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UCLA patient successfully receives smaller Total Artificial Heart

UCLA patient successfully receives smaller Total Artificial Heart

A petite 44-year-old woman has received a successful heart transplant at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, thanks to an experimental Total Artificial Heart designed for smaller patients. [More]
Providence Tarzana, CHLA collaborate to provide enhanced care to children in the San Fernando Valley

Providence Tarzana, CHLA collaborate to provide enhanced care to children in the San Fernando Valley

Children in the San Fernando Valley now have access to an enhanced level of pediatric care, under the terms of an innovative agreement between Providence Tarzana Medical Center and Children's Hospital Los Angeles and its physicians. [More]
UCLA patient first in California to receive smaller Total Artificial Heart

UCLA patient first in California to receive smaller Total Artificial Heart

A petite 44-year-old woman has received a successful heart transplant at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, thanks to an experimental Total Artificial Heart designed for smaller patients. [More]
Premature babies who avoid eye contact in early infancy less likely to show symptoms of autism

Premature babies who avoid eye contact in early infancy less likely to show symptoms of autism

Premature babies are at an increased risk for developing autism spectrum disorder. But a small study indicates that preemies who avoid eye contact in early infancy are less likely to demonstrate symptoms of autism at age 2 than preemies who maintain eye contact during early interactions, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. [More]
UCSF workshop helps improve palliative care communication skills among critical care nurses

UCSF workshop helps improve palliative care communication skills among critical care nurses

A workshop at the University of California San Francisco helped critical care nurses improve their palliative care communication skills, according to an article in the July issue of the American Journal of Critical Care. [More]
Study demonstrates safety and accuracy of robot-assisted telemedicine in NICU

Study demonstrates safety and accuracy of robot-assisted telemedicine in NICU

Many hospitals lack the resources and patient volume to employ a round-the-clock, neonatal intensive care specialist to treat their youngest and sickest patients. [More]
Scoring system may help hospitals better prepare for surges in trauma cases

Scoring system may help hospitals better prepare for surges in trauma cases

A scoring system that can identify periods of high activity and increased trauma patient deaths in hospital emergency rooms may help hospitals better prepare for surges in trauma patient volume that come with catastrophic events like the Boston Marathon bombing (April 2013) or disasters like the Amtrak train crash (May 2015) in Philadelphia. [More]
Researchers develop world's first prognosis scoring system for life expectancy of patients in hospitals

Researchers develop world's first prognosis scoring system for life expectancy of patients in hospitals

Researchers at the MedUni Vienna's University Department of Anaesthetics, General Intensive Care Medicine and Pain Therapy, the University Department of Internal Medicine III and the Centre for Medical Statistics, Information Technology and Intelligent Systems have developed the world's first prognosis scoring system (PANDORA score) for hospital patients and their life expectancy within the next 30 days. [More]
UC Davis pediatricians describe challenges faced by children with asthma in California

UC Davis pediatricians describe challenges faced by children with asthma in California

Low flu vaccination rates, medication compliance and limited access to primary care providers have contributed to the high pediatric asthma rates in California, say UC Davis pediatricians Ulfat Shaikh and Robert Byrd, who have published an extensive study describing the challenges faced by children with asthma in California. [More]
Basilea announces UK launch of broad-spectrum Cephalosporin Zevtera for first-line treatment of pneumonia

Basilea announces UK launch of broad-spectrum Cephalosporin Zevtera for first-line treatment of pneumonia

Basilea Pharmaceutica AG today announces the UK launch of its broad-spectrum Cephalosporin Zevtera (Ceftobiprole medocaril) for the first-line treatment of serious bacterial pneumonia. [More]
Researchers identify fast and accurate approach to diagnose respiratory tract infection

Researchers identify fast and accurate approach to diagnose respiratory tract infection

Researchers from the University of Manchester are part of a team that has identified an important new approach to diagnose infections in critically ill patients rapidly and accurately. [More]
Study reveals benefit of early screening for vascular disorder patent ductus arteriosus among preterm infants

Study reveals benefit of early screening for vascular disorder patent ductus arteriosus among preterm infants

Among extremely preterm infants, early screening for the vascular disorder patent ductus arteriosus before day 3 of life was associated with a lower risk of in-hospital death and pulmonary hemorrhage, but not with differences in other severe complications, according to a study in the June 23/30 issue of JAMA. [More]
EEG-measurements better predict outcome of postanoxic coma

EEG-measurements better predict outcome of postanoxic coma

EEG-measurements enable better prediction of the outcome of a coma that was caused by a lack of oxygen to the brain. This became clear from research of the University of Twente (MIRA) in cooperation with Rijnstate hospital and Medisch Spectrum Twente. [More]
Hill-Rom, Welch Allyn joining forces to advance patient care around the world

Hill-Rom, Welch Allyn joining forces to advance patient care around the world

Two of the world's leading healthcare technology companies are joining forces to make possible the development of leading-edge solutions that will advance patient care around the world. Hill-Rom Holdings, Inc. and privately-held Welch Allyn, Inc. today announced that the Boards of Directors of both companies have unanimously approved a definitive agreement under which Hill-Rom will acquire Welch Allyn for approximately $2.05 billion in cash and stock. [More]
Completing sepsis resuscitation bundle in six hours after diagnosis

Completing sepsis resuscitation bundle in six hours after diagnosis

Blood poisoning, known as sepsis, is the most common cause of death in intensive care units, according to the National Institutes of Health. The body's immune response to fight the infection triggers inflammation that restricts blood flow and leads to multiple organ failure. [More]

Physicians have responsibility to help families make end-of-life decisions

About 20 percent of Americans spend time in an intensive care unit around the time of their death, and most deaths follow a decision to limit life-sustaining therapies. [More]
Study reveals surgical consequences of severe obesity

Study reveals surgical consequences of severe obesity

Research from the University of Alberta's Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry is revealing the heavy surgical consequences of severe obesity. [More]
Surgeons perform breakthrough operation to separate six-month-old conjoined Haitian twins

Surgeons perform breakthrough operation to separate six-month-old conjoined Haitian twins

On Friday, May 22, an 18-member team of physicians and nurses from Children's Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA) and Keck Medicine of the University of Southern California (USC) led an international collaboration to separate a pair of six-month-old conjoined Haitian twins, the first such operation ever performed on Haitian soil. [More]
Whole genome sequencing can help implement rapid-response infection control protocols

Whole genome sequencing can help implement rapid-response infection control protocols

Whole genome sequencing can quickly isolate the specific strain of bacteria causing an outbreak, identify the source of contamination, and enable rapid infection prevention to stop the spread of infection, according to a study published today. [More]

Researchers develop device to diagnose bacterial meningitis in babies

Currently the only test to diagnose bacterial meningitis in babies is through a lumbar puncture, a painful and difficult procedure to perform. For this reason, a group of biomedical engineers decided to search for an alternative and developed a portable device that can detect this illness with a simple ultrasound scan of the fontanelle. [More]
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