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New device turns paralysis victims' breath into words

New device turns paralysis victims' breath into words

A new device which transforms paralysis victims' breath into words - believed to be the first invention of its kind - has been developed by academics from Loughborough University. [More]
Probiotics show no benefit in preventing gastrointestinal colonization with drug-resistant microbes in ICU patients

Probiotics show no benefit in preventing gastrointestinal colonization with drug-resistant microbes in ICU patients

Compared with routine medical care, probiotics administered to critically ill patients in intensive care units showed no benefit in preventing the colonization of drug-resistant microbes in the intestinal tract, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. [More]
Few U.S. hospitals comply with CDC infection prevention guidelines for arterial catheter insertions

Few U.S. hospitals comply with CDC infection prevention guidelines for arterial catheter insertions

According to a survey conducted by Rhode Island Hospital researchers, there is significant variability regarding how clinicians manage catheters placed in the arteries of patients in intensive care units. Some practices may increase risk of infection associated with these catheters. Fewer than half of those surveyed complied with current Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) infection prevention guidelines for arterial catheter insertions. [More]

Radiometer introduces MicroMode measuring for fetal scalp and neonatal capillary sampling

Radiometer has launched the advanced ABL90 FLEX PLUS blood gas analyzer, featuring a unique MicroMode measuring function for extremely small volume blood samples. [More]
Seizures are common but not clinically apparent in newborns after cardiac surgery

Seizures are common but not clinically apparent in newborns after cardiac surgery

In 2011, the American Clinical Neurophysiology Society issued a guideline recommending that neonates undergoing cardiac surgery for repair of congenital heart disease be placed on continuous encephalographic (EEG) monitoring after surgery to detect seizures. These recommendations followed reports that seizures are common in this population, may not be detected clinically, and are associated with adverse neurocognitive outcomes. [More]
U-M microbiome research may lead to new ways to prevent, fight lung infections in patients

U-M microbiome research may lead to new ways to prevent, fight lung infections in patients

With every breath you take, microbes have a chance of making it into your lungs. But what happens when they get there? And why do dangerous lung infections like pneumonia happen in some people, but not others? Researchers at the University of Michigan Medical School have started to answer these questions by studying the microbiome of the lungs - the community of microscopic organisms that are in constant contact with our respiratory system. [More]
Arterial shunt in hybrid palliation better for hypoplastic left heart syndrome treatment

Arterial shunt in hybrid palliation better for hypoplastic left heart syndrome treatment

Children born with the major congenital heart defect hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) often must undergo a series of corrective surgeries beginning at birth. While most have the standard three-stage Norwood procedure, a hybrid strategy has been introduced to offset some disadvantages associated with the Norwood surgeries. In a report in The Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, investigators compare whether outcomes can be improved if an arterial shunt is used as a source of pulmonary blood flow rather than the more conventional venous shunt as part of the hybrid strategy of HLHS surgical reconstruction. [More]
Mallinckrodt subsidiary to acquire Therakos for $1.325 billion

Mallinckrodt subsidiary to acquire Therakos for $1.325 billion

Mallinckrodt plc, a leading specialty biopharmaceutical company, and The Gores Group, a global investment firm, announced today that they have entered into a definitive agreement under which a subsidiary of Mallinckrodt will acquire Therakos, Inc. a leading immunotherapy company in a transaction valued at approximately $1.325 billion. [More]
AACN selects Linda L. Chlan as 2016 Distinguished Research Lecturer

AACN selects Linda L. Chlan as 2016 Distinguished Research Lecturer

The American Association of Critical-Care Nurses recently selected Linda L. Chlan, RN, PhD, FAAN, as its 2016 Distinguished Research Lecturer. [More]
Johns Hopkins researchers report on more effective way to spot patients at risk of septic shock

Johns Hopkins researchers report on more effective way to spot patients at risk of septic shock

For a patient with sepsis - which kills more Americans every year than AIDS and breast and prostate cancer combined - hours can make the difference between life and death. [More]
Dartmouth study finds NICU admission rates are increasing for newborns of all weights

Dartmouth study finds NICU admission rates are increasing for newborns of all weights

Neonatal intensive care units were originally created for newborns who are extremely ill and/or underweight, but a Dartmouth study finds that NICU admission rates are increasing for newborns of all weights. [More]
Finding by UCSF researchers could increase availability of kidneys for transplant

Finding by UCSF researchers could increase availability of kidneys for transplant

Mild hypothermia in deceased organ donors significantly reduces delayed graft function in kidney transplant recipients when compared to normal body temperature, according to UC San Francisco researchers and collaborators, a finding that could lead to an increase in the availability of kidneys for transplant. [More]
University of Southampton study to examine how nurse staffing levels affect care, safety of patients

University of Southampton study to examine how nurse staffing levels affect care, safety of patients

A University of Southampton study will investigate how the provision of nurses in hospitals affects the care and safety of patients. [More]
CHOP surgeons successfully complete world's first bilateral hand transplant on child

CHOP surgeons successfully complete world's first bilateral hand transplant on child

Surgeons at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia joined with colleagues from Penn Medicine recently to complete the world's first bilateral hand transplant on a child. Earlier this month, the surgical team successfully transplanted donor hands and forearms onto eight-year-old Zion Harvey who, several years earlier, had undergone amputation of his hands and feet and a kidney transplant following a serious infection. [More]

Study shows that home births lead to higher infant mortality among Dutch women living in poorer areas

Home births lead to higher infant mortality than hospital births, at least for mothers living in poorer areas. This is the conclusion of a new study conducted by N. Meltem Daysal (University of Southern Denmark and IZA), Mircea Trandafir (University of Southern Denmark and IZA) and Reyn van Ewijk (VU University Amsterdam and University of Mainz) that examines 356,412 low-risk Dutch women who delivered between 2000 and 2008 and who were allowed to choose between a home and a hospital birth. [More]
Multiple sclerosis relapse management: an interview with Gina Remington

Multiple sclerosis relapse management: an interview with Gina Remington

MS relapses are typically reflective of new neurological symptoms. However, it can be a worsening of neurologic symptoms that begins after a patient has been stable (generally for about 30 days), but relapses are persistent and consistent changes in symptoms that occur for more than 24 to 48 hours. [More]
Wayne State's faculty selected for Aspen Health Innovators Fellowship

Wayne State's faculty selected for Aspen Health Innovators Fellowship

The Washington, D.C.-based educational and policy studies organization The Aspen Institute has selected Wayne State University School of Medicine's Patrick Hines, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor of Physiology and an assistant professor of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, one of only 20 health care leaders in the country for the inaugural class of its Health Innovators Fellowship. [More]
Organ donor honored at Reagan UCLA Medical Center

Organ donor honored at Reagan UCLA Medical Center

Two years ago, Rachel Greenberg went out to run a few errands. While she was gone, her husband Glenn suffered a massive brain hemorrhage. He was immediately taken to Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center where physicians explained he had suffered the worst kind of brain bleed. [More]
Rutgers physicians use new treatments to restore teenager’s life

Rutgers physicians use new treatments to restore teenager’s life

At first, 13-year-old Christina Blumstein thought she had an ordinary headache. She and her parents were returning from a visit to Long Island in July 2014 when the pain struck. Was it a bout of carsickness? Too much screen time on her iPad? But a few hours later, back home in Old Bridge, New Jersey, her mother MaryAnn says, "Christina started screaming that somebody was stabbing her in the head with a knife." Soon afterward Christina was comatose and in an ambulance - and her life was in grave danger. [More]
Family members who avoid major medical decisions may suffer from PTSD

Family members who avoid major medical decisions may suffer from PTSD

Family members who make major medical decisions for relatives in an intensive care unit (ICU) may suffer posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) if they cope by avoiding the situation, according to a new study by scientists at Case Western Reserve University's Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing. [More]
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