Inflammatory Bowel Disease News and Research RSS Feed - Inflammatory Bowel Disease News and Research

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is an ongoing or chronic health problem that causes inflammation and swelling in the digestive tract. The irritation causes bleeding sores called ulcers to form along the digestive tract. This in turn can cause crampy, abdominal pain and severe bloody diarrhea.

There are two main types of inflammatory bowel disease: ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). The diseases are very similar. In fact, doctors often have a hard time figuring out which type of IBD a person has. The main difference between UC and CD is the area of the digestive tract they affect. CD can occur along the entire digestive tract and spread deep into the bowel wall. In contrast, UC usually only affects the top layer of the large intestine (colon) and rectum. Medicine can control the symptoms of IBD in most women. But for people who have severe IBD, surgery is sometimes needed. Over the course of a person's life, the symptoms of IBD often come and go. With close monitoring and medicines, most people with IBD lead full and active lives.
Breakthrough research opens door to potential new therapies for inflammatory diseases

Breakthrough research opens door to potential new therapies for inflammatory diseases

Scientists have made a major breakthrough in understanding the workings of the cellular machinery involved in a host of inflammatory diseases. [More]
Ludwig researchers shed more light on key requirement for function of regulatory T cells

Ludwig researchers shed more light on key requirement for function of regulatory T cells

A Ludwig Cancer Research study published online September 5th in Nature Immunology illuminates a key requirement for the function of regulatory T cells—immune cells that play a critical role in many biological processes, from suppressing inflammation and deadly autoimmunity to helping tumors evade immune attack. [More]
Mayo Clinic article provides better understanding on potentially devastating liver disease

Mayo Clinic article provides better understanding on potentially devastating liver disease

An article published today in the New England Journal of Medicine updates the medical community on a potentially devastating liver disease that afflicts approximately 29,000 Americans. [More]
Groundbreaking research findings could lead to potential new treatments for Crohn’s disease

Groundbreaking research findings could lead to potential new treatments for Crohn’s disease

A Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine-led team of international researchers has for the first time identified a fungus as a key factor in the development of Crohn's disease. [More]
Leading experts in iron deficiency to participate in 3rd European Iron Academy meeting

Leading experts in iron deficiency to participate in 3rd European Iron Academy meeting

The 3rd European Iron Academy (EIA) will take place on the 12th and 13th September 2016 in Berlin, Germany, and will bring together over 450 clinicians with an interest in iron deficiency. [More]
Hamilton researchers conduct ground-breaking new trial on pediatric fecal transplant for IBD

Hamilton researchers conduct ground-breaking new trial on pediatric fecal transplant for IBD

Hamilton researchers are conducting a ground-breaking new trial looking at fecal transplants to help treat inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in children. [More]
New discovery could potentially lead to treatments for Crohn's disease

New discovery could potentially lead to treatments for Crohn's disease

Scientists at the University of British Columbia have made a discovery that could potentially lead to treatments for a debilitating complication of Crohn's disease. [More]
LJI researchers reveal unanticipated way by which neutrophils defend against invading pathogens

LJI researchers reveal unanticipated way by which neutrophils defend against invading pathogens

As an arm of the innate immune system, white blood cells called neutrophils form the first line of defense against invading pathogens. [More]
Penn State dermatologist clarifies common myths about psoriasis

Penn State dermatologist clarifies common myths about psoriasis

Psoriasis is a much-misunderstood disease, often kept under wraps by sufferers who want to hide their skin lesions. [More]
Cedars-Sinai study identifies metabolic enzyme that alerts the body to invading bacteria

Cedars-Sinai study identifies metabolic enzyme that alerts the body to invading bacteria

Biomedical investigators at Cedars-Sinai have identified an enzyme found in all human cells that alerts the body to invading bacteria and jump-starts the immune system. [More]
Crohn's disease sufferers experience slower cognitive response times, study shows

Crohn's disease sufferers experience slower cognitive response times, study shows

New research published in the UEG Journal1 has found that Crohn's disease sufferers experience slower response times than matched individuals that do not have the disease. [More]
Non-coding RNAs play key role in maintaining proper balance between fighting infection and inflammation

Non-coding RNAs play key role in maintaining proper balance between fighting infection and inflammation

Special RNA molecules called long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are key controllers for maintaining immune health when fighting infection or preventing inflammatory disorders, according to research led by Jorge Henao-Mejia, MD, PhD, an assistant professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Penn scientists develop combined medical and surgical care plan for managing Crohn's disease

Penn scientists develop combined medical and surgical care plan for managing Crohn's disease

The first published combined medical and surgical care plan for managing septic perianal Crohn's disease, a serious complication that occurs in around 40 percent of Crohn's disease patients, has been developed by researchers at Penn State College of Medicine. [More]
Ginger-derived nanoparticles may be good medicine for inflammatory bowel disease

Ginger-derived nanoparticles may be good medicine for inflammatory bowel disease

A recent study by researchers at the Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center took them to a not-so-likely destination: local farmers markets. They went in search of fresh ginger root. [More]
Drugs designed to target nervous system could control inflammation in the gut, study shows

Drugs designed to target nervous system could control inflammation in the gut, study shows

There's a reason it's called a gut feeling. The brain and the gut are connected by intricate neural networks that signal hunger and satiety, love and fear, even safety and danger. These networks employ myriad chemical signals that include dopamine, a powerful neurotransmitter most famous for its role in reward and addiction. [More]
Hygiene hypothesis: a misleading misnomer? An interview with Professor Sally Bloomfield

Hygiene hypothesis: a misleading misnomer? An interview with Professor Sally Bloomfield

Professor Strachan first proposed the hygiene hypothesis back in 1989. Reviewing the evidence, he suggested that one of the causes of the recent rapid rise in allergic diseases in children was lack of exposure to childhood infections [More]
Scientists improve potential weapon to fight against autoimmune disorders

Scientists improve potential weapon to fight against autoimmune disorders

With a trick of engineering, scientists at the Gladstone Institutes improved a potential weapon against inflammation and autoimmune disorders. Their work could one day benefit patients who suffer from inflammatory bowel disease or organ transplant rejection. [More]
Battling IBD with super heroes: an interview with Dr James Lindsay

Battling IBD with super heroes: an interview with Dr James Lindsay

Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Limited has launched IBD Unmasked as a first-of-its-kind global initiative designed to raise awareness of the unsung Super Heroes of the global IBD community. [More]
Generic biologic drugs appear to be as effective as brand-name versions

Generic biologic drugs appear to be as effective as brand-name versions

Generic forms of a biologic drug used to treat rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease and psoriasis appear to be as safe and effective as their brand-name counterparts, a new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health analysis suggests. [More]
New method helps characterize immune cells in tumor tissues

New method helps characterize immune cells in tumor tissues

Despite recent achievements in the development of cancer immunotherapies, only a small group of patients typically respond to them. Predictive markers of disease course and response to immunotherapy are urgently needed. [More]
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