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Insulin is a hormone that is needed to convert glucose, starches and other food into energy needed for daily life. Insulin allows cells to use glucose for fuel and is secreted by beta cells in the islets of Langerhans. The release of insulin from the pancreas is stimulated by increased blood glucose, vagal nerve stimulation, and other factors. Insulin is obtained from various animals and available in a variety of preparations. Commercial insulin preparations differ in a number of ways, including differences in the animal species from which they are obtained; their purity, concentration, and solubility; and the time of onset and duration of their biologic action. An oral hypoglycemic agent is not a form of insulin therapy.
Researchers produce insulin-secreting cells from stem cells of diabetic patients

Researchers produce insulin-secreting cells from stem cells of diabetic patients

Signaling a potential new approach to treating diabetes, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Harvard University have produced insulin-secreting cells from stem cells derived from patients with type 1 diabetes. [More]
Oral regimens could offer simple solution for severe hyperglycaemia

Oral regimens could offer simple solution for severe hyperglycaemia

Study findings indicate that oral treatments could offer a simpler alternative to upfront insulin for patients who have severe hyperglycaemia at the time of diagnosis with Type 2 diabetes. [More]
Digital health: putting patients at the center. An interview with Roz Davies

Digital health: putting patients at the center. An interview with Roz Davies

In England alone the NHS sees 1 million patients every 36 hours and there are 3 million volunteers across health and social care many of whom are motivated by their personal experience of healthcare services. [More]
Videogame addiction may impact sleep habits, obesity and cardio-metabolic health among children and teens

Videogame addiction may impact sleep habits, obesity and cardio-metabolic health among children and teens

Some children and youth with high videogame addiction tendencies may be at risk of sleep deprivation and disorders associated with obesity and poor cardio-metabolic health, Hamilton researchers have found. [More]
Study shows over-expression of adhesion molecules in fat tissues protects mice from obesity, diabetes

Study shows over-expression of adhesion molecules in fat tissues protects mice from obesity, diabetes

Okayama University researchers report that the overexpression of an adhesion molecule found on the surface of fat cells appears to protect mice from developing obesity and diabetes. The findings, published in the journal Diabetes, March 2016, may fuel the development of new therapies targeting these diseases. [More]
Cancerous lung tumors can alter metabolism by hijacking circadian mechanisms

Cancerous lung tumors can alter metabolism by hijacking circadian mechanisms

University of California, Irvine scientists who study how circadian rhythms - our own body clocks - control liver function have discovered that cancerous lung tumors can hijack this process and profoundly alter metabolism. [More]
Researchers link global increase in type 1 diabetes to advances in medical care

Researchers link global increase in type 1 diabetes to advances in medical care

Researchers from the University of Adelaide say the global increase in cases of type 1 diabetes is directly linked to advances in medical care, with the underlying genetics of the disease more likely to be passed from one generation to the next. [More]
Human milk hormones may play vital role in shaping healthy infant microbiome

Human milk hormones may play vital role in shaping healthy infant microbiome

A new University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus study finds that hormones in breast milk may impact the development of healthy bacteria in infants' guts, potentially protecting them from intestinal inflammation, obesity and other diseases later in life. [More]
Scientists find that disruption to SCN rhythms can negatively impact overall health

Scientists find that disruption to SCN rhythms can negatively impact overall health

Researchers have shown for the first time how neurons in the SCN are connected to each other, shedding light on this vital area of the brain. Understanding this structure — and how it responds to disruption — is important for tackling illnesses like diabetes and posttraumatic stress disorder. The scientists have also found that disruption to these rhythms such as shifts in work schedules or blue light exposure at night can negatively impact overall health. [More]
Positive effects of Mediterranean diet on health of elderly population

Positive effects of Mediterranean diet on health of elderly population

Sticking to a Mediterranean style diet might slow down ageing finds the EU funded project NU-AGE. At a recent conference in Brussels, researchers presented that a NU-AGE Mediterranean style diet, tested in the project, significantly decreased the levels of the protein known as C-reactive protein, one of the main inflammatory marker linked with the ageing process [More]
Transplanted human islets provide excellent glycemic control for Type 1 diabetes patients with severe hypoglycemia

Transplanted human islets provide excellent glycemic control for Type 1 diabetes patients with severe hypoglycemia

Northwestern Medicine researchers are co-investigators in a breakthrough clinical trial that found transplanted human islets prevent hypoglycemic events and provide excellent glycemic control for patients with Type 1 diabetes with severe hypoglycemia. The results of the multi-center, single arm, phase III study are published in Diabetes Care on Monday, April 18. The research was funded by National Institute of Health grants through the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and the National Institute for Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disease. [More]
New nanoparticle approach can deliver antiobesity drugs directly to fat tissue

New nanoparticle approach can deliver antiobesity drugs directly to fat tissue

Researchers at MIT and Brigham and Women's Hospital have developed nanoparticles that can deliver antiobesity drugs directly to fat tissue. Overweight mice treated with these nanoparticles lost 10 percent of their body weight over 25 days, without showing any negative side effects. [More]
Southern Society bestows 2016 Clinical Science Young Investigator Award to Stansfield

Southern Society bestows 2016 Clinical Science Young Investigator Award to Stansfield

Dr. Brian K. Stansfield, neonatologist at Children's Hospital of Georgia and a 2004 graduate of the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University, has received the 2016 Clinical Science Young Investigator Award from the Southern Society for Pediatric Research. [More]
Study helps discover new treatments for type 2 diabetes in men with low testosterone

Study helps discover new treatments for type 2 diabetes in men with low testosterone

Doctors have long known that men with low testosterone are at greater risk for developing type 2 diabetes. For the first time, researchers have identified how testosterone helps men regulate blood sugar by triggering key signaling mechanisms in islets, clusters of cells within the pancreas that produce insulin. The findings, co-authored by Tulane University researchers, are published in the journal [More]
Integrating fiber optic biosensor into microfluidic chip may help in early diagnosis of diabetes

Integrating fiber optic biosensor into microfluidic chip may help in early diagnosis of diabetes

Insulin deficiency and hyperglycemia are two well-known culprits behind diabetes, both of which are reflected in blood glucose concentrations. Now, researchers are working to create ultrasensitive lab-on-a-chip devices to quickly measure glucose concentrations with the goal of developing device for early diagnosis and prevent of diabetes [More]
Dopamine neuron transplants controlled by designer drug may fight Parkinson's disease in mice

Dopamine neuron transplants controlled by designer drug may fight Parkinson's disease in mice

A University of Wisconsin-Madison neuroscientist has inserted a genetic switch into nerve cells so a patient can alter their activity by taking designer drugs that would not affect any other cell. The cells in question are neurons and make the neurotransmitter dopamine, whose deficiency is the culprit in the widespread movement disorder Parkinson's disease. [More]
Daily chocolate consumption may improve cardio-metabolic health

Daily chocolate consumption may improve cardio-metabolic health

A new study published in the British Journal of Nutrition appears to back up the adage that a little of what you fancy does you good. [More]
Study links age-related changes in human pancreas to diabetes development

Study links age-related changes in human pancreas to diabetes development

A Stanford-led national collaboration to procure and analyze human pancreatic tissue from deceased donors illustrates how the organ's function changes as we age, and could point the way toward new diabetes treatments. [More]
Little and often gives exercise benefits in Type 2 diabetes

Little and often gives exercise benefits in Type 2 diabetes

Sedentary, overweight adults with Type 2 diabetes can improve their cardiometabolic profile by engaging in very brief but regular periods of light walking or resistance exercise, research suggests. [More]
New fruit fly model study reveals metabolic pathway that can be targeted to treat FXS patients

New fruit fly model study reveals metabolic pathway that can be targeted to treat FXS patients

Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common genetically inherited cause of intellectual disability in humans. New research shows how the hormone insulin -- usually associated with diabetes -- is involved in the daily activity patterns and cognitive deficits in the fruitfly model of FXS, according to a new study from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania published online this month in Molecular Psychiatry in advance of the print issue. [More]
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