Liver Cancer News and Research RSS Feed - Liver Cancer News and Research

Liver cancer is more common in older people. Over half of people newly diagnosed with liver cancer are age 65 and over. Liver cancer is more common in men than in women. Liver cancer rates are highest among Asians and Pacific Islanders, most likely because of higher prevalence of viral Hepatitis infection. Liver cancer rates are lower among whites than Blacks or Asians and Pacific Islanders. At this time, we do not know exactly what causes cancer of the liver. There are several different types of liver cancer. The most common type is associated with long-term excessive alcoholic beverage use, scarring of the liver (cirrhosis), and Hepatitis B virus or Hepatitis C virus infection. Long-term use of anabolic steroids can also increase the risk of getting liver cancer. Smoking is also believed to increase the risk of getting liver cancer.
New analysis finds global improvements in life expectancy

New analysis finds global improvements in life expectancy

Global life expectancy increased by 5.8 years in men and 6.6 years in women between 1990 and 2013, according to a major new analysis from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 (GBD 2013). [More]
New study highlights importance of generating awareness about HCV testing, support and care

New study highlights importance of generating awareness about HCV testing, support and care

A new study shows that many patients infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) are lost during different stages of health care to manage the disease. This real-life' view of the HCV patient care continuum in a major U.S. urban area is published in Hepatology, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, and highlights the importance of generating awareness among clinicians and at-risk groups about appropriate HCV testing, referral, support and care. [More]
Centenary researchers find potential way to stop spread of tumors

Centenary researchers find potential way to stop spread of tumors

By blocking a widespread enzyme, Centenary researchers have shown they can slow down the movement of cells and potentially stop tumours from spreading and growing. [More]
Research finding could lead to new therapies for malignant glioma

Research finding could lead to new therapies for malignant glioma

Targeted therapies are a growing and groundbreaking field in cancer care in which drugs or other substances are designed to interfere with genes or molecules that control the growth and survival of cancer cells. Now, scientists at Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center and VCU Institute of Molecular Medicine (VIMM) have identified a novel interaction between a microRNA and a gene that could lead to new therapies for the most common and deadly form of brain tumor, malignant glioma. [More]
Added benefit of daclatasvir drug not proven for chronic hepatitis C infection

Added benefit of daclatasvir drug not proven for chronic hepatitis C infection

The drug daclatasvir (trade name Daklinza) has been available since August 2014 for the treatment of adults with chronic hepatitis C (CHC) infection. The German Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care examined in a dossier assessment whether this new drug offers an added benefit over the appropriate comparator therapy. [More]
Can-Fite to commence pre-clinical development program of CF602 drug for sexual dysfunction

Can-Fite to commence pre-clinical development program of CF602 drug for sexual dysfunction

Can-Fite BioPharma Ltd., a biotechnology company with a pipeline of proprietary small molecule drugs that address inflammatory and cancer diseases, today reported that it will initiate a pre-clinical development program of its next generation drug CF602 for the indication of sexual dysfunction. Upon successful completion, the company intends to file an IND with the FDA to allow human Phase I studies. [More]
Novel targeted therapies and treatment combinations for leukemia

Novel targeted therapies and treatment combinations for leukemia

Recognizing that leukemia cannot be conquered with a "one-size-fits-all" approach, researchers are pursuing novel targeted therapies and combinations of existing treatment regimens with new agents for patient populations with historically poor prognoses, according to data presented today during the 56th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting and Exposition. [More]
Scientists review HBV-associated tumor microenvironment in hepatocellular carcinoma

Scientists review HBV-associated tumor microenvironment in hepatocellular carcinoma

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the few cancers in which a continued increase in incidence has been observed over recent years. Globally, there are approximately 750,000 new cases of liver cancer reported each year. Importantly, population-based studies show that HCC ranks as the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. [More]
Resveratrol in red wine may prevent cancer

Resveratrol in red wine may prevent cancer

Alcohol use is a major risk factor for head and neck cancer. But an article published in the November issue of the journal Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology shows that the chemical resveratrol found in grape skins and in red wine may prevent cancer as well. [More]
Interventional X-ray guidance device may reduce radiation exposure of liver cancer patients

Interventional X-ray guidance device may reduce radiation exposure of liver cancer patients

Johns Hopkins researchers report that their test of an interventional X-ray guidance device approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 2013 has the potential to reduce the radiation exposure of patients undergoing intra-arterial therapy (IAT) for liver cancer. [More]
CARsgen announces completion of series A financing

CARsgen announces completion of series A financing

CARsgen, a leader in the development of Chimeric Antigen Receptors T (CAR-T) cell immunotherapy to treat a variety of cancers, today announced the completion of a series A financing led by BVCF, a China-based healthcare private equity fund. [More]
Montefiore Medical Center receives $3.5M grant to advance treatment for hepatitis C

Montefiore Medical Center receives $3.5M grant to advance treatment for hepatitis C

Montefiore Medical Center received a $3.5 million grant as part of the $10 million Health Care Innovation Award from the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services to identify, diagnose and treat people with hepatitis C (HCV). [More]

New treatment regimen for hepatitis C in transplant patients produces promising results

A new treatment regimen for hepatitis C, the most common cause of liver cancer and transplantation, has produced results that will transform treatment protocols for transplant patients, according to research published online today in the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
Medicinal plant market goes untested for health hazards, shows study

Medicinal plant market goes untested for health hazards, shows study

Medicinal plant market goes untested for health hazards, according to a recent study published in journal Fungal Biology [More]
Researchers discover new kind of stem cell that may hold clues to origins of liver cancer

Researchers discover new kind of stem cell that may hold clues to origins of liver cancer

A Mount Sinai-led research team has discovered a new kind of stem cell that can become either a liver cell or a cell that lines liver blood vessels, according to a study published today in the journal Stem Cell Reports. The existence of such a cell type contradicts current theory on how organs arise from cell layers in the embryo, and may hold clues to origins of, and future treatment for, liver cancer. [More]
Obesity greatly accelerates aging of the liver

Obesity greatly accelerates aging of the liver

Using a recently developed biomarker of aging known as an epigenetic clock, UCLA researchers working closely with a German team of investigators have found for the first time that obesity greatly accelerates aging of the liver. This finding could explain the early onset of many age-related diseases, including liver cancer, in obese subjects [More]
Decaffeinated coffee may benefit liver health

Decaffeinated coffee may benefit liver health

Researchers from the National Cancer Institute report that decaffeinated coffee drinking may benefit liver health. Results of the study published in Hepatology, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, show that higher coffee consumption, regardless of caffeine content, was linked to lower levels of abnormal liver enzymes. This suggests that chemical compounds in coffee other than caffeine may help protect the liver. [More]
Many US patients with liver cancer do not receive proper treatment

Many US patients with liver cancer do not receive proper treatment

Many US patients with liver cancer-even those with early stage disease that can often be cured-do not receive treatment for their disease, according to an analysis of studies published between 1989 and 2013. [More]
Galmed Pharmaceuticals purchases EndoPAT devices, accessories from Itamar Medical

Galmed Pharmaceuticals purchases EndoPAT devices, accessories from Itamar Medical

Galmed Pharmaceuticals Ltd. ("Galmed"), a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company focused on the development and commercialization of a once-daily, oral medication for the treatment of liver diseases and cholesterol gallstones, announced today that it purchased 60 EndoPAT™ devices and accessories from Itamar Medical Ltd. [More]
Pitt researchers awarded new $5.8 million NIH grant to develop microfluidic 3D liver model system

Pitt researchers awarded new $5.8 million NIH grant to develop microfluidic 3D liver model system

With a new $5.8 million, three-year award from the National Institutes of Health, researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine will further develop a state-of-the-art, microfluidic 3D model system that mimics structure and function of the liver to better predict organ physiology, assess drug toxicity and build disease models. [More]