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PinnacleHealth, Pennsylvania leaders launch new campaign to help combat sepsis

PinnacleHealth, Pennsylvania leaders launch new campaign to help combat sepsis

PinnacleHealth System launched its "Knock Out Sepsis" campaign this morning from the Harrisburg State Capitol Rotunda steps joined by Pennsylvania Secretary of Health Karen Murphy, Insurance Commissioner Teresa Miller, State Representatives Mike Regan and Patty Kim, sepsis survivors Russ DiGilio, Aaron Stoner, and Carol Brame, mother of Sean Brame, and medical professionals on the frontlines of combatting sepsis. [More]
Gene therapy for LPLD patients linked to lower frequency and severity of pancreatitis

Gene therapy for LPLD patients linked to lower frequency and severity of pancreatitis

Up to 6 years after receiving a single treatment with the gene therapy product lipoprotein lipase (LPL), patients with the debilitating genetic disease LPL deficiency (LPLD) had about 50% fewer episodes of pancreatitis than before receiving the treatment. [More]
UCM REACT program receives $2 million federal grant to support children affected by violence

UCM REACT program receives $2 million federal grant to support children affected by violence

The University of Chicago Medicine Comer Children's Hospital will provide screening and mental health care for hundreds of children and families that have been affected by violence in many of Chicago's South and West side neighborhoods. [More]
Three-way partnership launches Australia’s first eICU monitoring program for high-risk patients

Three-way partnership launches Australia’s first eICU monitoring program for high-risk patients

Royal Philips, Macquarie University’s MQ Health in Sydney and Emory Healthcare in Atlanta, Georgia (US), today announced the launch of Australia’s first - and only - remote intensive care unit (eICU) monitoring program, to improve the outcomes of high risk patients in most need of ‘round-the-clock’ observation. [More]
New research sheds light on how many doctors attend their patient’s funerals

New research sheds light on how many doctors attend their patient’s funerals

New research at the University of Adelaide has shed light on how many doctors are attending the funerals of their patients and the reasons behind their choice. The researchers say more needs to be done within the medical profession to openly discuss the issue. [More]
CHOP researchers exploit gene discovery in severe epilepsy to identify precision treatment

CHOP researchers exploit gene discovery in severe epilepsy to identify precision treatment

An international team of researchers who discovered a new gene disorder that causes severe childhood epilepsy leveraged that finding to reduce seizures in two children. [More]
UChicago opens new Family Birth Center inside Comer Children's Hospital

UChicago opens new Family Birth Center inside Comer Children's Hospital

The University of Chicago Medicine is opening its new 25,000-square foot Family Birth Center inside Comer Children's Hospital, bringing a more customizable birth experience to women on the South Side and south suburbs. [More]
ACCA annual congress shines lights on managing risk in acute cardiovascular care

ACCA annual congress shines lights on managing risk in acute cardiovascular care

Acute Cardiovascular Care 2016 will put a spotlight on managing high risk patients. The annual congress of the Acute Cardiovascular Care Association, a registered branch of the European Society of Cardiology, is held 15 to 17 October at the Centro de Congressos de Lisboa in Lisbon, Portugal. [More]
Language barriers can complicate treatment for children with special health care needs

Language barriers can complicate treatment for children with special health care needs

Language barriers can have dangerous consequences for children with special health care needs, according to a paper by authors including pediatric specialists at McGovern Medical School at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. [More]
Researchers develop new model to map links between salmonella and sepsis

Researchers develop new model to map links between salmonella and sepsis

Research by industrial engineering and biology researchers at Kansas State University marks a significant milestone in the battle against sepsis, the second highest cause of death in intensive care units in the U.S. [More]
UC football team supports brain cancer survivor

UC football team supports brain cancer survivor

In 2009, Mitch Stone was 11 when he was diagnosed with a brain tumor. He went through very aggressive treatments at Cincinnati Children's. [More]
VIB-Ghent University research provides insights into septic shock

VIB-Ghent University research provides insights into septic shock

Researchers at VIB and Ghent University have discovered an important mechanism of sepsis, an overreaction of the body's immune system to an infection. [More]
Social, emotional factors may raise risk of postpartum depression in mothers of preterm infants

Social, emotional factors may raise risk of postpartum depression in mothers of preterm infants

Postpartum depression is the most common complication of pregnancy and childbirth, affecting up to 15 percent of all women within the first three months following delivery. [More]
Experts develop urine-based method to diagnose conditions in newborn babies

Experts develop urine-based method to diagnose conditions in newborn babies

Experts from the V. I. Kulakov Research Center for Obstetrics, Gynecology and Perinatology and the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology have devised a method that uses the urinary proteome to diagnose conditions in newborn babies. [More]
CHORI scientists reveal improved protective antibody responses to new meningococcal vaccine

CHORI scientists reveal improved protective antibody responses to new meningococcal vaccine

A study conducted by UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital Oakland Research Institute scientists shows greatly improved protective antibody responses to a new mutant vaccine antigen for prevention of disease caused by Neisseria meningitidis - also known as meningococcus - that has the potential to improve the current vaccines for meningitis. [More]
Innovative computer app could be invaluable tool empowering patients who are voiceless

Innovative computer app could be invaluable tool empowering patients who are voiceless

There are almost 800,000 patients in the United States who are intubated and require mechanical ventilation annually. More than half of these patients are awake, alert and desperately attempting to communicate with nurses, physicians and their loved ones. [More]
Smartphone application may be feasible, effective sexual health education tool for teenage girls

Smartphone application may be feasible, effective sexual health education tool for teenage girls

Across the globe, there is increased focus on developing interventions related to comprehensive sexual health education for adolescents, with the ultimate goal of combatting unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections. [More]
Delirium in advanced cancer patients: an interview with Dr Knox Todd

Delirium in advanced cancer patients: an interview with Dr Knox Todd

Delirium is a terribly distressing syndrome of acute confusion. We often see it in the emergency department in older patients and in those with multiple medical problems. They may be acting strangely at home and concerned loved ones bring them to the emergency department. [More]
Using biomarkers to diagnose sepsis: an interview with Jordi Trafi

Using biomarkers to diagnose sepsis: an interview with Jordi Trafi

Sepsis, according to the new clinical definition of sepsis, is organ dysfunction caused by the body’s dysregulated response to an infection. Sepsis is common, with about 20 million patients/year in the developed world. It can escalate to septic shock, which is a life-threatening condition with a mortality rate of about 40%. In fact, about every second someone in the world dies of sepsis. [More]
Study examines perspectives linked to family-centered ICU rounds

Study examines perspectives linked to family-centered ICU rounds

Families are increasingly welcome in intensive care units (ICUs), including as active participants in discussions with physicians and nurses during daily bedside rounds. [More]
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