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Noise in ICUs exceeds recommended levels, disturbs patients and care givers

Noise in ICUs exceeds recommended levels, disturbs patients and care givers

A study presented at Euroanaesthesia 2016 shows that noise levels in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) can go well above recommended levels, disturbing both patients and the medical teams that care for them. [More]
National Cancer Moonshot initiative needs to target proteins that drive cancer

National Cancer Moonshot initiative needs to target proteins that drive cancer

The National Cancer Moonshot initiative needs to move beyond genomics to target the proteins that are driving cancer, according to an Inova Health System and George Mason University collaborative paper published Thursday in the American Association for Cancer Research. [More]
Studies explore possible link between pediatric cancer and light therapy for newborn jaundice

Studies explore possible link between pediatric cancer and light therapy for newborn jaundice

Two new studies raise enough questions about a possible link between childhood cancer and light therapy for newborn jaundice that clinicians should exercise caution in prescribing the treatment for infants whose jaundice is likely to resolve on its own, a pediatric oncologist from Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center argues in an editorial published today by the journal Pediatrics. [More]
SUSTAIN study to test effect of high-dose selenium on recovery of cardiac surgery patients

SUSTAIN study to test effect of high-dose selenium on recovery of cardiac surgery patients

Queen's University researcher Daren Heyland is leading a study that aims to reduce the risk of complications and improves recovery of cardiac surgery patients. [More]
MERS individuals develop severe critical illness, higher mortality than non-MERS SARI patients

MERS individuals develop severe critical illness, higher mortality than non-MERS SARI patients

Patients with Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) develop more severe critical illness and have higher mortality than patients with non-MERS severe acute respiratory infection (SARI), according to investigators involved with the largest study of critically ill patients with MERS. [More]
New lab blood test may help identify HELLP syndrome in pregnant women

New lab blood test may help identify HELLP syndrome in pregnant women

A laboratory blood test developed at Johns Hopkins for the diagnosis of a rare genetic red blood cell disorder also shows promise in identifying HELLP syndrome, a life-threatening high blood pressure condition affecting 1 percent of all pregnant women that causes hypertension along with end organ damage, researchers report in the May issue of the journal Experimental Hematology. [More]
Overnight extubations in ICU patients linked to higher mortality

Overnight extubations in ICU patients linked to higher mortality

Adult patients who were admitted to U.S. intensive care units had higher mortality if they were extubated overnight. The results reported at the ATS 2016 International Conference may discourage hospital administrators from expanding the practice of overnight extubations in ICUs, which the lead author noted are rapidly being transformed to provide continuity of care. [More]
Researchers identify risk factors for unplanned readmissions following esophageal resection

Researchers identify risk factors for unplanned readmissions following esophageal resection

Esophagectomy is a major surgical procedure associated with significant complications with up to 1 in 5 patients readmitted following hospital discharge. These unplanned readmissions are an important problem as they negatively impact patient care and, in the future, may have implications for reimbursement through the Hospital Readmissions Reduction program. [More]
New Canadian study highlights need to consider mental health of caregivers in post-ICU care

New Canadian study highlights need to consider mental health of caregivers in post-ICU care

A new Canadian study focusing on caregiver outcomes of critically ill patients reveals that caregivers of intensive care unit (ICU) survivors, who have received mechanical ventilation for a minimum of seven days, are at a high risk of developing clinical depression persisting up to one year after discharge. [More]
Innovative technology in NICU can predict risk of major infections in premature or critically ill babies

Innovative technology in NICU can predict risk of major infections in premature or critically ill babies

A new technology in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at UC San Diego Health is able to predict the risk of life-threatening infections up to 24 hours before they appear in severely premature or critically ill infants. Infection is the leading cause of death in this fragile patient population. [More]
New study finds link between prenatal SSRI use and umbilical cord length

New study finds link between prenatal SSRI use and umbilical cord length

Umbilical cords of children whose mothers used selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors during pregnancy may be longer than umbilical cords of other newborn children, shows a new study from the University of Eastern Finland and Kuopio University Hospital. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, SSRIs, are commonly prescribed antidepressants, and this is the first time their association with umbilical cord length was observed. [More]
Researchers investigate effects of new steroid treatment on children with ARDS

Researchers investigate effects of new steroid treatment on children with ARDS

Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) affects hundreds of thousands of people each year, many of them children. Those with this life threatening condition have severely injured and wet lungs, and are treated with mechanical ventilation. [More]
Researchers monitor ICP and PRx to characterize temporal evolution in severe TBI patients

Researchers monitor ICP and PRx to characterize temporal evolution in severe TBI patients

Winner of the Best International Abstract Award, Hadie Adams, presented his research, Characterizing the Temporal Evolution of ICP and Cerebrovascular Reactivity after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury, during the 2016 American Association of Neurological Surgeons Annual Scientific Meeting. [More]
Michigan researchers use 'kidney on a chip' device to measure effect of drug doses on kidney cells

Michigan researchers use 'kidney on a chip' device to measure effect of drug doses on kidney cells

University of Michigan researchers have used a "kidney on a chip" device to mimic the flow of medication through human kidneys and measure its effect on kidney cells. [More]
Stroke Awareness Month: Meridian Neuroscience provides latest information about stroke prevention, treatments

Stroke Awareness Month: Meridian Neuroscience provides latest information about stroke prevention, treatments

In observance of Stroke Awareness Month, Meridian Neuroscience is kicking off a series of informative community events, providing expert advice, tips, and the latest information about stroke prevention and treatments. The events will take place at Meridian Health locations throughout Monmouth and Ocean counties. [More]
Cerebellar not cerebral atrophy predicts poor anti-NMDAR encephalitis outcome

Cerebellar not cerebral atrophy predicts poor anti-NMDAR encephalitis outcome

Diffuse cerebral atrophy in patients with anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis does not necessarily mean irreversible brain damage, whereas progressive cerebellar atrophy may indicate a poor long-term prognosis, researchers report. [More]
Feeding breast milk during first month of life may spur brain growth in preterm infants

Feeding breast milk during first month of life may spur brain growth in preterm infants

Feeding premature babies mostly breast milk during the first month of life appears to spur more robust brain growth, compared with babies given little or no breast milk. [More]
More neurological resources needed to manage Zika virus infections

More neurological resources needed to manage Zika virus infections

WFN Zika-Info-Service: World Federation of Neurology establishes Work Group on Zika virus to support international efforts - Lack of neurological resources in countries most concerned by the virus. [More]
Acid suppression drugs frequently prescribed for high-risk newborns, study shows

Acid suppression drugs frequently prescribed for high-risk newborns, study shows

Since 2006, several published studies have associated the use of some acid suppression medications in hospitalized high-risk babies with infections, necrotizing enterocolitis and increased risk of death. Those medications - histamine-2 receptor antagonists, such as ranitidine (Zantac and others), and proton pump inhibitors, such as esomeprazole (Nexium and others) - were originally approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use in adults and older children. [More]
Patients who survived life-threatening illness in ICU at increased risk for psychiatric symptoms

Patients who survived life-threatening illness in ICU at increased risk for psychiatric symptoms

Results of a multi-institutional national study of nearly 700 people who survived life-threatening illness with a stay in an intensive care unit (ICU) suggest that a substantial majority of them are at high risk for persistent depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder — especially if they are female, young and unemployed. [More]
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