Influenza News and Research RSS Feed - Influenza News and Research

Influenza (the flu) is a contagious respiratory illness caused by influenza viruses. It can cause mild to severe illness, and at times can lead to death. The best way to prevent the flu is by getting a flu vaccination each year. Every year in the United States, on average 5% to 20% of the population gets the flu; more than 200,000 people are hospitalized from flu complications, and; about 36,000 people die from flu-related causes. Some people, such as older people, young children, and people with certain health conditions, are at high risk for serious flu complications.
H3N2v-neutralizing antibodies produced from human subjects given candidate vaccine

H3N2v-neutralizing antibodies produced from human subjects given candidate vaccine

Influenza A viruses are responsible for seasonal disease outbreaks in humans. Influenza A also circulates among bird and some mammal populations and periodically crosses between species. [More]
New research highlights need to abandon modern hygiene hypothesis

New research highlights need to abandon modern hygiene hypothesis

The July issue of Perspectives in Public Health (published by the Royal Society of Public Health) takes an objective view of ongoing research showing that the hygiene hypothesis – the idea that allergies are the price we are paying for our “modern obsession with cleanliness” – is a misleading misnomer. [More]
Key differences in immune response may explain young children’s proneness to infecion

Key differences in immune response may explain young children’s proneness to infecion

Schools are commonly known as breeding grounds for viruses and bacteria, but this may not necessarily be linked to hygiene. [More]
New IDSA guidelines focus on diagnosis, treatment of deadly aspergillosis

New IDSA guidelines focus on diagnosis, treatment of deadly aspergillosis

New therapies are improving care, but early diagnosis remains critical in the effective treatment of invasive, a potentially deadly fungal infection, according to new guidelines released by the Infectious Diseases Society of America and published in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases. [More]
TSRI scientists develop new strategy to design potential HIV vaccine candidates

TSRI scientists develop new strategy to design potential HIV vaccine candidates

Want to catch a criminal? Show a mugshot on the news. Want to stop HIV infections? Get the immune system to recognize and attack the virus's tell-tale structure. That's part of the basic approach behind efforts at The Scripps Research Institute to design an AIDS vaccine. [More]
Researchers identify exact origin of 2009 swine H1N1 flu pandemic

Researchers identify exact origin of 2009 swine H1N1 flu pandemic

The 2009 swine H1N1 flu pandemic — responsible for more than 17,000 deaths worldwide — originated in pigs from a very small region in central Mexico, a research team headed by investigators at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai is reporting. [More]
Research shows enveloped viruses could survive on toys long enough to cause infection

Research shows enveloped viruses could survive on toys long enough to cause infection

Certain viruses, such as influenza, could survive on children's toys long enough to result in exposures, placing children at risk for getting infectious diseases, according to researchers at Georgia State University. [More]
Mobile devices of healthcare workers often contaminated by viral RNA

Mobile devices of healthcare workers often contaminated by viral RNA

In clinical settings, mobile phones benefit patients by placing useful data and information at the fingertips of health professionals during interactions on the ward. [More]
Switch to rituximab shows anti-inflammatory effect in relapsing-remitting MS

Switch to rituximab shows anti-inflammatory effect in relapsing-remitting MS

Rituximab may be an attractive treatment option for patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, suggest phase II study findings showing its efficacy in controlling inflammatory activity. [More]
First CRISPR/Cas9 screen helps identify human proteins required for Zika virus replication

First CRISPR/Cas9 screen helps identify human proteins required for Zika virus replication

Scientists at the University of Massachusetts Medical School have performed the first CRISPR/Cas9 screen to discover human proteins that Zika virus needs for replication. [More]
RVFV uses cancer pathway to hijack host cell and cause infection

RVFV uses cancer pathway to hijack host cell and cause infection

Viruses can't live without us -- literally. As obligate parasites, viruses need a host cell to survive and grow. Scientists are exploiting this characteristic by developing therapeutics that close off pathways necessary for viral infection, essentially stopping pathogens in their tracks. [More]
T memory cells with naive phenotype can help boost immunity in older adults

T memory cells with naive phenotype can help boost immunity in older adults

Sixty-five is the age when many people retire, kick back and take it easy. And so it often is with the human immune system. [More]
Study provides insights into new pathways to generate universal vaccine against influenza viruses

Study provides insights into new pathways to generate universal vaccine against influenza viruses

Diverse antibodies induced in humans by vaccination with an avian influenza virus vaccine may offer broader, more durable protection against multiple strains of influenza than today's vaccines typically provide, according to a study led by Florian Krammer, PhD, Assistant Professor in the Department of Microbiology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and Patrick Wilson, PhD, Associate Professor in the Department of Medicine at the University of Chicago. [More]
Far-UVC light can combat deadly scourge of drug-resistant surgical site infections

Far-UVC light can combat deadly scourge of drug-resistant surgical site infections

Scientists from the Center for Radiological Research at Columbia University Medical Center have shown that a narrow wavelength of ultraviolet (UV) light safely killed drug-resistant MRSA bacteria in mice, demonstrating a potentially safe and cost-effective way to reduce surgical site infections, a major public health concern. [More]
Tanaka develops world's first kit to directly detect ZIKA virus in blood

Tanaka develops world's first kit to directly detect ZIKA virus in blood

Tanaka Holdings Co., Ltd. announced today that Tanaka Kikinzoku Kogyo K.K., which operates the Tanaka Precious Metals manufacturing business, has developed the world's first kit able to directly detect the ZIKA virus in blood. The kit is capable of rapid ZIKV detection in just 10 to 15 minutes. [More]
Research shows IFITM3 protein can block Zika virus from infecting human, mouse cells

Research shows IFITM3 protein can block Zika virus from infecting human, mouse cells

Eight weeks after receiving their first samples of Zika virus, scientists at the University of Massachusetts Medical School have shown that a very small protein we all have in our bodies, interferon-induced protein 3 (IFITM3), can dramatically reduce the ability of Zika virus to infect human and mouse cells. [More]
Maternal vaccination against influenza can reduce flu risk in newborns

Maternal vaccination against influenza can reduce flu risk in newborns

Each year, influenza causes between 250,000 and half a million deaths around the world. Pregnant women and young infants have a higher risk of complications related to influenza; these complications can easily lead to death. [More]
Study finds decrease in Google searches for chickenpox after vaccination implementation

Study finds decrease in Google searches for chickenpox after vaccination implementation

Countries that implement government-mandated vaccinations for chickenpox see a sharp drop in the number of Google searches for the common childhood disease afterward, demonstrating that immunization significantly reduces seasonal outbreaks. [More]
Zinbryta gets FDA approval for treating adults with relapsing forms of MS

Zinbryta gets FDA approval for treating adults with relapsing forms of MS

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Zinbryta (daclizumab) for the treatment of adults with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). Zinbryta is a long-acting injection that is self- administered by the patient monthly. [More]
New hydrogel-based biochip may help in early diagnosis of bowel cancer

New hydrogel-based biochip may help in early diagnosis of bowel cancer

Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, the Engelhardt Institute of Molecular Biology, the Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry and a number of other Russian research centers have developed a new method of diagnosing colorectal cancer. [More]
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