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Researchers receive Stafford Fox Medical Research Foundation grant to accelerate CFS diagnosis

Researchers receive Stafford Fox Medical Research Foundation grant to accelerate CFS diagnosis

Major improvement in the diagnosis of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome is expected following the award of $4m in funding to one of Australia’s foremost authorities on the condition. [More]
AAOS: Shoulder replacement surgeries skyrocketing nationally

AAOS: Shoulder replacement surgeries skyrocketing nationally

The number of shoulder replacement surgeries has skyrocketed nationally and at Loyola University Medical Center as technology improves and aging Baby Boomers seek to relieve pain and restore function to arthritic shoulders. [More]
Active older population, better technology may be cause for more hip and knee replacement surgeries

Active older population, better technology may be cause for more hip and knee replacement surgeries

An active aging population is a good thing for society. It also keeps John Shields, M.D., very busy. [More]
MMJ Labs launches VibraCool Massaging Ice Therapy for joint and muscle pain relief

MMJ Labs launches VibraCool Massaging Ice Therapy for joint and muscle pain relief

MMJ Labs LLC., industry leaders in non-invasive pain relief, have announced the launch of their newest product, VibraCool Massaging Ice Therapy. VibraCool incorporates Cool-Pulse technology, leveraging the physiologic pain relievers of high frequency vibration and ice in a product optimized for athletes and chronic joint pain sufferers. [More]
Bilingual support group addressing health needs of lupus patients has positive impact, study finds

Bilingual support group addressing health needs of lupus patients has positive impact, study finds

A bilingual support group addressing the psychological and educational needs of patients with lupus and their families is a valuable resource to help them cope, according to a study at Hospital for Special Surgery. [More]
NSU researchers learn more about Gulf War illness to help veterans

NSU researchers learn more about Gulf War illness to help veterans

As the nation honors our veterans on November 11, we must pause to remember the long-lasting health effects soldiers experience not only from bullets or bombs, but from exposure to unexplained pesticides, radiation or other toxins during their time in the service. [More]
Mosquito-borne diseases appear to be driven by infections in and around homes, research suggests

Mosquito-borne diseases appear to be driven by infections in and around homes, research suggests

Outbreaks of the mosquito-borne disease chikungunya appear to be driven by infections centered in and around the home, with women significantly more likely to become ill, suggests new research from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, the Institut Pasteur in Paris and the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh. [More]
Biologic drugs may help prevent progressive bone loss in patients with RA

Biologic drugs may help prevent progressive bone loss in patients with RA

A new review by the International Osteoporosis Foundation Chronic Inflammation and Bone Structure Working Group concludes that early and aggressive treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) with biologic drugs, specifically biological disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs), may be most effective in halting progressive bone loss in patients with RA. [More]
Medovex announces successful demo of DenerveX System during EuroSpine 2016 in Berlin

Medovex announces successful demo of DenerveX System during EuroSpine 2016 in Berlin

Medovex Corp., a developer of medical technology products, today announced that the Company successfully exhibited its' DenerveX System during EuroSpine 2016 Tradeshow last week in Berlin, Germany. [More]
Touch Surgery and Episurf Medical jointly launch new Episealer surgical knee simulations

Touch Surgery and Episurf Medical jointly launch new Episealer surgical knee simulations

Today, Episurf Medical announced the public release of the Episealer surgical training simulation on the Touch Surgery app. [More]
New evolutionary analysis provides insights into how Zika virus spreads between populations

New evolutionary analysis provides insights into how Zika virus spreads between populations

In a study published in Pathogens and Global Health, researchers have modelled the evolutionary development and diversity of the Zika virus to better understand how infection spreads between populations and how the virus reacts with the immune system. [More]
Estrogen receptor degrader increases progression-free survival in advanced breast cancer patients

Estrogen receptor degrader increases progression-free survival in advanced breast cancer patients

Fulvestrant significantly increases progression-free survival in women with hormone-receptor-positive advanced breast cancer, particularly those with less aggressive lower-volume disease, researchers reported at the ESMO 2016 Congress in Copenhagen [More]
Researchers confirm long persistence of Zika virus in semen and reveal its presence within spermatozoa

Researchers confirm long persistence of Zika virus in semen and reveal its presence within spermatozoa

Recent work has shown that Zika virus persists in semen for up to 6 months after infection. In a correspondence published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases, the researchers, in addition to confirming its long persistence in semen (in this case for more than 130 days, i.e., over 4 months), reveal the presence of the virus even within spermatozoa. [More]
Novartis gets three FDA approvals for expanded use of biologic drug to treat rare autoinflammatory diseases

Novartis gets three FDA approvals for expanded use of biologic drug to treat rare autoinflammatory diseases

Novartis announced today that the US Food and Drug Administration has granted three simultaneous approvals for the expanded use of Ilaris (canakinumab) to treat three rare and distinct types of Periodic Fever Syndromes. [More]
Dengue vaccine may worsen infections if used in areas with low rates of disease

Dengue vaccine may worsen infections if used in areas with low rates of disease

The world's only licensed vaccine for dengue may worsen subsequent dengue infections if used in areas with low rates of dengue infection, suggests new research. [More]
Mayo Clinic offers CDC’s Zika virus screening test

Mayo Clinic offers CDC’s Zika virus screening test

Mayo Clinic will offer the Zika virus antibody test developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [More]
Official statistics may underestimate size of Zika epidemic, study suggests

Official statistics may underestimate size of Zika epidemic, study suggests

A study supported by FAPESP and coordinated by researchers at the São José do Rio Preto Medical School in São Paulo State, Brazil, suggests official statistics may underestimate the size of the epidemic caused by Zika virus. [More]
Revised FDA guidance recommends universal testing of entire blood supply for Zika virus in the U.S.

Revised FDA guidance recommends universal testing of entire blood supply for Zika virus in the U.S.

As a further safety measure against the emerging Zika virus outbreak, today the U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued a revised guidance recommending universal testing of donated Whole Blood and blood components for Zika virus in the U.S. and its territories. [More]
NIH researchers discover rare, lethal inflammatory disease that affects young children

NIH researchers discover rare, lethal inflammatory disease that affects young children

National Institutes of Health researchers have discovered a rare and sometimes lethal inflammatory disease - otulipenia - that primarily affects young children. They have also identified anti-inflammatory treatments that ease some of the patients' symptoms: fever, skin rashes, diarrhea, joint pain and overall failure to grow or thrive. [More]
Cardinals appear as super-suppressors protecting Atlanta residents from West Nile Virus

Cardinals appear as super-suppressors protecting Atlanta residents from West Nile Virus

A bird species that does a poor job spreading West Nile virus (WNV) but is particularly likely to get mosquito bites may explain why human infections with the disease are relatively uncommon in Atlanta, Georgia—despite evidence of high rates of virus circulating in the local bird population, according to a new study published online today in the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. [More]
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