Life Expectancy News and Research RSS Feed - Life Expectancy News and Research

Life expectancy is the expected (in the statistical sense) number of years of life remaining at a given age. It is denoted by e''x'', which means the average number of subsequent years of life for someone now aged ''x'', according to a particular mortality experience.
SIOG, EORTC update expert opinion on managing treatment for aged patients with NSCLC

SIOG, EORTC update expert opinion on managing treatment for aged patients with NSCLC

Half of all patients diagnosed with non-small cell lung cancer are 70 years of age or older, yet despite this high percentage, these elderly patients are not well represented in clinical trials. Therefore, the paucity of clinical data has made it difficult to reach evidence based clinical recommendations. [More]
NEPHRON+ project improves lives of kidney failure patients by developing wearable artificial kidney device

NEPHRON+ project improves lives of kidney failure patients by developing wearable artificial kidney device

End stage kidney disease is a global public health problem with an estimated 2.4 million patients on dialysis. The number of new cases is rising (7-8% annually) due to population ageing and increased diabetes prevalence. [More]
Study looks at factors that influence life expectancy of childhood cancer survivors

Study looks at factors that influence life expectancy of childhood cancer survivors

Many factors influence the life expectancy of childhood cancer survivors: not getting enough exercise, being underweight, and being worried about their future health or their health insurance. These are the findings of research led by Cheryl Cox of the St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in the US, published in Springer's Journal of Cancer Survivorship. The study found that, on average, childhood cancer survivors passed away before they were 40 years old. [More]
Prostate cancer breakthroughs offer new hope for men

Prostate cancer breakthroughs offer new hope for men

Men have lower life expectancy than women. This discrepancy is especially pronounced for African American men who live 6 fewer years than women. According to the CDC, life expectancy in the US is 76 years for men compared to 81 for women. [More]
New therapeutic agent reduces age-related sleep problems in fruit flies

New therapeutic agent reduces age-related sleep problems in fruit flies

Elderly flies do not sleep well - they frequently wake up during the night and wander around restlessly. The same is true of humans. For researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing in Cologne, the sleeplessness experienced by the fruit fly Drosophila is therefore a model case for human sleeping behaviour. [More]
Boston Scientific presents new data on cardiology-related clinical trials at ACC 2014

Boston Scientific presents new data on cardiology-related clinical trials at ACC 2014

Reinforcing its position as a global leader in bringing new therapies to patients with heart and cardiovascular disease, Boston Scientific Corporation (NYSE: BSX) reported favorable results in studies related to cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), platinum chromium stent platforms and transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). [More]

State roundup: W.Va. Governor Tomblin vetoes abortion ban; New York curbs medical bills with surprises; California bill aims to raise malpractice cap

Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin vetoed a bill late Friday that would have banned abortions of fetuses after 20 weeks gestation. The governor called the bill unconstitutional and a "detriment" to women's health. [More]
MADIT-CRT study: Boston Scientific CRT defibrillator reduces risk of death in mild heart failure patients

MADIT-CRT study: Boston Scientific CRT defibrillator reduces risk of death in mild heart failure patients

In the longest follow-up to date of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) for mild heart failure patients, Boston Scientific Corporation's exclusively sponsored and landmark Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial – Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (MADIT-CRT) study demonstrated significant and sustained survival benefit for the indicated population. [More]
Gastric surgery reduces heart attack risk in obese people

Gastric surgery reduces heart attack risk in obese people

Obese people who have stomach surgery to help them lose weight will halve their risk of heart attack according to new research from a team of doctors at the University of East Anglia, University of Manchester and University of Aberdeen. [More]
Tgen professor to receive 2014 Hope Funds Award for developing numerous cancer treatments

Tgen professor to receive 2014 Hope Funds Award for developing numerous cancer treatments

Dr. Daniel D. Von Hoff, who has been instrumental in developing numerous new cancer treatments, is among this year's recipients of the Award of Excellence from the Hope Funds for Cancer Research. [More]
Study: Overweight and obese teenagers have higher risk of death before age 50

Study: Overweight and obese teenagers have higher risk of death before age 50

Although people live longer today than they did 50 years ago, people who were overweight and obese as teenagers aren't experiencing the same gains as other segments of the population, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCEM). [More]
Expert highlights the importance of gender-specific approach for treating diabetes mellitus

Expert highlights the importance of gender-specific approach for treating diabetes mellitus

The international guidelines on the drug-based therapy of diabetes mellitus specify which factors need to be taken into account during treatment. [More]

Breast cancer screening in older women

Extending national breast cancer screening programmes to women over the age of 70 does not result in a decrease in the numbers of cancers detected at advanced stages, according to new research from The Netherlands. [More]
Longer looks: The politics of face and hand transplants; Apple's Healthbook; connecting income to life expectancy

Longer looks: The politics of face and hand transplants; Apple's Healthbook; connecting income to life expectancy

Fairfax County, Va., and McDowell County, W.Va., are separated by 350 miles, about a half-day's drive. Traveling west from Fairfax County, the gated communities and bland architecture of military contractors give way to exurbs, then to farmland and eventually to McDowell's coal mines and the forested slopes of the Appalachians. Perhaps the greatest distance between the two counties is this: Fairfax is a place of the haves, and McDowell of the have-nots. ... One of the starkest consequences of that divide is seen in the life expectancies of the people there. Residents of Fairfax County are among the longest-lived in the country: Men have an average life expectancy of 82 years and women, 85, about the same as in Sweden. In McDowell, the averages are 64 and 73, about the same as in Iraq (Annie Lowrey, 3/15). [More]
Investigational vaccine reduces number of tumors in mice with lung cancer

Investigational vaccine reduces number of tumors in mice with lung cancer

Researchers at UC Davis have found that the investigational cancer vaccine tecemotide, when administered with the chemotherapeutic cisplatin, boosted the immune response and reduced the number of tumors in mice with lung cancer. [More]
New drug for patients with leukaemia and lymphoma puts an end to chemotherapy

New drug for patients with leukaemia and lymphoma puts an end to chemotherapy

Patients with terminal forms of leukaemia and lymphoma who have run out of treatment options could soon benefit from a new drug, which not only puts an end to chemotherapy and has virtually no side effects but also improves a patient's life expectancy and quality of life. [More]

Celgene reiterates commitment to increase awareness and understanding of pancreatic cancer

With pancreatic cancer poised to become the third leading cause of cancer death in Europe, Celgene International Sàrl, a subsidiary of Celgene Corporation, has today reiterated its commitment to patients and their families with the announcement that it will focus significant resources to increase awareness and understanding of the disease. [More]
Researchers create statistical model to predict whether heart scans are useful in prescribing statins

Researchers create statistical model to predict whether heart scans are useful in prescribing statins

As long as inexpensive statins, which lower cholesterol, are readily available and patients don't mind taking them, it doesn't make sense to do a heart scan to measure how much plaque has built up in a patient's coronary arteries before prescribing the pills, according to a new study by researchers at UC San Francisco. [More]
Finding elevates mortality risk with increasing waist circumference at all levels of BMI

Finding elevates mortality risk with increasing waist circumference at all levels of BMI

Having a big belly has consequences beyond trouble squeezing into your pants. It's detrimental to your health, even if you have a healthy body mass index (BMI), a new international collaborative study led by a Mayo Clinic researcher found. [More]

Scientists throw light on genetic mutation that causes particularly severe genetic disease ARVC5

The genetic disease ARVC leads to sudden cardiac death and is more common than it has been hitherto assumed. This is reported by an international team of researchers headed by Prof Dr Hendrik Milting from the Heart and Diabetes Center NRW in the "European Heart Journal". [More]