Kidney Disease News and Research RSS Feed - Kidney Disease News and Research

Female hormones may be responsible for decreased risk of kidney failure in women than men

Female hormones may be responsible for decreased risk of kidney failure in women than men

Female hormones may play a role in women's decreased risk of developing kidney failure relative to men, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. The findings may be helpful for future attempts at safeguarding women's and men's kidney health in sex-specific ways. [More]
Administering flu vaccinations in the morning could induce greater antibody responses

Administering flu vaccinations in the morning could induce greater antibody responses

New research from the University of Birmingham has shown that flu vaccinations are more effective when administered in the morning. [More]
More cautious blood pressure-lowering strategy may be reasonable for elderly CKD patients

More cautious blood pressure-lowering strategy may be reasonable for elderly CKD patients

New research indicates that higher systolic blood pressure is linked with poor outcomes in patients with kidney disease, although the association diminishes with advanced age. The findings, which come from a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (CJASN), provide valuable information concerning patients who are often excluded from blood pressure-lowering clinical trials. [More]
Transplanted human islets prevent hypoglycemic events in Type 1 diabetes patients

Transplanted human islets prevent hypoglycemic events in Type 1 diabetes patients

Northwestern Medicine researchers are co-investigators in a breakthrough clinical trial that found transplanted human islets prevent hypoglycemic events and provide excellent glycemic control for patients with Type 1 diabetes with severe hypoglycemia. [More]
Green vegetation near homes plays important role in reducing mortality

Green vegetation near homes plays important role in reducing mortality

Women live longer in areas with more green vegetation, according to new research funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), part of the National Institutes of Health. Women with the highest levels of vegetation, or greenness, near their homes had a 12 percent lower death rate compared to women with the lowest levels of vegetation near their homes. The results were published Apr. 14, 2016 in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives. [More]
Coronary heart disease, cancer less likely among people with learning disabilities

Coronary heart disease, cancer less likely among people with learning disabilities

Coronary heart disease and cancer rates among people with learning disabilities are nearly a third lower than the general population, says new research. [More]
Scientists use FAN1 knockout mice to refine detailed mechanisms involved in damaged DNA repair

Scientists use FAN1 knockout mice to refine detailed mechanisms involved in damaged DNA repair

Like jewels in a vault, our precious genetic material is stored in the nucleus of a cell--sequestered away from potentially damaging cellular components and toxins so that no harm can come to it. Yet over the course of a life moving through this world, our DNA does get damaged, and our cells have a host of complicated repair mechanisms to deal with such injuries. [More]
WHO global diabetes report shows Australia must lift its game

WHO global diabetes report shows Australia must lift its game

Australia should do more to prevent diabetes and provide better care for those living with the disease, according to an author of the World Health Organisation’s (WHO) first ever global diabetes report. [More]
Kidney possesses circadian clock that regulates, coordinates variety of organ's functions

Kidney possesses circadian clock that regulates, coordinates variety of organ's functions

An internal clock within the kidneys plays an important role in maintaining balance within the body, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. [More]
Researchers identify vital inflammatory mechanisms in type 1 diabetes, obesity-related kidney dysfunction

Researchers identify vital inflammatory mechanisms in type 1 diabetes, obesity-related kidney dysfunction

In a new study, published in the online edition of the journal EBioMedicine, a multi-disciplinary team led by researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine has identified key inflammatory mechanisms underlying type 1 diabetes and obesity-related kidney dysfunction. [More]
HPV vaccination may be beneficial for CKD patients but not for kidney transplant recipients

HPV vaccination may be beneficial for CKD patients but not for kidney transplant recipients

Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination stimulates robust and sustained immune responses in girls and young women with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and those on dialysis, but less optimal responses to the vaccine were observed among those with a kidney transplant. [More]
Investigational drug provides no improved protection to patients with contrast-induced acute kidney injury

Investigational drug provides no improved protection to patients with contrast-induced acute kidney injury

Patients treated with CMX-2043--an investigational drug that has previously shown some ability to protect heart muscle from damage during stenting--saw no improved protection in their kidneys compared to placebo, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 65th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Researchers to study people over 100 years old in Acciaroli, Italy to unlock secrets of healthy aging

Researchers to study people over 100 years old in Acciaroli, Italy to unlock secrets of healthy aging

The average life expectancy in the United States is approximately 78 years old. Americans live longer, with better diets and improved health care, than ever before, but only 0.02 percent will hit the century mark. [More]
New report offers startling statistics about chronic kidney disease in the U.S.

New report offers startling statistics about chronic kidney disease in the U.S.

A sweeping new report assessing chronic kidney disease in the United States offers startling statistics about a condition that affects almost 14 percent of the U.S. population and costs billions in Medicare spending each year. [More]
New thematic issue highlights link between hyperuricemia, gout and kidney disease

New thematic issue highlights link between hyperuricemia, gout and kidney disease

The increasing prevalence of both gout and chronic kidney disease has led to a growing interest in the association between hyperuricemia (an abnormally high level of uric acid in the blood) and kidney disease. [More]
Wnt secretion inhibitors may reduce renal fibrosis

Wnt secretion inhibitors may reduce renal fibrosis

Renal fibrosis or the scarring of kidneys, following an injury, reduces their function and can cause kidney disease to progressively worsen. [More]
Researchers elucidate mechanisms underlying impaired ciliogenesis in PKD

Researchers elucidate mechanisms underlying impaired ciliogenesis in PKD

In an article published online ahead of print on Feb. 19, 2015 in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, investigators at the Medical University of South Carolina and the Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center report findings from in vitro and in vivo studies that elucidate the mechanisms underlying the impaired ciliogenesis and abnormal kidney development characteristic of polycystic kidney disease (PKD). [More]
Study: Conservative care could be a reasonable choice for selected kidney failure patients

Study: Conservative care could be a reasonable choice for selected kidney failure patients

A new study found no significant survival advantage among elderly kidney failure patients who chose dialysis over conservative management. The findings, which appear in an upcoming issue of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, indicate that conservative care may be a reasonable choice for selected older patients. [More]
Sodium MRI could provide more detailed picture of tissue health and disease

Sodium MRI could provide more detailed picture of tissue health and disease

MRI experts at The University of Nottingham win £1m grant to adapt scanning techniques to pick up sodium in the body. The research could lead to much more detailed MRI scans in the future with significant improvements to the diagnosis and treatment of many diseases. [More]
Study could lead to potential new therapeutic target with fewer side effects for hypertension

Study could lead to potential new therapeutic target with fewer side effects for hypertension

A team of Vermont investigators has been issued a patent for their discovery of a molecule that rescues damaged blood vessels, yet preserves healthy vessels and could serve as a springboard for a new pharmaceutical therapy with fewer side effects for hypertension - a major risk factor for cardiovascular and kidney disease that effects roughly one in three people in the U.S. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement