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Carbon monoxide may actually protect the brain from damage after subarachnoid hemorrhage

Carbon monoxide may actually protect the brain from damage after subarachnoid hemorrhage

Carbon monoxide is known by many as a poisonous gas that causes brain injury and other neurological symptoms, including memory loss and confusion. But a new study led by investigators at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center suggests the opposite may be true: When administered in small, carefully controlled amounts, carbon monoxide may actually protect the brain from damage following subarachnoid hemorrhage, a devastating stroke that results from bleeding in the brain. [More]
Researchers create 'brainstorm barometer' to calculate the brain functions of very premature infants

Researchers create 'brainstorm barometer' to calculate the brain functions of very premature infants

University of Helsinki researchers have partnered with Swedish and Australian researchers to create a "brainstorm barometer", which allows computers to calculate the brain functions of very premature babies during their first hours of life. [More]
Discovery Lab enrolls first patient in phase 2a clinical trial of AEROSURF

Discovery Lab enrolls first patient in phase 2a clinical trial of AEROSURF

Discovery Laboratories, Inc., a specialty biotechnology company focused on developing aerosolized KL4 surfactant therapies for respiratory diseases, today reported that the first patient has been enrolled in the next phase of its phase 2a clinical evaluation of AEROSURF, which is designed to evaluate the safety and tolerability of higher and repeat doses of aerosolized KL4 surfactant administered to premature infants 29 to 34 weeks gestational age (GA) who are receiving nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) for respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), compared to infants receiving nCPAP alone. [More]
Findings support use of high-flow nasal oxygen therapy to treat postoperative respiratory failure

Findings support use of high-flow nasal oxygen therapy to treat postoperative respiratory failure

A relatively new, easier to implement, and better-tolerated method to provide supplemental oxygen to patients at risk of respiratory failure after surgery did not result in a worse rate of treatment failure compared to a more commonly used method, according to a study appearing in JAMA. [More]
Bathing patients in common hospital soap can reduce MRSA contamination

Bathing patients in common hospital soap can reduce MRSA contamination

Holding hope for a relatively inexpensive way to improve care and prevent the spread of deadly hospital-acquired infections, a new study reports that bathing patients in a common hospital soap, called chlorhexidine, was equally effective in preventing the transmission of the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) as the common practice of having healthcare workers avoid physical contact with the patients. [More]
Workplace mindfulness-based intervention reduces stress levels of employees

Workplace mindfulness-based intervention reduces stress levels of employees

A study by researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center found that a workplace mindfulness-based intervention reduced stress levels of employees exposed to a highly stressful occupational environment. [More]
Cardiome signs commercialization agreement with AOP for ESMOCARD products

Cardiome signs commercialization agreement with AOP for ESMOCARD products

Cardiome Pharma Corp. today announced that the company has entered a commercialization agreement with AOP Orphan Pharma to sell AOP's cardiovascular products, ESMOCARD and ESMOCARD LYO (esmolol hydrochloride) in Italy, France, Spain and Belgium. [More]
New Johns Hopkins-led research suggests risk factors for developing acute kidney injury

New Johns Hopkins-led research suggests risk factors for developing acute kidney injury

Physicians treating hospitalized patients for conditions unrelated to the kidneys should pay close attention to common blood and urine tests for kidney function in order to prevent incidental injury to the organs that help cleanse the body of toxins, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health-led research suggests. [More]
Conjoined twin boys undergo successful separation surgery

Conjoined twin boys undergo successful separation surgery

Carter and Conner, conjoined twin boys born Dec. 12, 2014, in Jacksonville, Fla., underwent a successful separation surgery on May 7, 2015. The 12-hour surgery was led by a team of highly skilled pediatric specialists that included Daniel Robie, MD, chief of pediatric general surgery, and Nicholas Poulos, MD, pediatric general surgeon, for Nemours Children's Specialty Care and Wolfson Children's Hospital. [More]
Workplace mindfulness-based intervention reduces stress levels and risk of burnout

Workplace mindfulness-based intervention reduces stress levels and risk of burnout

A study by researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center found that a workplace mindfulness-based intervention reduced stress levels of employees exposed to a highly stressful occupational environment. [More]
Gynecologic oncologist awarded grant to improve quality of life for women with endometrial cancer

Gynecologic oncologist awarded grant to improve quality of life for women with endometrial cancer

The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute Board of Governors recently awarded more than $2.7 million in contracted funding to Katina Robison, MD, a gynecologic oncologist with the Program in Women's Oncology at Women & Infants Hospital of Rhode Island, a Care New England hospital, for the study "Cancer of the Uterus and Treatment of Stress Incontinence." [More]
UC Davis researchers develop new intervention to help depressed mothers seek treatment

UC Davis researchers develop new intervention to help depressed mothers seek treatment

Researchers at UC Davis have developed a new intervention that identifies potentially depressed mothers and encourages them to seek treatment. The Motivating our Mothers (MOM) program takes a unique approach, relying on pediatricians rather than the mother's doctor for diagnosis. [More]
CHOP's patient safety team recognized for work alarm fatigue in hospital units

CHOP's patient safety team recognized for work alarm fatigue in hospital units

A patient safety team at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia who analyzed the problem of alarm fatigue in hospital units has been recognized for the best research paper of 2014 in a journal dedicated to biomedical technology. [More]
Loyola's Ronald McDonald Children's Hospital implements pediatric early warning scoring system

Loyola's Ronald McDonald Children's Hospital implements pediatric early warning scoring system

The Ronald McDonald Children's Hospital at Loyola University Medical Center has implemented a pediatric early warning scoring system to better identify children who are at-risk of becoming critically ill while in the hospital. [More]
Fecal transplantation cures C. diff infection, eliminates multi-drug resistant pathogens

Fecal transplantation cures C. diff infection, eliminates multi-drug resistant pathogens

A fecal microbiota transplant (FMT) not only cured a case of Clostridium difficile (C. diff) infection in a 66 year old man; it eliminated populations of multi-drug resistant organisms both in the patient's gastrointestinal tract, and several other body sites. [More]
Perception of quality of care for the dying in U.S. worsens

Perception of quality of care for the dying in U.S. worsens

Surveys of loved ones who lost elderly relatives show that the perception of the quality of care for the dying in the United States has worsened over the last decade. For all the health care industry has done to try to make progress, huge gaps remain between how care is delivered and what patients and their loved ones want, reports a new study in the Journal of Palliative Medicine. [More]
New guide helps doctors, nurses to identify hospital patients who may benefit from urinary catheter

New guide helps doctors, nurses to identify hospital patients who may benefit from urinary catheter

What's the only thing worse than having a urinary catheter when you're in the hospital? Having one and getting a urinary tract infection (UTI) - or worse - as a result. Now, a new detailed guide gives doctors and nurses information to help decide which hospital patients may benefit from a urinary catheter - and which ones don't. [More]
Applying palliative care principles to transform geriatric emergency care may reduce hospital admissions

Applying palliative care principles to transform geriatric emergency care may reduce hospital admissions

Applying palliative care principles to emergency departments may reduce the number of geriatric patients admitted to intensive care units, possibly extending lives and reducing Medicare costs, according to a three-year analysis by Mount Sinai researchers set to be published in the May edition of Health Affairs, which can be found online. [More]
Mutations in PARN and RTEL1 associated with familial pulmonary fibrosis, telomere shortening

Mutations in PARN and RTEL1 associated with familial pulmonary fibrosis, telomere shortening

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have identified mutations in two genes that cause a fatal lung scarring disease known as familial pulmonary fibrosis. [More]
Premature female infants tend to do better than males

Premature female infants tend to do better than males

A new study from Loyola University Medical Center provides further evidence that female infants tend to do better than males when born prematurely. [More]
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