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LSTM scientists one step closer to understanding why HAP increases risk of pneumonia

LSTM scientists one step closer to understanding why HAP increases risk of pneumonia

Scientists at LSTM have come a step closer to understanding why people exposed to household air pollution (HAP) are at higher risk of lung infections such as pneumonia and tuberculosis. [More]
SLU professor reveals why women have higher rates of strokes than men, suggests steps to reduce risk

SLU professor reveals why women have higher rates of strokes than men, suggests steps to reduce risk

Each year, around 55,000 more women than men will have a stroke. Longer lifespans, pregnancies and hormones all contribute to the disparity, as do illnesses that tend to strike women more frequently. Crunch the numbers and the math adds up to more strokes for women, making it important for women monitor their risk. [More]
Mutations in PARN and RTEL1 associated with familial pulmonary fibrosis, telomere shortening

Mutations in PARN and RTEL1 associated with familial pulmonary fibrosis, telomere shortening

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have identified mutations in two genes that cause a fatal lung scarring disease known as familial pulmonary fibrosis. [More]
Lung volume reduction surgery could improve lung function in emphysema patients

Lung volume reduction surgery could improve lung function in emphysema patients

Emphysema is a chronic, progressive, obstructive lung disease in which the small sacs of the lung (alveoli) are destroyed, leading to air pockets and severe breathing difficulties. In 2011, 4.7 million Americans reported being diagnosed with emphysema, and in 2013 more than 8200 patients died from emphysema. [More]
Lyncean announces commercial operation of world's first miniature synchrotron X-ray device

Lyncean announces commercial operation of world's first miniature synchrotron X-ray device

Lyncean Technologies, Inc. today announced the commercial operation of a Compact Light Source (CLS), the world's first miniature synchrotron X-ray source employing state-of-the-art laser and electron beam technology. [More]
SLU selected to work on universal flu vaccine project

SLU selected to work on universal flu vaccine project

Supported by a federal contract, Saint Louis University will study a concept for a universal flu vaccine that is designed to protect people from influenza pandemics that could turn deadly as well as seasonal flu caused by the influenza A virus. [More]
Mayo Clinic heart transplant surgeons present findings from three clinical studies at ISHLT 2015

Mayo Clinic heart transplant surgeons present findings from three clinical studies at ISHLT 2015

Heart transplant surgeons from Mayo Clinic are presenting findings from three recent clinical studies involving heart transplant patients. The presentations took place during the 2015 International Society of Heart & Lung Transplant in Nice, France, on April 15-18. [More]
Latest genome sequencing techniques help identify new autoimmune syndrome in children

Latest genome sequencing techniques help identify new autoimmune syndrome in children

Using the latest genome sequencing techniques, a research team led by scientists from UC San Francisco, Baylor College of Medicine, and Texas Children's Hospital has identified a new autoimmune syndrome characterized by a combination of severe lung disease and arthritis that currently has no therapy. [More]
SLU study explores feasibility of using text messages for minority mothers with postpartum depression

SLU study explores feasibility of using text messages for minority mothers with postpartum depression

A Saint Louis University research paper published online March 16 in JMIR Mental Health explores the feasibility of helping low-income mothers through postpartum depression using text messages. [More]
May issue of Red Journal focuses on role of radiation therapy in current lymphoma treatment

May issue of Red Journal focuses on role of radiation therapy in current lymphoma treatment

The "Radiation and the Modern Management of Lymphoma" issue (May 1, 2015) of the International Journal of Radiation Oncology • Biology • Physics (Red Journal), the official scientific journal of the American Society for Radiation Oncology, is focused on the integral role of radiation therapy in current lymphoma treatment. [More]
Challenges involved in tracing the source of Legionnaires’ disease outbreak

Challenges involved in tracing the source of Legionnaires’ disease outbreak

Genetic research helps to explain why tracing the source of an outbreak of Legionnaires' disease that claimed four lives has proven to be more complicated than scientists hoped. [More]
Study may point to immediate cause of CF exacerbations

Study may point to immediate cause of CF exacerbations

In the genetic disorder cystic fibrosis (CF), the most severe symptoms are recurring episodes of lung inflammation and bacterial infection (known as "exacerbations") that happen from one to three times a year and cause ever-increasing amounts of lung damage through the course of a CF patient's life. [More]
Amgen's Vectibix (panitumumab) receives EC approval for treatment patients with WT RAS mCRC

Amgen's Vectibix (panitumumab) receives EC approval for treatment patients with WT RAS mCRC

Amgen today announced that the European Commission approved a new use of Vectibix (panitumumab) as first-line treatment in combination with FOLFIRI for the treatment of adult patients with wild-type (WT) RAS metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). [More]
LA BioMed scientist awarded $80,000 to study effectiveness of pulmonary rehab in treating COPD

LA BioMed scientist awarded $80,000 to study effectiveness of pulmonary rehab in treating COPD

The ATS Foundation and Breathe California of Los Angeles have awarded $80,000 to Harry Rossiter, PhD, a lead researcher at the Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute, to study the effectiveness of pulmonary rehabilitation in reducing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) symptoms in an underserved population in Los Angeles. [More]
Johns Hopkins researchers find link between premature aging of telomere and lung diseases

Johns Hopkins researchers find link between premature aging of telomere and lung diseases

Lung diseases like emphysema and pulmonary fibrosis are common among people with malfunctioning telomeres, the “caps” or ends of chromosomes. Now, researchers from Johns Hopkins say they have discovered what goes wrong and why. [More]
Johns Hopkins researchers find link between premature aging of telomere and lung diseases

Johns Hopkins researchers find link between premature aging of telomere and lung diseases

Lung diseases like emphysema and pulmonary fibrosis are common among people with malfunctioning telomeres, the “caps” or ends of chromosomes. Now, researchers from Johns Hopkins say they have discovered what goes wrong and why. [More]
Women face Lymphangioleiomyomatosis risk during their childbearing years

Women face Lymphangioleiomyomatosis risk during their childbearing years

A rare and potentially deadly lung disease called Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) strikes women during their childbearing years. [More]
Key finding may point to immediate cause of CF exacerbations

Key finding may point to immediate cause of CF exacerbations

In the genetic disorder cystic fibrosis (CF), the most severe symptoms are recurring episodes of lung inflammation and bacterial infection (known as "exacerbations") that happen from one to three times a year and cause ever-increasing amounts of lung damage through the course of a CF patient's life. [More]
Publicly insured Americans who undergo lung transplantation fare worse than their UK counterparts

Publicly insured Americans who undergo lung transplantation fare worse than their UK counterparts

Publicly insured Americans who undergo lung transplantation for cystic fibrosis fare markedly worse in the long run than both publicly insured patients in the United Kingdom and privately insured Americans, according to the results of a study conducted by researchers from Johns Hopkins in Baltimore and U.K. colleagues working in that nation's government-funded National Health Service. [More]
Discontinuation of statin therapy may benefit patients with terminal illness

Discontinuation of statin therapy may benefit patients with terminal illness

Discontinuing statin use in patients with late-stage cancer and other terminal illnesses may help improve patients' quality of life without causing other adverse health effects, according to a new study by led by researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus and Duke University and funded by the National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR). [More]
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