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New Canadian study highlights need to consider mental health of caregivers in post-ICU care

New Canadian study highlights need to consider mental health of caregivers in post-ICU care

A new Canadian study focusing on caregiver outcomes of critically ill patients reveals that caregivers of intensive care unit (ICU) survivors, who have received mechanical ventilation for a minimum of seven days, are at a high risk of developing clinical depression persisting up to one year after discharge. [More]
Innovative technology in NICU can predict risk of major infections in premature or critically ill babies

Innovative technology in NICU can predict risk of major infections in premature or critically ill babies

A new technology in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at UC San Diego Health is able to predict the risk of life-threatening infections up to 24 hours before they appear in severely premature or critically ill infants. Infection is the leading cause of death in this fragile patient population. [More]
New study finds link between prenatal SSRI use and umbilical cord length

New study finds link between prenatal SSRI use and umbilical cord length

Umbilical cords of children whose mothers used selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors during pregnancy may be longer than umbilical cords of other newborn children, shows a new study from the University of Eastern Finland and Kuopio University Hospital. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, SSRIs, are commonly prescribed antidepressants, and this is the first time their association with umbilical cord length was observed. [More]
Researchers investigate effects of new steroid treatment on children with ARDS

Researchers investigate effects of new steroid treatment on children with ARDS

Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) affects hundreds of thousands of people each year, many of them children. Those with this life threatening condition have severely injured and wet lungs, and are treated with mechanical ventilation. [More]
Researchers monitor ICP and PRx to characterize temporal evolution in severe TBI patients

Researchers monitor ICP and PRx to characterize temporal evolution in severe TBI patients

Winner of the Best International Abstract Award, Hadie Adams, presented his research, Characterizing the Temporal Evolution of ICP and Cerebrovascular Reactivity after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury, during the 2016 American Association of Neurological Surgeons Annual Scientific Meeting. [More]
Michigan researchers use 'kidney on a chip' device to measure effect of drug doses on kidney cells

Michigan researchers use 'kidney on a chip' device to measure effect of drug doses on kidney cells

University of Michigan researchers have used a "kidney on a chip" device to mimic the flow of medication through human kidneys and measure its effect on kidney cells. [More]
Stroke Awareness Month: Meridian Neuroscience provides latest information about stroke prevention, treatments

Stroke Awareness Month: Meridian Neuroscience provides latest information about stroke prevention, treatments

In observance of Stroke Awareness Month, Meridian Neuroscience is kicking off a series of informative community events, providing expert advice, tips, and the latest information about stroke prevention and treatments. The events will take place at Meridian Health locations throughout Monmouth and Ocean counties. [More]
Cerebellar not cerebral atrophy predicts poor anti-NMDAR encephalitis outcome

Cerebellar not cerebral atrophy predicts poor anti-NMDAR encephalitis outcome

Diffuse cerebral atrophy in patients with anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis does not necessarily mean irreversible brain damage, whereas progressive cerebellar atrophy may indicate a poor long-term prognosis, researchers report. [More]
Feeding breast milk during first month of life may spur brain growth in preterm infants

Feeding breast milk during first month of life may spur brain growth in preterm infants

Feeding premature babies mostly breast milk during the first month of life appears to spur more robust brain growth, compared with babies given little or no breast milk. [More]
More neurological resources needed to manage Zika virus infections

More neurological resources needed to manage Zika virus infections

WFN Zika-Info-Service: World Federation of Neurology establishes Work Group on Zika virus to support international efforts - Lack of neurological resources in countries most concerned by the virus. [More]
Acid suppression drugs frequently prescribed for high-risk newborns, study shows

Acid suppression drugs frequently prescribed for high-risk newborns, study shows

Since 2006, several published studies have associated the use of some acid suppression medications in hospitalized high-risk babies with infections, necrotizing enterocolitis and increased risk of death. Those medications - histamine-2 receptor antagonists, such as ranitidine (Zantac and others), and proton pump inhibitors, such as esomeprazole (Nexium and others) - were originally approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use in adults and older children. [More]
Patients who survived life-threatening illness in ICU at increased risk for psychiatric symptoms

Patients who survived life-threatening illness in ICU at increased risk for psychiatric symptoms

Results of a multi-institutional national study of nearly 700 people who survived life-threatening illness with a stay in an intensive care unit (ICU) suggest that a substantial majority of them are at high risk for persistent depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder — especially if they are female, young and unemployed. [More]
Study indicates mRS is poorly suited to evaluate, report quality of neuro-surgery

Study indicates mRS is poorly suited to evaluate, report quality of neuro-surgery

Surgery has become a volatile field during the past few years, with study after study challenging prevailing treatment practices. For example, surgical treatment of acute appendicitis and arthroscopic surgery on degenerative knees have been called into question by recent research results reached by Finnish researchers. [More]
New study links high-volume lung transplant centers with lower costs, readmissions

New study links high-volume lung transplant centers with lower costs, readmissions

High-volume lung transplant centers have lower transplantation costs and their patients are less likely to be readmitted within 30 days of leaving the hospital following surgery, according to a new study of more than 3,000 Medicare patients who received lung transplants. [More]
Quality improvement intervention in ICUs does not reduce in-hospital mortality, study reveals

Quality improvement intervention in ICUs does not reduce in-hospital mortality, study reveals

Implementation of a multifaceted quality improvement intervention with daily checklists, goal setting, and clinician prompting did not reduce in-hospital mortality compared with routine care among critically ill patients treated in intensive care units (ICUs) in Brazil, according to a study appearing in the April 12 issue of JAMA. [More]
Researchers find evidence that protein involved in regulating inflammation has anti-septic effects

Researchers find evidence that protein involved in regulating inflammation has anti-septic effects

Sepsis represents a serious complication of infection and is one of the leading causes of death and critical illness worldwide due in part to the lack of effective therapies. A report in the American Journal of Pathology provides evidence from both mouse and human studies that SHARPIN, a protein involved in regulating inflammation, has anti-septic effects. These findings may spur development of novel sepsis treatments. [More]
Cutaneous ureterostomy with single stoma may reduce complications in older patients undergoing bladder cancer surgery

Cutaneous ureterostomy with single stoma may reduce complications in older patients undergoing bladder cancer surgery

A retrospective study indicates that for certain elderly patients undergoing surgery for bladder cancer, diverting urine from the bladder can be safely achieved with what's known as a cutaneous ureterostomy with a single stoma rather than the commonly used ileal conduit. [More]
Analysis reveals improved survivorship for acute liver failure patients

Analysis reveals improved survivorship for acute liver failure patients

More patients hospitalized with acute liver failure - often the result of acetaminophen overdose - are surviving, including those who receive a liver transplant and those who don't, an analysis led by a UT Southwestern Medical Center researcher showed. [More]
Researchers explore rapid changes in oxygen levels as aggravating factors in lung failure

Researchers explore rapid changes in oxygen levels as aggravating factors in lung failure

Mechanical ventilation can contribute to lung damage by inducing rapid changes in oxygen levels. Researchers at the Medical University of Vienna are now conducting studies for the first time into the significance of these changes as aggravating factors in lung failure. [More]
Researchers propose new method for diagnosis of bacterial infection in preterm infants

Researchers propose new method for diagnosis of bacterial infection in preterm infants

A research group led by Kobe University Professor MORIOKA Ichiro (Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics), Associate Professor OSAWA Kayo (Graduate School of Health Sciences, Department of Biophysics), and Clinical Technologist SATO Itsuko (Kobe University Hospital, Department of Clinical Laboratory) is proposing a new criterion for diagnosis of bacterial infection in preterm infants. [More]
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