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Rutgers physicians use new treatments to restore teenager’s life

Rutgers physicians use new treatments to restore teenager’s life

At first, 13-year-old Christina Blumstein thought she had an ordinary headache. She and her parents were returning from a visit to Long Island in July 2014 when the pain struck. Was it a bout of carsickness? Too much screen time on her iPad? But a few hours later, back home in Old Bridge, New Jersey, her mother MaryAnn says, "Christina started screaming that somebody was stabbing her in the head with a knife." Soon afterward Christina was comatose and in an ambulance - and her life was in grave danger. [More]
Family members who avoid major medical decisions may suffer from PTSD

Family members who avoid major medical decisions may suffer from PTSD

Family members who make major medical decisions for relatives in an intensive care unit (ICU) may suffer posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) if they cope by avoiding the situation, according to a new study by scientists at Case Western Reserve University's Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing. [More]
New paper describes positive effects of CRAC channel inhibitors in animal models of acute pancreatitis

New paper describes positive effects of CRAC channel inhibitors in animal models of acute pancreatitis

Researchers from CalciMedica, Inc. and the University of Liverpool today announced the publication of a paper describing positive effects of calcium release-activated calcium (CRAC) channel inhibitors in animal models of acute pancreatitis. The paper, titled "Inhibitors of ORAI1 prevent cytosolic calcium-associated injury of human pancreatic acinar cells and acute pancreatitis in 3 mouse models" appears in the August edition of the journal Gastroenterology. [More]
New mathematical simulation model helps manage ICU bed occupancy effectively

New mathematical simulation model helps manage ICU bed occupancy effectively

The critical care doctor Julio Barado-Hualde (Villava, Navarre, 1965) has developed a mathematical simulation model that enables the occupancy of beds in an ICU (Intensive Care Unit) to be predicted so that they can be managed more effectively. This research, which focusses on the Hospital Complex of Navarre, is part of his PhD thesis read at the NUP/UPNA-Public University of Navarre. [More]
Nutrition vital for patients recovering from severe burns

Nutrition vital for patients recovering from severe burns

For someone recovering from severe burns, eating is often the last thing they want to do. However, burn specialists at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center say nutrition is so vital to their patients' recovery that they make it a quality indicator for patient care. [More]
MediCollector to commercialize Wyss Institute's bedside data-acquisition software

MediCollector to commercialize Wyss Institute's bedside data-acquisition software

The Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University today announced that its bedside data-acquisition software will be commercialized by a recently formed startup company, MediCollector LLC. The announcement follows a worldwide license agreement between Harvard's Office of Technology Development and MediCollector. [More]

UVA partners with MITRE to develop better health data analysis tools

University of Virginia Health System and The MITRE Corporation are partnering to develop better health data analysis tools to help prevent patients from getting sick and improving care while reducing healthcare costs. [More]
Chicago creates sustainable network to meet complicated public health emergencies

Chicago creates sustainable network to meet complicated public health emergencies

The Ebola epidemic and resulting international public health emergency is referred to as a "Black Swan" event in medical circles because of its unpredictable and impactful nature. However, a paper in the June 30 issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases, a leading journal in the field of infectious diseases, suggests that the response of the Chicago Ebola Response Network (CERN) in 2014-2015 has laid a foundation and a roadmap for how a regional public health network can anticipate, manage and prevent the next Black Swan public health event. [More]
UChicago, Argonne National Laboratory and USF to jointly study gut microbiomes of premature infants

UChicago, Argonne National Laboratory and USF to jointly study gut microbiomes of premature infants

Scientists have suspected that this initial disruption is linked to health problems down the road—things like autism, asthma, food allergies and autoimmune diseases—but so far they only have circumstantial evidence based on case studies. [More]
Three Wishes Project brings peace to critically ill patients and their families

Three Wishes Project brings peace to critically ill patients and their families

Asking for and honouring last wishes helps to create meaning, memories and closure at death, and personalizes the dying process for patients and their families, says a new study led by a McMaster University professor. [More]
Innovation in anaesthesia: an interview with Matti Lehtonen, GE Healthcare

Innovation in anaesthesia: an interview with Matti Lehtonen, GE Healthcare

The spectrum of patients seen today, from pre-term infants to the morbidly obese to the longer living elderly, is wider than ever before and increasingly more challenging with patients often presenting with multiple co-morbidities. This puts a huge strain on healthcare providers who are facing increasing challenges such as cost pressure and staff shortages. [More]
Study: Distinct naming convention for babies in NICU can reduce wrong-patient errors by almost 40%

Study: Distinct naming convention for babies in NICU can reduce wrong-patient errors by almost 40%

Traditionally, babies in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) are temporarily identified by gender and last name, such as Babyboy Jackson or Babygirl Smith, but this naming configuration can result in wrong-patient errors for the fragile newborns. [More]
Agfa HealthCare to launch new mobile DR system with FreeView telescopic column at AHRA 2015

Agfa HealthCare to launch new mobile DR system with FreeView telescopic column at AHRA 2015

Agfa HealthCare announces today that it will launch its new mobile DR system with FreeView telescopic column at AHRA 2015, the Association for Medical Imaging Management's annual meeting, in Las Vegas, Nevada, July 19-22. [More]
High-frequency tympanometry testing can help identify middle-ear problems in newborn babies

High-frequency tympanometry testing can help identify middle-ear problems in newborn babies

Screening newborn babies who are in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) using a testing process called high-frequency tympanometry can help identify middle-ear problems earlier, according to newly published research from a local team of researchers. [More]

Avita Medical donates ReCell devices, sends experienced personnel to help treat burn victims in Taiwan

Avita Medical Ltd., a regenerative medicine company specializing in the treatment of wounds and skin defects, has donated a number of free ReCell devices and sent personnel experienced in burn treatment to provide any support requested by authorities in Taiwan, where hundreds of people have been left seriously burned in a mass casualty event at a waterpark. [More]
Aridis expands, accelerates current AR-301 Phase 2a study for treatment of acute pneumonia in the U.S.

Aridis expands, accelerates current AR-301 Phase 2a study for treatment of acute pneumonia in the U.S.

Aridis Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a biopharmaceutical company applying proprietary technologies to produce novel anti-infectives and immunotherapies for infectious diseases, announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has accepted its Investigational New Drug (IND) application for AR-301, also referred to as Salvecin, the company's fully human anti-Staphylococcal α-toxin IgG1 monoclonal antibody being developed for the treatment of hospital-acquired and ventilator-associated pneumonia (HAP and VAP) caused by Staphylococcus aureus, including multi-drug resistant 'MRSA' strains. [More]
UCLA patient successfully receives smaller Total Artificial Heart

UCLA patient successfully receives smaller Total Artificial Heart

A petite 44-year-old woman has received a successful heart transplant at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, thanks to an experimental Total Artificial Heart designed for smaller patients. [More]
Providence Tarzana, CHLA collaborate to provide enhanced care to children in the San Fernando Valley

Providence Tarzana, CHLA collaborate to provide enhanced care to children in the San Fernando Valley

Children in the San Fernando Valley now have access to an enhanced level of pediatric care, under the terms of an innovative agreement between Providence Tarzana Medical Center and Children's Hospital Los Angeles and its physicians. [More]
UCLA patient first in California to receive smaller Total Artificial Heart

UCLA patient first in California to receive smaller Total Artificial Heart

A petite 44-year-old woman has received a successful heart transplant at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, thanks to an experimental Total Artificial Heart designed for smaller patients. [More]
Premature babies who avoid eye contact in early infancy less likely to show symptoms of autism

Premature babies who avoid eye contact in early infancy less likely to show symptoms of autism

Premature babies are at an increased risk for developing autism spectrum disorder. But a small study indicates that preemies who avoid eye contact in early infancy are less likely to demonstrate symptoms of autism at age 2 than preemies who maintain eye contact during early interactions, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. [More]
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