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Adropin hormone offers a promising treatment option for type 2 diabetes

Adropin hormone offers a promising treatment option for type 2 diabetes

In a study published in Molecular Metabolism, a SLU researcher has found that adropin, a hormone that regulates whether the body burns fat or sugar during feeding and fasting cycles, can improve insulin action in obese, diabetic mice, suggesting that it may work as a therapy for type 2 diabetes. [More]
Plymouth researchers awarded grant to evaluate pulmonary rehabilitation programme in East Africa

Plymouth researchers awarded grant to evaluate pulmonary rehabilitation programme in East Africa

Chronic lung disease is a growing and debilitating health issue for countries in East Africa. Resulting from respiratory infections such as TB and HIV, and lifestyle problems such as tobacco smoking and poor nutrition, chronic lung disease affects one in five adults in Africa and is a major threat to health. [More]
SLU researcher discovers new information about how antibiotics stop staph infections

SLU researcher discovers new information about how antibiotics stop staph infections

In research published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, assistant professor of biochemistry and molecular biology at Saint Louis University Mee-Ngan F. Yap, Ph.D., discovered new information about how antibiotics like azithromycin stop staph infections, and why staph sometimes becomes resistant to drugs. [More]
New American Lung Association report calls on California to reduce tobacco-caused death and disease

New American Lung Association report calls on California to reduce tobacco-caused death and disease

Once a national leader in tobacco control efforts, progress is at a standstill in California as advances in statewide tobacco control policies have stagnated. These were the findings of the 13th annual American Lung Association State of Tobacco Control 2015 report released today. [More]
Saint Louis University researchers find way to prevent type I diabetes in animal model

Saint Louis University researchers find way to prevent type I diabetes in animal model

In new research published in Endocrinology, Thomas Burris, Ph.D., chair of pharmacological and physiological science at Saint Louis University, reports that his team has found a way to prevent type I diabetes in an animal model. [More]
Leading microbiologist warns of killer fungi’s increasing threat

Leading microbiologist warns of killer fungi’s increasing threat

A leading microbiologist has warned of the increasing threat that killer fungi poses to humans and the environment. [More]
Changes in health limitations, chronic conditions can predict mortgage distress

Changes in health limitations, chronic conditions can predict mortgage distress

The mortgage strain of American home ownership can lead to poor health but a new study finds that the inverse may also be true-- changes in health can serve as a predictor to mortgage distress. [More]
TERT mutations may make smokers more susceptible to emphysema

TERT mutations may make smokers more susceptible to emphysema

Mutations in a gene that helps repair damaged chromosome ends may make smokers — especially female smokers — more susceptible to emphysema, according to results of a new study led by Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center researchers. [More]
Top notch endodontic care for patients with dental anxiety

Top notch endodontic care for patients with dental anxiety

It's no secret that vast majority of Americans don't look forward to a visit to the dentist. According to the American Association of Endodontists, a striking 80% of US adults experience dental fear or anxiety. On some levels, fear of the dentist is understandable because a checkup or a procedure involves poking and prodding around the mouth of a patient with an intimidating looking set of tools. [More]
Intriguing small molecule directs activity of key ‘clock proteins’

Intriguing small molecule directs activity of key ‘clock proteins’

In research published in Nature Communications, Thomas Burris, Ph.D., chair of pharmacological and physiological science at Saint Louis University, reports intriguing findings about a small molecule that directs the activity of key "clock proteins," offering the potential to manage circadian rhythm and treat problems that are associated with its dysfunction, like sleep and anxiety disorders. [More]
Gene variations predispose mestizo Mexican population to develop severe form of COPD

Gene variations predispose mestizo Mexican population to develop severe form of COPD

A study by Ramcés Falfán-Valencia, researcher at the National Institute of Respiratory Diseases, found that the mestizo Mexican population has a number of variations in certain genes that predispose them to develop the most severe form of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). [More]
SLU investigators find promising candidates for new herpes virus treatments

SLU investigators find promising candidates for new herpes virus treatments

Saint Louis University research findings published in the December issue of Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy report a family of molecules known as nucleotidyltransferase superfamily (NTS) enzyme inhibitors are promising candidates for new herpes virus treatments. [More]
Infant mortality rates for RSV much lower than previously thought

Infant mortality rates for RSV much lower than previously thought

It's a virus that has long been characterized as dangerous and even deadly, but new research shows infant deaths from respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) are actually quite uncommon in the 21st century. [More]
Researchers report promising outcomes from clinical trial in patients with dyskeratosis congenita

Researchers report promising outcomes from clinical trial in patients with dyskeratosis congenita

Researchers at Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center report promising outcomes from a clinical trial with patients with a rare form of bone marrow failure who received a hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) after pre-treatment with immunosuppressive drugs only. This is the first trial reporting successful transplant in dyskeratosis congenita (DC) patients without the use of any radiation or conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy beforehand. [More]
PulmoFlow's nebulized drug and device combination gets FDA approval for cystic fibrosis

PulmoFlow's nebulized drug and device combination gets FDA approval for cystic fibrosis

On Tuesday, the FDA granted final approval of PulmoFlow, Inc.'s New Drug Application for Kitabis Pak – a co-packaging of generic tobramycin inhalation solution with a PARI LC PLUS Nebulizer. This is the first nebulized drug and device combination to be approved for patients with cystic fibrosis. [More]
Ten facts about Alzheimer's disease

Ten facts about Alzheimer's disease

Dr. Daniel Thomas will be conducting a ground-breaking study to determine if cognitive decline due to memory-destroying Alzheimer's disease can begin to be reversed in 90 days by combating the root causes using an innovative combination of diet, exercise, vitamin supplements, hormone therapy, and intravenous nutrition. [More]
Human stem cells made from adult donor cells remember their origin, say McMaster scientists

Human stem cells made from adult donor cells remember their origin, say McMaster scientists

Scientists at McMaster University have discovered that human stem cells made from adult donor cells "remember" where they came from and that's what they prefer to become again. [More]
U-M startup company Imbio gets FDA approval to market Lung Density Analysis for COPD

U-M startup company Imbio gets FDA approval to market Lung Density Analysis for COPD

A technology that started in a University of Michigan Medical School lab may soon help lung disease patients around the world breathe a little easier, by helping their doctors make a clearer diagnosis and more individualized treatment plan. [More]
BWH researchers identify cells responsible for fibrosis

BWH researchers identify cells responsible for fibrosis

Researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital have identified what they believe to be the cells responsible for fibrosis, the buildup of scar tissue. Fibrotic diseases, such as chronic kidney disease and failure, lung disease, heart failure and cirrhosis of the liver, are estimated to be responsible for up to 45 percent of deaths in the developed world. [More]
SLU researcher discovers way to block pain pathway

SLU researcher discovers way to block pain pathway

In research published in the medical journal Brain, Saint Louis University researcher Daniela Salvemini, Ph.D. and colleagues within SLU, the National Institutes of Health and other academic institutions have discovered a way to block a pain pathway in animal models of chronic neuropathic pain including pain caused by chemotherapeutic agents and bone cancer pain suggesting a promising new approach to pain relief. [More]