to treat addiction, are more likely to disengage from treatment programs if they are black or Hispanic, unemployed, or have hepatitis C according to a study published online in the Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment. [More]
Experts issue clinical guidelines to help early introduction of peanut-containing foods to infants

Experts issue clinical guidelines to help early introduction of peanut-containing foods to infants

An expert panel sponsored by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, issued clinical guidelines today to aid health care providers in early introduction of peanut-containing foods to infants to prevent the development of peanut allergy. [More]
ESCMID grant helps young investigators to study microorganisms, find better approaches to treat infectious diseases

ESCMID grant helps young investigators to study microorganisms, find better approaches to treat infectious diseases

The European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases through its annual grant programme helps young investigators pursue ground-breaking research to advance our understanding of microorganisms and find better approaches to diagnose, prevent and treat infectious diseases. [More]
Persistent infection in infant reveals mutation that helps bacteria tolerate antibiotic therapy

Persistent infection in infant reveals mutation that helps bacteria tolerate antibiotic therapy

The quest to understand a prolonged infection in an infant being treated for leukemia has led to the St. Jude Children's Research Hospital discovery of a mutation that allows bacteria to tolerate normally effective antibiotic therapy. The report appears today in the scientific journal mBio. [More]
Einstein awarded more than $160 million NIH grant in federal fiscal year 2016

Einstein awarded more than $160 million NIH grant in federal fiscal year 2016

Investigators at Albert Einstein College of Medicine were awarded more than $160 million from the National Institutes of Health in federal fiscal year 2016. [More]
New database of PCR primers enables effective detection and identification of RNA viruses

New database of PCR primers enables effective detection and identification of RNA viruses

Scientists at Korea's Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology scientists have compiled a comprehensive new public database of genetic information to enable the detection and identification of RNA viruses using the polymerase chain reaction assay. [More]
New study finds overuse of hospital ICUs

New study finds overuse of hospital ICUs

Intensive Care Units, which provide the most expensive and invasive forms of care in a hospital setting, are being used too often for patients who don't need that level of care, according to a new study by LA BioMed and UCLA researchers published in the Journal of the American Medical Association Internal Medicine today. [More]
UF researchers play integral role in Ebola vaccine trial

UF researchers play integral role in Ebola vaccine trial

An international group of researchers associated with the World Health Organization has published its final report on the Ebola vaccine trial in Guinea, finding that the vaccine is a safe and effective way to prevent Ebola infection. [More]
Inherited CD70 deficiency increases susceptibility to Epstein-Barr virus and EBV-related cancer

Inherited CD70 deficiency increases susceptibility to Epstein-Barr virus and EBV-related cancer

Investigators at the National Institutes of Health and international colleagues have identified a genetic immune disorder characterized by increased susceptibility and poor immune control of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and, in some cases, an EBV-associated cancer called Hodgkin's lymphoma. [More]
Study discovers critical function of mother's immune cells in resisting preterm birth

Study discovers critical function of mother's immune cells in resisting preterm birth

Preterm birth -- birth before 37 weeks of pregnancy -- affects up to one in every six births in the United States and many other countries. [More]
Insights into immune system pathways may be key to developing effective TB vaccine

Insights into immune system pathways may be key to developing effective TB vaccine

New research findings provide insight into the immune system pathways that may be key to developing an effective tuberculosis (TB) vaccine. [More]
Shortened antimicrobial treatment inferior to standard regimen for middle ear infections, study finds

Shortened antimicrobial treatment inferior to standard regimen for middle ear infections, study finds

A five-day antimicrobial treatment regimen for middle ear infections in young children is inferior to the standard 10-day regimen, according to newly published research in The New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
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