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Zinbryta gets FDA approval for treating adults with relapsing forms of MS

Zinbryta gets FDA approval for treating adults with relapsing forms of MS

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Zinbryta (daclizumab) for the treatment of adults with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). Zinbryta is a long-acting injection that is self- administered by the patient monthly. [More]
Study shows birth defects in immune system function may contribute to malnutrition

Study shows birth defects in immune system function may contribute to malnutrition

Malnourished children are most likely to die from common infections, not starvation alone, and immune disorder may be part of the cause, according to a review led by Queen Mary University of London. [More]
ART alone not sufficient to reduce arterial inflammation among HIV-infected patients, study finds

ART alone not sufficient to reduce arterial inflammation among HIV-infected patients, study finds

Initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) soon after diagnosis of an HIV infection did not prevent the progression of significant arterial inflammation in a small group of previously untreated patients. [More]
Gene editing technology helps excise segment of HIV-1 DNA from genomes of living animals

Gene editing technology helps excise segment of HIV-1 DNA from genomes of living animals

Using gene editing technology, researchers at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University have, for the first time, successfully excised a segment of HIV-1 DNA - the virus responsible for AIDS - from the genomes of living animals. [More]
Robotic VATS could be safe alternative to conventional thoracoscopic procedures for lung cancer treatment

Robotic VATS could be safe alternative to conventional thoracoscopic procedures for lung cancer treatment

A new study shows that robotic video-assisted lung resection to remove a tumor achieves comparable outcomes with no significant differences in complications compared to conventional video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS), and robotic VATS (RVATS) may allow for preservation of more healthy lung tissue. [More]
Experimental drug ozanimod moderately effective in treatment of ulcerative colitis

Experimental drug ozanimod moderately effective in treatment of ulcerative colitis

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine have shown that ozanimod (RPC1063), a novel drug molecule, is moderately effective in the treatment of ulcerative colitis. Results of the Phase II clinical trial will appear in the May 5 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
Loyola researchers detect tumor gene that may help predict survival outcomes in mouth cancer patients

Loyola researchers detect tumor gene that may help predict survival outcomes in mouth cancer patients

Loyola researchers have identified a tumor gene that may help to predict survival outcomes in patients with cancer of the mouth and tongue. [More]
Real risk of rebound syndrome following fingolimod cessation for MS

Real risk of rebound syndrome following fingolimod cessation for MS

Rebound syndrome following cessation of fingolimod for multiple sclerosis occurs at a clinically relevant rate, shows research, prompting the need for further study on how best to sequence and discontinue such drugs. [More]
Liposuction to manage lymphedema? An interview with Professor John Boyages

Liposuction to manage lymphedema? An interview with Professor John Boyages

Lymphedema is persistent swelling of the arm and/or hand following biopsy or treatment of the axillary lymph nodes for patients with breast cancer. It is due to excess accumulation of protein‐rich fluid in body tissues. [More]
Controlling cholesterol metabolism could help reduce pancreatic cancer spread

Controlling cholesterol metabolism could help reduce pancreatic cancer spread

Researchers have shown how controlling cholesterol metabolism in pancreatic cancer cells reduces metastasis, pointing to a potential new treatment using drugs previously developed for atherosclerosis. [More]
LJI study could provide important target for autoimmune disease interventions

LJI study could provide important target for autoimmune disease interventions

Follicular helper T cells (Tfh cells), a rare type of T cells, are indispensable for the maturation of antibody-producing B cells. They promote the proliferation of B cells that produce highly selective antibodies against invading pathogens while weeding out those that generate potentially harmful ones. [More]
UGA researcher works to advance effective treatment for infectious mononucleosis

UGA researcher works to advance effective treatment for infectious mononucleosis

The University of Georgia's Mark Ebell wasn't impressed with research on infectious mononucleosis when he wrote his first published review on it back in the 1990s. He still isn't—a subject he discusses in the April issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. [More]
Radiation therapy better than chemotherapy for stage IIa testicular cancer patients

Radiation therapy better than chemotherapy for stage IIa testicular cancer patients

A large study of testicular cancer patients has shown that radiation therapy is a better treatment than chemotherapy for patients with stage IIa disease (where one or more regional lymph nodes contain cancer cells but they are less than 2cms in diameter). [More]
Rituximab drug more effective than fingolimod for patients with highly active multiple sclerosis

Rituximab drug more effective than fingolimod for patients with highly active multiple sclerosis

A new study indicates that rituximab is more effective than fingolimod for preventing relapses in patients with highly active multiple sclerosis switching from treatment with natalizumab. [More]
New drug combination before surgery may improve outcomes in breast cancer patients

New drug combination before surgery may improve outcomes in breast cancer patients

Results from the I-SPY 2 trial show that giving patients with HER2-positive invasive breast cancer a combination of the drugs trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1) and pertuzumab before surgery was more beneficial than the combination of paclitaxel plus trastuzumab. [More]
Scientists reveal mechanism involved in regulation of lymphangiogenesis

Scientists reveal mechanism involved in regulation of lymphangiogenesis

After an injury to tissues, such as in organ transplantation, the body grows new lymphatic vessels in a process known as lymphangiogenesis. A new study in Nature Communications reveals a mechanism involved in the regulation of this process, specifically in corneal transplants and infectious eye disease. [More]
Study assesses risk factors for metastases in prostate cancer patients on active surveillance

Study assesses risk factors for metastases in prostate cancer patients on active surveillance

Radical treatment such as surgery and radiation for localized prostate cancer may cause significant side effects. Active surveillance is increasingly accepted as an option for treating patients with clinically insignificant disease to maintain their quality of life. [More]
Antibodies given within one day of SHIV exposure can clear the virus

Antibodies given within one day of SHIV exposure can clear the virus

Scientists at the Oregon National Primate Research Center today revealed that infant rhesus macaques treated with antibodies within 24 hours of being exposed to SHIV, a chimeric simian virus that bears the HIV envelope protein, were completely cleared of the virus. [More]
Neo-Bioscore staging system adds HER2 status for precise prognostic stratification of breast cancer subtypes

Neo-Bioscore staging system adds HER2 status for precise prognostic stratification of breast cancer subtypes

A new breast cancer staging system developed by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center finds that incorporating tumor biology is a critical prognostic indicator for women who undergo neoadjuvant, or pre-surgical, therapy for breast cancer. [More]
Multi-gene test can help identify early breast cancer patients who can safely be spared chemotherapy

Multi-gene test can help identify early breast cancer patients who can safely be spared chemotherapy

Researchers have shown for the first time that it is possible to use a multi-gene test to identify patients with early breast cancer who can be spared chemotherapy and who will still be alive and well five years after diagnosis. [More]
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