Inflammatory Bowel Disease News and Research RSS Feed - Inflammatory Bowel Disease News and Research

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is an ongoing or chronic health problem that causes inflammation and swelling in the digestive tract. The irritation causes bleeding sores called ulcers to form along the digestive tract. This in turn can cause crampy, abdominal pain and severe bloody diarrhea.

There are two main types of inflammatory bowel disease: ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). The diseases are very similar. In fact, doctors often have a hard time figuring out which type of IBD a person has. The main difference between UC and CD is the area of the digestive tract they affect. CD can occur along the entire digestive tract and spread deep into the bowel wall. In contrast, UC usually only affects the top layer of the large intestine (colon) and rectum. Medicine can control the symptoms of IBD in most women. But for people who have severe IBD, surgery is sometimes needed. Over the course of a person's life, the symptoms of IBD often come and go. With close monitoring and medicines, most people with IBD lead full and active lives.
Patients with particular genetic variation more prone to drug-induced pancreatitis

Patients with particular genetic variation more prone to drug-induced pancreatitis

Doctors have discovered that patients with a particular genetic variation are four times more likely to develop pancreatitis if they are prescribed a widely used group of drugs. [More]
GILZ protein key to preventing bone loss, researchers report

GILZ protein key to preventing bone loss, researchers report

A small protein named GILZ appears to protect against the bone loss that often accompanies arthritis and its treatment, researchers report. [More]
Restarting infliximab therapy after drug holiday is safe for patients with IBD

Restarting infliximab therapy after drug holiday is safe for patients with IBD

Restarting infliximab therapy after a drug holiday is safe and effective for patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), according to a new study1 in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the official clinical practice journal of the American Gastroenterological Association. [More]
Researchers discover genetic factors involved in development of early-onset ulcerative colitis

Researchers discover genetic factors involved in development of early-onset ulcerative colitis

UCLA researchers were part of a team that has discovered the interplay of several genetic factors that may be involved in the development of early-onset ulcerative colitis, a severe type of inflammatory bowel disease. [More]
Study: One in every 200 Ontarians diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease

Study: One in every 200 Ontarians diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease

One in every 200 Ontarians has been diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), with the number of people living with the disease increasing by 64 per cent between 1999 and 2008, according to a study by researchers at the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, and the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute. [More]
Genetic changes in patients with Crohn's disease could hold clues to fighting illness

Genetic changes in patients with Crohn's disease could hold clues to fighting illness

Genetic changes that occur in patients with the bowel condition Crohn's disease could hold clues to fighting the illness. [More]
Cilag GmbH International acquires biopharmaceutical company, Covagen AG

Cilag GmbH International acquires biopharmaceutical company, Covagen AG

Cilag GmbH International, an affiliate of the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson, announced today that it has acquired Covagen AG, a privately-held, biopharmaceutical company specializing in the development of multispecific protein therapeutics through the FynomAb® technology platform. [More]
Study finds a host of new clues on gene-environment interactions in Crohn's disease

Study finds a host of new clues on gene-environment interactions in Crohn's disease

A new study finds a wide range of epigenetic changes-alterations in DNA across the genome that may be related to key environmental exposures-in children with Crohn's disease (CD), reports Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, official journal of the Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America. [More]
Study shows new role for protein APC in suppressing colorectal cancer

Study shows new role for protein APC in suppressing colorectal cancer

A study recently published in the journal Carcinogenesis by researchers at the University of Kansas shows a new role for the protein adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) in suppressing colorectal cancer - the second-leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the U.S. [More]
Scientists create computer algorithm for cell and tissue engineering

Scientists create computer algorithm for cell and tissue engineering

In a boon to stem cell research and regenerative medicine, scientists at Boston Children's Hospital, the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University and Boston University have created a computer algorithm called CellNet as a "roadmap" for cell and tissue engineering, to ensure that cells engineered in the lab have the same favorable properties as cells in our own bodies. [More]
23andMe, Pfizer partner to explore genetic factors associated with IBD

23andMe, Pfizer partner to explore genetic factors associated with IBD

23andMe, the leading personal genetics company today announced an agreement with Pfizer Inc. in which the companies will aim to enroll 10,000 people with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) in a research initiative designed to explore the genetic factors associated with the onset, progression, severity and response to treatments for IBD. [More]
New disposable device may help doctors to monitor post-operative ileus

New disposable device may help doctors to monitor post-operative ileus

A disposal, plastic listening device that attaches to the abdomen may help doctors definitively determine which post-operative patients should be fed and which should not, an invention that may improve outcomes, decrease healthcare costs and shorten hospital stays, according to a UCLA study. [More]
New method of growing human cells may help develop tailor-made therapies for GI conditions

New method of growing human cells may help develop tailor-made therapies for GI conditions

A method of growing human cells from tissue removed from a patient's gastrointestinal (GI) tract eventually may help scientists develop tailor-made therapies for inflammatory bowel disease and other GI conditions. [More]
Immunosuppressive drugs increase risk of myeloid disorders among IBD patients

Immunosuppressive drugs increase risk of myeloid disorders among IBD patients

Immunosuppressive drugs called thiopurines have been found to increase the risk of myeloid disorders, such as acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome, a rare bone marrow disorder, seven-fold among inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. [More]
Bacteria that aid in digestion help keep intestinal lining intact

Bacteria that aid in digestion help keep intestinal lining intact

Scientists at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have found that bacteria that aid in digestion help keep the intestinal lining intact. [More]
Microbes living in guts of males and females react differently to diet

Microbes living in guts of males and females react differently to diet

The microbes living in the guts of males and females react differently to diet, even when the diets are identical, according to a study by scientists from The University of Texas at Austin and six other institutions published this week in the journal Nature Communications. [More]
New noninvasive method could lead to better diagnosis, treatment of gut diseases

New noninvasive method could lead to better diagnosis, treatment of gut diseases

A multi-institutional team of researchers has developed a new nanoscale agent for imaging the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. This safe, noninvasive method for assessing the function and properties of the GI tract in real time could lead to better diagnosis and treatment of gut diseases. [More]
George Mason University researchers use dyes to paint new picture of diseases

George Mason University researchers use dyes to paint new picture of diseases

By using brightly hued dyes, George Mason University researchers discovered an innovative way to reveal where proteins touch each other, possibly leading to new treatments for cancer, arthritis, heart disease and even lung disease. [More]
Chemoprevention and colon cancer: an interview with Dr. John Letterio, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine

Chemoprevention and colon cancer: an interview with Dr. John Letterio, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine

The basic idea of cancer chemopre­vention is to arrest or reverse the progression of pre­malignant cells towards full malignancy, using physiological mechanisms that do not kill healthy cells. [More]
People who grow up farm with livestock better protected against inflammatory bowel diseases

People who grow up farm with livestock better protected against inflammatory bowel diseases

New research conducted at Aarhus University has revealed that people who have grown up on a farm with livestock are only half as likely as their urban counterparts to develop the most common inflammatory bowel diseases: ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. [More]