Inflammatory Bowel Disease News and Research RSS Feed - Inflammatory Bowel Disease News and Research

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is an ongoing or chronic health problem that causes inflammation and swelling in the digestive tract. The irritation causes bleeding sores called ulcers to form along the digestive tract. This in turn can cause crampy, abdominal pain and severe bloody diarrhea.

There are two main types of inflammatory bowel disease: ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). The diseases are very similar. In fact, doctors often have a hard time figuring out which type of IBD a person has. The main difference between UC and CD is the area of the digestive tract they affect. CD can occur along the entire digestive tract and spread deep into the bowel wall. In contrast, UC usually only affects the top layer of the large intestine (colon) and rectum. Medicine can control the symptoms of IBD in most women. But for people who have severe IBD, surgery is sometimes needed. Over the course of a person's life, the symptoms of IBD often come and go. With close monitoring and medicines, most people with IBD lead full and active lives.
New study highlights important milestone for future development of infant milk formula

New study highlights important milestone for future development of infant milk formula

New data published today in The Journal of Nutrition show that Bimuno, a unique galacto-oligosaccharide, is functionally similar to human milk oligosaccharides (HMOS) by producing comparable anti-inflammatory intestinal protection. [More]
Certain viral infections during pregnancy could cause behavioral changes in offspring

Certain viral infections during pregnancy could cause behavioral changes in offspring

A study published in the journal Science found that activation in pregnant mice of a particular immune response, similar to what may occur with certain viral infections during pregnancy, alters the brain structure of the mouse offspring and causes behavioral changes, reminiscent of those observed in humans with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). [More]
Weekend junk food binges bad for your gut health

Weekend junk food binges bad for your gut health

Yo-yoing between eating well during the week and bingeing on junk food over the weekend is likely to be just as bad for your gut health as a consistent diet of junk, new UNSW research suggests. [More]
New report highlights resourcing issues in services for patients with bowel cancer

New report highlights resourcing issues in services for patients with bowel cancer

A new report published today (12 January 2016), by the Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland (ACPGBI) and Bowel Cancer UK, highlights numerous areas of service provision that fall short of having the resources needed to provide optimum service and safety for bowel disease patients. [More]
Novartis announces FDA approval of Cosentyx for treatment of adult patients with AS and PsA

Novartis announces FDA approval of Cosentyx for treatment of adult patients with AS and PsA

Novartis announced today that the US Food and Drug Administration has approved Cosentyx (secukinumab) for two new indications - the treatment of adult patients with active ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and active psoriatic arthritis (PsA). [More]
First trials of smart gas sensing pills offer new clues for development of gut disorder treatments

First trials of smart gas sensing pills offer new clues for development of gut disorder treatments

Researchers have conducted the first ever trials of smart pills that can measure intestinal gases inside the body, with surprising results revealing some unexpected ways that fibre affects the gut. [More]
Chromoendoscopy superior to other surveillance methods in detecting dysplasia in IBD patients

Chromoendoscopy superior to other surveillance methods in detecting dysplasia in IBD patients

Chromoendoscopy is superior to random biopsy or white-light colonoscopy in detecting dysplasia in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), according to a long-term surveillance study led by James F. Marion, MD, Professor of Medicine at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and Director of Education and Outreach at The Susan and Leonard Feinstein Inflammatory Bowel Disease Clinical Center at The Mount Sinai Hospital, published online in the journal Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. [More]

Largest real world study to date demonstrate effectiveness of biosimilar infliximab in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases who have been switched from reference infliximab

Data from the PRospective Observational cohort Study on patients with Inflammatory bowel disease receiving Therapy with BIOsimilars (PROSIT-BIO) in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease (CD) has been presented at the Italian Group for the Study of IBD (IG-IBD), VII National Congress, Palermo, Italy. [More]
New research sheds light on how gut damage can cause malnutrition, oral vaccine failure

New research sheds light on how gut damage can cause malnutrition, oral vaccine failure

It has been estimated that if every nutritional measure known to be helpful were applied to every child in the world, global malnutrition would be decreased by only a third. New research from the University of Virginia School of Medicine, the University of Vermont and the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research in Bangladesh sheds light on why: Damage to the gut from infection explains why food alone is not a solution to malnutrition. [More]
IBD Plexus brings patients, researchers and doctors together to create IBD research initiative

IBD Plexus brings patients, researchers and doctors together to create IBD research initiative

For the first time, more than 40,000 IBD patients, researchers, and healthcare providers will be brought together by IBD Plexus to create the world's largest registry of IBD patients of all ages which will transform how IBD research is being conducted. [More]
NEK7 enzyme acts as on-off switch in innate immune system

NEK7 enzyme acts as on-off switch in innate immune system

UT Southwestern Medical Center and California researchers today provide the first report that an enzyme previously known solely for its role in cell division also acts as an on-off switch in the innate immune system -- the body's first defense against infection. [More]
Genetic information of patients with IBD could provide road map for more effective treatments

Genetic information of patients with IBD could provide road map for more effective treatments

Genetic variation in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) appears to play a major role in determining how sick they will become and could provide a road map for more effective treatments. [More]
First patient enrolled in Phase 2 clinical trial of Immune's bertilimumab in Ulcerative Colitis

First patient enrolled in Phase 2 clinical trial of Immune's bertilimumab in Ulcerative Colitis

Immune Pharmaceuticals Inc. announced today that the first patient has been enrolled into the Phase 2 clinical trial evaluating the safety and efficacy of its first in class fully human monoclonal antibody, bertilimumab in Ulcerative Colitis (UC). [More]
Johns Hopkins researchers present new healthcare tips from American Heart Association Meeting

Johns Hopkins researchers present new healthcare tips from American Heart Association Meeting

Linking digital activity trackers to smartphones and periodically pinging users with personalized texts that urge them to walk more can significantly increase physical activity levels and spark healthy behavior changes, according to findings of a pilot study conducted at Johns Hopkins. [More]
Some gut microbes may hold the key to regulating good health, say Oregon scientists

Some gut microbes may hold the key to regulating good health, say Oregon scientists

University of Oregon scientists have found that strength in numbers doesn't hold true for microbes in the intestines. A minority population of the right type might hold the key to regulating good health. [More]
Certain antibiotic treatment for MRSA may potentially make patients sicker

Certain antibiotic treatment for MRSA may potentially make patients sicker

A new study sheds light on how treatment of the "superbug" known as MRSA with certain antibiotics can potentially make patients sicker. The findings by Cedars-Sinai scientists, published today in the journal Cell Host & Microbe, could have implications for managing the bug, a virulent form of the common staph infection that can be difficult to control. [More]
New book by Virginia Tech researchers explains a set of techniques to model the immune system

New book by Virginia Tech researchers explains a set of techniques to model the immune system

The complexity of the human immune response has been difficult to characterize on a 'big picture' level, but researchers at the Virginia Bioinformatics Institute at Virginia Tech have written the book on how it can be done. [More]
Diet missing soluble fiber promotes inflammation in the intestines, leading to weight gain

Diet missing soluble fiber promotes inflammation in the intestines, leading to weight gain

Eating too much high-fat, high-calorie food is considered the primary cause of obesity and obesity-related disease, including diabetes. While the excess calories consumed are a direct cause of the fat accumulation, scientists suspect that low-grade inflammation due to an altered gut microbiome may also be involved. [More]
Scientists one step closer to developing new treatment for inflammatory bowel disease

Scientists one step closer to developing new treatment for inflammatory bowel disease

For patients with inflammatory bowel disease, the possibility of taking a single pill to bring long-lasting relief might seem too good to be true. Scientists at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University are on the brink of making that happen, thanks to a recent proof-of-concept study, in which the severity of a form of inflammatory bowel disease in mice was dramatically reduced with one oral dose of a protein isolated from a bacterial biofilm. [More]
Takeda highlights safety, efficacy of vedolizumab for UC and CD at ACG Annual Scientific Meeting

Takeda highlights safety, efficacy of vedolizumab for UC and CD at ACG Annual Scientific Meeting

Takeda Pharmaceuticals, U.S.A., Inc., today announced that data highlighting the efficacy and safety of vedolizumab for the treatment of adults with moderately to severely active ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), will be presented during the 2015 American College of Gastroenterology Annual Scientific Meeting in Honolulu, Hawaii, held on October 16-21. [More]
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