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Trauma Innovation unites healthcare professionals across Europe to discuss future of patient care

Trauma Innovation unites healthcare professionals across Europe to discuss future of patient care

Across the globe, the threat level for international terrorism is high. The unpredictable timings and locations of the recent atrocities in Belgium, France and Germany have highlighted how important it is for medical professionals to be prepared for mass casualty incidents. [More]
Steroid treatment linked to increased risk of retinopathy in very low birth weight infants

Steroid treatment linked to increased risk of retinopathy in very low birth weight infants

Because of the beneficial effect of corticosteroids on lung function, especially in infants who are ventilator dependent, corticosteroids are, at times, administered to very low birth weight neonates to treat established or evolving lung disease. However, it has long been suspected that steroids may have negative neurodevelopmental effects on very premature infants. [More]
Study reveals 1 in 3 people experience depression symptoms after ICU stay

Study reveals 1 in 3 people experience depression symptoms after ICU stay

A so-called meta-analysis of reports on more than 4,000 patients suggests that almost one in three people discharged from hospital intensive care units (ICUs) has clinically important and persistent symptoms of depression, according to researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine. [More]
Rare genetic variations linked to severe porphyria

Rare genetic variations linked to severe porphyria

An international research team has linked rare variations in a cell membrane protein to the wide variation in symptom severity that is a hallmark of porphyria, a rare disorder that often affects the skin, liver and nervous system. [More]
Pang receives NSF award to improve ICU management

Pang receives NSF award to improve ICU management

Guodong (Gordon) Pang has been awarded $150,000 by the National Science Foundation for research that aims to improve discharge predictions within intensive care units (ICUs) and a patient's subsequent flow through the hospital system. [More]
Clinics with comprehensive care for premature infants alleviate concerns for parents

Clinics with comprehensive care for premature infants alleviate concerns for parents

On January 24, 2013, Iris Vega-Figueroa's life changed completely. That's the day she gave birth to her twin girls, Iris and Geraldine. The twins were monoamniotic-monochorionic, meaning they shared one amniotic sack and one placenta in the womb. These rare pregnancies are considered high risk because of the uneven blood flow that occurs between the infants through the placenta. [More]
Disordered airway microbiome at birth may be linked to severe neonatal lung disease

Disordered airway microbiome at birth may be linked to severe neonatal lung disease

In contrast to the general belief that the airways of an infant are sterile until after birth, University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers and colleagues have found that the infant airway is already colonized with bacteria or bacterial DNA when a baby is born -- and this is true for infants born as early as 24 weeks gestation. [More]
Study shows hospitals that send more number of heart patients to ICU perform worse in quality of care

Study shows hospitals that send more number of heart patients to ICU perform worse in quality of care

Patients who suffer heart attacks, or flare-ups of congestive heart failure, can be cared for in a variety of hospital locations. But a new study suggests that they'll fare worse in hospitals that rely heavily on their intensive care units to care for patients like them. [More]
Telestroke program increases clot-dissolving treatment rates among ischemic stroke patients

Telestroke program increases clot-dissolving treatment rates among ischemic stroke patients

The use of a life-saving clot-dissolving treatment for patients with acute ischemic stroke increased by 73 percent following the implementation of a Kaiser Permanente telestroke program, according to a study published today in The Permanente Journal. [More]
New CCN article offers guidance on providing optimal care to critically ill obese patients

New CCN article offers guidance on providing optimal care to critically ill obese patients

The U.S. obesity epidemic means more critically ill patients have weight-associated conditions affecting their illness or are at greater risk of specific complications during their hospital stay. [More]
Kaiser Permanente telestroke program increases use of clot-dissolving treatment for stroke patients

Kaiser Permanente telestroke program increases use of clot-dissolving treatment for stroke patients

The use of a life-saving clot-dissolving treatment for patients with acute ischemic stroke increased by 73 percent following the implementation of a Kaiser Permanente telestroke program, according to a study published today in The Permanente Journal. [More]
Pre-term infants fed with breast milk have better IQs, working memory and motor function, study shows

Pre-term infants fed with breast milk have better IQs, working memory and motor function, study shows

A new study, which followed 180 pre-term infants from birth to age seven, found that babies who were fed more breast milk within the first 28 days of life had had larger volumes of certain regions of the brain at term equivalent and had better IQs, academic achievement, working memory, and motor function. [More]
New series of treatments may provide another option for families of unborn babies with CPAM

New series of treatments may provide another option for families of unborn babies with CPAM

A medical team at Osaka University Hospital, Japan, has conducted successful treatment for the fetal lung disorder Congenital Pulmonary Airway Malformattion (CPAM), also known as Congenital Cystic Adenomatoid Malformation (CCAM). [More]
AJCC article outlines role of LTAC hospitals in health care continuum

AJCC article outlines role of LTAC hospitals in health care continuum

Advances in technology have helped more patients survive acute illness and trauma, and these patients are increasingly transferred to long-term acute care hospitals. [More]
Scientists undertake major biomedical research initiative to escalate problem of sepsis

Scientists undertake major biomedical research initiative to escalate problem of sepsis

A multidisciplinary team of scientists -- including two UC Santa Barbara faculty members -- is poised to undertake a major biomedical research initiative focused on the escalating problem of sepsis, the body's abnormal response to severe infections. [More]
Scientists detect gut bacteria in deepest reaches of failing lungs

Scientists detect gut bacteria in deepest reaches of failing lungs

No one knows for sure how they got there. But the discovery that bacteria that normally live in the gut can be detected in the lungs of critically ill people and animals could mean a lot for intensive care patients. [More]
Preventing sudden unexpected deaths of babies and children: an interview with Professor Peter Fleming

Preventing sudden unexpected deaths of babies and children: an interview with Professor Peter Fleming

SIDS is the sudden and unexpected death of a baby, which usually occurs during sleep. The great majority of the babies are aged between about two weeks and seven or eight months. [More]
IDSA/ATS recommends shorter courses of antibiotics for patients with hospital-acquired, ventilator-associated pneumonia

IDSA/ATS recommends shorter courses of antibiotics for patients with hospital-acquired, ventilator-associated pneumonia

Hospital-acquired pneumonia and ventilator-associated pneumonia– which account for 20 to 25 percent of hospital-acquired infections – should be treated with shorter courses of antibiotics than they typically are, according to new guidelines released by the Infectious Diseases Society of America and American Thoracic Society and published in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases. [More]
New technology can help in rapid diagnosis and treatment of sepsis

New technology can help in rapid diagnosis and treatment of sepsis

Sepsis patients can be diagnosed and treated earlier with the help of new technology available for hospitals and homecare settings. [More]
Study finds significant differences among pediatric hospitals in managing inpatients with asthma

Study finds significant differences among pediatric hospitals in managing inpatients with asthma

Children's hospitals vary greatly in managing inpatients with asthma, according to researchers who analyzed hospital records in a large national database. [More]
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