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Moberg receives CE Mark approval for CNS Monitor

Moberg receives CE Mark approval for CNS Monitor

Moberg has received CE Mark approval for the CNS Monitor, a medical device used for advanced monitoring of neurological intensive care patients. The CE Mark certifies that a product has met European Union requirements for commercial marketing in Europe. [More]
ProMedica and Harbor team up to address growing community need for mental health services

ProMedica and Harbor team up to address growing community need for mental health services

Today ProMedica and Harbor announced plans to form a joint operating company (JOC) to address a growing community need for mental health services in northwest Ohio and southeast Michigan. [More]
Report: Too few staff to care for children admitted to intensive care units

Report: Too few staff to care for children admitted to intensive care units

More children than ever are being admitted to intensive care units in England and Wales but there are fewer staff per bed available to cope with the increase, according to a new report published jointly by the University of Leeds and University of Leicester. [More]
Study provides support for new understanding of the immune system

Study provides support for new understanding of the immune system

A study published in the journal Science provides support for a new-and still controversial-understanding of the immune system. The research was conducted by collaborators in the U.S. and Europe, including Robert Cramer, PhD, an assistant professor of microbiology and immunology at the Geisel School of Medicine and member of the Dartmouth Lung Biology Center, and Kelly Shepherdson, PhD, at the time a graduate student in Cramer's lab. [More]
Viewpoints: New insurers suggest health law success; slow response on Ebola

Viewpoints: New insurers suggest health law success; slow response on Ebola

Before Obamacare launched, conservative outlets warned that the law would collapse as insurers shunned the overpriced, overregulated insurance exchanges. [More]
Elsevier recognizes four nurse professionals in fourth annual Superheroes of Nursing Contest

Elsevier recognizes four nurse professionals in fourth annual Superheroes of Nursing Contest

Elsevier, a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services, today announced the 2014 Elsevier Superheroes of Nursing. Now in its fourth year, the program was created to honor real-life superheroes who perform outstanding work in the field of nursing. [More]
Seattle Children's Research Institute receives grant to improve health of infants with heart defects

Seattle Children's Research Institute receives grant to improve health of infants with heart defects

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Office of Orphan Products Development has awarded Seattle Children's Research Institute a $1.6 million grant to lead a 4-year, multi-site clinical trial aimed at improving long-term health in infants born with a heart defect. [More]
Hospitals seek to control costs by setting standards for care

Hospitals seek to control costs by setting standards for care

One group in Delaware looked at high spending on cardiac monitoring for patients who really didn't need it and encouraged doctors to instead use guidelines from the American Heart Association. Costs fell by 70 percent for the monitoring, a study finds. [More]
DNA sequencing may lead to greater care for patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia

DNA sequencing may lead to greater care for patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia

A patient survives life-threatening trauma, is intubated in the intensive care unit (ICU) to support his or her affected vital functions, starts to recover, and then develops pneumonia. [More]
New evidence-based guidelines for prevention, treatment of POAF

New evidence-based guidelines for prevention, treatment of POAF

The American Association for Thoracic Surgery has released new evidence-based guidelines for the prevention and treatment of perioperative and postoperative atrial fibrillation (POAF) and flutter for thoracic surgical procedures. [More]
Experts to study how improved support for dementia carers can enhance quality of life

Experts to study how improved support for dementia carers can enhance quality of life

Experts will explore how improved support and powers for people caring for loved-ones with dementia can improve quality of life for both patients and carers around the UK. [More]
Single-family room environment can optimize care for preterm infants

Single-family room environment can optimize care for preterm infants

The prevalence of preterm birth - the birth of an infant prior to 37 weeks of pregnancy - is a significant health problem that has increased over the past two decades. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, preterm birth affects nearly 500,000 babies each year, or one of every eight born in the U.S. While medical care has improved survival rates for preterm infants, questions remain about ways to positively impact the neurodevelopmental outcomes of preterm infants. [More]
Highlights: Hawaii public hospital cuts; La. struggles with state worker health program costs; aging in Ky.

Highlights: Hawaii public hospital cuts; La. struggles with state worker health program costs; aging in Ky.

Public hospitals across Hawaii are finding ways to reduce staff and cut services because they don't have enough money to make ends meet. Executives from the Hawaii Health Systems Corp. told lawmakers Friday that even after layoffs they are facing a $30 million deficit in 2015. One hospital on Maui chose to close its adolescent psychology unit because it couldn't sustain the appropriate staffing levels to provide the services. It's also considering cuts to oncology and dialysis services if the situation doesn't improve (9/20). [More]
Improvements in NICU nursing care could boost health outcomes for underweight black infants

Improvements in NICU nursing care could boost health outcomes for underweight black infants

The health outcomes and quality of care for underweight black infants could greatly improve with more nurses on staff at hospitals with higher concentrations of black patients, according to a new study co-led by a Rutgers researcher. [More]
UVA Center for Telehealth receives 2014 Governor's Technology Award

UVA Center for Telehealth receives 2014 Governor's Technology Award

The University of Virginia Center for Telehealth received a 2014 Governor's Technology Award for making it easier to access high-quality care and health education for patients across Virginia. [More]
Peer pressure influences adherence to hand hygiene

Peer pressure influences adherence to hand hygiene

Nationally, hand hygiene adherence by healthcare workers remains staggeringly low despite its critical importance in infection control. [More]
Hospitals see sharp declines in rates of CLABSIs and ventilator-associated pneumonias

Hospitals see sharp declines in rates of CLABSIs and ventilator-associated pneumonias

Hospitals across the country have seen sharp declines in rates of central line-associated blood stream infections (CLABSIs) and ventilator-associated pneumonias (VAPs) among critically ill neonates and children, according to a new study in the journal Pediatrics. [More]
Ultrasound procedures encourage many hospitals in Europe to adopt the technology

Ultrasound procedures encourage many hospitals in Europe to adopt the technology

Growing awareness of the harmful effects of radiation exposure is driving the uptake of ultrasound systems, which are radiation free, less expensive, and more versatile than bigger modalities such as magnetic resonance. [More]
Codman reaches exclusive distribution agreement with Pulsar Vascular to market PulseRider

Codman reaches exclusive distribution agreement with Pulsar Vascular to market PulseRider

Codman Neuro, part of DePuy Synthes Companies of Johnson & Johnson, today announced it has reached an exclusive distribution agreement with Pulsar Vascular to market and promote that company's PulseRider® in Europe, the Middle East and Africa. [More]
Extreme environment medicine: an interview with Dr Kevin Fong, University College London

Extreme environment medicine: an interview with Dr Kevin Fong, University College London

The understanding of how long-duration space flight affects the human body has come on quite considerably in recent years, and in large part, we owe that to programs of research that have taken place aboard the International Space Station and the Mir Space Station. [More]