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Infant mortality rates for RSV much lower than previously thought

Infant mortality rates for RSV much lower than previously thought

It's a virus that has long been characterized as dangerous and even deadly, but new research shows infant deaths from respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) are actually quite uncommon in the 21st century. [More]
Researchers report promising outcomes from clinical trial in patients with dyskeratosis congenita

Researchers report promising outcomes from clinical trial in patients with dyskeratosis congenita

Researchers at Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center report promising outcomes from a clinical trial with patients with a rare form of bone marrow failure who received a hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) after pre-treatment with immunosuppressive drugs only. This is the first trial reporting successful transplant in dyskeratosis congenita (DC) patients without the use of any radiation or conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy beforehand. [More]
PulmoFlow's nebulized drug and device combination gets FDA approval for cystic fibrosis

PulmoFlow's nebulized drug and device combination gets FDA approval for cystic fibrosis

On Tuesday, the FDA granted final approval of PulmoFlow, Inc.'s New Drug Application for Kitabis Pak – a co-packaging of generic tobramycin inhalation solution with a PARI LC PLUS Nebulizer. This is the first nebulized drug and device combination to be approved for patients with cystic fibrosis. [More]
Ten facts about Alzheimer's disease

Ten facts about Alzheimer's disease

Dr. Daniel Thomas will be conducting a ground-breaking study to determine if cognitive decline due to memory-destroying Alzheimer's disease can begin to be reversed in 90 days by combating the root causes using an innovative combination of diet, exercise, vitamin supplements, hormone therapy, and intravenous nutrition. [More]
Human stem cells made from adult donor cells remember their origin, say McMaster scientists

Human stem cells made from adult donor cells remember their origin, say McMaster scientists

Scientists at McMaster University have discovered that human stem cells made from adult donor cells "remember" where they came from and that's what they prefer to become again. [More]
U-M startup company Imbio gets FDA approval to market Lung Density Analysis for COPD

U-M startup company Imbio gets FDA approval to market Lung Density Analysis for COPD

A technology that started in a University of Michigan Medical School lab may soon help lung disease patients around the world breathe a little easier, by helping their doctors make a clearer diagnosis and more individualized treatment plan. [More]
BWH researchers identify cells responsible for fibrosis

BWH researchers identify cells responsible for fibrosis

Researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital have identified what they believe to be the cells responsible for fibrosis, the buildup of scar tissue. Fibrotic diseases, such as chronic kidney disease and failure, lung disease, heart failure and cirrhosis of the liver, are estimated to be responsible for up to 45 percent of deaths in the developed world. [More]
SLU researcher discovers way to block pain pathway

SLU researcher discovers way to block pain pathway

In research published in the medical journal Brain, Saint Louis University researcher Daniela Salvemini, Ph.D. and colleagues within SLU, the National Institutes of Health and other academic institutions have discovered a way to block a pain pathway in animal models of chronic neuropathic pain including pain caused by chemotherapeutic agents and bone cancer pain suggesting a promising new approach to pain relief. [More]
Study reveals how one type of DNA damage may lead to several human diseases

Study reveals how one type of DNA damage may lead to several human diseases

Using a new imaging technique, National Institutes of Health researchers have found that the biological machinery that builds DNA can insert molecules into the DNA strand that are damaged as a result of environmental exposures. These damaged molecules trigger cell death that produces some human diseases, according to the researchers. [More]
Five USF faculty members named AAAS Fellow

Five USF faculty members named AAAS Fellow

Five faculty members from the University of South Florida in Tampa have been named Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Election as an AAAS Fellow is an honor bestowed upon AAAS members by their peers. [More]
2014 Canadian Prix Galien for Innovative Product Award presented to Esbriet (pirfenidone)

2014 Canadian Prix Galien for Innovative Product Award presented to Esbriet (pirfenidone)

This year's prestigious Canadian Prix Galien for Innovative Product Award has been presented to Esbriet (pirfenidone), a medicine used to treat idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). It is the only medication approved in Canada with a specific IPF indication and is approved for mild to moderate IPF in adults. [More]
Women with symptoms of serious psychological distress less likely to receive routine cancer screenings

Women with symptoms of serious psychological distress less likely to receive routine cancer screenings

Women with symptoms of serious mental illness are significantly less likely to receive three routine cancer screenings - Pap tests, mammograms and clinical breast exams - than women in the general population, despite being at elevated risk for medical comorbidities and early death, a new study indicates. [More]
New treatment for Marfan syndrome works as well as beta blockers

New treatment for Marfan syndrome works as well as beta blockers

A new treatment for Marfan syndrome, a rare genetic disease that can lead to heart problems, works as well as the currently recommended medical therapy, beta blockers, according to an article in the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
FIRS mobilizes members to raise awareness on COPD

FIRS mobilizes members to raise awareness on COPD

On World COPD Day (19 November 2014), the Forum of International Respiratory Societies (FIRS) is mobilizing its members to raise awareness of the disease and help prevent the risk factors that cause it. [More]
Excess fat in lungs may cause pulmonary fibrosis

Excess fat in lungs may cause pulmonary fibrosis

Pulmonary fibrosis has no cure. It's caused by scarring that seems to feed on itself, with the tougher, less elastic tissue replacing the ever moving and stretching lung, making it increasingly difficult for patients to breathe. [More]
Nutrition treatment for older COPD patients shows better outcomes

Nutrition treatment for older COPD patients shows better outcomes

People aged 65 and older, who were being treated for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in the hospital and received nutrition treatment (oral nutrition supplements) had reduced lengths of stay, hospital costs and chances of returning to the hospital within 30-days, according to a study published in CHEST. [More]
Exposure to tobacco smoke, roadway air pollution can contribute to obesity

Exposure to tobacco smoke, roadway air pollution can contribute to obesity

New research from Keck Medicine of the University of Southern California (USC) bolsters evidence that exposure to tobacco smoke and near-roadway air pollution contributes to the development of obesity. [More]
Pretreatment ILD is a risk factor for developing radiation pneumonitis in stage I NSCLC patients

Pretreatment ILD is a risk factor for developing radiation pneumonitis in stage I NSCLC patients

Pretreatment interstitial lung disease (ILD) is a significant risk factor for developing symptomatic and severe radiation pneumonitis in stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) alone. [More]
New program aims to educate COPD patients on how to manage their disease

New program aims to educate COPD patients on how to manage their disease

The American Thoracic Society today announced a new program, produced with support from Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc., to provide materials to educate patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) about this progressive lung disease and how it can be managed. [More]
New model explains how immune cells recognize, destroy bacteria

New model explains how immune cells recognize, destroy bacteria

The innate immune system serves as the body's specialized armed forces division, comprised of a host of defense mechanisms used to battle bacterial infections. Among the system's warriors are white blood cells including the specialized macrophages, which maintain constant surveillance for foreign intruders or pathogens, functioning as the body's first line of defense, poised to attack at barrier sites including the skin, lungs and intestines. [More]