Influenza News and Research RSS Feed - Influenza News and Research

Influenza (the flu) is a contagious respiratory illness caused by influenza viruses. It can cause mild to severe illness, and at times can lead to death. The best way to prevent the flu is by getting a flu vaccination each year. Every year in the United States, on average 5% to 20% of the population gets the flu; more than 200,000 people are hospitalized from flu complications, and; about 36,000 people die from flu-related causes. Some people, such as older people, young children, and people with certain health conditions, are at high risk for serious flu complications.
Study suggests that self-administration of influenza vaccine may be feasible with microneedle patch

Study suggests that self-administration of influenza vaccine may be feasible with microneedle patch

There are many reasons some people may not get a flu shot, but would they be more likely to do so if there was a simple device that could be mailed directly to them, was easy enough to use by themselves, and provided at least the same level of protection as a traditional flu shot without the pain of a needle jab? A recent NIBIB-funded study, published online February 2014 in the journal Vaccine, suggests the answer is yes. [More]
New national research consortium focuses on better drug therapies for viral infections

New national research consortium focuses on better drug therapies for viral infections

Viral infections with limited or no treatment options can pose a major global health threat, but a new national research consortium centered at the University of Alabama at Birmingham is focused on the discovery of new and better drug therapies as these viruses emerge. [More]
Biogen Idec's ALPROLIX gets Health Canada approval for hemophilia B

Biogen Idec's ALPROLIX gets Health Canada approval for hemophilia B

Today Biogen Idec announced that Health Canada has approved ALPROLIX [Coagulation Factor IX (Recombinant), Fc Fusion Protein], for the control and prevention of bleeding episodes and routine prophylaxis in adults, and children aged 12 and older, with hemophilia B. [More]
Research roundup: New medical coding system; choosing a hospice; revamping Medicare

Research roundup: New medical coding system; choosing a hospice; revamping Medicare

On October 1, 2014, all health plans, health data clearinghouses, and health care providers that transmit health information electronically must use a new, significantly broader, coding system, called ICD-10, for diagnoses and inpatient procedures. [More]
UC San Diego Library becomes official repository for the papers of Jonas Salk

UC San Diego Library becomes official repository for the papers of Jonas Salk

The University of California, San Diego Library has become the official repository for the papers of Jonas Salk, noted physician, virologist, and humanitarian, best known for his development of the world's first successful vaccine for the prevention of polio. [More]
NIH awards $28M grant to establish new center for excellence to find treatment for Ebola virus

NIH awards $28M grant to establish new center for excellence to find treatment for Ebola virus

The National Institutes of Health has awarded a five-year, $28 million grant to establish a new center for excellence to find an antibody "cocktail" to fight two types of viruses that cause severe hemorrhagic fever, including the deadly Ebola virus. The project involves researchers from 15 institutions, including Kartik Chandran, Ph.D., and Jonathan Lai, Ph.D., at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University. Einstein will receive approximately $4 million of the total grant. [More]

Tamiflu cuts H1N1 pandemic deaths by 25%, shows study

Adults hospitalised with H1N1 influenza during the 2009–2010 pandemic were 25% less likely to die from the disease if they were given antiviral drugs called neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs) such as Tamiflu, according to a large meta-analysis involving more than 29 000 patients from 38 countries, published in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine journal. The findings also indicate that treatment within 2 days of flu symptoms developing halved the risk of death compared with later treatment or no treatment. [More]
VaxInnate starts Phase 1 clinical trial to evaluate VAX2012Q for prevention of seasonal influenza

VaxInnate starts Phase 1 clinical trial to evaluate VAX2012Q for prevention of seasonal influenza

VaxInnate Corporation today announced that enrollment has commenced in a Phase 1 clinical trial to evaluate VAX2012Q, a recombinant quadrivalent vaccine in development for the prevention of seasonal influenza. VaxInnate is a biotechnology firm pioneering a breakthrough technology platform for the development of novel vaccines. [More]

CLL patients more prone to infections due to reduced number of antibodies

People with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) are essentially more prone to infections such as varicella, influenza or pneumococci due to the reduction in the number of antibodies that their condition causes. [More]
Amgen announces results from Phase 3 TESLA Trial of evolocumab in patients with HoFH

Amgen announces results from Phase 3 TESLA Trial of evolocumab in patients with HoFH

Amgen (NASDAQ: AMGN) today announced that the Phase 3 TESLA (Trial Evaluating PCSK9 Antibody in Subjects with LDL Receptor Abnormalities) trial evaluating evolocumab met its primary endpoint of the percent reduction from baseline at week 12 in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). [More]
Quail and chickens are likely sources of infection of H7N9 influenza virus to humans

Quail and chickens are likely sources of infection of H7N9 influenza virus to humans

Among the copious species of poultry in China, quail and chickens are the likely sources of infection of H7N9 influenza virus to humans, according to a paper published ahead of print in the Journal of Virology. [More]

Study shows only 23% of seasonal and pandemic flu caused symptoms

Around 1 in 5 of the population were infected in both recent outbreaks of seasonal flu and the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic, but just 23% of these infections caused symptoms, and only 17% of people were ill enough to consult their doctor. [More]
Australians it's time to consider a flu vaccination

Australians it's time to consider a flu vaccination

Although it is still early in the season, NPS MedicineWise is joining other health experts in recommending that people at risk of complications of the flu (influenza) get vaccinated against the illness. [More]

ECMO can be used for treating carbon monoxide poisoning

Allison Morgan was in pretty bad shape when the medical helicopter touched down on the rooftop helipad of the University of Alabama at Birmingham Hospital. [More]
Teen researcher wins top award from Intel Foundation for research on potential drugs to treat influenza

Teen researcher wins top award from Intel Foundation for research on potential drugs to treat influenza

From new cancer treatments to an exploration of how technology affects the adolescent brain, the innovative research of America's future scientists, engineers and inventors took center stage in the nation's capital today. [More]

Costs for medications expected to rise by 3 – 5% in all health care settings in 2014

Costs for medications are expected to rise by three to five percent in all health care settings in 2014, according to a report published online ahead of print, by the American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy (AJHP), the professional journal of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP). [More]
New drug is effective against superbug MRSA

New drug is effective against superbug MRSA

"I routinely call hospitals and request their yearly antibiotic susceptibility testing data," said Washington University in St. Louis' Timothy Wencewicz. "The log might say, for example, that they've treated hundreds of patients for Acinetobacter baumanni, a bacterium brought into U.S. hospitals by soldiers wounded in the Iraq war, with 30 different antibiotics. [More]

Study: Self-administration of flu vaccines with microneedle patches may one day be feasible

The annual ritual of visiting a doctor's office or health clinic to receive a flu shot may soon be outdated, thanks to the findings of a new study published in the journal Vaccine. [More]
Scientists map key elements of immune overreaction triggered by influenza virus infection

Scientists map key elements of immune overreaction triggered by influenza virus infection

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have mapped key elements of a severe immune overreaction—a "cytokine storm"—that can both sicken and kill patients who are infected with certain strains of flu virus. [More]

Study: Twitter could be used to track HIV incidence and drug-related behaviors

Real-time social media like Twitter could be used to track HIV incidence and drug-related behaviors with the aim of detecting and potentially preventing outbreaks, a new UCLA-led study shows. [More]