Life Expectancy News and Research RSS Feed - Life Expectancy News and Research

Life expectancy is the expected (in the statistical sense) number of years of life remaining at a given age. It is denoted by e''x'', which means the average number of subsequent years of life for someone now aged ''x'', according to a particular mortality experience.
Researchers discover three new risk genes for ALS

Researchers discover three new risk genes for ALS

Published today in Nature Genetics, the study reveals three new risk genes for ALS and one of these - C21orf2 - increases an individual's risk of developing the dis-ease by 65 per cent. [More]
Ageing population can stimulate breakthroughs in medicine, technology but increase political risks

Ageing population can stimulate breakthroughs in medicine, technology but increase political risks

The UN estimates that the number of people aged 65 and older will have reached almost a billion by 2030. [More]
Report: Britons at risk of long-term disability, reduced life expectancy due to delays in treatment services

Report: Britons at risk of long-term disability, reduced life expectancy due to delays in treatment services

Up to a million Britons are at risk of preventable, long-term disability and reduced life expectancy due to delays in referrals to specialist advice and treatment services, according to the most comprehensive audit of rheumatology services carried out across England and Wales. [More]
Study highlights need to deepen health reforms in China

Study highlights need to deepen health reforms in China

China needs to further reform its health system with a number of critical steps to meet the growing health needs of the population and further control spending increases, despite impressive achievements in healthcare reform and rapid progress toward universal health coverage. [More]
Pap tests may be beneficial for preventing cervical cancer in older women

Pap tests may be beneficial for preventing cervical cancer in older women

A new study from the University of Illinois confirms a link between Pap smear screenings and a lower risk of developing cervical cancer in women over age 65. However, most American health guidelines discourage women in that age range from receiving screenings unless they have pre-existing risk factors. [More]
New subcutaneous treatment reduces pain, increases survival chances of breast cancer patients

New subcutaneous treatment reduces pain, increases survival chances of breast cancer patients

Breast cancer treatments are usually painful, time consuming and aggressive, which leads to long term hospitalization, medical staff and high economic expenses. [More]
Obesity is linked with premature death, particularly in men

Obesity is linked with premature death, particularly in men

Being overweight or obese is associated with an increased risk of premature death, according to the largest ever study into obesity and death. [More]
Diabetic patients experience long-term survival outcomes with TAR/CABG surgery

Diabetic patients experience long-term survival outcomes with TAR/CABG surgery

Diabetic patients who undergo heart bypass surgery are living longer and have much better long-term outcomes when cardiothoracic surgeons use arteries rather than veins for the bypasses, according to a new study published online today by The Annals of Thoracic Surgery. [More]
Food nudging could contribute to healthy eating

Food nudging could contribute to healthy eating

Is it possible to change our behaviour when it comes to food choices only by presenting the food to the guests in a canteen in a different order, or by making it more difficult to reach the less healthy food? Yes, a review of existing research in this area concludes. [More]
Routine Pap smear screenings linked to lower cervical cancer risk in older women

Routine Pap smear screenings linked to lower cervical cancer risk in older women

A new study from the University of Illinois confirms a link between routine Pap smear screenings and a lower risk of developing cervical cancer in women over age 65. [More]
Study shows wealthier Americans receive more health care than lower-income groups

Study shows wealthier Americans receive more health care than lower-income groups

Inequality in the use of health care has increased dramatically in recent years, with wealthier Americans, who tend to be healthier, now consuming the most care, according to a study published today [Wednesday, July 6] in the July issue of Health Affairs. [More]
Alnylam reports new results from investigational RNAi therapeutic programs

Alnylam reports new results from investigational RNAi therapeutic programs

Alnylam Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (Nasdaq: ALNY), the leading RNAi therapeutics company, announced today preliminary results from its ongoing Phase 2 open-label extension (OLE) studies with patisiran and revusiran, both investigational RNAi therapeutics targeting transthyretin (TTR) for the treatment of hereditary TTR-mediated amyloidosis (hATTR amyloidosis). [More]
Study finds link between cortisol levels and obesity in patients with bipolar disorder or recurrent depressions

Study finds link between cortisol levels and obesity in patients with bipolar disorder or recurrent depressions

Low levels of the stress hormone cortisol are linked to obesity, high levels of fat in the blood and metabolic syndrome among patients with recurrent depressions or bipolar disorder. This according to a study at Umea University in Sweden published in the Journal of Affective Disorders. [More]
Walking meeting could help increase physical activity levels of office workers

Walking meeting could help increase physical activity levels of office workers

Changing just one seated meeting per week at work into a walking meeting increased the work-related physical activity levels of white-collar workers by 10 minutes, according to a new study published by public health researchers with the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. [More]
Regorafenib drug improves survival rates in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma

Regorafenib drug improves survival rates in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma

Oral multikinase inhibitor regorafenib achieves significantly improved survival rates compared to placebo in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma, according to data from the phase III RESORCE trial, presented at the ESMO 18th World Congress of Gastrointestinal Cancer in Barcelona, Spain. [More]
Mathematical model helps investigate mechanisms involved in genesis of AF-related dementia

Mathematical model helps investigate mechanisms involved in genesis of AF-related dementia

Atrial fibrillation (AF), the most common cardiac arrhythmia, turns out to be a potential mechanism into the genesis of AF-related cognitive impairment/dementia. [More]
Hyde Park artist draws daily creative inspiration from chronic health experience

Hyde Park artist draws daily creative inspiration from chronic health experience

A kidney transplantation means much more than good health to Jason E. Jones. The 53 year-old Hyde Park artist and Loyola Medicine patient draws daily creative inspiration from his chronic health experience. [More]
Neurofibromatosis causes benign tumor formation in normal nervous tissue

Neurofibromatosis causes benign tumor formation in normal nervous tissue

Although neurofibromatosis (NF) is not commonly discussed, it affects more than 2 million people worldwide. [More]
CD Laboratory at MedUni Vienna explores new therapeutic approaches to enhance peritoneal dialysis

CD Laboratory at MedUni Vienna explores new therapeutic approaches to enhance peritoneal dialysis

One of the main functions of the kidneys is to filter metabolic products out of the blood. If the kidneys are no longer able to do this, the blood has to be artificially purified and drained of excess fluid. [More]
Elevated levels of CXCL10 protein could help diagnose cGvHD in blood, bone marrow transplant patients

Elevated levels of CXCL10 protein could help diagnose cGvHD in blood, bone marrow transplant patients

A new study published today in the journal Blood has identified a protein that could diagnose chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGvHD), a serious, long-term complication that affects some patients after a blood and bone marrow transplant. [More]
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