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Advances in inhaled drug delivery: an interview with Dr Robert Clarke

Advances in inhaled drug delivery: an interview with Dr Robert Clarke

Delivering drugs to the lungs via inhalation has a number of potential advantages over traditional routes of administration like pills or injections. For treating pulmonary diseases, the obvious logic we are applying is topical delivery to the airways via inhalation. [More]
SLU researchers receive federal grant to study Zika virus

SLU researchers receive federal grant to study Zika virus

Saint Louis University vaccine researchers have received $1.3 million in federal funding to study Zika, as part of a multi-site study funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Study highlights need to improve end-of-life care for all patients with serious illnesses

Study highlights need to improve end-of-life care for all patients with serious illnesses

Historically, efforts to improve end-of-life care have focused primarily on patients with cancer. But few studies have looked at the quality of end-of-life care for patients with other serious illnesses, such as lung, kidney or heart failure or dementia. [More]
SLU to conduct human clinical trial of vaccine to protect people from Zika virus

SLU to conduct human clinical trial of vaccine to protect people from Zika virus

Saint Louis University's vaccine center has been tapped by the National Institutes of Health to conduct a human clinical trial of a vaccine to prevent the Zika virus, which can cause devastating birth defects in babies. [More]
Women working long hours may be working themselves sick

Women working long hours may be working themselves sick

Research published this week shows that women working long hours for many years are at increased risk of developing life-threatening illnesses. Diabetes, cancer, heart trouble and arthritis were three times more common among women who worked an average of 60 hours or more per week for 30 years compared with women working fewer hours. [More]
Long work hours may triple risk of life-threatening illnesses in women

Long work hours may triple risk of life-threatening illnesses in women

Women who put in long hours for the bulk of their careers may pay a steep price: life-threatening illnesses, including heart disease and cancer. [More]
Rehabilitation programmes can help reverse frailty in older COPD patients

Rehabilitation programmes can help reverse frailty in older COPD patients

One in four patients with COPD referred for exercise rehabilitation are frail, but nevertheless can respond favourably to rehabilitation and their frailty can be reversed, finds a new study led by King's College London and Royal Brompton & Harefield NHS Foundation Trust. [More]
Air pollution exposure may have direct role in triggering lupus among children and adolescents

Air pollution exposure may have direct role in triggering lupus among children and adolescents

The results of a study presented today at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress show for the first time that an individual's exposure to air pollution may have a direct role in triggering disease activity as well as airway inflammation in children and adolescents with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE). [More]
Researchers identify lymphatic endothelial lineage that shows potential for new anti-cancer treatment

Researchers identify lymphatic endothelial lineage that shows potential for new anti-cancer treatment

Identifying the cell of origin is crucial to understanding how a tumor develops and metastasizes and for developing targeted therapies. [More]
Correcting defective p73 gene function may be promising therapeutic strategy for chronic lung diseases

Correcting defective p73 gene function may be promising therapeutic strategy for chronic lung diseases

Rising global air pollution and increasing smoking prevalence in many developing nations will likely lead to a growing incidence of lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which currently affects more than 330 million people worldwide, is the third-leading cause of death and carries an estimated healthcare cost of $2.1 trillion. [More]
Experts urge cancer researchers to use old, obese mice for preclinical immunotherapy studies

Experts urge cancer researchers to use old, obese mice for preclinical immunotherapy studies

Researchers should include laboratory mice that are old and obese in their studies of immunotherapy treatments for cancer, according to a review article by Saint Louis University scientists. [More]
New Rutgers research aims at exploring gender differences in lung cancer

New Rutgers research aims at exploring gender differences in lung cancer

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in both men and women. Lung cancer diagnoses have more than doubled among females in the past 38 years, while having fallen 29 percent among males, according to the American Lung Association. [More]
Discrimination linked to lower vaccination rates among racial/ethnic minorities

Discrimination linked to lower vaccination rates among racial/ethnic minorities

Yearly flu shots are strongly recommended for adults with certain chronic illnesses, but patients of racial/ethnic minority groups are less likely to receive them. [More]
Four major phenotypes may help improve prediction, prevention of cardiometabolic risk in prediabetes

Four major phenotypes may help improve prediction, prevention of cardiometabolic risk in prediabetes

Prediabetes is associated with increased risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, dementia and cancer. However, the disease risk considerably varies among subjects. [More]
Hydroxyurea treatment improves pulmonary function decline in children with sickle cell disease

Hydroxyurea treatment improves pulmonary function decline in children with sickle cell disease

For the first time, researchers were able to demonstrate that children diagnosed with sickle cell disease showed improvement in lung function after treatment with hydroxyurea, a treatment that is underused despite its demonstrated benefits. [More]
ICS users may be at greater risk for nontuberculous mycobacteria pulmonary disease

ICS users may be at greater risk for nontuberculous mycobacteria pulmonary disease

Patients with obstructive lung disease who take inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) may be at greater risk for nontuberculous mycobacteria pulmonary disease (NTM PD), according to new research presented at the ATS 2016 International Conference. [More]
COPD exacerbations accelerate lung decline

COPD exacerbations accelerate lung decline

In patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), exacerbations accelerated lung function loss, according to a new study presented at the ATS 2016 International Conference. The effect was particularly prominent in those with mild disease. [More]
Fitness may preserve lung function as we age

Fitness may preserve lung function as we age

Being fit may reduce the decline in lung function that occurs as we grow older, according to research presented at the ATS 2016 International Conference. [More]
Boehringer Ingelheim presents new data on OFEV® (nintedanib) in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF)

Boehringer Ingelheim presents new data on OFEV® (nintedanib) in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF)

New analyses presented at the American Thoracic Society’s 2016 annual conference (ATS 2016) further add to the efficacy and safety profile of OFEV® (nintedanib) in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). [More]
Pulmonary hypertension impacts walking ability in SSc patients

Pulmonary hypertension impacts walking ability in SSc patients

The results of a meta-analysis show the adverse impact pulmonary hypertension has on the walking stamina of patients with systemic sclerosis. [More]
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