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Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is an ongoing or chronic health problem that causes inflammation and swelling in the digestive tract. The irritation causes bleeding sores called ulcers to form along the digestive tract. This in turn can cause crampy, abdominal pain and severe bloody diarrhea.

There are two main types of inflammatory bowel disease: ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). The diseases are very similar. In fact, doctors often have a hard time figuring out which type of IBD a person has. The main difference between UC and CD is the area of the digestive tract they affect. CD can occur along the entire digestive tract and spread deep into the bowel wall. In contrast, UC usually only affects the top layer of the large intestine (colon) and rectum. Medicine can control the symptoms of IBD in most women. But for people who have severe IBD, surgery is sometimes needed. Over the course of a person's life, the symptoms of IBD often come and go. With close monitoring and medicines, most people with IBD lead full and active lives.
TNF-alpha protein involved in autoimmune diseases may also promote tissue healing

TNF-alpha protein involved in autoimmune diseases may also promote tissue healing

As its name suggests, inflammatory bowel disease, which afflicts more than 1.6 million Americans, involves chronic inflammation of all or some of the digestive tract. An autoimmune disease known to have a strong genetic component, its symptoms are abdominal cramps, bloody diarrhea, and fever and, sometimes, weight loss. IBD, which is a group of inflammatory conditions, includes Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. [More]
Small piece of detoxified E. coli wall makes mice lose natural sweet tooth, study finds

Small piece of detoxified E. coli wall makes mice lose natural sweet tooth, study finds

Putting just a tiny piece of the wall of detoxified E. coli into their gut make mice lose their natural sweet tooth, researchers report. [More]
New therapy strategy for liver disease shows initial measureable success with norUrso

New therapy strategy for liver disease shows initial measureable success with norUrso

The new therapy strategy for primary sclerosing cholangitis, a liver disease that at present still cannot be cured with medication, shows initial measureable success with the nor-ursodeoxycholic acid (norUrso). [More]
Taking antibiotics in early childhood can disrupt immune system function lifelong

Taking antibiotics in early childhood can disrupt immune system function lifelong

Scientists want to know whether taking antibiotics early in life can disrupt your immune system function lifelong. [More]
Bacteroidia pilins prevalent in human gut and mouth form new type of pili to cling to hosts

Bacteroidia pilins prevalent in human gut and mouth form new type of pili to cling to hosts

Many bacteria interact with their environment through hair-like structures known as pili, which attach to and help mediate infection of host organisms, among other things. Now a U.S.-Japanese research team, including scientists from the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, has discovered that certain bacteria prevalent in the human gut and mouth assemble their pili in a previously unknown way - information that could potentially open up new ways of fighting infection. [More]
Study shows epidermal growth factor negatively regulates shedding of epithelial cells

Study shows epidermal growth factor negatively regulates shedding of epithelial cells

The lining of the intestine is the most rapidly-renewing tissue in the body. Routine shedding of epithelial cells from this lining is a key element of tissue turnover, and is thus essential to maintaining optimal health. Altered shedding is associated with multiple disorders, ranging from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) to colorectal cancer. [More]
Novel way of hitting prostate cancer

Novel way of hitting prostate cancer

Researchers at UC Davis, in collaboration with the other institutions, have found that suppressing the nuclear receptor protein ROR-γ with small-molecule compounds can reduce androgen receptor (AR) levels in castration-resistant prostate cancer and stop tumor growth. [More]
New research links antibiotic use before age 2 to childhood obesity

New research links antibiotic use before age 2 to childhood obesity

While early antibiotic use has been associated with a number of rare long-term health consequences, new research links antibiotics to one of the most important and growing public health problems worldwide -- obesity. [More]
GEMINI LTS study: Patients with active ulcerative colitis report clinical improvements with vedolizumab treatment

GEMINI LTS study: Patients with active ulcerative colitis report clinical improvements with vedolizumab treatment

Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Limited, (“Takeda”) today announced that the interim findings from the GEMINI Long-Term Safety (LTS) study were presented during the 2016 European Crohn's and Colitis Organisation (ECCO) Annual Scientific Meeting in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. [More]
Psoriasis patients experience widespread bone loss

Psoriasis patients experience widespread bone loss

Researchers from the Genes, Development and Disease Group, headed by Erwin Wagner at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre have discovered that psoriasis patients experience a widespread bone loss as a result of the disease. [More]
Global research links genes to five common, hard-to-treat inflammatory diseases

Global research links genes to five common, hard-to-treat inflammatory diseases

A global study involving 50 different research centres has found hundreds of genes which cause five common, hard-to-treat and debilitating inflammatory diseases, paving the way to new treatments for these conditions [More]
Decreased dietary diversity linked to reduced microbiotic richness

Decreased dietary diversity linked to reduced microbiotic richness

Changes in farming practices over the last 50 years have resulted in decreased agro-diversity which, in turn, has resulted in decreased dietary diversity. The significant impact of this change in dietary richness on human health is the topic of an insightful perspective in Molecular Metabolism by Mark Heiman, MicroBiome Therapeutics and Frank Greenway, Pennington Biomedical Research Center [More]
Russian scientists propose new technique to analyze intestinal metagenomes

Russian scientists propose new technique to analyze intestinal metagenomes

A group of Russian scientists, among them staff at the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, have proposed a new method for the comparison of metagenome-coupled DNA sequences from all of the organisms in a sample of biological material being investigated. [More]
People newly diagnosed with multiple sclerosis share risk factors of other chronic illnesses

People newly diagnosed with multiple sclerosis share risk factors of other chronic illnesses

People newly diagnosed with multiple sclerosis may often have other chronic health conditions as well, according to a study published in the March 9, 2016 online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Consuming green tea with dietary iron may lessen health benefits of green tea

Consuming green tea with dietary iron may lessen health benefits of green tea

Green tea is touted for its many health benefits as a powerful antioxidant, but experiments in a laboratory mouse model of inflammatory bowel disease suggest that consuming green tea along with dietary iron may actually lessen green tea's benefits. [More]
Incidence of IBD much higher in Rhode Island

Incidence of IBD much higher in Rhode Island

A study led by the Hasbro Children's Hospital Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Nutrition and Liver Diseases found that the incidence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in Rhode Island is one of the highest ever reported in the United States and that IBD rates nationally are much higher than previously reported. [More]
Study finds no evidence of lactase deficiency specific to autistic children with GI symptoms

Study finds no evidence of lactase deficiency specific to autistic children with GI symptoms

Children with autism have no unique pattern of abnormal results on endoscopy or other tests for gastrointestinal (GI) disorders, compared to non-autistic children with GI symptoms, reports a study in the Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, official journal of the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition and the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition. [More]

Current DRG-based cost recovery system appears problematic for patients with complex disorders

A new study by researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin compares the true cost of treating patients with chronic inflammatory bowel disease with costs recoverable under the current German DRG-based system. [More]
Study highlights dual role of cytokine in inflammatory bowel disease

Study highlights dual role of cytokine in inflammatory bowel disease

Small proteins that affect communication between cells play an important role in regulating inflammation that occurs during inflammatory bowel disease, according to researchers at Georgia State University, Emory University, the University of Michigan and Amgen, a biotechnology company. [More]
Scientists discover new subgroups of ILC immune cells using single-cell RNA sequencing

Scientists discover new subgroups of ILC immune cells using single-cell RNA sequencing

A relatively newly discovered group of immune cells known as ILCs have been examined in detail in a new study published in the journal Nature Immunology. By analysing the gene expression in individual tonsil cells, scientists at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have found three previously unknown subgroups of ILCs, and revealed more about how these cells function in the human body. [More]
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