Intensive Care News and Research RSS Feed - Intensive Care News and Research

Engineers bring touch of color to glucose monitoring

Engineers bring touch of color to glucose monitoring

University of Illinois engineers are bringing a touch of color to glucose monitoring. The researchers developed a new continuous glucose monitoring material that changes color as glucose levels fluctuate, and the wavelength shift is so precise that doctors and patients may be able to use it for automatic insulin dosing - something not possible using current point measurements like test strips. [More]
Futile treatment makes other ill patients needing medical attention to wait for critical care beds

Futile treatment makes other ill patients needing medical attention to wait for critical care beds

Providing futile treatment in the intensive care unit sets off a chain reaction that causes other ill patients needing medical attention to wait for critical care beds, according to a study by researchers from UCLA and RAND Health. [More]
Actavis reports positive results from ceftazidime-avibactam Phase III studies in cIAI patients

Actavis reports positive results from ceftazidime-avibactam Phase III studies in cIAI patients

Actavis plc today confirmed positive topline results from RECLAIM-1 and -2, pivotal Phase III studies evaluating the potential for the investigational antibiotic, ceftazidime-avibactam as a treatment for adult hospitalized patients with complicated intra-abdominal infections. [More]
Survey finds low awareness about risks of cognitive side effects following surgery

Survey finds low awareness about risks of cognitive side effects following surgery

Postsurgical cognitive side effects can have major implications for the level of care, length of hospital stay, and the patient's perceived quality of care, especially in elderly and fragile patients. A nationwide survey of Swedish anesthesiologists and nurse anesthetists has found there is low awareness of the risks of cognitive side effects following surgery. [More]
Viewpoints: Va. GOP's 'Medicaid charade'; Paul Ryan's health Rx for poverty; giving the sick unapproved drugs

Viewpoints: Va. GOP's 'Medicaid charade'; Paul Ryan's health Rx for poverty; giving the sick unapproved drugs

Virginia lawmakers will convene in a special session next month to address the question of expanding Medicaid and, more broadly, the fact that hundreds of thousands of poor and disabled people in the state have no health insurance coverage. Democrats and some moderate Republicans have advanced a variety of ideas to tackle that problem. Conservative Republicans, who control the legislature in Richmond, have rejected those solutions while proposing no alternative. Does the GOP intend for the special session to be anything more than a charade at taxpayers' expense? (8/15). [More]
CEOLIVE.TV interviews BioElectronics expert as part of its Executive Interview Series

CEOLIVE.TV interviews BioElectronics expert as part of its Executive Interview Series

BioElectronics Corporation, the maker of advanced consumer medical devices said that its EVP Dr. Deepak Kotak was interviewed by CEOLIVE.TV as part of its Executive Interview Series. [More]
Human milk diet protects intestines and supports growth of premature infants

Human milk diet protects intestines and supports growth of premature infants

For premature infants, adequate growth while in the neonatal intensive care unit is an indicator of better long-term health and developmental outcomes. [More]
Study: 9/11 dust cloud linked to pregnancy issues

Study: 9/11 dust cloud linked to pregnancy issues

Pregnant women living near the World Trade Center during 9/11 experienced higher-than-normal negative birth outcomes, according to a new working paper by Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. [More]
Bacteria in critically ill patients may be growing increasingly resistant to common antiseptic

Bacteria in critically ill patients may be growing increasingly resistant to common antiseptic

Bacteria that cause life-threatening bloodstream infections in critically ill patients may be growing increasingly resistant to a common hospital antiseptic, according to a recent study led by investigators at Johns Hopkins. [More]
Combination of NASBA and real-time qPCR detects aspergillosis with 100% accuracy

Combination of NASBA and real-time qPCR detects aspergillosis with 100% accuracy

The fungal infection invasive aspergillosis (IA) can be life threatening, especially in patients whose immune systems are weakened by chemotherapy or immunosuppressive drugs. Despite the critical need for early detection, IA remains difficult to diagnose. [More]
Bacteria may depend more on gastrointestinal age than on environmental factors in babies

Bacteria may depend more on gastrointestinal age than on environmental factors in babies

Scientists believe babies are born with digestive systems containing few or no bacteria. Their guts then quickly become colonized by microbes — good and bad — as they nurse or take bottles, receive medication and even as they are passed from one adoring relative to another. [More]
University of Chicago adds six new members to governing Board of Trustees

University of Chicago adds six new members to governing Board of Trustees

The University of Chicago Medical Center added six new members to its governing Board of Trustees, and named a new president of the medical staff. [More]
Study focuses on benefits of human milk for sick newborns

Study focuses on benefits of human milk for sick newborns

Human milk is infant food, but for sick, hospitalized babies, it's also medicine. That's the central premise of a series of articles in a neonatal nursing journal's special issue focused on human milk for sick newborns. [More]
Receipt of nutrition via feeding tube may be harmful for ICU patients

Receipt of nutrition via feeding tube may be harmful for ICU patients

Among mechanically ventilated intensive care unit (ICU) patients, receipt of high-protein nutrition via a feeding tube enriched with immune-modulating nutrients (such as glutamine, omega-3 fatty acids, and antioxidants) vs standard high-protein nutrition did not result in a significant difference in the incidence of new complications and may be harmful, as suggested by an increased risk of death at 6 months, according to a study in the August 6 issue of JAMA. [More]
PET-CT using FDG-labeled leucocytes may help in detecting infection in patients with acute pancreatitis

PET-CT using FDG-labeled leucocytes may help in detecting infection in patients with acute pancreatitis

A new study diagnosing infection in patients with pancreatic fluid collections may swiftly and accurately rule out active infection in the body. [More]
Researchers reveal obesity paradox among older Americans suffering from sepsis

Researchers reveal obesity paradox among older Americans suffering from sepsis

University of Michigan Health System researchers revealed an obesity paradox among older Americans suffering from sepsis. [More]
New treatment plan could reduce need for antihypertensive drugs

New treatment plan could reduce need for antihypertensive drugs

It truly could be mind over matter after all. University Hospitals Case Medical Center's Richard Josephson, MD, recently released trial results in a study published in Psychosomatic Medicine that discusses mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) for hypertension. [More]
Team debriefings linked with good neurological survival for kids suffering from cardiac arrest

Team debriefings linked with good neurological survival for kids suffering from cardiac arrest

A new study found that staff members who joined structured team debriefings after emergency care for children suffering in-hospital cardiac arrests improved their CPR performance and substantially increased the rates of patients surviving with favorable neurological outcomes. [More]
Mother singing to her preterm infant while providing kangaroo care may see benefits in health

Mother singing to her preterm infant while providing kangaroo care may see benefits in health

A mother who sings to her preterm infant while providing 'kangaroo care,' or holding with direct skin-to-skin contact, may see improvements in both her child's and her own health. [More]
NSAID use may mask early pneumonia symptoms

NSAID use may mask early pneumonia symptoms

People with pneumococcal pneumonia who are taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs at the point of diagnosis tend to develop more severe disease despite being younger and healthier than those not using these drugs, shows research. [More]