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Tenofovir stems treatment-induced kidney toxicity in HBV-related chronic hepatitis

Tenofovir stems treatment-induced kidney toxicity in HBV-related chronic hepatitis

Switching to tenofovir may stave further kidney and bone impairment in patients with hepatitis B virus-related chronic hepatitis taking adefovir-based therapy, retrospective study findings suggest. [More]
New study shows mechanism behind tubulin transport in cilia

New study shows mechanism behind tubulin transport in cilia

Defective cilia can lead to a host of diseases and conditions in the human body--from rare, inherited bone malformations to blindness, male infertility, kidney disease and obesity. Scientists knew that somehow these tiny cell organelles become deformed and cause these diseases because of a problem related to their assembly, which requires the translocation of vast quantities of the vital cell protein tubulin. [More]
Astute Medical, bioMérieux sign agreement to develop NephroCheck Test for acute kidney injury

Astute Medical, bioMérieux sign agreement to develop NephroCheck Test for acute kidney injury

bioMérieux, a world leader in the field of in vitro diagnostics, and Astute Medical, Inc., a company dedicated to improving the diagnosis of high-risk medical conditions and diseases through the identification and validation of protein biomarkers, today announced that they have signed a global, semi-exclusive agreement regarding the development of a test for the early risk assessment of acute kidney injury (AKI). [More]
DaVita Rx celebrates ten years of service

DaVita Rx celebrates ten years of service

DaVita Rx, a full-service pharmacy created for patients with chronic conditions such as those with kidney disease, is celebrating a decade of accomplishments as an integrated pharmacy for patients with complex conditions across the country. [More]
DPS Health states that tackling Emergent-Risk cohort becomes a high priority

DPS Health states that tackling Emergent-Risk cohort becomes a high priority

The Emergent-Risk population represents one of the greatest threats to population health and will overwhelm the current U.S. healthcare system if something isn't done to engage these individuals in improving their health and quality of life, warned Neal Kaufman, MD, co-founder and Chief Medical Officer of DPS Health. [More]
ASA offers tips for safe surgery, anesthesia experience

ASA offers tips for safe surgery, anesthesia experience

Surgery and anesthesia are safer than ever, but most patients don't know about the steps they can and should take to make their experience safer and more comfortable. [More]
Dallas Cowboys timekeeper ready to get back to work after kidney transplant at UT Southwestern

Dallas Cowboys timekeeper ready to get back to work after kidney transplant at UT Southwestern

Jim Ely tackles life like Mean Joe Greene tackled running backs. A banker, he also worked weekends as a football referee for 38 years and still, at age 83, works as home-game timekeeper for the Dallas Cowboys. [More]
Kidney failure predictors in adolescents: an interview with Dr. Per-Ola Sundin

Kidney failure predictors in adolescents: an interview with Dr. Per-Ola Sundin

Diabetes, hypertension and other cardiovascular diseases as well as obesity are some of the markers of risk for kidney failure that we are aware of in adulthood. Markers of risk prior to adulthood for subsequent chronic kidney disease resulting in kidney failure are less well described. [More]
Helsinn, Pharmacosmos sign license agreement for commercialization of Monofer in the US

Helsinn, Pharmacosmos sign license agreement for commercialization of Monofer in the US

Helsinn Group and Pharmacosmos A/S today jointly announce that they have entered into an agreement for the exclusive US commercialization rights to Monofer, an innovative intravenous iron replacement therapy under development for the treatment of Iron Deficiency Anemia. [More]
Very small changes in blood acidity level may have detrimental impact on patients with CKD

Very small changes in blood acidity level may have detrimental impact on patients with CKD

A University of Manchester scientist has discovered that very small changes in the level of acidity in blood may have a detrimental impact on the health of patients with kidney disease. [More]
Multicenter, clinical trial to address long-term complications in CKD patients

Multicenter, clinical trial to address long-term complications in CKD patients

in collaboration with Parkland Health and Hospital System, Texas Health Resources, VA North Texas Health Care System, and ProHealth Physicians, Inc. of Connecticut - will lead the first National Institutes of Health-funded, multicenter, clinical trial to address interventions for patients with multiple chronic conditions centered around kidney disease. [More]
Keryx Biopharmaceuticals supplies AURYXIA tablets to wholesalers in US

Keryx Biopharmaceuticals supplies AURYXIA tablets to wholesalers in US

Keryx Biopharmaceuticals, Inc. (Nasdaq: KERX) (the "Company") today announced it has begun shipping AURYXIA™ (ferric citrate) tablets to wholesalers in the U.S. Auryxia is approved for the control of serum phosphorus levels in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) on dialysis. [More]
Study: Older adults with high blood pressure appear to have good kidney health after donation

Study: Older adults with high blood pressure appear to have good kidney health after donation

With proper monitoring, kidney donation may be safe for individuals with high blood pressure, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. The study found that while hypertension can have negative effects on the kidneys, older adults with the condition appear to have good kidney health following donation. [More]
New analysis finds global improvements in life expectancy

New analysis finds global improvements in life expectancy

Global life expectancy increased by 5.8 years in men and 6.6 years in women between 1990 and 2013, according to a major new analysis from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 (GBD 2013). [More]
Brandeis University researchers capture highest resolution images of cilia ever

Brandeis University researchers capture highest resolution images of cilia ever

Cilia, the cell's tails and antennas, are among the most important biological structures. They line our windpipe and sweep away all the junk we inhale; they help us see, smell and reproduce. When a mutation disrupts the function or structure of cilia, the effects on the human body are devastating and sometimes lethal. [More]
Higher human exposure to metal cadmium can lead to shorter telomeres

Higher human exposure to metal cadmium can lead to shorter telomeres

A new study led by a researcher at Milken Institute School of Public Health at the George Washington University looks at the metal cadmium and finds that higher human exposure can lead to significantly shorter telomeres, bits of DNA at the ends of chromosomes that are associated with cardiovascular disease, diabetes and other diseases of old age. [More]
UT Southwestern microbiologists identify key gut bacteria that promotes foodborne infections

UT Southwestern microbiologists identify key gut bacteria that promotes foodborne infections

UT Southwestern Medical Center microbiologists have identified key bacteria in the gut whose resources are hijacked to spread harmful foodborne E. coli infections and other intestinal illnesses. [More]
Study calls for new protocols to treat women with high blood pressure

Study calls for new protocols to treat women with high blood pressure

That blood pressure plays a role in human health has been known for quite a while. Hypertension - the medical term for high blood pressure - was first described as a disease in the early 1800s, and the inflatable cuff that's used in measuring blood pressure was invented in 1896. [More]
BWH researchers identify cells responsible for fibrosis

BWH researchers identify cells responsible for fibrosis

Researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital have identified what they believe to be the cells responsible for fibrosis, the buildup of scar tissue. Fibrotic diseases, such as chronic kidney disease and failure, lung disease, heart failure and cirrhosis of the liver, are estimated to be responsible for up to 45 percent of deaths in the developed world. [More]
New therapeutic targets can prevent scarring within transplanted kidneys

New therapeutic targets can prevent scarring within transplanted kidneys

Kidneys donated by people born with a small variation in the code of a key gene may be more likely, once in the transplant recipient, to accumulate scar tissue that contributes to kidney failure, according to a study led by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published today in the Journal of Clinical Investigation. [More]