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Most child pedestrian injuries occur near schools, bus stops, and in the spring months

Most child pedestrian injuries occur near schools, bus stops, and in the spring months

New research presented today at the 2015 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) found that most child pedestrian injuries involving a motor vehicle occurred while children were unsupervised, near schools and bus stops, and in the spring months during the afternoon and evening hours. [More]
Harris Health System uses sign language video technology to communicate with hearing-impaired patients

Harris Health System uses sign language video technology to communicate with hearing-impaired patients

Harris Health System is now using sign language video technology to better communicate with its hearing-impaired and hard-of-hearing patients. [More]
UM experts warn of serious risks associated with common IV devices

UM experts warn of serious risks associated with common IV devices

Every day, patients around the country get IV devices placed in their arms, to make it easier to receive medicines or have blood drawn over the course of days or weeks. But these PICC lines, as they're called, also raise the risk of potentially dangerous blood clots. [More]
Experts call for global review of sepsis guidelines

Experts call for global review of sepsis guidelines

Experts are calling for a global review of guidelines used to diagnose sepsis, after a study found one in eight patients with infections severe enough to need admission to an Intensive Care Unit in Australia and New Zealand, did not meet current criteria. [More]
Study investigates effects of antidepressant treatment in pain catastrophizing patients

Study investigates effects of antidepressant treatment in pain catastrophizing patients

A select population of patients having surgery experience what is called pain catastrophizing - an irrational thought process that leads a patient to perceive pain as worse than it actually is. Antidepressant medications reduce negative mood and might change this way of thinking, but according to a study published in the April edition of Anesthesiology, the official medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists, that may not be the case, at least for acute pain. [More]
New research finds old blood just as good as fresh blood

New research finds old blood just as good as fresh blood

Just like milk and many other foods, blood used for transfusions is perishable. But contrary to popular belief, new research shows that blood stored for three weeks is just as good as fresh blood - findings published today in the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
AACN to award ICU Design Citation to ICUs at Our Lady of the Lake Regional Medical Center

AACN to award ICU Design Citation to ICUs at Our Lady of the Lake Regional Medical Center

The American Association of Critical-Care Nurses will present the ICU Design Citation to the intensive care units at Our Lady of the Lake Regional Medical Center in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, during the 2015 National Teaching Institute & Critical Care Exposition, San Diego, May 18-21. [More]
Researchers discover gene associated with congenital anomaly of urinary tract

Researchers discover gene associated with congenital anomaly of urinary tract

An interdisciplinary team of researchers under the direction of the University of Bonn Hospital have discovered a gene which is associated with a rare congenital anomaly of the urinary tract called classic bladder exstrophy. [More]
TRMC expands use of capnography to monitor patients during moderate sedation

TRMC expands use of capnography to monitor patients during moderate sedation

Tillamook Regional Medical Center recently strengthened patient safety measures by expanding its use of capnography to monitor patients during moderate sedation. Sedation is commonly used during procedures such as colonoscopies and in some instances can suppress breathing. [More]
Early mobility therapy improves outcomes of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome

Early mobility therapy improves outcomes of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome

Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a life-threatening lung condition that affects approximately 200,000 people a year in the United States and has a higher mortality rate than breast and prostate cancer combined. The condition most often occurs in people who are critically ill or who have significant injuries; those who do survive it often experience profound skeletal muscle weakness. [More]
Deutsches Ärzteblatt International's current issue features two articles on geriatric medicine

Deutsches Ärzteblatt International's current issue features two articles on geriatric medicine

Very old persons often have chronic problems, such as physical immobility, unsteady gait, and mental impairments. In such patients, these risks have to be considered and their treatments adapted accordingly. Deutsches Ă„rzteblatt International in its current issue introduces two original articles on the subject of geriatric medicine. [More]
Recruitment completed for Phase III PROUD-PV trial of P1101 for treatment of polycythemia vera

Recruitment completed for Phase III PROUD-PV trial of P1101 for treatment of polycythemia vera

PharmaEssentia (Taipei, Taiwan) and AOP Orphan (Vienna, Austria) announce the completion of recruitment for the Phase III trial PROUD-PV to support global marketing of P1101 (Ropeginterferon alfa-2b), a novel, long-acting, mono-pegylated interferon for the first line treatment of polycythemia vera. [More]
Advanced clinical decision support tools reduce mortality for pneumonia patients

Advanced clinical decision support tools reduce mortality for pneumonia patients

A new study by Intermountain Medical Center researchers in Salt Lake City found that using advanced clinical decision support tools reduces mortality for the 1.1 million patients in the Unites States who are treated for pneumonia each year. [More]
Inhaled Nitric Oxide still being used in preterm neonates despite evidence of short-term benefit

Inhaled Nitric Oxide still being used in preterm neonates despite evidence of short-term benefit

Inhaled Nitric Oxide (iNO) is a drug approved by the Food and Drug Administration that is commonly used in term and near-term neonates who have severe respiratory failure caused by pulmonary hypertension. Over the last decade there have been multiple large studies trying to determine a clinical use for iNO in preterm neonates, but despite evidence of short-term benefit, this drug has not been shown to improve long-term outcomes in preemies. [More]
Imperial scientists develop new test that uses human stem cells to predict side effects of drugs

Imperial scientists develop new test that uses human stem cells to predict side effects of drugs

Scientists at Imperial College London have developed a test that uses combinations of cells from a single donor's blood to predict whether a new drug will cause a severe immune reaction in humans. [More]
Advanced clinical decision support tools help reduce mortality for pneumonia patients

Advanced clinical decision support tools help reduce mortality for pneumonia patients

A new study by Intermountain Medical Center researchers in Salt Lake City found that using advanced clinical decision support tools reduces mortality for the 1.1 million patients in the Unites States who are treated for pneumonia each year. [More]
Mallinckrodt enters into definitive agreement to acquire Ikaria

Mallinckrodt enters into definitive agreement to acquire Ikaria

Mallinckrodt plc, a leading global specialty biopharmaceutical company, and Ikaria, Inc. a privately-held critical care company, announced today that they have entered into a definitive agreement under which a subsidiary of Mallinckrodt will acquire Ikaria, Inc. from a Madison Dearborn-led investor group in a transaction valued at approximately $2.3 billion. [More]
Harris Health LBJ Hospital's Level III trauma center designation reverified

Harris Health LBJ Hospital's Level III trauma center designation reverified

The Texas Department of State Health Services has reverified the Level III trauma center for Harris Health System's Lyndon B. Johnson Hospital, a distinction the hospital has held since 1996. [More]
New standardized approach for feeding infants in NICU improves growth of babies

New standardized approach for feeding infants in NICU improves growth of babies

A new standardized approach for feeding infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) helps babies attain full oral feeds sooner, improves their growth and sends them home sooner. [More]
New model of care decreases likelihood of serious illness after discharge from ICU

New model of care decreases likelihood of serious illness after discharge from ICU

The Critical Care Recovery Center care model -- the nation's first collaborative care concept focusing on the extensive cognitive, physical and psychological recovery needs of intensive care unit survivors -- decreases the likelihood of serious illness after discharge from an ICU, according to a new study from the Regenstrief Institute and the Indiana University schools of medicine and nursing. [More]
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