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VCU Health radiologist uses MRI technology to detect difficult prostate cancers

VCU Health radiologist uses MRI technology to detect difficult prostate cancers

For three years, Andrew Harder wondered if he had prostate cancer. In 2009, he had routine blood work that revealed an elevated prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level. [More]
New study identifies alternative route for tuberculosis infection

New study identifies alternative route for tuberculosis infection

Researchers from UT Southwestern Medical Center have identified a new way that tuberculosis bacteria get into the body, revealing a potential therapeutic angle to explore. [More]
ASTRO clinical practice statement outlines recommendations to customize treatment for rectal cancer

ASTRO clinical practice statement outlines recommendations to customize treatment for rectal cancer

The American Society for Radiation Oncology recently issued a new clinical practice statement, "Appropriate Customization of Radiation Therapy for Stage II and III Rectal Cancer: An ASTRO Clinical Practice Statement Using the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method." [More]
Bone marrow transplantation may one day be beneficial to subset of ALS, say researchers

Bone marrow transplantation may one day be beneficial to subset of ALS, say researchers

Harvard Stem Cell Institute researchers at Harvard University and the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT have found evidence that bone marrow transplantation may one day be beneficial to a subset of patients suffering from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a fatal neurodegenerative disorder more commonly known as Lou Gehrig's disease. [More]
Women who undergo axillary node surgery for breast cancer more likely to develop chronic pain

Women who undergo axillary node surgery for breast cancer more likely to develop chronic pain

An analysis led by McMaster University researchers has found that women who undergo armpit lymph node surgery for breast cancer are much more likely to develop chronic pain. [More]
Genetic test detects colon cancer-linked DNA in blood to predict disease recurrence risk

Genetic test detects colon cancer-linked DNA in blood to predict disease recurrence risk

Scientists at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center and University of Melbourne report they have used a genetic test that spots bits of cancer-related DNA circulating in the blood to accurately predict the likelihood of the disease's return in some — but not all — of a small group of patients with early-stage colon cancer. [More]
Researchers develop computer model for speed analysis of TB's complex life-cycle

Researchers develop computer model for speed analysis of TB's complex life-cycle

Tuberculosis (TB), caused by the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is a serious global health problem accounting for 1.3 million worldwide deaths annually. [More]
Low mammographic breast density linked to worse prognosis in breast cancer patients

Low mammographic breast density linked to worse prognosis in breast cancer patients

Even though dense breast tissue is a risk factor for breast cancer, very low mammographic breast density is associated with a worse prognosis in breast cancer patients. [More]
Researchers develop AI-powered systems to make pathologic diagnoses more accurate

Researchers develop AI-powered systems to make pathologic diagnoses more accurate

Pathologists have been largely diagnosing disease the same way for the past 100 years, by manually reviewing images under a microscope. But new work suggests that computers can help doctors improve accuracy and significantly change the way cancer and other diseases are diagnosed. [More]
Legions of immune cells play complex role to destroy Legionella bacteria

Legions of immune cells play complex role to destroy Legionella bacteria

Immunologists and microbiologists from the University of Melbourne's Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute and the Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity - a joint venture between the University of Melbourne and Royal Melbourne Hospital - have led a study that defined a new cell type responsible for turning the attack back on the bacteria. [More]
Salk Institute researchers use super-resolution microscope to image vital receptors in lymph nodes

Salk Institute researchers use super-resolution microscope to image vital receptors in lymph nodes

When the body is fighting an invading pathogen, white blood cells--including T cells--must respond. Now, Salk Institute researchers have imaged how vital receptors on the surface of T cells bundle together when activated. [More]
PharmaMar announces initiation of pivotal plitidepsin clinical trial in patients with T-cell lymphomas

PharmaMar announces initiation of pivotal plitidepsin clinical trial in patients with T-cell lymphomas

PharmaMar today announced the start of a multicenter, prospective, pivotal study to analyze the efficacy of the antitumoral compound of marine origin, plitidepsin in patients with relapsed and refractory angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma. [More]
New ultrasensitive magnetometer probe system for detecting cancer moves towards commercialisation

New ultrasensitive magnetometer probe system for detecting cancer moves towards commercialisation

Researchers at the University of South Australia’s Future Industries Institute have joined forces with New Zealand-based nanoparticle specialist Boutiq Science and major IP investor, Powerhouse Ventures. [More]
Researchers identify lymphatic endothelial lineage that shows potential for new anti-cancer treatment

Researchers identify lymphatic endothelial lineage that shows potential for new anti-cancer treatment

Identifying the cell of origin is crucial to understanding how a tumor develops and metastasizes and for developing targeted therapies. [More]
Pembrolizumab drug shows significant clinical responses in metastatic head and neck cancer patients

Pembrolizumab drug shows significant clinical responses in metastatic head and neck cancer patients

Treating head and neck cancer patients with recurrent or metastatic disease with the PD-1 inhibitor pembrolizumab resulted in significant clinical responses in a fifth of the patients from a phase II clinical trial, researchers at the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania and other institutions reported at the 2016 American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting. [More]
Zinbryta gets FDA approval for treating adults with relapsing forms of MS

Zinbryta gets FDA approval for treating adults with relapsing forms of MS

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Zinbryta (daclizumab) for the treatment of adults with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). Zinbryta is a long-acting injection that is self- administered by the patient monthly. [More]
Study shows birth defects in immune system function may contribute to malnutrition

Study shows birth defects in immune system function may contribute to malnutrition

Malnourished children are most likely to die from common infections, not starvation alone, and immune disorder may be part of the cause, according to a review led by Queen Mary University of London. [More]
ART alone not sufficient to reduce arterial inflammation among HIV-infected patients, study finds

ART alone not sufficient to reduce arterial inflammation among HIV-infected patients, study finds

Initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) soon after diagnosis of an HIV infection did not prevent the progression of significant arterial inflammation in a small group of previously untreated patients. [More]
Gene editing technology helps excise segment of HIV-1 DNA from genomes of living animals

Gene editing technology helps excise segment of HIV-1 DNA from genomes of living animals

Using gene editing technology, researchers at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University have, for the first time, successfully excised a segment of HIV-1 DNA - the virus responsible for AIDS - from the genomes of living animals. [More]
Robotic VATS could be safe alternative to conventional thoracoscopic procedures for lung cancer treatment

Robotic VATS could be safe alternative to conventional thoracoscopic procedures for lung cancer treatment

A new study shows that robotic video-assisted lung resection to remove a tumor achieves comparable outcomes with no significant differences in complications compared to conventional video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS), and robotic VATS (RVATS) may allow for preservation of more healthy lung tissue. [More]
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