Kidney Disease News and Research RSS Feed - Kidney Disease News and Research

Resverlogix presents new data on RVX-208 orally active BET inhibitor at ESC Congress 2015

Resverlogix presents new data on RVX-208 orally active BET inhibitor at ESC Congress 2015

Resverlogix Corp. is pleased to announce that Dr. Norman Wong, chief scientific officer of Resverlogix Corp. presented new data at the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Congress 2015 in a poster presentation titled: "RVX-208, an orally active BET inhibitor, lowers CVD risk by activities beyond raising ApoA-I/HDL." [More]
DaVita Kidney Care to establish kidney care specialty hospital chain in Shandong province China

DaVita Kidney Care to establish kidney care specialty hospital chain in Shandong province China

DaVita Kidney Care, a division of DaVita HealthCare Partners Inc. (NYSE: DVA) and a leading global provider of kidney care services, today announced it is forming a joint venture kidney care specialty hospital chain in Shandong province China. [More]
Symic receives $1.5M NIH Phase II SBIR grant to develop AVF therapeutic candidate

Symic receives $1.5M NIH Phase II SBIR grant to develop AVF therapeutic candidate

Platform therapeutic company Symic Biomedical, Inc. announced today that it has received a $1.5M Phase II SBIR grant from the National Institutes of Health to further develop its therapeutic agent to reduce arteriovenous fistula (AVF) failures, a significant unmet clinical need in end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients undergoing hemodialysis. [More]
GARFIELD-AF data to demonstrate impact of antithrombotic treatment patterns on AF patients at ESC Congress 2015

GARFIELD-AF data to demonstrate impact of antithrombotic treatment patterns on AF patients at ESC Congress 2015

New analyses from the Global Anticoagulant Registry in the Field - Atrial Fibrillation (GARFIELD-AF) will be presented at ESC Congress 2015 to be held in London, United Kingdom, from August 29 to September 2, 2015. [More]
‘Medical foods’ for patients with rare IEMs may cause harm when not carefully managed

‘Medical foods’ for patients with rare IEMs may cause harm when not carefully managed

Many "medical foods" are designed to help manage patients with rare inborn errors of metabolism (IEMs), and can help prevent serious and life-threatening complications. However, such special foods may cause harm in some patients when their use is not carefully monitored and managed, according to a research team led by scientists at the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), part of the National Institutes of Health. [More]
USC kidney researcher named recipient of ASN-AHA Young Investigator Award

USC kidney researcher named recipient of ASN-AHA Young Investigator Award

Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California kidney researcher Janos Peti-Peterdi is the 2015 recipient of the ASN-AHA Young Investigator Award. [More]
Ardelyx reports net income of $9.0 million for second quarter 2015

Ardelyx reports net income of $9.0 million for second quarter 2015

Ardelyx, Inc., a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company focused on gastrointestinal and cardio-renal diseases, today announced financial results for the second quarter ended June 30, 2015. [More]
Southern-style diet may increase risk of heart disease

Southern-style diet may increase risk of heart disease

Previous research from the University of Alabama at Birmingham has shown regularly consuming the "Southern-style" diet of fried foods, processed meats, foods high in fat and sugar-sweetened beverages, can lead to an increased risk of stroke and an increased risk of death for chronic kidney disease patients. [More]
LA BioMed researcher launches study to examine medication adherence among patients with dialysis

LA BioMed researcher launches study to examine medication adherence among patients with dialysis

Taking medications as prescribed is challenging for many patients, and following doctors' orders regarding medication often varies over time and among different patients. The consequences of failing to follow the prescribed medication regimen range from mild to life-threatening, depending on the medication and the illness or condition being treated. [More]
Lund University researchers discovered 'main switch' that regulates cell invaginations

Lund University researchers discovered 'main switch' that regulates cell invaginations

Lack of microinvaginations in the cell membrane, caveolae, can cause serious diseases such as lipodystrophy and muscular dystrophy. Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have now discovered a "main switch" that regulates the formation of these invaginations. [More]
Scientists use highly specialized X-ray crystallography technique to solve protein structure of HIFs

Scientists use highly specialized X-ray crystallography technique to solve protein structure of HIFs

In a collaborative study between Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute and the Argonne National Laboratory, scientists have used a highly specialized X-ray crystallography technique to solve the protein structure of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs), important regulators of a tumor's response to low oxygen (hyopoxia). [More]
Resverlogix announces formation of international Clinical Steering Committee for RVX-208 "apabetalone" Phase 3 trial

Resverlogix announces formation of international Clinical Steering Committee for RVX-208 "apabetalone" Phase 3 trial

Resverlogix Corp. is pleased to announce the formation of an international Clinical Steering Committee for the RVX-208 "apabetalone" Phase 3 clinical trial BETonMACE assessing major adverse cardiac events (MACE) in high-risk vascular patients with diabetes mellitus and a recent Acute Coronary Syndrome event. BETonMACE is expected to start in the fall of 2015. [More]
Study demonstrates significance of EMT as potential therapeutic target for reversing kidney disease

Study demonstrates significance of EMT as potential therapeutic target for reversing kidney disease

Adults who are worried or terrified sometimes curl up into a fetal position. Likewise, adult cells that are injured, including genetic injury leading to cancer, initiate a process that was present during embryonic development. [More]
Integrated treatment required for diabetes-eating disorder combination

Integrated treatment required for diabetes-eating disorder combination

As they reach their teens, many with type 1 diabetes discover that the disease provides a secret weapon for losing weight. By restricting or reducing the amount of insulin they inject, they can eat just about anything they want and control their weight. [More]
Girls are born with weaker spines compared to boys, study finds

Girls are born with weaker spines compared to boys, study finds

Looking at measurements of the vertebrae - the series of small bones that make up the spinal column - in newborn children, investigators at Children's Hospital Los Angeles found that differences between the sexes are present at birth. Results of the study, now online in advance of publication in the August issue of the Journal of Pediatrics, suggest that this difference is evolutionary, allowing the female spine to adapt to the fetal load during pregnancy. [More]
3SBio purchases entire equity interest in Zhejiang Wansheng

3SBio purchases entire equity interest in Zhejiang Wansheng

3SBio Inc., a leading China-based biotechnology company focused on researching, developing, manufacturing and marketing biopharmaceutical products, today announced that it has acquired the entire equity interest in Zhejiang Wansheng Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd a limited liability company incorporated in the PRC for an aggregate consideration of RMB 528 million. [More]
UC San Diego researchers identify pivotal player in diabetic kidney disease

UC San Diego researchers identify pivotal player in diabetic kidney disease

Tapping the potential of metabolomics, an emerging field focused on the chemical processes of metabolism, researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have identified a new and pivotal player in diabetic kidney disease. [More]
Research suggests that only one in three older Americans have diabetes under control

Research suggests that only one in three older Americans have diabetes under control

Only one in three older Americans have their diabetes under control as measured by guidelines set by the American Diabetes Association, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests. [More]
Dietary phosphate appears to cause spikes in blood phosphorus levels

Dietary phosphate appears to cause spikes in blood phosphorus levels

Phosphates artificially added to dairy and cereal products appear to cause bigger spikes in blood phosphorus levels than naturally occurring phosphates, potentially putting harmful stress on kidneys. Too much dietary phosphate stiffens blood vessels, enlarges the heart and is bad for bones, but a new study by Houston Methodist researchers suggests it matters where the phosphates come from. [More]
Researchers use iPSCs to explore new treatments for kidney disease

Researchers use iPSCs to explore new treatments for kidney disease

One promising way to treat diseased or damaged kidneys is cell therapies that include the transplantation of renal progenitor cells, which can then develop into the cells needed for full recovery. Acquiring a sufficient number of progenitor cells has been difficult, however, which is why scientists have considered induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), since they can be expanded at significantly high levels and then differentiated into the progenitors. [More]
Advertisement