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Influenza (the flu) is a contagious respiratory illness caused by influenza viruses. It can cause mild to severe illness, and at times can lead to death. The best way to prevent the flu is by getting a flu vaccination each year. Every year in the United States, on average 5% to 20% of the population gets the flu; more than 200,000 people are hospitalized from flu complications, and; about 36,000 people die from flu-related causes. Some people, such as older people, young children, and people with certain health conditions, are at high risk for serious flu complications.
Johns Hopkins researchers named recipients of Hartwell’s 2014 Individual Biomedical Research Award

Johns Hopkins researchers named recipients of Hartwell’s 2014 Individual Biomedical Research Award

Gul Dolen, M.D., Ph.D., an assistant professor of neuroscience at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and Eili Y. Klein, Ph.D., an assistant professor of emergency medicine, are among 12 recipients of The Hartwell Foundation’s 2014 Individual Biomedical Research Award competition, the foundation announced on April 1. [More]
Simple, effective portable tool can help predict avian flu outbreaks

Simple, effective portable tool can help predict avian flu outbreaks

A simple and effective portable tool to predict avian flu outbreaks on farms has been created by University of Guelph researchers. [More]
UofL-led study focuses on flu vaccine for children with neurological disorders

UofL-led study focuses on flu vaccine for children with neurological disorders

Children who have neurological disorders such as cerebral palsy or epilepsy are no more likely to be vaccinated against influenza than youngsters without these conditions, despite the increased risk for complications from flu these children experience. [More]
Seal Shield's new Airocide DS air purifier may help eliminate 'Super Bugs' in hospitals

Seal Shield's new Airocide DS air purifier may help eliminate 'Super Bugs' in hospitals

Seal Shield LLC (Jacksonville, FL), today announced the new Airocide DS air purifier. The Airocide DS is a table top or bed side air purification product that uses a unique photocatalytic biocide reactor to eliminate viral, fungal and bacterial pathogens from the air. Developed by NASA, Airocide converts dangerous bacteria, virus and destructive VOC's into harmless water vapor without producing ozone or other harmful byproducts. [More]
MGH investigators identify inflammatory molecule that plays key role in lupus

MGH investigators identify inflammatory molecule that plays key role in lupus

Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators have identified an inflammatory molecule that appears to play an essential role in the autoimmune disorder systemic lupus erythematosus, commonly known as lupus. [More]
HPAI H5 viruses of Eurasian origin continue to circulate in North American wild birds

HPAI H5 viruses of Eurasian origin continue to circulate in North American wild birds

Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5 viruses of Eurasian origin continue to circulate and evolve in North American wild birds. [More]
Alere i Strep A test receives marketing clearance from FDA

Alere i Strep A test receives marketing clearance from FDA

Alere Inc., a global leader in rapid diagnostic tests, today announced that its Alere i Strep A test has received marketing clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Alere i Strep A is the first molecular test that detects Group A Streptococcus (GAS) bacteria in throat swab specimens in 8 minutes or less. [More]

American scientists develop simple system to detect influenza virus from nasal or throat swabs

Almost every winter sees a new wave of influenza, threatening people by its highly contagious character and severe pathogenesis if those with weak or compromised immune system are infected. But when do sniffing and high temperature only point to a bad cold and when is it real influenza? American scientists have developed a simple system for testing for the influenza virus by just taking nasal or throat swabs and measuring the viral presence amperometrically by assessing the glucose level. [More]
Rare genetic mutation explains why flu can kill in rare cases

Rare genetic mutation explains why flu can kill in rare cases

Nobody likes getting the flu, but for some people, fluids and rest aren't enough. A small number of children who catch the influenza virus fall so ill they end up in the hospital — perhaps needing ventilators to breathe — even while their family and friends recover easily. New research by Rockefeller University scientists, published March 26 in Science, helps explain why: a rare genetic mutation. [More]
Pathogen may cause high levels of virulence in closely-related hosts

Pathogen may cause high levels of virulence in closely-related hosts

When viruses such as influenza and Ebola jump from one species to another, their ability to cause harm can change dramatically, but research from the University of Cambridge shows that it may be possible to predict the virus's virulence by looking at how deadly it is in closely-related species. [More]
New vaccine for post exposure treatment of rabies infection enters human clinical trial

New vaccine for post exposure treatment of rabies infection enters human clinical trial

Yisheng Biopharma Co., Ltd., a biopharmaceutical company focusing on the research, development, manufacturing, sales and marketing of vaccine products, announced that a new vaccine for the post exposure treatment of the rabies infection was entering human clinical trial after a six-year long collaboration with a number of research institutes worldwide. [More]
Flu vaccine based upon four strains of inactivated influenza enhances flu protection

Flu vaccine based upon four strains of inactivated influenza enhances flu protection

A flu vaccine given just under the surface of the skin that includes four strains of inactivated influenza could be more protective than a similar flu vaccine containing only three strains, Saint Louis University research found. [More]
Advanced clinical decision support tools reduce mortality for pneumonia patients

Advanced clinical decision support tools reduce mortality for pneumonia patients

A new study by Intermountain Medical Center researchers in Salt Lake City found that using advanced clinical decision support tools reduces mortality for the 1.1 million patients in the Unites States who are treated for pneumonia each year. [More]
Advanced clinical decision support tools help reduce mortality for pneumonia patients

Advanced clinical decision support tools help reduce mortality for pneumonia patients

A new study by Intermountain Medical Center researchers in Salt Lake City found that using advanced clinical decision support tools reduces mortality for the 1.1 million patients in the Unites States who are treated for pneumonia each year. [More]
Adults only really catch flu about twice a decade, suggests study

Adults only really catch flu about twice a decade, suggests study

Adults over the age of 30 only catch flu about twice a decade, a new study suggests. Flu-like illness can be caused by many pathogens, making it difficult to assess how often people are infected by influenza. [More]
Life expectancy for Spaniards increases due to 'cardiovascular revolution'

Life expectancy for Spaniards increases due to 'cardiovascular revolution'

Over the last century, life expectancy for Spaniards has increased by 40 years. A study by the International University of La Rioja highlights the main cause, since 1980, as being the reduced incidence of cardiovascular diseases while other pathologies, such as mental illnesses and certain types of cancer, have been seen to rise. The authors predict that the effects of the economic recession on mortality will show up in the long-term. [More]
Kansas State researchers preparing for next potential influenza strain

Kansas State researchers preparing for next potential influenza strain

As seasonal influenza cases decrease across the United States, Kansas State University researchers are preparing for the next potential virulent strain of flu. [More]
New antibody provides 100% protection against H5N1 influenza virus in animal models

New antibody provides 100% protection against H5N1 influenza virus in animal models

Since 2003, the H5N1 influenza virus, more commonly known as the bird flu, has been responsible for the deaths of millions of chickens and ducks and has infected more than 650 people, leading to a 60 percent mortality rate for the latter. Luckily, this virus has yet to achieve human-to-human transmission, but a small number of mutations could change that, resulting in a pandemic. [More]
Study points respiratory viruses as the most common cause of childhood pneumonia

Study points respiratory viruses as the most common cause of childhood pneumonia

Respiratory viruses, not bacterial infections, are the most commonly detected causes of community-acquired pneumonia in children, according to new research released Feb. 26 in the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
Researchers examine individuals' confidence or reluctance in vaccination decision-making

Researchers examine individuals' confidence or reluctance in vaccination decision-making

Researchers explore individuals' confidence or reluctance to vaccinate their families and the associated effects on global health, in a collection published on February 25, 2015 by the open-access journal, PLOS Currents: Outbreaks. The collection is accompanied by the editorial "Hesitancy, trust and individualism in vaccination decision-making" by Jonathan E. Suk et al. from the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control. [More]
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