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Echo Therapeutics reports net loss of $3.9M in fourth quarter 2013

Echo Therapeutics reports net loss of $3.9M in fourth quarter 2013

Echo Therapeutics, Inc., a medical device company developing its Symphony® CGM System as a non-invasive, wireless continuous glucose monitoring system, today announced financial results for the year ended December 31, 2013. [More]
Personalis and Inova team up to advance genomic medicine

Personalis and Inova team up to advance genomic medicine

Inova Translational Medicine Institute and Personalis, Inc. today announced a partnership to advance genomic medicine for Inova's patient population. [More]
Vancouver-led research initiative awarded $1.5M grant to prevent deaths of moms and babies

Vancouver-led research initiative awarded $1.5M grant to prevent deaths of moms and babies

A Vancouver-led research initiative to prevent deaths of moms and babies got a boost recently with a new $1.5-million grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The grant will expand efforts to improve diagnosis and care for pregnant women with pre-eclampsia. [More]
Miriam Hospital ICU attains silver-level Beacon Award for Excellence

Miriam Hospital ICU attains silver-level Beacon Award for Excellence

The Intensive Care Unit at The Miriam Hospital has attained a silver-level Beacon Award for Excellence from The American Association of Critical-Care Nurses. The three-year award recognizes the hospital for its exceptional patient care and improved patient outcomes, and practices that follow the AACN's six Healthy Work Environment Standards. [More]
Ulcerative colitis control: an interview with Dr Paul Robinson, Medical Director, MSD UK

Ulcerative colitis control: an interview with Dr Paul Robinson, Medical Director, MSD UK

Ulcerative colitis (UC) is an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which means there is chronic inflammation and ulceration in the lining of the digestive tract, usually in the large intestine. [More]
AM-Pharma reports positive results from recAP Phase I trial for Acute Kidney Injury

AM-Pharma reports positive results from recAP Phase I trial for Acute Kidney Injury

AM-Pharma B.V., a biopharmaceutical company focused on the development of recAP (recombinant human Alkaline Phosphatase) for inflammatory indications, announces the results of its Phase I trial with both single and multiple ascending doses, which demonstrate that recAP is safe and well tolerated at all doses. [More]
Cedars-Sinai partners with the U.S. military to design "operating room of the future"

Cedars-Sinai partners with the U.S. military to design "operating room of the future"

Cedars-Sinai has partnered with the U.S. military to design the "operating room of the future" that will enable emergency medical teams to respond more quickly and effectively to patients with life-threatening injuries. [More]
Viewpoints: Romneycare and cutting workers; Fla.'s surprising ruling on malpractice reform

Viewpoints: Romneycare and cutting workers; Fla.'s surprising ruling on malpractice reform

Health reform in Massachusetts in 2006 did not cause many workers to have their work hours cut, but that is no comfort for those workers nationwide who will begin to experience this side effect of the federal Affordable Care Act (Casey B. Mulligan, 3/19). [More]
Ventilator patients have considerable risk of developing psychological problems

Ventilator patients have considerable risk of developing psychological problems

Fortunately, more and more people survive critical illnesses and accidents. A new Danish-American survey shows, however, that hospitalisation where the patient has received mechanical ventilation can have serious consequences. [More]
Preterm babies' guts harbor infectious microbes that can cause late-onset sepsis

Preterm babies' guts harbor infectious microbes that can cause late-onset sepsis

Babies born prematurely are surviving in increasing numbers. But many withstand complications of early birth only to suffer late-onset sepsis - life-threatening bloodstream infections that strike after infants reach 72 hours of age. [More]
Scientists describe gut bacteria that cause sepsis in preterm infants

Scientists describe gut bacteria that cause sepsis in preterm infants

Researchers studying intestinal bacteria in newborns have characterized the gut bacteria of premature infants who go on to develop sepsis, a serious and potentially life-threatening condition caused by bacteria in the bloodstream. [More]
Study provides evidence that sepsis-related mortality has steadily decreased over time

Study provides evidence that sepsis-related mortality has steadily decreased over time

In critically ill patients in Australia and New Zealand with severe sepsis or septic shock, there was a decrease in the risk of death from 2000 to 2012, findings that were accompanied by changes in the patterns of discharge of intensive care unit (ICU) patients to home, rehabilitation, and other hospitals, according to a study appearing in JAMA. [More]
Dartmouth, Aeras to jointly conduct trial of DAR-901 vaccine against TB

Dartmouth, Aeras to jointly conduct trial of DAR-901 vaccine against TB

Dartmouth's Geisel School of Medicine and Aeras, a global nonprofit biotech, announced a collaboration to jointly conduct a trial of a new vaccine against tuberculosis (TB), one of the world's deadliest diseases. The vaccine, known as DAR-901, is related to the vaccine SRL-172, previously shown by Dartmouth investigators to decrease the risk of TB in a trial known as the DarDar Trial. [More]
States highlights: N.C. Medicaid overhaul; Conn. 'aid in dying' bill; Calif. Medical expenses crowdfunding

States highlights: N.C. Medicaid overhaul; Conn. 'aid in dying' bill; Calif. Medical expenses crowdfunding

North Carolina health officials said Monday that their long-awaited proposal to overhaul how Medicaid operates in North Carolina is "realistic" and "achievable" and will make state budgets more predictable. [More]
UVA Women's Services and Children's Hospital earns prestigious award from March of Dimes, VHHA

UVA Women's Services and Children's Hospital earns prestigious award from March of Dimes, VHHA

For improving the health of babies by stopping early elective deliveries, Women's Services and Children's Hospital at the University of Virginia have earned a prestigious award from the March of Dimes and the Virginia Hospital & Healthcare Association (VHHA). [More]

Over 40% of pregnant low-income women after diagnosis of false labor do not want to be sent home

More than 40 percent of pregnant low-income women discharged from the hospital after a diagnosis of false or early labor did not want to be sent home, with the most common reasons being that they were in too much pain or lived too far away, according to a study by Baylor University's Louise Herrington School of Nursing (LHSON) and Parkland Health & Hospital System. [More]

Loyola urogynecologist receives 2014 Christina Manthos Mentoring Award from SWIU

Elizabeth Mueller, MD, MS, has been named a 2014 Christina Manthos Mentoring Award recipient by the Society of Women in Urology (SWIU). Dr. Mueller is the division director and the fellowship program director of Female Pelvic Medicine & Reconstructive Surgery at Loyola University Health System. [More]
Obese orthopedic trauma patients have lower injury severity scores

Obese orthopedic trauma patients have lower injury severity scores

Approximately one-third of the American population is obese and the number is rising, as is the number of obese individuals involved in high-energy accidents with multiple injuries. [More]

ECMO can be used for treating carbon monoxide poisoning

Allison Morgan was in pretty bad shape when the medical helicopter touched down on the rooftop helipad of the University of Alabama at Birmingham Hospital. [More]
Researchers explore how genetics affects causes and prevalence of preterm birth

Researchers explore how genetics affects causes and prevalence of preterm birth

​More than 450,000 babies are born too soon each year in the U.S. Preterm birth is a serious health problem that costs the nation more than $26 billion annually, according to the Institute of Medicine, and is the leading cause of newborn death. [More]