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Study reveals how one type of DNA damage may lead to several human diseases

Study reveals how one type of DNA damage may lead to several human diseases

Using a new imaging technique, National Institutes of Health researchers have found that the biological machinery that builds DNA can insert molecules into the DNA strand that are damaged as a result of environmental exposures. These damaged molecules trigger cell death that produces some human diseases, according to the researchers. [More]
Five USF faculty members named AAAS Fellow

Five USF faculty members named AAAS Fellow

Five faculty members from the University of South Florida in Tampa have been named Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Election as an AAAS Fellow is an honor bestowed upon AAAS members by their peers. [More]
2014 Canadian Prix Galien for Innovative Product Award presented to Esbriet (pirfenidone)

2014 Canadian Prix Galien for Innovative Product Award presented to Esbriet (pirfenidone)

This year's prestigious Canadian Prix Galien for Innovative Product Award has been presented to Esbriet (pirfenidone), a medicine used to treat idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). It is the only medication approved in Canada with a specific IPF indication and is approved for mild to moderate IPF in adults. [More]
Women with symptoms of serious psychological distress less likely to receive routine cancer screenings

Women with symptoms of serious psychological distress less likely to receive routine cancer screenings

Women with symptoms of serious mental illness are significantly less likely to receive three routine cancer screenings - Pap tests, mammograms and clinical breast exams - than women in the general population, despite being at elevated risk for medical comorbidities and early death, a new study indicates. [More]
New treatment for Marfan syndrome works as well as beta blockers

New treatment for Marfan syndrome works as well as beta blockers

A new treatment for Marfan syndrome, a rare genetic disease that can lead to heart problems, works as well as the currently recommended medical therapy, beta blockers, according to an article in the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
FIRS mobilizes members to raise awareness on COPD

FIRS mobilizes members to raise awareness on COPD

On World COPD Day (19 November 2014), the Forum of International Respiratory Societies (FIRS) is mobilizing its members to raise awareness of the disease and help prevent the risk factors that cause it. [More]
Excess fat in lungs may cause pulmonary fibrosis

Excess fat in lungs may cause pulmonary fibrosis

Pulmonary fibrosis has no cure. It's caused by scarring that seems to feed on itself, with the tougher, less elastic tissue replacing the ever moving and stretching lung, making it increasingly difficult for patients to breathe. [More]
Nutrition treatment for older COPD patients shows better outcomes

Nutrition treatment for older COPD patients shows better outcomes

People aged 65 and older, who were being treated for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in the hospital and received nutrition treatment (oral nutrition supplements) had reduced lengths of stay, hospital costs and chances of returning to the hospital within 30-days, according to a study published in CHEST. [More]
Exposure to tobacco smoke, roadway air pollution can contribute to obesity

Exposure to tobacco smoke, roadway air pollution can contribute to obesity

New research from Keck Medicine of the University of Southern California (USC) bolsters evidence that exposure to tobacco smoke and near-roadway air pollution contributes to the development of obesity. [More]
Pretreatment ILD is a risk factor for developing radiation pneumonitis in stage I NSCLC patients

Pretreatment ILD is a risk factor for developing radiation pneumonitis in stage I NSCLC patients

Pretreatment interstitial lung disease (ILD) is a significant risk factor for developing symptomatic and severe radiation pneumonitis in stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) alone. [More]
New program aims to educate COPD patients on how to manage their disease

New program aims to educate COPD patients on how to manage their disease

The American Thoracic Society today announced a new program, produced with support from Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc., to provide materials to educate patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) about this progressive lung disease and how it can be managed. [More]
New model explains how immune cells recognize, destroy bacteria

New model explains how immune cells recognize, destroy bacteria

The innate immune system serves as the body's specialized armed forces division, comprised of a host of defense mechanisms used to battle bacterial infections. Among the system's warriors are white blood cells including the specialized macrophages, which maintain constant surveillance for foreign intruders or pathogens, functioning as the body's first line of defense, poised to attack at barrier sites including the skin, lungs and intestines. [More]
Janssen working with The Union to evaluate SIRTURO (bedaquiline) in patients with MDR-TB

Janssen working with The Union to evaluate SIRTURO (bedaquiline) in patients with MDR-TB

Janssen Research & Development, LLC today announced a collaboration with the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease (The Union) to include SIRTURO (bedaquiline) in the STREAM Study. [More]
New policy targeting hospital readmissions for COPD may hurt vulnerable patients, say experts

New policy targeting hospital readmissions for COPD may hurt vulnerable patients, say experts

Last week, the federal government revealed that it will fine more than 2,600 hospitals in the coming year, because too many Medicare patients treated at these hospitals are ending up back in the hospital within 30 days of going home. Two new conditions have been added in this round of penalties: elective hip and knee replacement and chronic lung disease. [More]
Endemic lung infection compromises lung cancer diagnosis

Endemic lung infection compromises lung cancer diagnosis

The accuracy of lung cancer diagnosis using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose–positron emission tomography may be compromised in areas with endemic infectious lung diseases, research suggests. [More]
Pre-treatment pain intensity predicts survival of patients with head and neck cancer

Pre-treatment pain intensity predicts survival of patients with head and neck cancer

Pre-treatment pain intensity is an independent survival predictor for patients with head and neck cancer, according to new research published in The Journal of Pain, the peer-reviewed publication of the American Pain Society. [More]
Aseptika launches Contactless Thermometer and Pulse Oximeter

Aseptika launches Contactless Thermometer and Pulse Oximeter

With the winter flu and cold season almost upon us we can stock up and take some steps to prepare at home for this eventuality. Having a flu jab, eating well, getting lots of exercise and sleep, and maintain good personal hygiene all help in preventing flu and colds. [More]
New screening tools detect heart and lung disease

New screening tools detect heart and lung disease

Two Michigan high school students, sisters Ilina and Medha Krishen, have developed screening tools using electronic stethoscopes to detect lung and heart disease. [More]
First-ever evidence-based guidelines released for prevention of acute COPD exacerbations

First-ever evidence-based guidelines released for prevention of acute COPD exacerbations

The American College of Chest Physicians (CHEST) and the Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS) announced today the release of Prevention of Acute Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: American College of Chest Physicians and Canadian Thoracic Society Guideline in the journal CHEST. [More]
New telemedicine system acts as 'activity coach'

New telemedicine system acts as 'activity coach'

Today's smartphone user can obtain a lot of data about his or her health, thanks to built-in or separate sensors. Researcher Harm op den Akker of the University of Twente (CTIT Institute) now takes this health monitoring to a higher level. [More]