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Hypotension is low blood pressure. Blood pressure is the force of blood pushing against the walls of the arteries as the heart pumps out blood. Blood pressure is measured as systolic and diastolic pressures. Systolic blood pressure is the pressure when the heart beats while pumping blood. Diastolic blood pressure is the pressure when the heart is at rest between beats. You will most often see blood pressure numbers written with the systolic number above or before the diastolic, such as 120/80 mmHg. (The mmHg is millimeters of mercury-the units used to measure blood pressure.) Normal blood pressure in adults is lower than 120/80 mmHg. Hypotension is blood pressure that's lower than 90/60 mmHg.
New article outlines reasons to stratify and report data by sex, gender or both

New article outlines reasons to stratify and report data by sex, gender or both

No one can deny that men and women have different genes, biology and anatomical features. [More]
FDA approves new therapy for initial treatment of soft tissue sarcoma

FDA approves new therapy for initial treatment of soft tissue sarcoma

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today granted accelerated approval to Lartruvo (olaratumab) with doxorubicin to treat adults with certain types of soft tissue sarcoma (STS), which are cancers that develop in muscles, fat, tendons or other soft tissues. [More]
Researchers unravel mystery of first Zika virus-related death in the continental U.S.

Researchers unravel mystery of first Zika virus-related death in the continental U.S.

The first Zika virus-related death in the continental U.S. occurred in June of this year, but even now, months later, two aspects of this case continue to puzzle health experts. [More]
Intensive treatment to lower systolic blood pressure could save many lives

Intensive treatment to lower systolic blood pressure could save many lives

Intensive treatment to lower systolic (top number) blood pressure to below 120 would save more than 100,000 lives per year in the United States, according to a study led by Loyola University Chicago researcher Holly Kramer, MD, MPH. [More]
VIB-Ghent University research provides insights into septic shock

VIB-Ghent University research provides insights into septic shock

Researchers at VIB and Ghent University have discovered an important mechanism of sepsis, an overreaction of the body's immune system to an infection. [More]
Study urges caution when using BP-lowering treatment in patients with coronary artery disease

Study urges caution when using BP-lowering treatment in patients with coronary artery disease

Caution has been urged in the use of blood pressure lowering treatment for heart disease patients after a study in more than 22 000 patients with coronary artery disease found that too low blood pressure was associated with worse outcomes. The analysis from the CLARIFY registry is presented today at ESC Congress and published in The Lancet. [More]
Revised blood pressure targets for diabetes patients may increase number of stroke patients

Revised blood pressure targets for diabetes patients may increase number of stroke patients

The Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare recently raised the recommended target blood pressure for patients with diabetes. [More]
Study shows 1 in 5 hospitalized adults discharged with vital sign instabilities

Study shows 1 in 5 hospitalized adults discharged with vital sign instabilities

Twenty percent of people hospitalized are released before all vital signs are stable, a pattern that is associated with an increased risk of death and hospital readmission, a new study by UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers shows [More]
Antihypertensives prescribed for older adults despite having low blood pressure, study shows

Antihypertensives prescribed for older adults despite having low blood pressure, study shows

According to a new study in the journal Age and Ageing, a significant proportion of patients over 70 remain on antihypertensive medication despite having low blood pressure. [More]
High blood pressure could increase vascular dementia risk

High blood pressure could increase vascular dementia risk

High blood pressure could significantly raise the risk of developing the second most common form of dementia, according to a new study from The George Institute for Global Health. [More]
New Research: High blood pressure raises risk of dementia

New Research: High blood pressure raises risk of dementia

High blood pressure could significantly raise the risk of developing the second most common form of dementia, according to a new study from The George Institute for Global Health. [More]
Pediatric researchers develop minimally invasive techniques to treat plastic bronchitis

Pediatric researchers develop minimally invasive techniques to treat plastic bronchitis

Pediatric researchers have devised an innovative, safe and minimally invasive procedure that helps relieve rare but potentially life-threatening airway blockages occurring in children who had surgery for congenital heart defects. [More]
Vanderbilt's A.S.A.P sees increase in number of patients treated for alpha-gal syndrome

Vanderbilt's A.S.A.P sees increase in number of patients treated for alpha-gal syndrome

Vanderbilt's Asthma, Sinus and Allergy Program (A.S.A.P) has seen an increase in the number of patients being treated for alpha-gal syndrome, commonly known as the red meat allergy linked to tick bites. [More]
Entresto drug shows added benefit in symptomatic chronic heart failure

Entresto drug shows added benefit in symptomatic chronic heart failure

The fixed-dose combination of sacubitril and valsartan (trade name: Entresto) has been approved since November 2015 for adults with symptomatic chronic heart failure with reduced pump function (ejection fraction). The German Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG) now examined in an early benefit assessment whether this drug combination offers an added benefit for patients in comparison with the appropriate comparator therapy. [More]
Inflectra (infliximab-dyyb) approved for multiple indications

Inflectra (infliximab-dyyb) approved for multiple indications

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Inflectra (infliximab-dyyb) for multiple indications. Inflectra is administered by intravenous infusion. This is the second biosimilar approved by the FDA. [More]
Investigational drug provides no improved protection to patients with contrast-induced acute kidney injury

Investigational drug provides no improved protection to patients with contrast-induced acute kidney injury

Patients treated with CMX-2043--an investigational drug that has previously shown some ability to protect heart muscle from damage during stenting--saw no improved protection in their kidneys compared to placebo, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 65th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Intravenous beta blockers offer no clinical benefit to patients with STEMI

Intravenous beta blockers offer no clinical benefit to patients with STEMI

Giving intravenous beta blockers before performing a coronary angioplasty in patients who had experienced the deadliest form of heart attack—ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI)—was safe but did not reduce heart attack severity or improve blood flow from the heart's main pumping chamber, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 65th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
FDA approves Defitelio to treat hepatic veno-occlusive disease in adults, children

FDA approves Defitelio to treat hepatic veno-occlusive disease in adults, children

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Defitelio (defibrotide sodium) to treat adults and children who develop hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD) with additional kidney or lung abnormalities after they receive a stem cell transplant from blood or bone marrow called hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). [More]
Heart attack patients experiencing cardiogenic shock at higher risk of death in first 60 days post-discharge

Heart attack patients experiencing cardiogenic shock at higher risk of death in first 60 days post-discharge

Heart attack patients who experience cardiogenic shock have a higher risk of death or rehospitalization than non-shock patients in the first 60 days post-discharge, but by the end of the first year, the gap between the two groups narrows, according to a study published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. [More]
New pain management strategies key to maximizing patient outcomes after TKR procedures

New pain management strategies key to maximizing patient outcomes after TKR procedures

According to a new literature review in the February issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, a team-based care approach (consisting of the patient, family members, the orthopaedic surgeon and other medical practitioners) on total knee replacement (TKR) procedures, in conjunction with newer pain management strategies, is key to maximizing patient outcomes. [More]
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