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SLU receives HRSA grant for training family physicians and medical family therapists in behavioral health

SLU receives HRSA grant for training family physicians and medical family therapists in behavioral health

Saint Louis University has received a $1.87 million grant to strengthen behavioral health training for family physicians, who often are the primary physician seen by many adults and children, and for medical family therapists who practice alongside them. [More]
Gene therapy may be viable approach for treating CF lung problems

Gene therapy may be viable approach for treating CF lung problems

Two new studies from the University of Iowa suggest that gene therapy may be a viable approach for treating or preventing lung disease caused by cystic fibrosis. [More]
ATS releases new clinical practice guidelines for diagnosis, management of LAM

ATS releases new clinical practice guidelines for diagnosis, management of LAM

The American Thoracic Society and the Japanese Respiratory Society have published new clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM), a rare lung disease that primarily affects women of child-bearing age. [More]
SLUCare cancer doctor offers advice to manage anxiety after cancer diagnosis

SLUCare cancer doctor offers advice to manage anxiety after cancer diagnosis

The first few days after a cancer diagnosis can feel overwhelming. At the very moment when you must make key decisions about your treatment and care, your brain may feel overloaded processing the distressing news you've just received. [More]
Research offers new insights into underlying mechanisms of deadly cystic fibrosis

Research offers new insights into underlying mechanisms of deadly cystic fibrosis

A minor hiccup in the sequence of a human gene can have devastating impacts on health. Such flaws cause cystic fibrosis (CF), a disease affecting the lungs and other vital organs, often leading to death by the age of 30. [More]
Liquid biopsies may be effective option for detecting mutations in advanced lung cancer patients

Liquid biopsies may be effective option for detecting mutations in advanced lung cancer patients

For patients with advanced lung cancer, a non-invasive liquid biopsy may be a more effective and suitable alternative to the gold standard tissue biopsy to detect clinically relevant mutations and help guide their course of treatment, suggests a new study published this week in the journal Clinical Cancer Research from researchers at the Abramson Cancer Center at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Acute COPD exacerbations linked to long-term decline in lung function

Acute COPD exacerbations linked to long-term decline in lung function

Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD, are associated with significant long-term lung function loss, according to research published online, ahead of print in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. [More]
Researchers reveal novel link between nicotine and inflammation

Researchers reveal novel link between nicotine and inflammation

An Umeå-based team in collaboration with US researchers reveals a new link between nicotine and inflammation. [More]
Nutrition could be cost-effective treatment to improve health in malnourished older adults

Nutrition could be cost-effective treatment to improve health in malnourished older adults

As a majority of older adults have two or more chronic conditions, finding new ways to improve their health and decrease the cost of care is vital to helping them live healthier, longer lives. [More]
Study shows many older jail inmates experience health-related distressing symptoms

Study shows many older jail inmates experience health-related distressing symptoms

More than 550,000 adults 55-years-old and older are arrested and detained every year--and that number is increasing rapidly. [More]
Boehringer Ingelheim and Duke expand collaboration to create largest patient registry for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF)

Boehringer Ingelheim and Duke expand collaboration to create largest patient registry for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF)

Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and the Duke Clinical Research Institute (DCRI) announced today the expansion of the Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis – PROspective Outcomes (IPF-PRO) Registry, a patient registry developed to uncover insights into IPF, a rare and serious lung disease. The expansion will increase the study enrollment from 300 patients at 18 study sites to 1,500 patients at approximately 45 sites, creating the largest registry of newly diagnosed IPF patients. [More]
Mathematicians developing new statistical methods to predict bacterial epidemics

Mathematicians developing new statistical methods to predict bacterial epidemics

Mathematicians are now developing completely new statistical calculations on the world's fastest computers in order to be able to predict how epidemics of dangerous hospital bacteria spread. [More]
Steroid treatment linked to increased risk of retinopathy in very low birth weight infants

Steroid treatment linked to increased risk of retinopathy in very low birth weight infants

Because of the beneficial effect of corticosteroids on lung function, especially in infants who are ventilator dependent, corticosteroids are, at times, administered to very low birth weight neonates to treat established or evolving lung disease. However, it has long been suspected that steroids may have negative neurodevelopmental effects on very premature infants. [More]
Former health minister backs Inhealthcare’s new self-testing service in Norfolk

Former health minister backs Inhealthcare’s new self-testing service in Norfolk

The former health minister Norman Lamb has given his backing to Inhealthcare’s new self-testing service in rural Norfolk. [More]
Experts underscore need to tackle rising global problem of stem cell medical tourism

Experts underscore need to tackle rising global problem of stem cell medical tourism

Stem cell medical tourism and unproven stem cell interventions are growing and concerning issues for patients afflicted with lung disease. [More]
RNA silencing technique developed by spinoff from UM-Madison effective in battling hepatitis B

RNA silencing technique developed by spinoff from UM-Madison effective in battling hepatitis B

A method for "silencing" RNA that emerged from a University of Wisconsin-Madison spinoff company is in clinical trials in Europe, Asia and the United States against hepatitis B, an infection that can destroy the liver. [More]
New disease gene linked to shortened telomeres appears to raise risk of pulmonary fibrosis-emphysema

New disease gene linked to shortened telomeres appears to raise risk of pulmonary fibrosis-emphysema

Johns Hopkins researchers say they have identified a new disease gene that, when mutated, appears to increase the risk in a small number of people of developing emphysema and a lung-scarring condition known as pulmonary fibrosis. [More]
Study recommends LISA ventilation strategy to prevent chronic lung disease in preterm infants

Study recommends LISA ventilation strategy to prevent chronic lung disease in preterm infants

Researchers from McMaster University have evaluated and determined the best ventilation strategy to prevent chronic lung disease, one of the most significant complications in preterm infants. [More]
Working or volunteering could decrease chances of physical disability in elders

Working or volunteering could decrease chances of physical disability in elders

Working or volunteering can reduce the chances of chronic health conditions leading to physical disability in older Americans, according to researchers at Georgia State University and Florida State University. [More]
Clinics with comprehensive care for premature infants alleviate concerns for parents

Clinics with comprehensive care for premature infants alleviate concerns for parents

On January 24, 2013, Iris Vega-Figueroa's life changed completely. That's the day she gave birth to her twin girls, Iris and Geraldine. The twins were monoamniotic-monochorionic, meaning they shared one amniotic sack and one placenta in the womb. These rare pregnancies are considered high risk because of the uneven blood flow that occurs between the infants through the placenta. [More]
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