Intensive Care News and Research RSS Feed - Intensive Care News and Research

Finding by UCSF researchers could increase availability of kidneys for transplant

Finding by UCSF researchers could increase availability of kidneys for transplant

Mild hypothermia in deceased organ donors significantly reduces delayed graft function in kidney transplant recipients when compared to normal body temperature, according to UC San Francisco researchers and collaborators, a finding that could lead to an increase in the availability of kidneys for transplant. [More]
University of Southampton study to examine how nurse staffing levels affect care, safety of patients

University of Southampton study to examine how nurse staffing levels affect care, safety of patients

A University of Southampton study will investigate how the provision of nurses in hospitals affects the care and safety of patients. [More]
CHOP surgeons successfully complete world's first bilateral hand transplant on child

CHOP surgeons successfully complete world's first bilateral hand transplant on child

Surgeons at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia joined with colleagues from Penn Medicine recently to complete the world's first bilateral hand transplant on a child. Earlier this month, the surgical team successfully transplanted donor hands and forearms onto eight-year-old Zion Harvey who, several years earlier, had undergone amputation of his hands and feet and a kidney transplant following a serious infection. [More]
Study shows that home births lead to higher infant mortality among Dutch women living in poorer areas

Study shows that home births lead to higher infant mortality among Dutch women living in poorer areas

Home births lead to higher infant mortality than hospital births, at least for mothers living in poorer areas. This is the conclusion of a new study conducted by N. Meltem Daysal (University of Southern Denmark and IZA), Mircea Trandafir (University of Southern Denmark and IZA) and Reyn van Ewijk (VU University Amsterdam and University of Mainz) that examines 356,412 low-risk Dutch women who delivered between 2000 and 2008 and who were allowed to choose between a home and a hospital birth. [More]
Multiple sclerosis relapse management: an interview with Gina Remington

Multiple sclerosis relapse management: an interview with Gina Remington

MS relapses are typically reflective of new neurological symptoms. However, it can be a worsening of neurologic symptoms that begins after a patient has been stable (generally for about 30 days), but relapses are persistent and consistent changes in symptoms that occur for more than 24 to 48 hours. [More]
Wayne State's faculty selected for Aspen Health Innovators Fellowship

Wayne State's faculty selected for Aspen Health Innovators Fellowship

The Washington, D.C.-based educational and policy studies organization The Aspen Institute has selected Wayne State University School of Medicine's Patrick Hines, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor of Physiology and an assistant professor of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, one of only 20 health care leaders in the country for the inaugural class of its Health Innovators Fellowship. [More]
Organ donor honored at Reagan UCLA Medical Center

Organ donor honored at Reagan UCLA Medical Center

Two years ago, Rachel Greenberg went out to run a few errands. While she was gone, her husband Glenn suffered a massive brain hemorrhage. He was immediately taken to Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center where physicians explained he had suffered the worst kind of brain bleed. [More]
Rutgers physicians use new treatments to restore teenager’s life

Rutgers physicians use new treatments to restore teenager’s life

At first, 13-year-old Christina Blumstein thought she had an ordinary headache. She and her parents were returning from a visit to Long Island in July 2014 when the pain struck. Was it a bout of carsickness? Too much screen time on her iPad? But a few hours later, back home in Old Bridge, New Jersey, her mother MaryAnn says, "Christina started screaming that somebody was stabbing her in the head with a knife." Soon afterward Christina was comatose and in an ambulance - and her life was in grave danger. [More]
Family members who avoid major medical decisions may suffer from PTSD

Family members who avoid major medical decisions may suffer from PTSD

Family members who make major medical decisions for relatives in an intensive care unit (ICU) may suffer posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) if they cope by avoiding the situation, according to a new study by scientists at Case Western Reserve University's Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing. [More]
New paper describes positive effects of CRAC channel inhibitors in animal models of acute pancreatitis

New paper describes positive effects of CRAC channel inhibitors in animal models of acute pancreatitis

Researchers from CalciMedica, Inc. and the University of Liverpool today announced the publication of a paper describing positive effects of calcium release-activated calcium (CRAC) channel inhibitors in animal models of acute pancreatitis. The paper, titled "Inhibitors of ORAI1 prevent cytosolic calcium-associated injury of human pancreatic acinar cells and acute pancreatitis in 3 mouse models" appears in the August edition of the journal Gastroenterology. [More]
New mathematical simulation model helps manage ICU bed occupancy effectively

New mathematical simulation model helps manage ICU bed occupancy effectively

The critical care doctor Julio Barado-Hualde (Villava, Navarre, 1965) has developed a mathematical simulation model that enables the occupancy of beds in an ICU (Intensive Care Unit) to be predicted so that they can be managed more effectively. This research, which focusses on the Hospital Complex of Navarre, is part of his PhD thesis read at the NUP/UPNA-Public University of Navarre. [More]
Nutrition vital for patients recovering from severe burns

Nutrition vital for patients recovering from severe burns

For someone recovering from severe burns, eating is often the last thing they want to do. However, burn specialists at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center say nutrition is so vital to their patients' recovery that they make it a quality indicator for patient care. [More]
MediCollector to commercialize Wyss Institute's bedside data-acquisition software

MediCollector to commercialize Wyss Institute's bedside data-acquisition software

The Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University today announced that its bedside data-acquisition software will be commercialized by a recently formed startup company, MediCollector LLC. The announcement follows a worldwide license agreement between Harvard's Office of Technology Development and MediCollector. [More]

UVA partners with MITRE to develop better health data analysis tools

University of Virginia Health System and The MITRE Corporation are partnering to develop better health data analysis tools to help prevent patients from getting sick and improving care while reducing healthcare costs. [More]
Chicago creates sustainable network to meet complicated public health emergencies

Chicago creates sustainable network to meet complicated public health emergencies

The Ebola epidemic and resulting international public health emergency is referred to as a "Black Swan" event in medical circles because of its unpredictable and impactful nature. However, a paper in the June 30 issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases, a leading journal in the field of infectious diseases, suggests that the response of the Chicago Ebola Response Network (CERN) in 2014-2015 has laid a foundation and a roadmap for how a regional public health network can anticipate, manage and prevent the next Black Swan public health event. [More]
UChicago, Argonne National Laboratory and USF to jointly study gut microbiomes of premature infants

UChicago, Argonne National Laboratory and USF to jointly study gut microbiomes of premature infants

Scientists have suspected that this initial disruption is linked to health problems down the road—things like autism, asthma, food allergies and autoimmune diseases—but so far they only have circumstantial evidence based on case studies. [More]
Three Wishes Project brings peace to critically ill patients and their families

Three Wishes Project brings peace to critically ill patients and their families

Asking for and honouring last wishes helps to create meaning, memories and closure at death, and personalizes the dying process for patients and their families, says a new study led by a McMaster University professor. [More]
Innovation in anaesthesia: an interview with Matti Lehtonen, GE Healthcare

Innovation in anaesthesia: an interview with Matti Lehtonen, GE Healthcare

The spectrum of patients seen today, from pre-term infants to the morbidly obese to the longer living elderly, is wider than ever before and increasingly more challenging with patients often presenting with multiple co-morbidities. This puts a huge strain on healthcare providers who are facing increasing challenges such as cost pressure and staff shortages. [More]
Study: Distinct naming convention for babies in NICU can reduce wrong-patient errors by almost 40%

Study: Distinct naming convention for babies in NICU can reduce wrong-patient errors by almost 40%

Traditionally, babies in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) are temporarily identified by gender and last name, such as Babyboy Jackson or Babygirl Smith, but this naming configuration can result in wrong-patient errors for the fragile newborns. [More]
Agfa HealthCare to launch new mobile DR system with FreeView telescopic column at AHRA 2015

Agfa HealthCare to launch new mobile DR system with FreeView telescopic column at AHRA 2015

Agfa HealthCare announces today that it will launch its new mobile DR system with FreeView telescopic column at AHRA 2015, the Association for Medical Imaging Management's annual meeting, in Las Vegas, Nevada, July 19-22. [More]
Advertisement