Liver Cancer News and Research RSS Feed - Liver Cancer News and Research

Liver cancer is more common in older people. Over half of people newly diagnosed with liver cancer are age 65 and over. Liver cancer is more common in men than in women. Liver cancer rates are highest among Asians and Pacific Islanders, most likely because of higher prevalence of viral Hepatitis infection. Liver cancer rates are lower among whites than Blacks or Asians and Pacific Islanders. At this time, we do not know exactly what causes cancer of the liver. There are several different types of liver cancer. The most common type is associated with long-term excessive alcoholic beverage use, scarring of the liver (cirrhosis), and Hepatitis B virus or Hepatitis C virus infection. Long-term use of anabolic steroids can also increase the risk of getting liver cancer. Smoking is also believed to increase the risk of getting liver cancer.
Can-Fite BioPharma reports financial results, provides update on drug development programs

Can-Fite BioPharma reports financial results, provides update on drug development programs

Can-Fite BioPharma Ltd., a biotechnology company with a pipeline of proprietary small molecule drugs being developed to treat inflammatory diseases, cancer and sexual dysfunction, today reported financial results for the six months ended June 30, 2016 and updates on its drug development programs. [More]
Liver cancer time-bomb as up to 70% people with Hep C miss out on follow-up testing

Liver cancer time-bomb as up to 70% people with Hep C miss out on follow-up testing

Up to 70 per cent of Victorians with suspected hepatitis C may not have received follow-up testing, putting them at risk of chronic liver disease and even cancer, University of Melbourne researchers say. [More]
Low selenium levels linked to liver cancer risk? An interview with Dr David Hughes

Low selenium levels linked to liver cancer risk? An interview with Dr David Hughes

Food provides us with a variety of substances we need to maintain life. These substances are essential nutrients and are classified as macronutrients (water, protein, fats, and carbohydrates) and micronutrients (vitamins and minerals). [More]
Hydrothermal DMR results show promise in treatment of type 2 diabetes

Hydrothermal DMR results show promise in treatment of type 2 diabetes

Fractyl Laboratories Inc. (Fractyl) announced today publication of data in the current issue of Diabetes Care from the Company’s first-in-human study of RevitaTM duodenal mucosal resurfacing (Revita DMR). [More]
Researchers urge people with suspected hepatitis C to get tested to prevent risk of liver disease

Researchers urge people with suspected hepatitis C to get tested to prevent risk of liver disease

Up to 70 per cent of Victorians with suspected hepatitis C may not have received follow-up testing, putting them at risk of chronic liver disease and even cancer, University of Melbourne researchers say. [More]
RNA silencing technique developed by spinoff from UM-Madison effective in battling hepatitis B

RNA silencing technique developed by spinoff from UM-Madison effective in battling hepatitis B

A method for "silencing" RNA that emerged from a University of Wisconsin-Madison spinoff company is in clinical trials in Europe, Asia and the United States against hepatitis B, an infection that can destroy the liver. [More]
Researchers develop computational algorithm to analyze big genomic data for different cancers

Researchers develop computational algorithm to analyze big genomic data for different cancers

University of Hawai'i Cancer Center researchers developed a computational algorithm to analyze "Big Data" obtained from tumor samples to better understand and treat cancer. [More]
Increased treatment for HCV in Rhode Island could help eradicate disease by 2030

Increased treatment for HCV in Rhode Island could help eradicate disease by 2030

A new Brown University study projects that increasing the number of Rhode Islanders treated every year for hepatitis C virus infection (HCV) to about 2,000 by 2020 would reduce cases by 90 percent and prevent more than 70 percent of expected liver-related deaths in the state by 2030. [More]
Research could help develop better therapies for new subtype of adenocarcinoma  patients

Research could help develop better therapies for new subtype of adenocarcinoma patients

Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer deaths, accounting for about a third of all tumor-related deaths. Adenocarcinomas, a non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), account for about 40 percent of cancer diagnoses, but few treatments are available for the disease. [More]
Research could help clinicians identify patients who may benefit from targeted therapy for liver cancer

Research could help clinicians identify patients who may benefit from targeted therapy for liver cancer

New research from Roswell Park Cancer Institute offers clinicians treating patients with advanced liver cancer a way of determining which patients may benefit most from the targeted therapy sorafenib. [More]
Researchers identify new mechanisms capable of suppressing propagation of HCV

Researchers identify new mechanisms capable of suppressing propagation of HCV

Researchers at Osaka University, Japan uncovered the mechanisms that suppress the propagation of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) with the potential of improving pathological liver conditions. [More]
New screen-and-treat programme for hepatitis B may thwart deadly complications of disease

New screen-and-treat programme for hepatitis B may thwart deadly complications of disease

Research into Africa's first 'screen-and-treat' programme for hepatitis B suggests the initiative may reduce deadly complications of the virus. [More]
Expanding the potential of existing cancer therapies: an interview with Dr Mark Rutstein

Expanding the potential of existing cancer therapies: an interview with Dr Mark Rutstein

Cancer remains a leading cause of death worldwide, and the global cancer burden is expected to increase by 70 percent over the next two decades. [More]
Low levels of blood selenium may increase risk of liver cancer

Low levels of blood selenium may increase risk of liver cancer

A new study, published in current issue of The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, shows that the highest levels of blood selenium or of selenoprotein P, the protein that distributes selenium from the liver around the body, are associated with a decreased risk of developing liver cancer (particularly hepatocellular carcinoma), even when all other major liver cancer risk factors are taken into account. [More]
Infant HBV vaccination prevents HCC in children, young adults

Infant HBV vaccination prevents HCC in children, young adults

Immunisation against hepatitis B virus in infants protects against the development of hepatocellular carcinoma in not only children but also young adults, a Taiwanese study finds. [More]
TDF reduces vertical HBV transmission

TDF reduces vertical HBV transmission

The mother-to-child transmission of hepatitis B virus is reduced with tenofovir disoproxil fumarate treatment during the third trimester in pregnant chronic HBV patients with a high viral load, show the findings of a trial conducted in China. [More]
Targeted molecular therapy reduces initial development of NAFLD in mice

Targeted molecular therapy reduces initial development of NAFLD in mice

Researchers report in the journal Cell Reports a targeted molecular therapy that dramatically reduces the initial development of Non Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) in laboratory mouse models of the disease. [More]
Researchers develop in vitro model system for investigating etiology of NAFLD

Researchers develop in vitro model system for investigating etiology of NAFLD

Researchers from the Institute for Stem Cell Research and Regenerative Medicine at the University Clinic of Düsseldorf have established an in vitro model system for investigating nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). [More]
Epclusa drug receives FDA approval for treating adult patients with chronic HCV

Epclusa drug receives FDA approval for treating adult patients with chronic HCV

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Epclusa to treat adult patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) both with and without cirrhosis (advanced liver disease). [More]
Clinical trial finds pioglitazone drug safe and effective for NASH patients

Clinical trial finds pioglitazone drug safe and effective for NASH patients

Researchers have found that an existing diabetes drug can be used to halt progression of another disease that is a leading cause of liver transplants. [More]
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