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Penicillin allergy testing: an interview with Dr. Eric Macy

Penicillin allergy testing: an interview with Dr. Eric Macy

Penicillin was one of the first antibiotics developed and has saved millions of lives. First used in the early 1940s, penicillin is still one of the most widely used and least toxic family of antibiotics. [More]
Study estimates health care costs of gastrointestinal illnesses in Switzerland

Study estimates health care costs of gastrointestinal illnesses in Switzerland

In Switzerland, between 300,000 and 700,000 patients per year visit a doctor due to acute diarrhoea. Until now, the financial burden on the Swiss health care system had been completely unclear. [More]
NIH funds collaborative project to develop better vaccine adjuvants for many diseases

NIH funds collaborative project to develop better vaccine adjuvants for many diseases

Dr. Qizhi Cathy Yao, professor of surgery, molecular virology and microbiology, and pathology & immunology at Baylor College of Medicine, has been awarded a National Institutes of Health grant to fund a collaborative project with Molecular Express, Inc. [More]
Opioid naive individuals at low risk of developing persistent opioid use after surgery, research shows

Opioid naive individuals at low risk of developing persistent opioid use after surgery, research shows

Researchers from the University Health Network's Department of Anesthesia and Pain Management and the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences have determined that patients who have not had an opioid prescription within a year prior to their procedure are at low risk of developing persistent opioid use after major surgery. [More]
Hygiene hypothesis: a misleading misnomer? An interview with Professor Sally Bloomfield

Hygiene hypothesis: a misleading misnomer? An interview with Professor Sally Bloomfield

Professor Strachan first proposed the hygiene hypothesis back in 1989. Reviewing the evidence, he suggested that one of the causes of the recent rapid rise in allergic diseases in children was lack of exposure to childhood infections [More]
Study: Risk of sports fans catching dengue fever during Rio Olympics low

Study: Risk of sports fans catching dengue fever during Rio Olympics low

The risk of sports fans catching dengue fever during the Rio Olympics is very low, according to a new study involving mathematicians at the University of Strathclyde. [More]
Coordinated treatment for both illnesses could save lives of people with HIV and TB

Coordinated treatment for both illnesses could save lives of people with HIV and TB

Tuberculosis (TB) is a leading killer of people with HIV, and providing therapy for both illnesses simultaneously saves lives - according to new guidelines on the treatment of drug-susceptible TB developed jointly by the American Thoracic Society, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Infectious Diseases Society of America. [More]
Study finds oral immunotherapy safe, effective at suppressing peanut allergy in preschool children

Study finds oral immunotherapy safe, effective at suppressing peanut allergy in preschool children

Nearly 80 percent of peanut-allergic preschool children successfully incorporated peanut-containing foods into their diets after receiving peanut oral immunotherapy (OIT), a clinical trial has found. [More]
Scientists improve potential weapon to fight against autoimmune disorders

Scientists improve potential weapon to fight against autoimmune disorders

With a trick of engineering, scientists at the Gladstone Institutes improved a potential weapon against inflammation and autoimmune disorders. Their work could one day benefit patients who suffer from inflammatory bowel disease or organ transplant rejection. [More]
Manganese-based antioxidant complex of Deinococcus protects mice from gamma radiation

Manganese-based antioxidant complex of Deinococcus protects mice from gamma radiation

They call it "Conan the Bacterium," and now it may be used to help save lives in the event of a nuclear disaster or terrorist attack. [More]
TSRI scientists zoom in to view how experimental therapy ZMapp targets Ebola virus

TSRI scientists zoom in to view how experimental therapy ZMapp targets Ebola virus

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute now have a high-resolution view of exactly how the experimental therapy ZMapp targets Ebola virus. [More]
Study finds no major difference in effectiveness of two classes of drugs in peritoneal dialysis patients

Study finds no major difference in effectiveness of two classes of drugs in peritoneal dialysis patients

With cardiovascular disease being the No. 1 cause of death in end-stage kidney disease patients on peritoneal dialysis, a new study examined two classes of medications commonly prescribed to prevent cardiovascular events in these patients and found no significant difference in outcomes. [More]
Mayo Clinic expert offers tips to avoid illness at major events

Mayo Clinic expert offers tips to avoid illness at major events

Zika isn't the only health concern now that the games have begun in Rio. Massive crowds from around the globe will be at the Olympics, and that means a world-class array of germs will mix with them. [More]
UM SOM selected as study site for human safety trial of new Zika vaccine

UM SOM selected as study site for human safety trial of new Zika vaccine

As world leaders increasingly recognize the Zika virus as an international public health threat, the Center for Vaccine Development at the University of Maryland School of Medicine's Institute for Global Health has been chosen as one of three study sites in a human safety trial of a new Zika vaccine. [More]
Increased treatment for HCV in Rhode Island could help eradicate disease by 2030

Increased treatment for HCV in Rhode Island could help eradicate disease by 2030

A new Brown University study projects that increasing the number of Rhode Islanders treated every year for hepatitis C virus infection (HCV) to about 2,000 by 2020 would reduce cases by 90 percent and prevent more than 70 percent of expected liver-related deaths in the state by 2030. [More]
Sickle cell trait linked to increased risk of rhabdomyolysis among African American Soldiers

Sickle cell trait linked to increased risk of rhabdomyolysis among African American Soldiers

A new study published Aug. 4 in the New England Journal of Medicine indicates that among African American U.S. Army Soldiers, sickle cell trait is not associated with an increase in mortality, but is associated with a modest increase in the risk of exertional rhabdomyolysis. [More]
People with lymphatic filariasis more likely to acquire HIV infection, study shows

People with lymphatic filariasis more likely to acquire HIV infection, study shows

People infected with a parasitic worm called Wuchereria bancrofti in areas where HIV is endemic may be more likely to acquire HIV than people who are not infected with the worm, according to a new study in southwest Tanzania, published in The Lancet. [More]
NIH launches clinical trial of experimental vaccine candidate for preventing Zika virus infection

NIH launches clinical trial of experimental vaccine candidate for preventing Zika virus infection

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, has launched a clinical trial of a vaccine candidate intended to prevent Zika virus infection. [More]
People with filariasis show two to three-fold increased risk for HIV

People with filariasis show two to three-fold increased risk for HIV

Since the start of the HIV epidemic, there have been speculations as to why HIV and the immunodeficiency syndrome it causes have spread so much more in Africa than in other countries around the world. [More]
New Zika cases may help better predict transmission of virus in the U.S, says expert

New Zika cases may help better predict transmission of virus in the U.S, says expert

Following the news that health officials in Florida have confirmed 14 people north of Miami infected with the Zika virus likely contracted it from local mosquitoes, Virginia Tech's Bryan Lewis said the new infections were not altogether surprising. [More]
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