Lymph Node News and Research RSS Feed - Lymph Node News and Research

Lymph is clear or white fluid that travels through vessels, moves within tissues and work to keep all the parts of the body clean. After passing through the channels of the lymphatic system they drain into the lymph nodes. The lymph nodes act as filters along the lymphatic system. These nodes trap germs like bacteria, viruses, toxins as well as cancer cells and ensure that these are removed from the body.
Agendia partners with Cryogene and Mist to distribute breast cancer recurrence assay in the Middle East

Agendia partners with Cryogene and Mist to distribute breast cancer recurrence assay in the Middle East

Agendia, Inc., a world leader in personalized medicine and molecular cancer diagnostics, announced today a partnership agreement to distribute the company’s breast cancer recurrence assay, MammaPrint, in the Middle East. [More]
New approach could overcome large immunosuppressive tumors

New approach could overcome large immunosuppressive tumors

Harnessing the body's own immune system to destroy tumors is a tantalizing prospect that has yet to realize its full potential. However, a new advance from MIT may bring this strategy, known as cancer immunotherapy, closer to becoming reality. [More]
Robot-assisted surgery at NYU Lutheran offers hope to women with endometrial cancer

Robot-assisted surgery at NYU Lutheran offers hope to women with endometrial cancer

Nandi Kumar Carpen, a 51-year-old wife, mother of two young girls, and a nurse at a major city hospital, noticed some "spotty" bleeding outside of her regular menstrual cycle. [More]
Studies look at alternative ways to overcome barriers and improve cancer screening rates

Studies look at alternative ways to overcome barriers and improve cancer screening rates

Early diagnosis of cancer is linked to better survival rates. Unfortunately, participation rates for cancer screening worldwide are low even when screening programmes are free. [More]
Ki67 may help spare some breast cancer patients from sentinel lymph node biopsies

Ki67 may help spare some breast cancer patients from sentinel lymph node biopsies

Breast cancer patients over 50 years old could be spared invasive procedures by use of stratification based on tumour size and molecular characteristics, including Ki67. [More]
Hidden Scar approach minimizes visible breast cancer scars

Hidden Scar approach minimizes visible breast cancer scars

PinnacleHealth Breast Care Surgeons Lisa Torp, Brynn Wolff and Katherine Barton are the first in Pennsylvania to be recognized for Excellence in Hidden Scar™ Breast Cancer Surgery. [More]
Leading cancer organizations publish new guidelines on postmastectomy radiotherapy

Leading cancer organizations publish new guidelines on postmastectomy radiotherapy

Three leading national cancer organizations today issued a joint clinical practice guideline update for physicians treating women with breast cancer who have undergone a mastectomy. [More]
Study shows retinoic acid could prevent postsurgical lymphedema

Study shows retinoic acid could prevent postsurgical lymphedema

A study conducted at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California showed that 9-cis retinoic acid (alitretinoin) could significantly prevent postsurgical lymphedema. [More]
ITL Virginia to support North American roll-out of Endomag’s Sentimag system

ITL Virginia to support North American roll-out of Endomag’s Sentimag system

ITL Virginia Inc, the US subsidiary of medical design and manufacturing company ITL, will be supporting the North American roll-out of the Sentimag system following Endomag’s signing of a major distribution deal. [More]
NEJM publishes MINDACT trial results

NEJM publishes MINDACT trial results

Agendia, Inc., a world leader in personalized medicine and molecular cancer diagnostics, announces the peer-reviewed publication of the primary outcome results of the Microarray In Node-negative and 1 to 3 positive lymph node Disease may Avoid ChemoTherapy (MINDACT) clinical trial in the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM). (i, iii, iv) The publication demonstrates that 46% of breast cancer patients considered for chemotherapy, whose tumors are classified MammaPrint Low Risk, have excellent survival without chemotherapy, and can thus be candidates to avoid this toxic therapy. [More]
Study shows lymph node stage may have clinical importance among NSCLC patients with M1a disease

Study shows lymph node stage may have clinical importance among NSCLC patients with M1a disease

Analysis of a large non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patient cohort with stage IV M1a disease identified lymph node staging as having clinical significance and an impact on prognosis. [More]
Breast cancer patients in the U.S. now have new surgical option that offers flexible alternative for cancer detection

Breast cancer patients in the U.S. now have new surgical option that offers flexible alternative for cancer detection

Breast cancer patients in the U.S. will have a new surgical option that eliminates exposure to radioactive materials and offers a less invasive, more flexible alternative for cancer detection. Receiving FDA approval in April and a distribution deal this month, the new device will be used to locate early stage tumors that cannot yet be felt. [More]
Study demonstrates safety and effectiveness of new SLN radiotracer in breast cancer patients

Study demonstrates safety and effectiveness of new SLN radiotracer in breast cancer patients

Determining whether breast cancer has spread to sentinel lymph nodes (SLN) is key to prognosis and treatment, making SLN mapping critical. [More]
Experimental immunotherapeutic strategy may pave way for new treatments against lymphoma

Experimental immunotherapeutic strategy may pave way for new treatments against lymphoma

Lymphoma is a cancer that affects lymphocytes, a type of white blood cell. The disease originates in a lymphoid organ (lymph node, spleen, or bone marrow) before spreading through the blood to infiltrate not only other lymphoid organs but also other tissues. [More]
Texas Biomed scientists receive $23 million NIH grant to develop AIDS vaccine

Texas Biomed scientists receive $23 million NIH grant to develop AIDS vaccine

To support a coordinated, innovative approach to the development of an AIDS vaccine, Texas Biomedical Research Institute scientists, together with a multi-institutional coalition of experts from the United States and Europe, have received a grant for $23 million from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases of the National Institutes of Health. [More]
ASTRO clinical practice statement outlines recommendations to customize treatment for rectal cancer

ASTRO clinical practice statement outlines recommendations to customize treatment for rectal cancer

The American Society for Radiation Oncology recently issued a new clinical practice statement, "Appropriate Customization of Radiation Therapy for Stage II and III Rectal Cancer: An ASTRO Clinical Practice Statement Using the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method." [More]

Cubresa receives US patent for flexible imaging sensors

Instead of a cloak of invisibility hiding a person in television and movies, a new method that describes mounting many imaging sensors underneath a flexible substrate could reveal tumors within humans or animals. [More]
Women who undergo axillary node surgery for breast cancer more likely to develop chronic pain

Women who undergo axillary node surgery for breast cancer more likely to develop chronic pain

An analysis led by McMaster University researchers has found that women who undergo armpit lymph node surgery for breast cancer are much more likely to develop chronic pain. [More]
New ultra-fast molecular method can help detect mycobacterial pathogens in the lungs

New ultra-fast molecular method can help detect mycobacterial pathogens in the lungs

What used to take several weeks is now possible in two days: Thanks to new molecular-based methods, mycobacterial pathogens that cause pulmonary infections or tuberculosis can now be detected much more quickly. [More]
Researchers develop AI-powered systems to make pathologic diagnoses more accurate

Researchers develop AI-powered systems to make pathologic diagnoses more accurate

Pathologists have been largely diagnosing disease the same way for the past 100 years, by manually reviewing images under a microscope. But new work suggests that computers can help doctors improve accuracy and significantly change the way cancer and other diseases are diagnosed. [More]
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