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Peer pressure influences adherence to hand hygiene

Peer pressure influences adherence to hand hygiene

Nationally, hand hygiene adherence by healthcare workers remains staggeringly low despite its critical importance in infection control. [More]
Hospitals see sharp declines in rates of CLABSIs and ventilator-associated pneumonias

Hospitals see sharp declines in rates of CLABSIs and ventilator-associated pneumonias

Hospitals across the country have seen sharp declines in rates of central line-associated blood stream infections (CLABSIs) and ventilator-associated pneumonias (VAPs) among critically ill neonates and children, according to a new study in the journal Pediatrics. [More]
Ultrasound procedures encourage many hospitals in Europe to adopt the technology

Ultrasound procedures encourage many hospitals in Europe to adopt the technology

Growing awareness of the harmful effects of radiation exposure is driving the uptake of ultrasound systems, which are radiation free, less expensive, and more versatile than bigger modalities such as magnetic resonance. [More]
Codman reaches exclusive distribution agreement with Pulsar Vascular to market PulseRider

Codman reaches exclusive distribution agreement with Pulsar Vascular to market PulseRider

Codman Neuro, part of DePuy Synthes Companies of Johnson & Johnson, today announced it has reached an exclusive distribution agreement with Pulsar Vascular to market and promote that company's PulseRider® in Europe, the Middle East and Africa. [More]
Extreme environment medicine: an interview with Dr Kevin Fong, University College London

Extreme environment medicine: an interview with Dr Kevin Fong, University College London

The understanding of how long-duration space flight affects the human body has come on quite considerably in recent years, and in large part, we owe that to programs of research that have taken place aboard the International Space Station and the Mir Space Station. [More]
MedStar Washington Hospital Center celebrates major safety milestone

MedStar Washington Hospital Center celebrates major safety milestone

The Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at MedStar Washington Hospital Center recently celebrated a major safety milestone: two years without a single Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infection (CLABSI) in its smallest and most vulnerable babies. [More]
Study could lead to improvements in outcomes for women with triple-negative breast cancer

Study could lead to improvements in outcomes for women with triple-negative breast cancer

William M. Sikov, a medical oncologist in the Breast Health Center and associate director for clinical research in the Program in Women's Oncology at Women & Infants Hospital of Rhode Island, served as study chair and lead author for a recently-published major national study that could lead to improvements in outcomes for women with triple-negative breast cancer, an aggressive form of the disease that disproportionately affects younger women. [More]
Study investigates white matter damage in chronic stages of traumatic axonal injury

Study investigates white matter damage in chronic stages of traumatic axonal injury

Traumatic Axonal Injury is a form of traumatic brain injury that can have detrimental effects on the integrity of the brain's white matter and lead to cognitive impairments. [More]
Serelaxin reduces occurrence of in-hospital worsening heart failure

Serelaxin reduces occurrence of in-hospital worsening heart failure

Serelaxin reduces the occurrence of in-hospital worsening heart failure by almost half in patients admitted for acute heart failure, according to the RELAX-AHF trial. The results were presented for the first time today at ESC Congress by co-principal investigator Professor John R. Teerlink. [More]
New paper highlights ways to improve outcomes of Ebola virus infection

New paper highlights ways to improve outcomes of Ebola virus infection

The largest-ever Ebola virus disease outbreak is ravaging West Africa, but with more personnel, basic monitoring, and supportive treatment, many of the sickest patients with Ebola virus disease do not need to die, note the authors of a new paper published ahead of print publication in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. [More]
Research roundup: Benefits of hip surgery; preventing surgical infections; assessing ACOs' predecessors

Research roundup: Benefits of hip surgery; preventing surgical infections; assessing ACOs' predecessors

Surgical treatment of hip fractures can achieve better survival and functional outcomes than nonoperative treatment, but less is known about its economic benefits. ... We estimated the effects of surgical treatment for displaced hip fractures through a Markov cohort analysis of patients 65 years and older. ... Estimated average lifetime societal benefits per patient exceeded the direct medical costs of hip fracture surgery by $65,000 to $68,000 for displaced hip fractures. With the exception of the assumption of nursing home use, the sensitivity analyses show that surgery produces positive net societal savings (Gu, Koenig, Mather and Tongue, 8/5). [More]
ACCA Clinical Decision-Making Toolkit mobile app helps make quick and correct decision

ACCA Clinical Decision-Making Toolkit mobile app helps make quick and correct decision

The ACCA Clinical Decision-Making Toolkit mobile app is now available on the App Store and Google Play. When dealing with acute cardiovascular diseases, a few seconds can make the difference and instant access to the best recommendations can save lives. [More]
CHLA ECMO program honored with prestigious Award for Excellence in Life Support

CHLA ECMO program honored with prestigious Award for Excellence in Life Support

The Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation program at Children's Hospital Los Angeles has been honored for the third time with the prestigious Award for Excellence in Life Support by the Extracorporeal Life Support Organization, an international group of health care professionals and scientists who evaluate hospital treatment therapies for patients fighting complex cardiac disease and respiratory failure. [More]
Futile medical care crowds out other patients

Futile medical care crowds out other patients

Every day in intensive care units across the country, patients get aggressive, expensive treatment their caregivers know is not going to save their lives or make them better. California researchers now report this so-called "futile" care has a hidden price: It's crowding out other patients who could otherwise survive, recover and get back to living their lives. [More]
Engineers bring touch of color to glucose monitoring

Engineers bring touch of color to glucose monitoring

University of Illinois engineers are bringing a touch of color to glucose monitoring. The researchers developed a new continuous glucose monitoring material that changes color as glucose levels fluctuate, and the wavelength shift is so precise that doctors and patients may be able to use it for automatic insulin dosing - something not possible using current point measurements like test strips. [More]

Futile treatment makes other ill patients needing medical attention to wait for critical care beds

Providing futile treatment in the intensive care unit sets off a chain reaction that causes other ill patients needing medical attention to wait for critical care beds, according to a study by researchers from UCLA and RAND Health. [More]
Actavis reports positive results from ceftazidime-avibactam Phase III studies in cIAI patients

Actavis reports positive results from ceftazidime-avibactam Phase III studies in cIAI patients

Actavis plc today confirmed positive topline results from RECLAIM-1 and -2, pivotal Phase III studies evaluating the potential for the investigational antibiotic, ceftazidime-avibactam as a treatment for adult hospitalized patients with complicated intra-abdominal infections. [More]

Survey finds low awareness about risks of cognitive side effects following surgery

Postsurgical cognitive side effects can have major implications for the level of care, length of hospital stay, and the patient's perceived quality of care, especially in elderly and fragile patients. A nationwide survey of Swedish anesthesiologists and nurse anesthetists has found there is low awareness of the risks of cognitive side effects following surgery. [More]
Viewpoints: Va. GOP's 'Medicaid charade'; Paul Ryan's health Rx for poverty; giving the sick unapproved drugs

Viewpoints: Va. GOP's 'Medicaid charade'; Paul Ryan's health Rx for poverty; giving the sick unapproved drugs

Virginia lawmakers will convene in a special session next month to address the question of expanding Medicaid and, more broadly, the fact that hundreds of thousands of poor and disabled people in the state have no health insurance coverage. Democrats and some moderate Republicans have advanced a variety of ideas to tackle that problem. Conservative Republicans, who control the legislature in Richmond, have rejected those solutions while proposing no alternative. Does the GOP intend for the special session to be anything more than a charade at taxpayers' expense? (8/15). [More]
CEOLIVE.TV interviews BioElectronics expert as part of its Executive Interview Series

CEOLIVE.TV interviews BioElectronics expert as part of its Executive Interview Series

BioElectronics Corporation, the maker of advanced consumer medical devices said that its EVP Dr. Deepak Kotak was interviewed by CEOLIVE.TV as part of its Executive Interview Series. [More]