Influenza News and Research RSS Feed - Influenza News and Research

Influenza (the flu) is a contagious respiratory illness caused by influenza viruses. It can cause mild to severe illness, and at times can lead to death. The best way to prevent the flu is by getting a flu vaccination each year. Every year in the United States, on average 5% to 20% of the population gets the flu; more than 200,000 people are hospitalized from flu complications, and; about 36,000 people die from flu-related causes. Some people, such as older people, young children, and people with certain health conditions, are at high risk for serious flu complications.
Researchers suggest novel concept for developing vaccines against HIV and cancer

Researchers suggest novel concept for developing vaccines against HIV and cancer

A experimental trial has shown successful by inducing serum in mice and has been highly neutralizing towards those ailments. [More]
Using NMR to study influenza and TB: an interview with Dr. Tim Cross

Using NMR to study influenza and TB: an interview with Dr. Tim Cross

In this interview, Tim Cross, Director of the NMR and MRI programs at the National High Magnetic Field Lab (NHMFL) in Tallahassee, Florida, talks about his research into protein structures in viruses and bacteria, and how the findings will affect medical research into disease prevention. [More]
Cities with Super Bowl teams see big spike in flu illness, deaths

Cities with Super Bowl teams see big spike in flu illness, deaths

Boston and Seattle football fans beware! Cities with teams in the Super Bowl see a big spike in flu deaths, according to a new Tulane University study. [More]
Research shows effectiveness of Tamiflu

Research shows effectiveness of Tamiflu

Earlier this month, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended the use of antiviral drugs to help treat influenza, in a year when the available vaccine is not a good match for the current strain. [More]
Low staff vaccination rates put vulnerable populations at risk of getting influenza

Low staff vaccination rates put vulnerable populations at risk of getting influenza

Influenza is associated with as many as 7,300 deaths annually in nursing home residents, but the vaccination rate for nursing home staff is only 54 percent, according to a study in the February issue of the American Journal of Infection Control, the official publication of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology. [More]
Efficacy of ebola vaccine to be assessed in large-scale clinical trial

Efficacy of ebola vaccine to be assessed in large-scale clinical trial

GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) announced today that they will soon be commencing the first large-scale clinical trial to assess the efficacy of an experimental ebola vaccine. [More]
COMPARE project aims to speed up global response to infectious disease outbreaks

COMPARE project aims to speed up global response to infectious disease outbreaks

A large EU project intends to speed up the detection of and response to disease outbreaks among humans and animals worldwide through the use of new genome technology. The aim is to reduce the impact and cost of disease outbreaks. To that end 28 European partners, including the Technical University of Denmark, have received more than 20 million euro in funding from the EU. [More]
People hospitalized for pneumonia at greater risk of developing cardiovascular disease

People hospitalized for pneumonia at greater risk of developing cardiovascular disease

Your chance of having a heart attack or stroke increases significantly if you have been hospitalized for pneumonia, according to a paper published today in the influential JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association). [More]
Study on influenza B viruses could help make flu vaccination programs more effective

Study on influenza B viruses could help make flu vaccination programs more effective

An analysis of 10 years' worth of data on human influenza B viruses has shed new light on the pathogen which can cause the seasonal flu. Findings from this study could help make flu immunization programs more effective; by better targeting vaccines or by eventually eliminating one of the flu lineages completely. [More]
Effective vaccine booster schedules needed to fight against whooping cough resurgence

Effective vaccine booster schedules needed to fight against whooping cough resurgence

A key to victory in battle, according to Chinese general and military strategist Sun Tzu, is to know your enemy. In the current fight against whooping cough resurgence, perhaps the biggest obstacle is an incomplete understanding of its underlying causes, according to a University of Michigan population ecologist. [More]
Researchers identify clusters of underimmunization, vaccine refusal in Northern California

Researchers identify clusters of underimmunization, vaccine refusal in Northern California

Researchers used spatial analysis software and electronic medical records to identify clusters of underimmunization and vaccine refusal among Kaiser Permanente members in Northern California, according to a study published today in the journal Pediatrics. [More]
Early estimates indicate flu vaccine is providing little protection in US

Early estimates indicate flu vaccine is providing little protection in US

Each year the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) undertake flu vaccine effectiveness studies. Early estimates for the current season indicate that those people (all ages) who had the flu vaccine were only 23% less likely to have to go to the doctor because of flu (influenza). [More]
Mobile diagnosis device to help reduce unnecessary antibiotics prescribing

Mobile diagnosis device to help reduce unnecessary antibiotics prescribing

New biosensor-based technology could help to reduce the over-prescribing of antibiotics by giving GPs and other frontline healthcare staff an accurate and fast method of identifying the nature of infectious diseases. [More]
NIAID awards contracts to support early-stage human clinical trials of infectious disease treatments

NIAID awards contracts to support early-stage human clinical trials of infectious disease treatments

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, has awarded contracts to three organizations to support early-stage human clinical trials of investigational infectious disease treatments. The new awards for the Phase I Clinical Trial Units for Therapeutics increases the number of funded organizations under the program from two to three, expanding capacity for conducting early safety testing of novel investigational drugs. [More]
Universal vaccine against flu may be on the horizon, say researchers

Universal vaccine against flu may be on the horizon, say researchers

The fact that this year's flu shot is not a good match against this year's influenza strain is well known, and has happened before. [More]
Mayo Clinic expert explains difference between severe sepsis and septic shock

Mayo Clinic expert explains difference between severe sepsis and septic shock

Sepsis can be a dangerous complication of almost any type of infection, including influenza, pneumonia and food poisoning; urinary tract infections; bloodstream infections from wounds; and abdominal infections. [More]
Study confirms safety of two measles-containing vaccines

Study confirms safety of two measles-containing vaccines

A 12-year study of two measles-containing vaccines, published today in Pediatrics, found that seven main adverse outcomes were unlikely after either vaccine. [More]
Clementia secures additional $10 million to support development of palovarotene for treatment of FOP

Clementia secures additional $10 million to support development of palovarotene for treatment of FOP

Clementia Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced that it has secured an additional $10 million from current investors to support development of the company's lead compound palovarotene for the treatment of fibrodysplasia ossificans progressive (FOP). [More]
Outbreaks of infectious diseases offer lessons for critical care providers

Outbreaks of infectious diseases offer lessons for critical care providers

Outbreaks of infectious diseases, such as Ebola in West Africa, offer insight for how healthcare professionals can respond more effectively to current and future challenges, according to editors of the American Journal of Critical Care. [More]
Researchers use whole genome sequencing to track evolution of chicken flu virus

Researchers use whole genome sequencing to track evolution of chicken flu virus

An international research team has shown how changes in a flu virus that has plagued Chinese poultry farms for decades helped create the novel avian H7N9 influenza A virus that has sickened more than 375 people since 2013. The research appears in the current online early edition of the scientific journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. [More]