Liver Cancer News and Research RSS Feed - Liver Cancer News and Research

Liver cancer is more common in older people. Over half of people newly diagnosed with liver cancer are age 65 and over. Liver cancer is more common in men than in women. Liver cancer rates are highest among Asians and Pacific Islanders, most likely because of higher prevalence of viral Hepatitis infection. Liver cancer rates are lower among whites than Blacks or Asians and Pacific Islanders. At this time, we do not know exactly what causes cancer of the liver. There are several different types of liver cancer. The most common type is associated with long-term excessive alcoholic beverage use, scarring of the liver (cirrhosis), and Hepatitis B virus or Hepatitis C virus infection. Long-term use of anabolic steroids can also increase the risk of getting liver cancer. Smoking is also believed to increase the risk of getting liver cancer.
Researchers identify new mechanisms capable of suppressing propagation of HCV

Researchers identify new mechanisms capable of suppressing propagation of HCV

Researchers at Osaka University, Japan uncovered the mechanisms that suppress the propagation of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) with the potential of improving pathological liver conditions. [More]
New screen-and-treat programme for hepatitis B may thwart deadly complications of disease

New screen-and-treat programme for hepatitis B may thwart deadly complications of disease

Research into Africa's first 'screen-and-treat' programme for hepatitis B suggests the initiative may reduce deadly complications of the virus. [More]
Low levels of blood selenium may increase risk of liver cancer

Low levels of blood selenium may increase risk of liver cancer

A new study, published in current issue of The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, shows that the highest levels of blood selenium or of selenoprotein P, the protein that distributes selenium from the liver around the body, are associated with a decreased risk of developing liver cancer (particularly hepatocellular carcinoma), even when all other major liver cancer risk factors are taken into account. [More]
Infant HBV vaccination prevents HCC in children, young adults

Infant HBV vaccination prevents HCC in children, young adults

Immunisation against hepatitis B virus in infants protects against the development of hepatocellular carcinoma in not only children but also young adults, a Taiwanese study finds. [More]
TDF reduces vertical HBV transmission

TDF reduces vertical HBV transmission

The mother-to-child transmission of hepatitis B virus is reduced with tenofovir disoproxil fumarate treatment during the third trimester in pregnant chronic HBV patients with a high viral load, show the findings of a trial conducted in China. [More]
Targeted molecular therapy reduces initial development of NAFLD in mice

Targeted molecular therapy reduces initial development of NAFLD in mice

Researchers report in the journal Cell Reports a targeted molecular therapy that dramatically reduces the initial development of Non Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) in laboratory mouse models of the disease. [More]
Researchers develop in vitro model system for investigating etiology of NAFLD

Researchers develop in vitro model system for investigating etiology of NAFLD

Researchers from the Institute for Stem Cell Research and Regenerative Medicine at the University Clinic of Düsseldorf have established an in vitro model system for investigating nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). [More]
Epclusa drug receives FDA approval for treating adult patients with chronic HCV

Epclusa drug receives FDA approval for treating adult patients with chronic HCV

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Epclusa to treat adult patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) both with and without cirrhosis (advanced liver disease). [More]
Clinical trial finds pioglitazone drug safe and effective for NASH patients

Clinical trial finds pioglitazone drug safe and effective for NASH patients

Researchers have found that an existing diabetes drug can be used to halt progression of another disease that is a leading cause of liver transplants. [More]
Potential therapeutic approaches to combat chronic myeloid leukemia

Potential therapeutic approaches to combat chronic myeloid leukemia

Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) develops through chromosomal alterations in blood-forming cells of the bone marrow and usually occurs in older persons. Around 20 percent of adults diagnosed with leukemia suffer from this type of blood cancer. [More]
Drinking piping hot beverages may increase risk of esophagus tumors

Drinking piping hot beverages may increase risk of esophagus tumors

Drinking piping hot coffee, tea and the caffeine-infused beverage yerba mate probably causes cancer, the World Health Organization announced Wednesday. [More]
Portal vein hypertension diminishes after hepatitis C recovery

Portal vein hypertension diminishes after hepatitis C recovery

This inflammatory viral infection of the liver causes inflexible scar tissue to form. This in turn impedes blood flow through the organ, with resulting hypertension in the portal vein. [More]
Disruption of SVIP protein can lead to cardiovascular, fatty liver disease

Disruption of SVIP protein can lead to cardiovascular, fatty liver disease

A UCF College of Medicine researcher has identified for the first time a tiny liver protein that when disrupted can lead to the nation's top killer -- cardiovascular disease -- as well as fatty liver disease, a precursor to cancer. [More]
Pre-procedure medication regimen could lower incidence of hospital readmission in lung caner patients

Pre-procedure medication regimen could lower incidence of hospital readmission in lung caner patients

Researchers at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine have found that putting liver cancer patients on a medication regimen prior to undergoing a certain treatment could lead to shorter hospital stays and less chance for readmission due to complications. [More]
New drug-capture device can soak up chemotherapy drugs to limit toxicity

New drug-capture device can soak up chemotherapy drugs to limit toxicity

Doctors have a powerful arsenal of cancer-fighting chemotherapy drugs to choose from, though a key challenge is to better target these drugs to kill tumors while limiting their potentially harmful side effects. [More]
Study shows no higher cancer risk in patients undergoing spinal fusion surgery with rhBMP

Study shows no higher cancer risk in patients undergoing spinal fusion surgery with rhBMP

Adding to previous evidence, a study based on a statewide cancer database shows no increase in cancer risk in patients undergoing spinal fusion surgery with the bone-promoting growth factor recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein (rhBMP). The study appears in Spine, published by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
Panel of microRNAs can predict patients at risk for developing HBV-driven liver cancer

Panel of microRNAs can predict patients at risk for developing HBV-driven liver cancer

Hepatocellular carcinoma, the most common type of liver cancer, is increasing in incidence in the United States, and infection with the Hepatitis B virus (HBV) causes about 50 percent of cases. [More]
Study finds increased risk of mortality in black, Hispanic cancer patients

Study finds increased risk of mortality in black, Hispanic cancer patients

Hispanic white and non-Hispanic black cancer patients between ages 15 and 29 may be more likely than same-aged white patients to die of their disease, according to a University of Colorado Cancer Center study presented at the American Society for Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting 2016. [More]
Scientists debate role of AAV in causing hepatocellular carcinoma

Scientists debate role of AAV in causing hepatocellular carcinoma

Liver cancer can be triggered by mutations in cancer driver genes resulting from the insertion of adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors used to deliver therapeutic genes, although this tumor-inducing role of AAV remains highly controversial. [More]
Researchers discover new potential treatment target for liver cancer

Researchers discover new potential treatment target for liver cancer

Researchers at the University of Eastern Finland and Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen have discovered a new molecular mechanism that can be used to inhibit the growth of hepatocellular carcinoma, which is the most common liver cancer. [More]
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