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National Psoriasis Foundation to hold free psoriatic arthritis program in Seattle

National Psoriasis Foundation to hold free psoriatic arthritis program in Seattle

If you're one of the roughly 28,000 Seattle metro residents struggling with pain from psoriatic arthritis (PsA)—an inflammatory autoimmune disease that causes pain, swelling and stiffness of the joints and tendons—learn to control your condition with Be Joint Smart, a free psoriatic arthritis program presented by the National Psoriasis Foundation, at the Double Tree Suites Southcenter on November 8. [More]
Chronic contact allergy from metal orthopedic implant linked to aggressive form of skin cancer

Chronic contact allergy from metal orthopedic implant linked to aggressive form of skin cancer

In rare cases, patients with allergies to metals develop persistent skin rashes after metal devices are implanted near the skin. New research suggests these patients may be at increased risk of an unusual and aggressive form of skin cancer. [More]
Dengue fever cases in India 282 times higher than officially reported, study says

Dengue fever cases in India 282 times higher than officially reported, study says

The annual number of dengue fever cases in India is 282 times higher than officially reported, and the disease inflicts an economic burden on the country of at least US$1.11 billion each year in medical and other expenses, according to a new study published online today in the American Journal of Tropical Medicine & Hygiene. [More]
Laser, needle acupuncture do not benefit patients with moderate to severe chronic knee pain

Laser, needle acupuncture do not benefit patients with moderate to severe chronic knee pain

Among patients older than 50 years with moderate to severe chronic knee pain, neither laser nor needle acupuncture provided greater benefit on pain or function compared to sham laser acupuncture, according to a study in the October 1 issue of JAMA. [More]
Weekly musculoskeletal pain on the rise among young adults

Weekly musculoskeletal pain on the rise among young adults

Research from Finland shows an increase in the prevalence of frequent musculoskeletal symptoms in young adults, which suggests the need for early intervention. [More]
Research for better understanding of pathology of severe form of dwarfism

Research for better understanding of pathology of severe form of dwarfism

A better understanding of the pathology of a severe form of dwarfism as well as a possible window of treatment have been discovered by researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). [More]
Ampio updates phase III, multicenter, double-blind STEP study of Ampion for knee osteoarthritis

Ampio updates phase III, multicenter, double-blind STEP study of Ampion for knee osteoarthritis

Ampio Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced an update on the phase III, multicenter, double-blind STEP study of Ampion™ for osteoarthritis of the knee. [More]
Chronic musculoskeletal pain influenced by genetics

Chronic musculoskeletal pain influenced by genetics

Children of parents with chronic musculoskeletal pain are at increased risk of also suffering from such pain as adults, a large family-linkage study shows. [More]

Legal-Bay announces that DePuy ASR first settlement litigation begins to wind down

Legal-Bay LLC, The Lawsuit Settlement Funding Company, announced today that the DePuy ASR first settlement litigation is beginning to wind down as claims are now being paid. [More]
Newly insured get schooling on how to use coverage

Newly insured get schooling on how to use coverage

Health law advocates who had focused on enrolling people in insurance now are teaching them how to use their often-complicated policies. Meanwhile, a Hartford physician explains why he won't take Obamacare plans and thousands of inmates in a Cook County jail sign up for insurance. [More]
First Edition: August 4, 2014

First Edition: August 4, 2014

Today's headlines include a variety of health policy stories reflecting developments on the state level. [More]
Acupuncture helps cut fatigue, anxiety and depression in breast cancer patients using aromatase inhibitors

Acupuncture helps cut fatigue, anxiety and depression in breast cancer patients using aromatase inhibitors

Use of electroacupuncture (EA) - a form of acupuncture where a small electric current is passed between pairs of acupuncture needles - produces significant improvements in fatigue, anxiety and depression in as little as eight weeks for early stage breast cancer patients experiencing joint pain related to the use of aromatase inhibitors (AIs) to treat breast cancer. [More]
Biogen Idec receives marketing authorization from EC for multiple sclerosis drug

Biogen Idec receives marketing authorization from EC for multiple sclerosis drug

Today Biogen Idec announced that the European Commission (EC) has granted marketing authorization for PLEGRIDY (peginterferon beta-1a) as a treatment for adults with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), the most common form of multiple sclerosis (MS). [More]
Research suggests effective role for natural steroid hormones in treating breast cancer

Research suggests effective role for natural steroid hormones in treating breast cancer

A new study supports a growing body of research suggesting a safe and effective role for natural steroid hormones in treating postmenopausal breast cancer, with fewer detrimental side effects and improved health profile than with standard anti-hormone therapies. [More]
Immunosignaturing holds promise for accurate diagnosis of Valley Fever

Immunosignaturing holds promise for accurate diagnosis of Valley Fever

On July 5, 2011, a massive wall of dust, ("haboob," in Arabic), blanketed Phoenix, Arizona, creating an awesome spectacle, (or stubborn nuisance, depending on your perspective). Dust storms are a common occurrence in the arid desert environments of the American Southwest. [More]
Chikungunya virus transmission occurs in Florida for the first time

Chikungunya virus transmission occurs in Florida for the first time

The chikungunya virus, which is transmitted to people by mosquitoes (Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus), was found for the first time in the Americas on islands in the Caribbean in December 2013. Yesterday, the first case of chikungunya in the continental United States was reported in a man from Florida who had not recently travelled outside the United States. [More]
Paracetamol safety and osteoarthritis: an interview with Professor David Hunter, University of Sydney

Paracetamol safety and osteoarthritis: an interview with Professor David Hunter, University of Sydney

Firstly, paracetamol has been the first-line recommended treatment for osteoarthritis pain for very many years and, secondly, it is readily available over the counter and can be bought in relatively large quantities. [More]
Pain control in osteoarthritis patients: an interview with Dr. Clarence Young, Chief Medical Officer and John Vavricka, President and CEO, Iroko Pharmaceuticals

Pain control in osteoarthritis patients: an interview with Dr. Clarence Young, Chief Medical Officer and John Vavricka, President and CEO, Iroko Pharmaceuticals

Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most common causes of disability, and inadequate pain control can lead to joint stiffness that may impair mobility for patients. [More]
Treating ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease: an interview with Dr. Stephen Hanauer, Medical Director, Digestive Health Center, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

Treating ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease: an interview with Dr. Stephen Hanauer, Medical Director, Digestive Health Center, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

Ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease are idiopathic (we don’t know the cause) inflammatory diseases (IBD) of the colon and/or small bowel. They are chronic in that we do not have a medical cure and are differentiated from IBS (irritable bowel syndrome) by inflammation that causes ulcerations of the GI tract. [More]
Global toolkit for managing menopause

Global toolkit for managing menopause

Created at Monash University, the world's first toolkit is designed for GPs to use with women from the age of 40. Thought to be the first of its kind, researchers say the toolkit has the potential to help manage menopausal conditions for women globally. [More]