Life Expectancy News and Research RSS Feed - Life Expectancy News and Research

Life expectancy is the expected (in the statistical sense) number of years of life remaining at a given age. It is denoted by e''x'', which means the average number of subsequent years of life for someone now aged ''x'', according to a particular mortality experience.
Insulin remains expensive and beyond the reach of many diabetics worldwide

Insulin remains expensive and beyond the reach of many diabetics worldwide

More than 90 years after it was first discovered, and despite being listed as an essential medicine by the World Health Organization (WHO) since 2007, the lifesaving diabetes drug, insulin, remains very expensive and beyond the reach of many people with type 1 and 2 diabetes who need it globally, say leading experts writing in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology journal. [More]
Increased breastfeeding could save over 800000 children’s lives annually

Increased breastfeeding could save over 800000 children’s lives annually

Just 1 in 5 children in high-income countries are breastfed to 12 months, whilst only 1 in 3 children in low and middle-income countries are exclusively breastfed for the first 6 months. [More]

New robotic arm could support daily activities of patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

Researchers from the University of Twente's MIRA research centre, together with the VUmc, TU Delft and the Radboud umc, have developed the A-Gear: a robotic arm that can support the daily activities of people suffering the muscular disease Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. [More]
Immunotherapy could be the future of cancer treatments

Immunotherapy could be the future of cancer treatments

For decades most cancers have been treated with the standard of care treatments which typically include surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy. Now there is talk that immunotherapy represents "the future of cancer treatments." [More]
Johnson & Johnson joins industry-wide call to address growing problem of antimicrobial resistance

Johnson & Johnson joins industry-wide call to address growing problem of antimicrobial resistance

Johnson & Johnson today announced it has joined more than 80 companies and organizations in signing the Declaration on Combating Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR), an industry-wide call to action announced at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. [More]
Salk Institute scientists find new target for glioblastoma multiforme treatment

Salk Institute scientists find new target for glioblastoma multiforme treatment

Glioblastoma multiforme is a particularly deadly cancer. A person diagnosed with this type of brain tumor typically survives 15 months, if given the best care. The late Senator Ted Kennedy succumbed to this disease in just over a year. [More]
Study reveals effects of plain packaging on tobacco products among Australian Indigenous people

Study reveals effects of plain packaging on tobacco products among Australian Indigenous people

Following the introduction of plain packaging on tobacco products in 2012, Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were 12 per cent less likely to think certain tobacco brands were less harmful than others, a new study found. [More]
Rich Pharmaceuticals obtains FDA approval to begin Phase 1/2 study in AML and MDS patients

Rich Pharmaceuticals obtains FDA approval to begin Phase 1/2 study in AML and MDS patients

Rich Pharmaceuticals, Inc. is pleased to announce that the Company has received approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to commence its Phase 1/2 clinical for the treatment of Acute Myelocytic Leukemia (AML) and Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS) patients. [More]
Roche's cobas HIV-1 viral load test approved by FDA for use on cobas 6800 and cobas 8800 Systems

Roche's cobas HIV-1 viral load test approved by FDA for use on cobas 6800 and cobas 8800 Systems

Roche announced today that it has received FDA approval for the cobas HIV-1 viral load test by the United States Food and Drug Administration for use on the cobas 6800 and cobas 8800 Systems. This HIV-1 viral load test is part of the next generation of Roche viral load tests, which clinicians use to manage the disease and treatment of patients infected with HIV-1. [More]
Stem cell therapy not significantly better than conventional treatment for Crohn's disease

Stem cell therapy not significantly better than conventional treatment for Crohn's disease

A clinical trial to test the effectiveness of a stem cell therapy among adults with difficult to treat Crohn's disease has found it is not significantly better than conventional treatment in producing sustained disease remission after one year. [More]
Array BioPharma reports top-line results from binimetinib Phase 3 trial in patients with NRAS-mutant melanoma

Array BioPharma reports top-line results from binimetinib Phase 3 trial in patients with NRAS-mutant melanoma

Array BioPharma today reported top-line results from the ongoing Phase 3 clinical trial of binimetinib in patients with advanced NRAS-mutant melanoma, known as the NEMO trial. The study met its primary endpoint of improving progression-free survival (PFS) compared with dacarbazine treatment. [More]
Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation does not provide improvement for patients with Crohn disease

Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation does not provide improvement for patients with Crohn disease

Among adults with difficult to treat Crohn disease not amenable to surgery, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, compared with conventional therapy, did not result in significant improvement in sustained disease remission at l year and was associated with significant toxicity, according to a study in the December 15 issue of JAMA. [More]

IIASA researchers provide new measures to replace old-age dependency ratio

Conventional measures of age usually define people as 'old' at one chronological age, often 65. In many countries around the world, age 65 is used as a cutoff for everything from pension age to health care systems, as the basis of a demographic measure known as the 'old-age dependency ratio,' which defines everyone over 65 as depending on the population between ages 20 and 65. [More]
AIDS treatment can improve well-being of HIV-negative people

AIDS treatment can improve well-being of HIV-negative people

In rural Malawi, roughly 10 percent of the adult population has HIV. At the peak of the epidemic, in the 1990s and early 2000s, nearly everyone knew someone infected with or affected by the virus, what demographer Hans-Peter Kohler of the University of Pennsylvania describes as a generalized epidemic. [More]
Two UK studies reveal apparent increase in healthy ageing, less severe disability

Two UK studies reveal apparent increase in healthy ageing, less severe disability

Two studies conducted 20 years apart in England reveal an apparent increase in healthy ageing, or years lived healthily, reflecting less cognitive impairment; and an increase in the proportion of life lived healthily, through a larger proportion of years lived with disability but less rather than more severe disability. [More]
Kanuma approved as first treatment for patients with LAL deficiency

Kanuma approved as first treatment for patients with LAL deficiency

Today, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Kanuma (sebelipase alfa) as the first treatment for patients with a rare disease known as lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) deficiency. [More]
Air pollution accounts for over 430 000 premature deaths in Europe, shows new report

Air pollution accounts for over 430 000 premature deaths in Europe, shows new report

Air pollution is the single largest environmental health risk in Europe. It shortens people’s lifespan and contributes to serious illnesses such as heart disease, respiratory problems and cancer. [More]
New drug combination shows promise in treating men with metastatic prostate cancer

New drug combination shows promise in treating men with metastatic prostate cancer

A new drug combination may be effective in treating men with metastatic prostate cancer. Preliminary results of this new approach are encouraging and have led to an ongoing international study being conducted in 196 hospitals worldwide. [More]
Bile pigment may provide natural protection from heart attacks

Bile pigment may provide natural protection from heart attacks

New hope in the fight against cardiovascular disease has arrived, following breakthrough research identifying a pigment in our bile which could protect us. [More]
Many European hospitals fail to routinely test people at risk of HIV infection

Many European hospitals fail to routinely test people at risk of HIV infection

A new study reveals that many European hospitals fail to routinely test people who may be at risk of an HIV-infection. If tests were more widely offered in the healthcare system, fewer HIV-patients would go unnoticed, especially in Northern Europe. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement