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New treatment reduces cerebral damage in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients

New treatment reduces cerebral damage in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients

Among comatose survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, treatment with inhaled xenon gas combined with hypothermia, compared with hypothermia alone, results in less white matter damage. [More]
Children who receive little to no nutrition during first week in intensive care recover faster

Children who receive little to no nutrition during first week in intensive care recover faster

Critically ill children are artificially fed soon after their arrival in intensive care. This common practice is based on the assumption that it will help them recover more quickly. An international study coordinated at KU Leuven, Belgium, has now disproven this theory. The study shows that receiving little to no nutrition during the first week in intensive care makes children recover faster. [More]
Researchers provide new mechanism for age-related macular degeneration

Researchers provide new mechanism for age-related macular degeneration

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of visual impairment in people over 50 in developed countries. Although this condition affects up to 20% of people between the ages of 65 and 75, what drives abnormal blood vessels to invade the retina is unknown. [More]
Researchers examine effects of family-centred neonatal discharge planning process

Researchers examine effects of family-centred neonatal discharge planning process

Researchers from the University of Bristol have found new parents benefit from help to prepare them to bring their premature babies home from hospital. [More]
Gut microbial imbalance appears to be underlying cause of fatal intestinal illness in premature babies

Gut microbial imbalance appears to be underlying cause of fatal intestinal illness in premature babies

An imbalance of certain gut microbes appears to be the underlying cause of a frequently fatal intestinal illness in premature babies, according to new research led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis [More]
LivaNova announces first implantation of Perceval sutureless valve in U.S.

LivaNova announces first implantation of Perceval sutureless valve in U.S.

LivaNova, PLC (the “Company”), a global medical technology company and a leader in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, announced the first U.S. implantation of the Perceval valve, the sutureless biological aortic replacement valve. [More]
Steroid use in late preterm delivery can reduce rate of neonatal respiratory complications

Steroid use in late preterm delivery can reduce rate of neonatal respiratory complications

Current recommendations are for all women who go into labor prior to 34 weeks gestation to be given antenatal corticosteroids (betamethasone) to help mature the baby's lungs. However, many babies born in the late preterm period - between 34 and 36 weeks gestation - require respiratory support at birth. [More]
Consultation between geriatrician and trauma surgeons improves care of elderly accident victims

Consultation between geriatrician and trauma surgeons improves care of elderly accident victims

An immediate consultation between trauma surgeons and a geriatrician improves multidisciplinary care of elderly accident victims and the sensitivity of the family to the patient's ongoing health care needs. [More]
Severe anemia associated with increased risk for necrotizing enterocolitis in premature infants

Severe anemia associated with increased risk for necrotizing enterocolitis in premature infants

A study from Emory University School of Medicine published in the Journal of the American Medical Association has found that severe anemia, but not red blood cell transfusions (RBC), is associated with an increased risk for a potentially fatal intestinal condition in premature infants. [More]
Study provides first evidence that Zika virus may cause Guillain-Barré syndrome

Study provides first evidence that Zika virus may cause Guillain-Barré syndrome

Analysis of blood samples from 42 patients diagnosed with Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) during the Zika virus outbreak in French Polynesia provides the first evidence that Zika virus might cause GBS, a severe neurological disorder, according to new research published in The Lancet today. [More]
FDA clearance expands clinical claims of Thermo Scientific B•R•A•H•M•S PCT biomarker for sepsis risk assessment

FDA clearance expands clinical claims of Thermo Scientific B•R•A•H•M•S PCT biomarker for sepsis risk assessment

Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc., the world leader in serving science, today announced it has received clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration that expands the clinical claims of the Thermo Scientific B·R·A·H·M·S PCT biomarker assay for sepsis risk assessment. [More]
Freestanding organ recovery facility for brain-dead donors increases organ transplant

Freestanding organ recovery facility for brain-dead donors increases organ transplant

Transplant surgeons report that obtaining organs from deceased organ donors costs much less and leads to a higher number of transplantable organs recovered when brain-dead donors are moved from the hospital to an independent, freestanding facility dedicated to organ recovery. Their study is published online as an "article in press" on the Journal of the American College of Surgeons website in advance of print publication later this year. [More]
New infection-fighting bandages for serious burn victims

New infection-fighting bandages for serious burn victims

Serious burn victims are immunocompromised and may be missing skin on parts of their body, and this makes them highly vulnerable to bacteria. Thanks to progress in intensive care, they are decreasingly likely to die from burn trauma. Death is more commonly the result of infections that can occur several months after being hospitalized. The bandages used to treat burns actually represent a real breeding ground for microbes. [More]
UMMC surgeons develop a program to direct critically ill patients to appropriate treatment location

UMMC surgeons develop a program to direct critically ill patients to appropriate treatment location

A team of surgeons at the University of Maryland Medical Center has developed a program that utilizes its Shock Trauma Center (STC) model to direct critically ill non-trauma patients to the appropriate treatment location and get them into an operating room and hospital intensive care unit (ICU) bed as quickly as possible. [More]
Novel unit can significantly speed access to specialized care for critically ill patients

Novel unit can significantly speed access to specialized care for critically ill patients

A novel unit to care for critically ill patients significantly speeds access to specialized care, according to a new study by physician scientists at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and the University of Maryland Medical Center. [More]
Study demonstrating link between anal cancer and HPV infection published in Obstetrics & Gynecology

Study demonstrating link between anal cancer and HPV infection published in Obstetrics & Gynecology

Researchers at Women & Infants Hospital, a Care New England hospital, recently published the results of a study demonstrating a connection between anal cancer and human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. [More]
Study finds gender differences in scholarly productivity among academic gynecologic oncologists

Study finds gender differences in scholarly productivity among academic gynecologic oncologists

The differences between men and women seem to infiltrate yet another aspect of medicine with a study spearheaded at Women & Infants Hospital, a Care New England hospital, indicating that younger female gynecologic oncologists were less productive scholastically and, therefore, poorly represented in the higher academic ranks, than their male contemporaries. [More]
Simulation training for prenatal and neonatal emergencies: an interview with Clive Patrickson

Simulation training for prenatal and neonatal emergencies: an interview with Clive Patrickson

It's difficult to practice skills on preterm babies who are in neonatal intensive care units (NICU). The complications associated with preterm babies can be varied and infrequent, making it hard for staff to develop their skills set. [More]
Variations in Tie2 gene play significant role in patient responses to infections

Variations in Tie2 gene play significant role in patient responses to infections

Major infections such as influenza and bacterial sepsis kill millions of people each year, often resulting fro dangerous complications that impair the body's blood vessels. But the reasons why some patients experience these dramatic responses to infections -- and others don't -- have been unclear. [More]
Sphere Medical to discuss potential application of Proxima at Symposium Intensivmedizin + Intensivpflege 2016

Sphere Medical to discuss potential application of Proxima at Symposium Intensivmedizin + Intensivpflege 2016

Sphere Medical, an innovator company in critical care monitoring and diagnostics equipment, announces that at the Symposium Intensivmedizin + Intensivpflege 2016, it will be discussing the potential application of its newly introduced Proxima patient-dedicated blood gas analyser with isolation beds during outbreaks of infections, such as winter influenza, MRSA and VRE. [More]
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