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Insulin is a hormone that is needed to convert glucose, starches and other food into energy needed for daily life. Insulin allows cells to use glucose for fuel and is secreted by beta cells in the islets of Langerhans. The release of insulin from the pancreas is stimulated by increased blood glucose, vagal nerve stimulation, and other factors. Insulin is obtained from various animals and available in a variety of preparations. Commercial insulin preparations differ in a number of ways, including differences in the animal species from which they are obtained; their purity, concentration, and solubility; and the time of onset and duration of their biologic action. An oral hypoglycemic agent is not a form of insulin therapy.
UT Southwestern researchers find potential therapy to treat diabetes, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

UT Southwestern researchers find potential therapy to treat diabetes, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

Reducing high concentrations of a fatty molecule that is commonly found in people with diabetes and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease rapidly improves insulin sensitivity, UT Southwestern Medical Center diabetes researchers have found. [More]
New project aims to revolutionize application of optogenetics in neuroscience

New project aims to revolutionize application of optogenetics in neuroscience

The revolution that optogenetics technology has brought to biology -- neuroscience in particular -- could be transformed all over again if a new project getting underway at Brown University and Central Michigan University is successful. [More]
Genetic mutation associated with severe loss of body fat, appearance of premature aging in children identified

Genetic mutation associated with severe loss of body fat, appearance of premature aging in children identified

Researchers at the Translational Genomics Research Institute have identified a genetic mutation associated with the appearance of premature aging and severe loss of body fat in children. [More]
New study shows high-fat diet can cause impairments in functioning of mesolimbic dopamine system

New study shows high-fat diet can cause impairments in functioning of mesolimbic dopamine system

High-fat feeding can cause impairments in the functioning of the mesolimbic dopamine system, says Stephanie Fulton of the University of Montreal and the CHUM Research Centre. This system is a critical brain pathway controlling motivation. Fulton's findings, published today in Neuropsychopharmacology, may have great health implications. [More]
New non-invasive glucose monitoring device could transform lives of people with diabetes

New non-invasive glucose monitoring device could transform lives of people with diabetes

A new laser sensor that monitors blood glucose levels without penetrating the skin could transform the lives of millions of people living with diabetes. [More]
Johns Hopkins endocrinologists propose new protocol for inpatient glucose management

Johns Hopkins endocrinologists propose new protocol for inpatient glucose management

Borrowing a page from a winning team’s playbook, Johns Hopkins endocrinologist Nestoras Mathioudakis, M.D., and his colleagues are taking on the topic of managing hospital patients’ diabetes. [More]
Lilly Diabetes releases Android version of Glucagon Mobile App to support diabetes caregivers

Lilly Diabetes releases Android version of Glucagon Mobile App to support diabetes caregivers

Lilly Diabetes has released an Android version of its mobile application designed for caregivers and healthcare providers who support people with diabetes. Through an injection tutorial and emergency instructions, the App can help people practice the injection steps ahead of time, which may help them feel better prepared to assist. [More]

Mayo Clinic, Gentag, Fraunhofer IMS and NovioSense partner to combat type 2 diabetes worldwide

Building on the long-standing collaboration between Gentag and Mayo Clinic, and the long-standing collaboration between NovioSense and Fraunhofer Institute for Microelectronic Circuits and Systems (IMS), Gentag and NovioSense today announced that they have formed a joint venture to combat the epidemic of type 2 diabetes that is overwhelming people and health care systems worldwide. [More]
Study finds gene linked to age-related obesity, diabetes

Study finds gene linked to age-related obesity, diabetes

Practically everyone gets fatter as they get older, but some people can blame their genes for the extra padding. Researchers have shown that two different mutations in a gene called ankyrin-B cause cells to suck up glucose faster than normal, fattening them up and eventually triggering the type of diabetes linked to obesity. [More]
Middle classes from developing countries more vulnerable to develop diabetes due ancestral diets

Middle classes from developing countries more vulnerable to develop diabetes due ancestral diets

The middle classes from developing countries are more susceptible than western Caucasians to obesity, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease in today's changing environment. New research published today in Cell Metabolism from the University of Sydney in Australia, the National Centre for Cell Science and the DYP Medical College in Pune, India reveals this may be a result of the nutrition endured by their ancestors. [More]
Virginia Tech researchers develop new scoring method for assessing overall beverage intake quality

Virginia Tech researchers develop new scoring method for assessing overall beverage intake quality

Researchers at Virginia Tech have developed a new scoring method for assessing beverage intake, the Healthy Beverage Index (HBI). In a report published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics they describe how this tool can be used to more accurately evaluate dietary consumption of all types of fluids. [More]
Chemicals used in plastics linked to increased risk of high blood pressure, diabetes in children and adolescents

Chemicals used in plastics linked to increased risk of high blood pressure, diabetes in children and adolescents

According to a new series of studies out of NYU Langone Medical Center, two chemicals increasingly used during manufacturing to strengthen plastic wrap, soap, cosmetics, and processed food containers have been linked to a rise in risk of high blood pressure and diabetes in children and adolescents. [More]
Simple blood test could detect early stages of type 1 diabetes

Simple blood test could detect early stages of type 1 diabetes

Scientists at the MRC's Clinical Sciences Centre in West London are the first to show that a small molecule circulates in the blood of people who are in the early stages of type 1 diabetes. A simple blood test could detect this biological marker years, maybe decades, before symptoms develop. [More]
Modified, healthier meal plan for youth with type 1 diabetes more expensive

Modified, healthier meal plan for youth with type 1 diabetes more expensive

Patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) often need to modify their eating habits, but many youths with T1DM do not consume a healthful diet. To learn more about the challenges their parents may face in providing them with a more healthful diet, researchers set out to discover the availability of healthier food options and the price difference of the food items at stores frequented by families in northeastern Kansas and western Missouri. [More]
City of Hope offers islet cell transplant program to cure type 1 diabetes

City of Hope offers islet cell transplant program to cure type 1 diabetes

For patients with severe type 1 diabetes, a strict diet and insulin shots are sometimes not enough to sufficiently control their disease. What they need are insulin-producing cells of their own - currently only available through a still-experimental procedure known as islet cell transplantation. [More]
WSU researcher secures $1.25 million NIH grant to study role of rosiglitazone drug in reversing preeclampsia

WSU researcher secures $1.25 million NIH grant to study role of rosiglitazone drug in reversing preeclampsia

Sascha Drewlo, Ph.D., assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology for the Wayne State University School of Medicine, has secured a $1.25 million grant from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health to study the role of approved drugs to improve placental function. [More]
Researchers pinpoint two biomarkers elevated in severe form of coronary disease

Researchers pinpoint two biomarkers elevated in severe form of coronary disease

Insulin resistance affects tens of millions of Americans and is a big risk factor for heart disease. Yet, some people with the condition never develop heart disease, while some experience moderate coronary blockages. Others, though, get severe atherosclerosis - multiple blockages and deterioration of coronary arteries characterized by thick, hard, plaque-ridden arterial walls. [More]
Akcea Therapeutics obtains FDA Orphan Drug Designation for volanesorsen

Akcea Therapeutics obtains FDA Orphan Drug Designation for volanesorsen

Akcea Therapeutics, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Isis Pharmaceuticals, Inc., announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted Orphan Drug Designation to volanesorsen (ISIS-APOCIIIRx) for the treatment of patients with Familial Chylomicronemia Syndrome (FCS). [More]
Researchers analyze cardiometabolic benefits of exercise

Researchers analyze cardiometabolic benefits of exercise

Everyone knows that exercise generally helps the cardiovascular system, but much remains unknown about how the benefits arise, and what to expect in different people who exercise to improve their health. To gain a more precise understanding of how exercise improves health and whom it helps most, researchers analyzed the results of 160 randomized clinical trials with nearly 7,500 participants. [More]
Penn study suggests future precision medicine approach to treating diabetes, other metabolic disorders

Penn study suggests future precision medicine approach to treating diabetes, other metabolic disorders

In the first study of its kind, Penn researchers have shown how an anti-diabetic drug can have variable effects depending on small natural differences in DNA sequence between individuals. Mitchell Lazar, MD, PhD, Raymond Soccio, MD, PhD, and colleagues at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, aim to apply this knowledge to develop personalized approaches to treating diabetes and other metabolic disorders. [More]
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