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Study helps physicians better identify patients at risk of acute respiratory distress syndrome

Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a leading cause of respiratory failure after surgery. Patients who develop the lung disorder postoperatively are at higher risk of dying in the hospital, and those who survive the syndrome may still bear its physical effects years later. [More]

Jersey Shore opens new CVICU to provide post-operative care for cardiac surgery patients

Jersey Shore University Medical Center recently unveiled the new CardioVascular Intensive Care Unit (CVICU) - a twelve bed critical care unit providing post-operative care for cardiac surgery patients, including those who receive traditional open heart surgery and newer, complex interventional cardiovascular procedures. [More]
MEDNAX acquires Fredericksburg Anesthesia Associates

MEDNAX acquires Fredericksburg Anesthesia Associates

MEDNAX, Inc., today announced the acquisition of Fredericksburg Anesthesia Associates, Inc., a private practice physician group based in Fredericksburg, Va. The practice will become part of MEDNAX's American Anesthesiology division and is the third Virginia-based anesthesia practice to join the division. [More]

Vanderbilt participates in national study to evaluate effectiveness of group prenatal care

Vanderbilt University hopes to enroll about 400 women in a national study to evaluate the effectiveness of a new model of group prenatal care designed to improve the health and well-being of mothers and babies during pregnancy, birth and infancy. [More]
New insight provides potential to improve treatment for sepsis

New insight provides potential to improve treatment for sepsis

In a review published in the April issue of Immunity, Kevin J. Tracey, MD, president of The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, says it's time to take a fresh look at the medical community's approach to treating sepsis, which kills millions worldwide every year, including more than 200,000 Americans. [More]
McGill University Health Centre launches new program to improve patient safety and quality care

McGill University Health Centre launches new program to improve patient safety and quality care

A new program aimed at improving patient safety and quality care has been launched at McGill University Health Centre hospitals. The program, which is being conducted in collaboration with Vendorlink.ca, is the first of its kind in a large academic Quebec hospital. [More]

Spike in mortality after cardiac surgery is associated with 30 days survival measurement

Analyzing a national database of hospital inpatient records, a team of researchers reports an expected spike in mortality six days after cardiac surgery, but also a more surprising and potentially troubling jump in deaths at the 30-day mark. [More]

Novel prediction model improves patient outcomes after paracetamol-induced acute liver failure

In the UK paracetamol toxicity is the most common cause of ALF and has a high mortality rate. It is estimated that 150 to 200 deaths and 15 to 20 LTs occur as a result of poisoning each year in England and Wales. [More]
TSRI scientists to study effects of pain medication on prenatal brain development

TSRI scientists to study effects of pain medication on prenatal brain development

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have been awarded a $472,500 Cutting Edge Basic Research Award (CEBRA) by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) of the National Institutes of Health to study models of the brain development of newborns who have been exposed-and become addicted-to prescription pain medication while still in the womb. [More]
Johns Hopkins student receives 2014 Excellence in Public Health Award

Johns Hopkins student receives 2014 Excellence in Public Health Award

Ramy El-Diwany, a fifth-year M.D./Ph.D. student at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, has won a 2014 Excellence in Public Health Award from the U.S. Public Health Service (USPHS) Physician Professional Advisory Committee for his contributions to community health services. [More]
1/3 of ICU patients develop depression that typically manifests as physical symptoms

1/3 of ICU patients develop depression that typically manifests as physical symptoms

A third of intensive care patients develop depression that typically manifests as physical, or somatic, symptoms such as weakness, appetite change, and fatigue, rather than psychological symptoms, according to one of the largest studies to investigate the mental health and functional outcomes of survivors of critical care, published in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine. [More]
Study: Moderate to severe depression increases risk of heart failure by 40%

Study: Moderate to severe depression increases risk of heart failure by 40%

Moderate to severe depression increases the risk of heart failure by 40%, a study of nearly 63 000 Norwegians has shown. The findings were presented for the first time today at EuroHeartCare 2014. [More]
Researchers identify possible way to prevent headaches of climbers

Researchers identify possible way to prevent headaches of climbers

By monitoring blood flow in the brains of six climbers scaling Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania, German medical researchers have identified a possible way to prevent the headaches that are a common feature of altitude sickness. This work appears in the latest issue of JNIRS—Journal of Near Infrared Spectroscopy. [More]
Patients who stay longer in ICU have substantial physical impairments 2 years later

Patients who stay longer in ICU have substantial physical impairments 2 years later

Patients have substantial physical impairments even two years after being discharged from the hospital after a stay in an intensive care unit (ICU), new Johns Hopkins research suggests. [More]

More doctors in Intensive Care benefit patients' survival rates

Patients in Intensive Care have a better chance of survival if there are more doctors and nurses working on the unit, new research shows. [More]
Stormont-Vail HealthCare partners with Mayo Clinic

Stormont-Vail HealthCare partners with Mayo Clinic

Stormont-Vail HealthCare and Mayo Clinic officials announced today that the Topeka-based health system has become a member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network, a national network of like-minded organizations that share a commitment to better serving patients and families. [More]

Interrupting diurnal rhythms impairs healing immediately after heart attack, study shows

To improve recovery for heart attack patients, hospitals should maintain normal day and night cycles for those patients during the first few days after the attack, say University of Guelph researchers. [More]
UT Southwestern launches telemedicine program to extend stroke care to patients in rural areas

UT Southwestern launches telemedicine program to extend stroke care to patients in rural areas

UT Southwestern Medical Center has launched a state-of-the-art telemedicine program that will extend immediate access to UT Southwestern's nationally recognized stroke care during the crucial time period when treatment is needed for a patient of an ischemic stroke, or clot in one of the brain's blood vessels. [More]
S. pneumoniae is commonest cause of paediatric CAP

S. pneumoniae is commonest cause of paediatric CAP

Streptococcus pneumoniae is the predominant cause of community-acquired pneumonia among children in Belgium, with non-vaccine serotypes accounting for the majority of cases, a Belgian study shows. [More]

rEVO Biologics commences ATryn Phase 3 clinical program for treatment of preeclampsia in pregnant women

rEVO Biologics Inc., a subsidiary of LFB SA, today announced the initiation of the Phase 3 clinical program for ATryn for the treatment of preeclampsia in pregnant women during the 24th to 28th week of pregnancy. [More]