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Keryx Biopharmaceuticals supplies AURYXIA tablets to wholesalers in US

Keryx Biopharmaceuticals supplies AURYXIA tablets to wholesalers in US

Keryx Biopharmaceuticals, Inc. (Nasdaq: KERX) (the "Company") today announced it has begun shipping AURYXIA™ (ferric citrate) tablets to wholesalers in the U.S. Auryxia is approved for the control of serum phosphorus levels in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) on dialysis. [More]
Study: Older adults with high blood pressure appear to have good kidney health after donation

Study: Older adults with high blood pressure appear to have good kidney health after donation

With proper monitoring, kidney donation may be safe for individuals with high blood pressure, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. The study found that while hypertension can have negative effects on the kidneys, older adults with the condition appear to have good kidney health following donation. [More]
New analysis finds global improvements in life expectancy

New analysis finds global improvements in life expectancy

Global life expectancy increased by 5.8 years in men and 6.6 years in women between 1990 and 2013, according to a major new analysis from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 (GBD 2013). [More]
Brandeis University researchers capture highest resolution images of cilia ever

Brandeis University researchers capture highest resolution images of cilia ever

Cilia, the cell's tails and antennas, are among the most important biological structures. They line our windpipe and sweep away all the junk we inhale; they help us see, smell and reproduce. When a mutation disrupts the function or structure of cilia, the effects on the human body are devastating and sometimes lethal. [More]
Higher human exposure to metal cadmium can lead to shorter telomeres

Higher human exposure to metal cadmium can lead to shorter telomeres

A new study led by a researcher at Milken Institute School of Public Health at the George Washington University looks at the metal cadmium and finds that higher human exposure can lead to significantly shorter telomeres, bits of DNA at the ends of chromosomes that are associated with cardiovascular disease, diabetes and other diseases of old age. [More]
UT Southwestern microbiologists identify key gut bacteria that promotes foodborne infections

UT Southwestern microbiologists identify key gut bacteria that promotes foodborne infections

UT Southwestern Medical Center microbiologists have identified key bacteria in the gut whose resources are hijacked to spread harmful foodborne E. coli infections and other intestinal illnesses. [More]
Study calls for new protocols to treat women with high blood pressure

Study calls for new protocols to treat women with high blood pressure

That blood pressure plays a role in human health has been known for quite a while. Hypertension - the medical term for high blood pressure - was first described as a disease in the early 1800s, and the inflatable cuff that's used in measuring blood pressure was invented in 1896. [More]
BWH researchers identify cells responsible for fibrosis

BWH researchers identify cells responsible for fibrosis

Researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital have identified what they believe to be the cells responsible for fibrosis, the buildup of scar tissue. Fibrotic diseases, such as chronic kidney disease and failure, lung disease, heart failure and cirrhosis of the liver, are estimated to be responsible for up to 45 percent of deaths in the developed world. [More]
New therapeutic targets can prevent scarring within transplanted kidneys

New therapeutic targets can prevent scarring within transplanted kidneys

Kidneys donated by people born with a small variation in the code of a key gene may be more likely, once in the transplant recipient, to accumulate scar tissue that contributes to kidney failure, according to a study led by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published today in the Journal of Clinical Investigation. [More]
DFG to establish eight new Collaborative Research Centres

DFG to establish eight new Collaborative Research Centres

The Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG, German Research Foundation) will establish eight new Collaborative Research Centres (CRCs). [More]
People diagnosed with diabetes in midlife experience cognitive problems later

People diagnosed with diabetes in midlife experience cognitive problems later

People diagnosed with diabetes in midlife are more likely to experience significant memory and cognitive problems during the next 20 years than those with healthy blood sugar levels, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests. [More]
Alport syndrome: an interview with Dr Paul Grint, CMO, Regulus

Alport syndrome: an interview with Dr Paul Grint, CMO, Regulus

Alport Syndrome was first described by a physician called Cecil Alport, back in the late 1920s. It's a genetic disease that affects a certain type of collagen involved in the functioning of the kidney, the ear, and the eye. [More]
Promising new therapeutic strategy for chronic kidney disease

Promising new therapeutic strategy for chronic kidney disease

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) affects at least one in four Americans who are older than 60 and can significantly shorten lifespan. Yet the few available drugs for CKD can only modestly delay the disease's progress towards kidney failure. Now, however, a team led by researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, has found an aspect of CKD's development that points to a promising new therapeutic strategy. [More]
Baxter seeks FDA approval of BAX 855 for treatment of people with hemophilia A

Baxter seeks FDA approval of BAX 855 for treatment of people with hemophilia A

Nektar Therapeutics reported that partner Baxter International Inc. today announced that the company has submitted a biologics license application (BLA) to the United States Food and Drug Administration for the approval of BAX 855, an investigational, extended half-life recombinant factor VIII (rFVIII) treatment for hemophilia A based on ADVATE [Antihemophilic Factor (Recombinant)]. [More]
DFG to establish new Collaborative Research Centres

DFG to establish new Collaborative Research Centres

The Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG, German Research Foundation) will establish eight new Collaborative Research Centres (CRCs). [More]
UL professor awarded HRB grant to improve understanding of Acute Kidney Injury

UL professor awarded HRB grant to improve understanding of Acute Kidney Injury

It is estimated that at least 1 in 5 hospitalised adults develop Acute Kidney Injury (AKI). Emerging evidence suggests that AKI: is under-recognised in clinical practice; predicts an accelerated risk of end-stage kidney disease (ESKD), and may be a risk amplifier for many other chronic diseases with death rates in excess of 20%. [More]
Investigational drug maintains normal potassium levels in patients with chronic kidney disease

Investigational drug maintains normal potassium levels in patients with chronic kidney disease

Research published today found that the investigational drug patiromer decreased high potassium levels and maintained normal potassium levels in patients with chronic kidney disease. The results of a multicenter trial appear in the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
Kidney disease patients can benefit from simple and structured exercise

Kidney disease patients can benefit from simple and structured exercise

Simple yet structured exercise can significantly improve kidney disease patients' quality of life as well as decrease their pain, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (CJASN). [More]
Researchers discover second protein associated with membranous nephropathy

Researchers discover second protein associated with membranous nephropathy

An international team of researchers from France, Germany, and the US have identified a protein that turns a person's immune system against itself in a form of kidney disease called membranous nephropathy (MN). The new research was presented at ASN Kidney Week 2014 in Philadelphia and published online in the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]

Study evaluates efficacy, safety of zirconium cyclosilicate drug in patients with hyperkalemia

Mikhail Kosiborod, M.D., of Saint Luke's Mid America Heart Institute, Kansas City, and colleagues evaluated the efficacy and safety of the drug zirconium cyclosilicate in patients with hyperkalemia (higher than normal potassium levels). The study appears in JAMA and is being released to coincide with its presentation at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2014. [More]