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Insulin is a hormone that is needed to convert glucose, starches and other food into energy needed for daily life. Insulin allows cells to use glucose for fuel and is secreted by beta cells in the islets of Langerhans. The release of insulin from the pancreas is stimulated by increased blood glucose, vagal nerve stimulation, and other factors. Insulin is obtained from various animals and available in a variety of preparations. Commercial insulin preparations differ in a number of ways, including differences in the animal species from which they are obtained; their purity, concentration, and solubility; and the time of onset and duration of their biologic action. An oral hypoglycemic agent is not a form of insulin therapy.
UAlberta researchers discover link between pulmonary hypertension, diabetes and cancer

UAlberta researchers discover link between pulmonary hypertension, diabetes and cancer

A UAlberta team has discovered that a protein that plays a critical role in metabolism, the process by which the cell generates energy from foods, is important for the development of pulmonary hypertension, a deadly disease. [More]
Growth hormone worthwhile treatment in hypochondroplasia

Growth hormone worthwhile treatment in hypochondroplasia

Researchers report that recombinant human growth hormone can improve growth in children with hypochondroplasia. [More]
Promising results for low-dose insulin in paediatric diabetic ketoacidosis

Promising results for low-dose insulin in paediatric diabetic ketoacidosis

Results of a randomised trial suggest that low-dose insulin may be at least as good as standard-dose insulin for the treatment of children with diabetic ketoacidosis. [More]
UBC researchers set to develop universal antidote to simplify use of heparin

UBC researchers set to develop universal antidote to simplify use of heparin

Heparin, the life saving blood thinner used in major surgeries and treatment of heart diseases, is a complicated drug but a research team from the University of British Columbia has set out to make its use a lot safer by developing a universal antidote. [More]
Economic impact of hypoglycaemia: an interview with Dr Klaus Henning Jensen

Economic impact of hypoglycaemia: an interview with Dr Klaus Henning Jensen

Hypoglycaemia is the term used to describe a lower than normal blood sugar level. There are a number of things that actually need to be formally defined in order for a hypoglycaemic episode to be diagnosed. [More]
Rates of type 1 diabetes increase significantly among non-Hispanic white youth

Rates of type 1 diabetes increase significantly among non-Hispanic white youth

The rate of non-Hispanic white youth diagnosed with type 1 diabetes increased significantly from 2002 to 2009 in all but the youngest age group of children, according to a new study published today in the journal Diabetes. [More]
Growth factor boosts natural defence against auto-immune diseases

Growth factor boosts natural defence against auto-immune diseases

Our immune system defends us from harmful bacteria and viruses, but, if left unchecked, the cells that destroy those invaders can turn on the body itself, causing auto-immune diseases like type-1 diabetes or multiple sclerosis. A molecule called insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) boosts the body's natural defence against this 'friendly fire', scientists at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Monterotondo, Italy, have found. [More]
Insulin resistance linked to treatment-refractory bipolar disorder

Insulin resistance linked to treatment-refractory bipolar disorder

Patients with bipolar disorder who are insulin resistant are likely to also be refractory to mood-stabilising treatment, report researchers. [More]
Marital hostility, history of depression can increase obesity risk in adults

Marital hostility, history of depression can increase obesity risk in adults

The double-whammy of marital hostility and a history of depression can increase the risk for obesity in adults by altering how the body processes high-fat foods, according to new research. [More]
Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: an interview with Dr. Alexandria Phan

Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: an interview with Dr. Alexandria Phan

GEP-NETs stands for gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). This is a type of rare cancer that is increasing in incidence and prevalence – more on this later. [More]
Research: MHCI protein moonlights in nervous system to regulate synapses

Research: MHCI protein moonlights in nervous system to regulate synapses

When it comes to the brain, "more is better" seems like an obvious assumption. But in the case of synapses, which are the connections between brain cells, too many or too few can both disrupt brain function. [More]
Researchers propose new milestones to augment National Alzheimer's Plan

Researchers propose new milestones to augment National Alzheimer's Plan

The U.S. Government has initiated a major effort to prevent and effectively treat Alzheimer's disease by 2025. However, a workgroup of nearly 40 Alzheimer's researchers and scientists says the research milestones in the U.S. Government's National Plan to Address Alzheimer's Disease must be broadened in scope, increased in scale, and adequately funded in order to successfully achieve this goal. [More]
State highlights: Ariz. agrees to settlement on health care for prisoners

State highlights: Ariz. agrees to settlement on health care for prisoners

Prop. 46 would make it mandatory for doctors to consult the database. California would become one of nine states requiring doctors to check before prescribing painkillers to first-time patients. After passing similar laws, Tennessee and New York saw a significant reduction in the number of narcotics prescriptions written. Studies have verified the correlation, but acknowledge that drug abusers may be turning to street drugs, like heroin. Many doctors in California like the database. Some have called it 'indispensable.' But they don't like being told how to practice medicine (Dembosky, 10/14). [More]
Intake of arsenic linked to cardiovascular disease, diabetes

Intake of arsenic linked to cardiovascular disease, diabetes

Associated with various types of cancer such as skin and liver, the intake of arsenic it is also linked to cardiovascular disease and diabetes. According to a long-term research conducted by experts from the Center for Research and Advanced Studies it was determined that this metalloid inhibits enzymes associated with antioxidant protection. [More]
Scientists create light-activated drug to help control type 2 diabetes

Scientists create light-activated drug to help control type 2 diabetes

Scientists have created a drug for type 2 diabetes that is switched on by blue light, which they hope will improve treatment of the disease. [More]
Lund University researchers explore personalised treatment for type 2 diabetes

Lund University researchers explore personalised treatment for type 2 diabetes

Researchers at Lund University in Sweden are testing a treatment for type 2 diabetes which targets the disease mechanism itself - and not just the symptoms. For the first time, knowledge about the individual patient's genetic risk profile is being used. The treatment completely restores the capacity to secrete insulin, which is impaired by the risk gene. [More]
Viewpoints: Ebola myths; Sen. McCain's 'opportunistic alarmism'; Gov. Jindal on CDC's misspent resources

Viewpoints: Ebola myths; Sen. McCain's 'opportunistic alarmism'; Gov. Jindal on CDC's misspent resources

Hubris is the greatest danger in wealthy countries -; a sort of smug assumption that advanced technologies and emergency-preparedness plans guarantee that Ebola and other germs will not spread. It was hubris that left Toronto's top hospitals battling SARS in 2003, long after the virus was conquered in poorer Vietnam. It was hubris that led the World Health Assembly in 2013 to cut the WHO's outbreak-response budget in favor of more programs to treat cancer and heart disease. [More]
Study reveals inner workings of PKA switch that regulates cellular functions, contributes to deadly disorders

Study reveals inner workings of PKA switch that regulates cellular functions, contributes to deadly disorders

A University of Utah-led study using X-rays and neutron beams has revealed the inner workings of a master switch that regulates basic cellular functions, but that also, when mutated, contributes to cancer, cardiovascular disease and other deadly disorders. [More]
Obesity greatly accelerates aging of the liver

Obesity greatly accelerates aging of the liver

Using a recently developed biomarker of aging known as an epigenetic clock, UCLA researchers working closely with a German team of investigators have found for the first time that obesity greatly accelerates aging of the liver. This finding could explain the early onset of many age-related diseases, including liver cancer, in obese subjects [More]
BIDMC scientists uncover new class of molecules that protects against diabetes

BIDMC scientists uncover new class of molecules that protects against diabetes

Scientists at the Salk Institute and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston have discovered a new class of molecules—produced in human and mouse fat—that protects against diabetes. [More]