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Researchers discover how Zika virus travels from pregnant mother to fetus

Researchers discover how Zika virus travels from pregnant mother to fetus

Zika virus can infect numerous cell types in the human placenta and amniotic sac, according to researchers at UC San Francisco and UC Berkeley who show in a new paper how the virus travels from a pregnant woman to her fetus. They also identify a drug that may be able to block it. [More]
First clinical study for Zika vaccine to begin in Canada

First clinical study for Zika vaccine to begin in Canada

Université Laval's Infectious Disease Research Centre and Centre de recherche du CHU de Québec-Université Laval are proud to announce that the first clinical study for a Zika vaccine in Canada is set to begin in Quebec City. [More]
Mass incarceration of drug users leads to high levels of HIV, tuberculosis and hepatitis among prisoners

Mass incarceration of drug users leads to high levels of HIV, tuberculosis and hepatitis among prisoners

The War on Drugs, mass incarceration of drug users, and the failure to provide proven harm reduction and treatment strategies has led to high levels of HIV, tuberculosis, and hepatitis B and C infection among prisoners—far higher than in the general population. [More]
HOPE study seeks to understand safety of vaginal ring in protecting women against HIV

HOPE study seeks to understand safety of vaginal ring in protecting women against HIV

Women who took part in ASPIRE, a trial that found a vaginal ring containing an antiretroviral (ARV) drug called dapivirine was safe and helped protect against HIV, will soon be offered the opportunity to use the ring as part of a new study called HOPE. [More]
Soligenix announces encouraging preliminary results of heat stable Ebola vaccine

Soligenix announces encouraging preliminary results of heat stable Ebola vaccine

A biopharmaceutical company collaborating with Hawai'i scientists on an Ebola vaccine announced encouraging news about its vaccine today. [More]
SLU researchers study investigational vaccine for yellow fever

SLU researchers study investigational vaccine for yellow fever

Saint Louis University's Center for Vaccine Development is studying an investigational vaccine for yellow fever, a potentially deadly disease that is spread by the same mosquito that transmits Zika virus. [More]
Findings offer renewed hope for speedy development curative medicines for people with toxoplasmosis

Findings offer renewed hope for speedy development curative medicines for people with toxoplasmosis

In the July 14 edition of Scientific Reports (Nature), 39 researchers from 14 leading institutions in the United States, United Kingdom and France suggest novel approaches that could hasten the development of better medications for people suffering from toxoplasmosis. [More]
Cancer immunotherapy could treat HIV

Cancer immunotherapy could treat HIV

A type of immunotherapy that has shown promising results against cancer could also be used against HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. [More]
Research highlights global burden of HIV and other infectious diseases among prisoners and detainees

Research highlights global burden of HIV and other infectious diseases among prisoners and detainees

Prisoners and detainees worldwide have higher burdens of HIV, viral hepatitis and tuberculosis than the communities from which they come, and the regular cycling of infected people in and out of incarceration is worsening the epidemics both inside and outside of prison, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health-led research suggests. [More]
Novel method can test multi-drug resistant bacteria’s susceptibility to antibiotics in clinical setting

Novel method can test multi-drug resistant bacteria’s susceptibility to antibiotics in clinical setting

The recent emergence of bacterial infections that are resistant to many existing antibiotics is driving an urgent need for tools to quickly identify the small number of therapies that are still effective for individual patients. [More]
Ecologists identify bat species with high potential to harbor Ebola and other filoviruses

Ecologists identify bat species with high potential to harbor Ebola and other filoviruses

An international team of ecologists has identified the bat species with the greatest potential to harbor filoviruses--a family that includes Ebola virus. [More]
IDSA/ATS recommends shorter courses of antibiotics for patients with hospital-acquired, ventilator-associated pneumonia

IDSA/ATS recommends shorter courses of antibiotics for patients with hospital-acquired, ventilator-associated pneumonia

Hospital-acquired pneumonia and ventilator-associated pneumonia– which account for 20 to 25 percent of hospital-acquired infections – should be treated with shorter courses of antibiotics than they typically are, according to new guidelines released by the Infectious Diseases Society of America and American Thoracic Society and published in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases. [More]
The Wistar Institute and partners receive HIV cure research grant to test novel immunotherapies

The Wistar Institute and partners receive HIV cure research grant to test novel immunotherapies

The Wistar Institute is pleased to announce that the National Institutes of Health has awarded a nearly $23 million Martin Delaney Collaboratories for HIV Cure Research grant to the BEAT-HIV: Delaney Collaboratory to Cure HIV-1 Infection by Combination Immunotherapy, a consortium of top HIV researchers led by co-principal investigators Luis J. Montaner, D.V.M., D.Phil., director of the HIV-1 Immunopathogenesis Laboratory at The Wistar Institute Vaccine Center, and James L. Riley, Ph.D., research associate professor at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Researchers receive grant to test transcutaneously refillable implant that delivers HIV-prevention drugs

Researchers receive grant to test transcutaneously refillable implant that delivers HIV-prevention drugs

A Houston Methodist research team received a nearly $4 million grant to test a transcutaneously refillable implant that administers pre-exposure prophylaxis drugs to subjects at risk of HIV-exposure. [More]

Community-level ART coverage, male circumcision linked to decline in new male HIV infections in Uganda

Increasing the number of men who undergo circumcision and increasing the rates at which women with HIV are given antiretroviral therapy (ART) were associated with significant declines in the number of new male HIV infections in rural Ugandan communities, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Health research suggests. [More]
Sugar-binding protein galectin-9 could be new weapon to fight HIV

Sugar-binding protein galectin-9 could be new weapon to fight HIV

The ultimate impediment to a cure for HIV infection is the presence of latent, HIV-infected cells, which can reawaken and produce new virus when antiretroviral drug therapy is stopped. [More]
Antibodies from survivors of filovirus infection may offer protection against other filoviral diseases

Antibodies from survivors of filovirus infection may offer protection against other filoviral diseases

Ebola and Marburg filovirus disease outbreaks have typically occurred as isolated events, confined to central Africa. [More]
New study finds whether HIV-infected people on antiretroviral treatment transmit virus to their partner

New study finds whether HIV-infected people on antiretroviral treatment transmit virus to their partner

A new study has found that neither gay men nor heterosexual people with HIV transmit the virus to their partner, provided they are on suppressive antiretroviral treatment. [More]
Scientists discover new biological defense system against pathogenic microorganisms

Scientists discover new biological defense system against pathogenic microorganisms

For the first time in the world, a group of researchers discovered a human immune receptor, which detects the invasion of pathogenic microorganisms. [More]
Scientists use machine learning to interpret mosquito genome

Scientists use machine learning to interpret mosquito genome

Scientists are using machine learning to identify important sequences of DNA within the mosquito genome that regulate how the insect's cells develop and behave. [More]
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