Lymph Node News and Research RSS Feed - Lymph Node News and Research

Lymph is clear or white fluid that travels through vessels, moves within tissues and work to keep all the parts of the body clean. After passing through the channels of the lymphatic system they drain into the lymph nodes. The lymph nodes act as filters along the lymphatic system. These nodes trap germs like bacteria, viruses, toxins as well as cancer cells and ensure that these are removed from the body.
New ultra-fast molecular method can help detect mycobacterial pathogens in the lungs

New ultra-fast molecular method can help detect mycobacterial pathogens in the lungs

What used to take several weeks is now possible in two days: Thanks to new molecular-based methods, mycobacterial pathogens that cause pulmonary infections or tuberculosis can now be detected much more quickly. [More]
Researchers develop AI-powered systems to make pathologic diagnoses more accurate

Researchers develop AI-powered systems to make pathologic diagnoses more accurate

Pathologists have been largely diagnosing disease the same way for the past 100 years, by manually reviewing images under a microscope. But new work suggests that computers can help doctors improve accuracy and significantly change the way cancer and other diseases are diagnosed. [More]
PCP screening could be effective way to improve early melanoma diagnosis

PCP screening could be effective way to improve early melanoma diagnosis

Skin cancer screenings performed by primary care physicians (PCPs) during routine office visits improve the detection of potentially deadly melanomas and find them in earlier stages, according to new research from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. [More]
Radiation therapy better than chemotherapy for stage IIa testicular cancer patients

Radiation therapy better than chemotherapy for stage IIa testicular cancer patients

A large study of testicular cancer patients has shown that radiation therapy is a better treatment than chemotherapy for patients with stage IIa disease (where one or more regional lymph nodes contain cancer cells but they are less than 2cms in diameter). [More]
Latest trends in robotic surgery: an interview with Dr. Patrick Ross, Chairman of Surgery for Main Line Health

Latest trends in robotic surgery: an interview with Dr. Patrick Ross, Chairman of Surgery for Main Line Health

When new technology becomes available, surgical or otherwise, there are those who adopt early, and those who hold on to previous familiar methods. [More]
Understanding role of ethnicity, age in breast cancer prognosis

Understanding role of ethnicity, age in breast cancer prognosis

Although breast cancer is somewhat more aggressive in South Asian and Black women than in White women, this is largely due to age differences between ethnic groups in the UK, according to new research. [More]
Researchers launch clinical trials to test novel cellular-immunotherapy to treat three types of blood cancer

Researchers launch clinical trials to test novel cellular-immunotherapy to treat three types of blood cancer

Cancer immunology is based upon boosting the body's own immune system to vanquish malignancies. It is among the fastest growing areas of oncology research. Researchers at UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center have launched three clinical trials to test the safety and efficacy of a novel cellular-immunotherapy that uses modified T cells - one of the immune system's primary weapons - to treat three different types of blood cancer that often defy existing therapies. [More]
Post-treatment imaging can help detect recurrences of HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancer

Post-treatment imaging can help detect recurrences of HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancer

For patients treated with definitive radiation therapy (RT) for oropharyngeal cancer caused by human papillomavirus (HPV), the majority of recurrences can be detected by post-treatment imaging at three months and physical exams during the six months following treatment, according to research presented at the 2016 Multidisciplinary Head and Neck Cancer Symposium. [More]
Uninsured and Medicaid patients have higher overall and cancer-specific mortality rates

Uninsured and Medicaid patients have higher overall and cancer-specific mortality rates

Compared to patients with non-Medicaid insurance, uninsured patients and patients with Medicaid are more likely to present with advanced stages of head and neck cancer and have higher overall and cancer-specific mortality rates, according to research presented at the 2016 Multidisciplinary Head and Neck Cancer Symposium. [More]
Most stage III melanoma patients do not benefit from interferon treatment

Most stage III melanoma patients do not benefit from interferon treatment

Final results for the Sunbelt Melanoma Trial, published online this month in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, show that thanks to current diagnostic techniques, most stage III melanoma patients do not benefit from treatment with interferon. [More]
UAB discovery may offer new therapeutic approaches to asthma

UAB discovery may offer new therapeutic approaches to asthma

University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers have found a previously unknown step in the pathway that leads to asthma, a discovery that may offer new therapeutic approaches to this incurable disease. Asthma affects more than 25 million people in the United States, including about 7 million children. [More]
New footage shows how AIDS vaccine candidate recruits immune cells to destroy infected cells

New footage shows how AIDS vaccine candidate recruits immune cells to destroy infected cells

Using innovative technology, scientists from the Institut Pasteur and Inserm have filmed in vivo the process by which an AIDS vaccine candidate, developed by the French Vaccine Research Institute and the ANRS, triggers the immune response. [More]
Adjuvant chemotherapy not beneficial for patients with luminal A subtype of breast cancer

Adjuvant chemotherapy not beneficial for patients with luminal A subtype of breast cancer

Premenopausal women whose invasive breast cancers were of the luminal A subtype had comparable 10-year disease-free survival rates regardless of whether or not they received adjuvant chemotherapy, according to data from the phase III DBCG77B clinical trial presented at the 2015 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, held Dec. 8-12. [More]
Endomag’s new magnetic technology provides equivalent detection rates to current standards of cancer care

Endomag’s new magnetic technology provides equivalent detection rates to current standards of cancer care

A global shortage of the most commonly used radioisotope in medical diagnostic procedures, Technetium-99 (99mTc), will have a major impact on hospitals around the world within the next year. [More]
Cornell biomedical engineers develop 'super natural killer cells' to destroy cancer cells in lymph nodes

Cornell biomedical engineers develop 'super natural killer cells' to destroy cancer cells in lymph nodes

Cornell biomedical engineers have developed specialized white blood cells - dubbed "super natural killer cells" - that seek out cancer cells in lymph nodes with only one purpose: destroy them. [More]
Study finds no consistent evidence that antidepressants increase complications after plastic surgery

Study finds no consistent evidence that antidepressants increase complications after plastic surgery

For patients undergoing plastic surgery procedures, there's no consistent evidence that taking antidepressants increases the risk of bleeding, breast cancer, or other adverse outcomes, concludes a research review in the November issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. [More]
Imlygic approved for treatment of melanoma lesions in the skin and lymph nodes

Imlygic approved for treatment of melanoma lesions in the skin and lymph nodes

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Imlygic (talimogene laherparepvec), the first FDA-approved oncolytic virus therapy, for the treatment of melanoma lesions in the skin and lymph nodes. [More]
Researchers find protein that plays crucial role in development of allergic airway inflammation

Researchers find protein that plays crucial role in development of allergic airway inflammation

Allergies are becoming more commonplace, particularly in industrialised coun-tries. In addition to hay fever, allergic asthma is currently considered to be one of the most widespread allergies. UFZ researchers and their colleagues from the University of Leipzig have recently been successful in finding a protein that plays a critical role in the development of allergic airway inflammation. [More]
New smartphone-based device can reliably perform molecular diagnoses at low cost

New smartphone-based device can reliably perform molecular diagnoses at low cost

NIBIB-funded researchers at the Massachusetts General Hospital have developed a smartphone-based device that can reliably carry out molecular diagnoses in under an hour for approximately two dollars per patient. The device could enable point-of-care cancer diagnostics in low- to middle-income or remote areas, which often have high rates of mortality from cancer due to missed opportunities for treatment. [More]
Intratumoral morphological diversity of breast cancer not related to chromosome aberrations

Intratumoral morphological diversity of breast cancer not related to chromosome aberrations

Intratumor morphological heterogeneity (diversity) of breast cancer is not related to chromosome aberrations. This conclusion was made based on the study of one case with aggressive variant of breast cancer - invasive micropapillary carcinoma by researchers from Tomsk State University, Tomsk Cancer Research Institute, and Institute of Medical Genetics. [More]
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