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Lung cancer is the world's most common cancer and kills more people than any other cancer. In 2008, approximately 1.52 million new cases of lung cancer were diagnosed worldwide, with 1.31 million people dying from the disease.(14) In the United States, an estimated 161,840 deaths, accounting for 29 percent of all cancer deaths, occurred in 2008, according to the American Cancer Society (ACS).
Lancet study links worldwide economic crisis to increased cancer mortality

Lancet study links worldwide economic crisis to increased cancer mortality

Unemployment and reduced public-sector health spending following the 2008 global economic crisis were associated with increased cancer mortality, according to a new study published in The Lancet. [More]
Advanced cancer patients lack palliative, hospice care

Advanced cancer patients lack palliative, hospice care

Medical societies, including the American Society of Clinical Oncology, recommend that patients with advanced cancer receive palliative care soon after diagnosis and receive hospice care for at least the last three days of their life. Yet major gaps persist between these recommendations and real-life practice, a new study shows. [More]
SBP scientists discover new regulator of immune responses

SBP scientists discover new regulator of immune responses

Research led by scientists at the Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute has identified a new regulator of immune responses. The study, published recently in Immunity, sheds new light on why T cells fail to clear chronic infections and eliminate tumors. [More]
Early diagnosis of lung cancer can increase survival rate by 73%

Early diagnosis of lung cancer can increase survival rate by 73%

The UK Lung cancer screening trial (UKLS) has been successfully completed and demonstrated that patients with a high risk of developing lung cancer can be identified with early stage disease and have up to a 73% chance of surviving for five years or more. The UKLS trial was conducted by experts in the University of Liverpool. [More]
Researchers emphasize need to rethink tobacco control strategies

Researchers emphasize need to rethink tobacco control strategies

The tobacco product landscape has changed significantly with the introduction of alternatives that are much less harmful than traditional cigarettes. [More]
New Rutgers research aims at exploring gender differences in lung cancer

New Rutgers research aims at exploring gender differences in lung cancer

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in both men and women. Lung cancer diagnoses have more than doubled among females in the past 38 years, while having fallen 29 percent among males, according to the American Lung Association. [More]
Rice University researchers set stage for large-scale synthesis of cytotoxic agent to treat cancer

Rice University researchers set stage for large-scale synthesis of cytotoxic agent to treat cancer

The lab of Rice University synthetic organic chemist K.C. Nicolaou has reported the streamlined total synthesis of delta12-prostaglandin J3, a molecule previously claimed to kill leukemic cancer cells. [More]
Studies explore possible link between pediatric cancer and light therapy for newborn jaundice

Studies explore possible link between pediatric cancer and light therapy for newborn jaundice

Two new studies raise enough questions about a possible link between childhood cancer and light therapy for newborn jaundice that clinicians should exercise caution in prescribing the treatment for infants whose jaundice is likely to resolve on its own, a pediatric oncologist from Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center argues in an editorial published today by the journal Pediatrics. [More]
Investigational drug abemaciclib shows durable clinical activity for variety of cancer types

Investigational drug abemaciclib shows durable clinical activity for variety of cancer types

The investigational anticancer therapeutic abemaciclib, which targets CDK4 and CDK6, showed durable clinical activity when given as continuous single-agent therapy to patients with a variety of cancer types, including breast cancer, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), glioblastoma, and melanoma, according to results from a phase I clinical trial. [More]
Inhibiting palmitate-adding enzyme can make cancer cells sensitive to EGFR inhibitors

Inhibiting palmitate-adding enzyme can make cancer cells sensitive to EGFR inhibitors

The mistaken activation of certain cell-surface receptors contributes to a variety of human cancers. Knowing more about the activation process has led researchers to be able to induce greater vulnerability by cancer cells to an existing first-line treatment for cancers (mainly lung) driven by a receptor called EGFR. [More]
AstraZeneca, MedImmune to provide update on extensive oncology pipeline at ASCO 2016

AstraZeneca, MedImmune to provide update on extensive oncology pipeline at ASCO 2016

AstraZeneca and its global biologics research and development arm, MedImmune, will provide an update on their extensive oncology pipeline at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology in Chicago, USA, on 3-7 June 2016. [More]
WHO: Air pollution levels increase in low- and middle income cities

WHO: Air pollution levels increase in low- and middle income cities

More than 80% of people living in urban areas that monitor air pollution are exposed to air quality levels that exceed the World Health Organization limits. While all regions of the world are affected, populations in low-income cities are the most impacted. [More]
New research solves mystery of why cetuximab drug proved futile for many colorectal cancer patients

New research solves mystery of why cetuximab drug proved futile for many colorectal cancer patients

Cancer researchers have identified a marker that shows up in a blood test that determines which patients with colorectal cancer that has spread would benefit from receiving the drug cetuximab. [More]
Robotic VATS could be safe alternative to conventional thoracoscopic procedures for lung cancer treatment

Robotic VATS could be safe alternative to conventional thoracoscopic procedures for lung cancer treatment

A new study shows that robotic video-assisted lung resection to remove a tumor achieves comparable outcomes with no significant differences in complications compared to conventional video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS), and robotic VATS (RVATS) may allow for preservation of more healthy lung tissue. [More]
Cancer may have negative impact on health of individuals as they age

Cancer may have negative impact on health of individuals as they age

A new study indicates that cancer may have negative impacts on both the physical and mental health of individuals as they age. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the study suggests that cancer increases the risk for certain health issues above and beyond normal aging. This is likely due, in part, to decreased physical activity and stress associated with cancer diagnosis and treatment. [More]
Study provides vital information regarding four diagnostic PD-L1 assays

Study provides vital information regarding four diagnostic PD-L1 assays

A pre-competitive consortia of pharmaceutical companies, diagnostic companies, and academic associations, including the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, announced phase I results of the "BLUEPRINT PD-L1 IHC ASSAY COMPARISON PROJECT" at the Annual Meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research on April 19. [More]
Bim protein may hold clue for immunotherapy response in metastatic melanoma patients

Bim protein may hold clue for immunotherapy response in metastatic melanoma patients

A protein called Bim may hold the clue to which patients may be successful on immunotherapy for metastatic melanoma, according to the results of a study by Mayo Clinic researchers led by senior author Haidong Dong, M.D., Ph.D., and published online in the May 5 edition of JCI Insight. [More]
Duke scientists develop human-derived antibody that preferentially attacks cancer cells

Duke scientists develop human-derived antibody that preferentially attacks cancer cells

A research team from Duke Health has developed an antibody from the body's own immune system that preferentially attacks cancer cells. [More]
Older adults experience greater survival rates after lung cancer surgery

Older adults experience greater survival rates after lung cancer surgery

Patients aged 65 years and older are living longer after lung cancer surgery, and with older people representing a rapidly growing proportion of patients diagnosed with lung cancer, this improved survival is especially significant, according to an article posted online today by The Annals of Thoracic Surgery. [More]
Bayer-new phase 3 liver cancer data

Bayer-new phase 3 liver cancer data

Bayer has announced that a Phase III trial evaluating its oncology compound Stivarga® (regorafenib) tablets for the treatment of patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has met its primary endpoint of a statistically significant improvement in overall survival. The study, called RESORCE, evaluated the efficacy and safety of regorafenib in patients with HCC whose disease has progressed after treatment with sorafenib. The safety and tolerability were generally consistent with the known profile of regorafenib. Detailed efficacy and safety analyses from this study are expected to be presented at an upcoming scientific congress. [More]
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