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Experimental drug warrants clinical study for treatment of Ebola infection

Experimental drug warrants clinical study for treatment of Ebola infection

A case report, published in The Lancet today, describes the successful treatment of Ebola using a new drug under clinical development for vascular leakage (FX06, a fibrin-derived peptide). [More]
SPECT scan measures brain activity during seizures

SPECT scan measures brain activity during seizures

Loyola University Medical Center is offering epileptic patients an imaging scan that records brain activity during seizures. [More]
Ortho-Clinical Diagnostics announces availability of NEPHROCHECK Test System for AKI patients

Ortho-Clinical Diagnostics announces availability of NEPHROCHECK Test System for AKI patients

Ortho-Clinical Diagnostics, Inc. today announced the nationwide availability to hospitals of the NEPHROCHECK Test System designed to help healthcare providers identify patients at risk of developing moderate or severe acute kidney injury (AKI) within 12 hours of patient assessment. [More]
Two-drug combination before surgery benefits women with triple-negative breast cancer

Two-drug combination before surgery benefits women with triple-negative breast cancer

A breast cancer specialist and clinical researcher at Women & Infants Hospital of Rhode Island presented research yesterday at the 2014 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium showing that adding either the chemotherapy drug carboplatin or the blood vessel-targeting drug bevacizumab to the standard treatment of chemotherapy before surgery helped women who have the basal-like subtype of triple-negative breast cancer. [More]
Key steps to improve care for pregnant mothers and babies affected by CDH

Key steps to improve care for pregnant mothers and babies affected by CDH

A new study has revealed key steps for hospitals to improve care for pregnant mums and babies affected by a life-threatening condition. [More]
Multiple factors influence survival of extremely premature infants

Multiple factors influence survival of extremely premature infants

Multiple factors influence how well a severely premature infant (23 weeks gestation) will do after birth and over the long-term, according to researchers at Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine. These findings were published in the latest issue of the American Journal of Perinatology. [More]
FDA Advisory Committee votes in favor of Actavis' ceftazidime-avibactam

FDA Advisory Committee votes in favor of Actavis' ceftazidime-avibactam

Actavis plc today announced that the Anti-Infective Drugs Advisory Committee convened by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has voted to recommend approval of Actavis' New Drug Application (NDA) for ceftazidime-avibactam, an investigational antibiotic being developed to treat hospitalized patients when limited or no treatment options are available for complicated intra-abdominal infections (cIAI) (in combination with metronidazole) and complicated urinary tract infections (cUTI) (including acute pyelonephritis) caused by Gram-negative pathogens. [More]
Simple treatments for Ebola patients not given sufficient priority

Simple treatments for Ebola patients not given sufficient priority

The widespread misconception that there are no proven treatments for Ebola virus disease has meant that simple treatments – especially intravenous fluids and electrolytes, which could reduce the number of deaths caused by the virus – have been neglected, according to a new Comment, published in The Lancet. [More]
Study on hospital alarm fatigue records more than 2.5 million alarms in one month

Study on hospital alarm fatigue records more than 2.5 million alarms in one month

Jessica Zègre-Hemsey, a cardiac monitoring expert at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and her colleagues at the University of California San Francisco, revealed more than 2.5 million alarms were triggered on bedside monitors in a single month - the first figure ever reported from a real-world hospital setting. [More]
Elegant Medical to receive patent for groundbreaking Stethos electronic stethoscope

Elegant Medical to receive patent for groundbreaking Stethos electronic stethoscope

Elegant Medical LLC today announced it will receive an issued patent from the US Patent and Trademark Office for its groundbreaking Stethos electronic stethoscope, the most significant advancement to the stethoscope in half a century. [More]
GlySure awarded three U.S. patents for proprietary calibration technique, sensor membrane

GlySure awarded three U.S. patents for proprietary calibration technique, sensor membrane

GlySure Limited, developer of in-hospital continuous blood glucose monitoring (CBGM) systems, announced today that it has been awarded three U.S. patents covering the company's core proprietary calibration technique and sensor membrane. [More]
New study details weight loss patterns of breastfed newborns

New study details weight loss patterns of breastfed newborns

Using weights obtained from over 100,000 Northern California babies, a new study is the first to detail the weight loss patterns of exclusively breastfed newborns. The results show that some breastfed babies lose weight faster and for a longer period than was previously recognized. [More]

Sphere Medical to unveil Proxima in-line miniature blood gas analyser at ICS State of the Art meeting

Sphere Medical, innovator in critical care monitoring and diagnostics equipment, will be introducing its new Proxima in-line patient dedicated arterial blood gas analyser to the Intensive Care Society (ICS) community at its State of the Art Meeting, ICC London ExCel, 8-10th December. [More]
Pathology specialist publishes invited commentary on breast cancer gene screening

Pathology specialist publishes invited commentary on breast cancer gene screening

There has been much recent debate on the benefits and risks of screening for breast cancer using BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in the general adult population. [More]
Abnormal vitamin D, trace element levels may indicate asthma risk

Abnormal vitamin D, trace element levels may indicate asthma risk

Serum levels of vitamin D, copper and zinc could help identify infants with recurrent wheezing who are at risk of developing asthma, Turkish researchers suggest. [More]
University of Vermont Medical Center recognized with 2014 Partnership in Prevention Award

University of Vermont Medical Center recognized with 2014 Partnership in Prevention Award

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, and the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America today recognized the University of Vermont Medical Center with the 2014 Partnership in Prevention Award for achieving sustainable improvements toward eliminating healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). [More]
Preterm birth becomes world's number one killer of young children

Preterm birth becomes world's number one killer of young children

For the first time in history, the complications of preterm birth outrank all other causes as the world's number one killer of young children. [More]
Experts focus on key issues impeding delivery of cardiac care in resource-limited settings

Experts focus on key issues impeding delivery of cardiac care in resource-limited settings

Critical care is defined by life-threatening conditions, which require close evaluation, monitoring, and treatment by appropriately trained health professionals. Cardiovascular care bears these same requirements. [More]
Study: Critically ill newborns may be exposed to DEHP chemicals in medical products

Study: Critically ill newborns may be exposed to DEHP chemicals in medical products

Hospitalized premature infants are exposed to unsafe levels of a chemical found in numerous medical products used to treat them, raising questions about whether critically ill newborns may be adversely affected by equipment designed to help save their lives. [More]
Hospice care lowers hospitalization, ICU admissions and invasive procedures for Medicare patients

Hospice care lowers hospitalization, ICU admissions and invasive procedures for Medicare patients

Medicare patients with poor­ prognosis cancers who received hospice care had significantly lower rates of hospitalization, intensive care unit (ICU) admissions and invasive procedures at the end of life, along with significantly lower health care expenditures during the last year of life, according to a study in the November 12 issue of JAMA. [More]