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Researchers reveal inherited genetic mutations associated with ovarian cancer risk

Researchers reveal inherited genetic mutations associated with ovarian cancer risk

Previous research has established a link between genetic mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes to an increased risk of developing ovarian, fallopian tube or peritoneal cancer in women. [More]
AES releases new guideline to help physicians treat status epilepticus patients effectively

AES releases new guideline to help physicians treat status epilepticus patients effectively

Status epilepticus - continuous or rapid sequential seizure activity for 30 minutes or more - is a medical emergency with a high mortality rate in both children and adults. Prompt and effective treatment is key; therefore the American Epilepsy Society has released a new guideline to help physicians, hospitals, and health systems treat patients effectively. [More]
New article provides guidance on managing critically ill patients at risk for alcohol withdrawal

New article provides guidance on managing critically ill patients at risk for alcohol withdrawal

Alcohol withdrawal adds challenges to caring for critically ill patients, and nurses must be diligent at each stage of care to minimize complications, according to an article in the February issue of Critical Care Nurse. [More]
Use of antenatal steroids during late preterm delivery prevents neonatal respiratory complications

Use of antenatal steroids during late preterm delivery prevents neonatal respiratory complications

In a study to be presented on Feb. 4 in the oral plenary session at 8 a.m. EST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting, in Atlanta, researchers with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and Maternal-Fetal Medicine Units Network found that the administration of antenatal steroids in pregnancies at risk for late preterm delivery prevents respiratory and other neonatal complications. [More]
Simple blood test could help predict emergence of pre-eclampsia in pregnant women

Simple blood test could help predict emergence of pre-eclampsia in pregnant women

Pre-eclampsia is a serious illness associated with pregnancy, which develops after twenty weeks and is associated with defective ingrowing of the placenta within the mother. The dangerous illness is both the second most frequent cause of death in pregnant women, and the reason for severe complications for mother and child, especially during premature births. [More]
Epidural analgesia has some adverse effects on newborns

Epidural analgesia has some adverse effects on newborns

Researchers from the University of Granada observed that babies born after epidural analgesia show a small decline in Apgar index values, a quick test applied to newborn babies in order to assess their general health. [More]
Patients undergoing surgery in hospitals with best nursing care have better outcomes

Patients undergoing surgery in hospitals with best nursing care have better outcomes

Patients are often unaware that choosing the right hospital is very important to having a good outcome. A novel study published today in the prominent surgery journal JAMA Surgery showed that patients undergoing surgery at Magnet hospitals recognized for nursing excellence, and good nurse staffing, have better outcomes at the same or lower costs as other hospitals. [More]
New Penn study examines differences in costs of end-of-life care among developed countries

New Penn study examines differences in costs of end-of-life care among developed countries

Despite widespread perception, the United States does not provide the worst end-of-life care in the world. In the first international comparison of end-of-life care practices, researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and colleagues from seven countries found that the United States actually has the lowest proportion of deaths in the hospital and the lowest number of days in the hospital in the last six months of life among the those countries, according to a new study published today in JAMA. [More]
Artificial pancreas moves closer to becoming a reality

Artificial pancreas moves closer to becoming a reality

As the accuracy, reliability, adoption, and successful use of Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) continue to increase, the ultimate goal of combining CGM with an insulin pump and sophisticated algorithms for automating the control and suspension of insulin infusion--known as the "artificial pancreas"--moves closer to becoming a reality. [More]
Post-term deliveries associated with increased short-term risks to newborns

Post-term deliveries associated with increased short-term risks to newborns

While pregnancy is considered full-term at 40 weeks, only some 5 percent of women actually give birth on their predetermined due date. Most OBGYNs recommend more frequent and more vigilant monitoring after 40 weeks and sometimes the artificial induction of labor. But many pregnant women refuse induction due to the risk of stress to the fetus or increased likelihood of requiring a caesarean section. [More]
Scientists develop wireless brain sensors

Scientists develop wireless brain sensors

A team of neurosurgeons and engineers has developed wireless brain sensors that monitor intracranial pressure and temperature and then are absorbed by the body, negating the need for surgery to remove the devices. [More]
iMDsoft announces implementation of MetaVision clinical information system in more than 45 units in 2015

iMDsoft announces implementation of MetaVision clinical information system in more than 45 units in 2015

iMDsoft announced that the MetaVision clinical information system was successfully implemented in more than 45 anaesthesia and critical care units across the globe over the past 12 months. [More]
Wearing helmet could cut life-threatening sledding injuries in kids

Wearing helmet could cut life-threatening sledding injuries in kids

With the coldest months of the year upon us, it’s only a matter of time until the first snowfall of the season hits. Sledding, a seasonal favorite for children of all ages seeking thrills, is probably high on kids’ to-do lists as the first flakes hit the ground. [More]
Researchers find association between obesity and VTE in pediatric populations

Researchers find association between obesity and VTE in pediatric populations

Researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center have found an association between obesity and the formation of blood clots in the veins of children and adolescents. [More]
New nursing competencies may help improve veterans' health care needs

New nursing competencies may help improve veterans' health care needs

As the daughter of a 27-year veteran of the U.S. Air Force, and herself an intensive care nurse for more than 20 years, University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Nursing Professor Jacqueline Moss, Ph.D., is familiar with the U.S. military and caring for its veterans. [More]
Higher-fat DASH diet significantly reduces blood pressure and triglycerides

Higher-fat DASH diet significantly reduces blood pressure and triglycerides

The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) dietary pattern, which is high in fruits, vegetables and low fat dairy foods, significantly lowers blood pressure as well as low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. [More]
Ebola health-care workers develop guidelines for treating children during future outbreaks

Ebola health-care workers develop guidelines for treating children during future outbreaks

When the Ebola virus outbreak erupted in West Africa in 2014, children infected with the virus -- particularly those under age 5 -- faced overwhelming challenges. Not only was there a high death rate among young children infected with the disease, they often were isolated from their families, leaving them feeling distressed and without the intensive care they needed. [More]

MU researchers to present new disaster management system at 2016 Consumer Electronics Show

Two University of Missouri researchers will present Panacea's Cloud, a new disaster management system, at the 2016 Consumer Electronics Show on Jan. 6-9, 2016, in Las Vegas. [More]
Buprenorphine superior to methadone in reducing duration of treatment for babies born in drug withdrawal

Buprenorphine superior to methadone in reducing duration of treatment for babies born in drug withdrawal

A study of two opioids used to wean babies born in withdrawal from drugs their mothers have taken shows that buprenorphine is superior to methadone in reducing duration of treatment and length of hospital stay. [More]
Study supports open and patient-centered visitation guidelines in critical care settings

Study supports open and patient-centered visitation guidelines in critical care settings

Watching the clock is becoming an outdated part of visiting a patient in intensive care, as more hospitals ease restrictions and develop more flexible policies focused on the preferences and needs of each patient. [More]
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