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Johns Hopkins study finds that nearly one-quarter of ICU survivors experience PTSD

Johns Hopkins study finds that nearly one-quarter of ICU survivors experience PTSD

Post-traumatic stress disorder is often thought of as a symptom of warfare, major catastrophes and assault. It’s rarely considered in patients who survive a critical illness and stay in the intensive care unit (ICU). However, in a recent Johns Hopkins study, researchers found that nearly one-quarter of ICU survivors suffer from PTSD. [More]
Getinge secures EUR 160 million loan from EIB for development of new medical devices

Getinge secures EUR 160 million loan from EIB for development of new medical devices

The European Investment Bank has provided a EUR 160 million loan to Getinge AB, a global medical technology company, for its research and development in the areas of surgery, intensive care, infection control, care ergonomics and wound care. Getinge’s research addresses unmet medical needs and targets the development of new devices with higher efficiency and safety for increased positive outcomes for both caregivers and patients. [More]
French clinicians diagnose first case of rabies since 2003

French clinicians diagnose first case of rabies since 2003

A team of French clinicians has diagnosed the first case of rabies in that country since 2003. Only 20 cases of human rabies had been diagnosed in France between 1970 and 2003. Moreover, the patient was unaware of having been bitten. [More]
Nearly one-quarter of ICU survivors experience PTSD

Nearly one-quarter of ICU survivors experience PTSD

Post-traumatic stress disorder is often thought of as a symptom of warfare, major catastrophes and assault. It's rarely considered in patients who survive a critical illness and stay in the intensive care unit (ICU). [More]
Pulmonary Hypertension Center at RI Hospital receives PHA accreditation

Pulmonary Hypertension Center at RI Hospital receives PHA accreditation

The Pulmonary Hypertension Center at Rhode Island Hospital is one of the nation's first centers of its kind to be accredited by the Pulmonary Hypertension Association. For those affected by pulmonary hypertension (PH), accreditation assures them and their providers that they have access to the most advanced care available in the country. [More]
CareFusion showcases new medication management technologies at HIMSS annual conference

CareFusion showcases new medication management technologies at HIMSS annual conference

CareFusion, a BD company, today announced it is demonstrating several new medication management technologies at the Healthcare Information Management and Systems Society annual conference in the Intelligent Health Pavilion and Interoperability Showcase. [More]
AACN announces recipients of annual research grants

AACN announces recipients of annual research grants

The American Association of Critical-Care Nurses announces the recipients of its annual research grants, with total available funding of $160,000. [More]
Collaboration between nurses and physicians decreases rates of HAIs in critical care

Collaboration between nurses and physicians decreases rates of HAIs in critical care

Collaborative relationships between nurses and physicians decrease rates of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) in critical care, according to an article in the April issue of Critical Care Nurse. [More]
New research reveals how a deadly fungus grows and kills immune cells

New research reveals how a deadly fungus grows and kills immune cells

New research from the University of Toronto has scientists re-thinking how a lethal fungus grows and kills immune cells. The study hints at a new approach to therapy for Candida albicans, one of the most common causes of bloodstream infections. [More]

AJN honors six of Elsevier's nursing book titles with Book of the Year awards

Elsevier, a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services, announced today that six of its nursing book titles are recipients of the American Journal of Nursing (AJN) Book of the Year awards. [More]
RSV infection rate on the rise among young children

RSV infection rate on the rise among young children

Children with Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV), a common virus that infects the lungs and breathing passageways, has been on the rise across the nation for the last several years. Though it may only produce minor cold symptoms in adults, it can lead to serious illness in young children and those with compromised immune systems. [More]
Penn surgeons develop new tools to identify joint replacement patients at risk for serious complications

Penn surgeons develop new tools to identify joint replacement patients at risk for serious complications

Orthopedic surgeons from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have developed two new prediction tools aimed at identifying total hip and knee replacement patients who are at-risk of developing serious complications after surgery. [More]
Most child pedestrian injuries occur near schools, bus stops, and in the spring months

Most child pedestrian injuries occur near schools, bus stops, and in the spring months

New research presented today at the 2015 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) found that most child pedestrian injuries involving a motor vehicle occurred while children were unsupervised, near schools and bus stops, and in the spring months during the afternoon and evening hours. [More]
Harris Health System uses sign language video technology to communicate with hearing-impaired patients

Harris Health System uses sign language video technology to communicate with hearing-impaired patients

Harris Health System is now using sign language video technology to better communicate with its hearing-impaired and hard-of-hearing patients. [More]
UM experts warn of serious risks associated with common IV devices

UM experts warn of serious risks associated with common IV devices

Every day, patients around the country get IV devices placed in their arms, to make it easier to receive medicines or have blood drawn over the course of days or weeks. But these PICC lines, as they're called, also raise the risk of potentially dangerous blood clots. [More]
Experts call for global review of sepsis guidelines

Experts call for global review of sepsis guidelines

Experts are calling for a global review of guidelines used to diagnose sepsis, after a study found one in eight patients with infections severe enough to need admission to an Intensive Care Unit in Australia and New Zealand, did not meet current criteria. [More]
Study investigates effects of antidepressant treatment in pain catastrophizing patients

Study investigates effects of antidepressant treatment in pain catastrophizing patients

A select population of patients having surgery experience what is called pain catastrophizing - an irrational thought process that leads a patient to perceive pain as worse than it actually is. Antidepressant medications reduce negative mood and might change this way of thinking, but according to a study published in the April edition of Anesthesiology, the official medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists, that may not be the case, at least for acute pain. [More]
New research finds old blood just as good as fresh blood

New research finds old blood just as good as fresh blood

Just like milk and many other foods, blood used for transfusions is perishable. But contrary to popular belief, new research shows that blood stored for three weeks is just as good as fresh blood - findings published today in the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]

AACN to award ICU Design Citation to ICUs at Our Lady of the Lake Regional Medical Center

The American Association of Critical-Care Nurses will present the ICU Design Citation to the intensive care units at Our Lady of the Lake Regional Medical Center in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, during the 2015 National Teaching Institute & Critical Care Exposition, San Diego, May 18-21. [More]
Researchers discover gene associated with congenital anomaly of urinary tract

Researchers discover gene associated with congenital anomaly of urinary tract

An interdisciplinary team of researchers under the direction of the University of Bonn Hospital have discovered a gene which is associated with a rare congenital anomaly of the urinary tract called classic bladder exstrophy. [More]
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