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Microfluidic cell-squeezing device could introduce specific antigens inside immune system's B cells

Microfluidic cell-squeezing device could introduce specific antigens inside immune system's B cells

MIT researchers have shown that they can use a microfluidic cell-squeezing device to introduce specific antigens inside the immune system's B cells, providing a new approach to developing and implementing antigen-presenting cell vaccines. [More]
Scripps Proton Therapy Center reports exceptional results in treating patients with pencil-beam scanning

Scripps Proton Therapy Center reports exceptional results in treating patients with pencil-beam scanning

The nation's first and only proton therapy center to treat patients exclusively with pencil-beam scanning is reporting exceptional results in delivering cancer treatment since opening for patient care just more than a year ago. [More]
Endo Pharmaceuticals supports efforts to bring first ever treatment guidelines for Peyronie's Disease

Endo Pharmaceuticals supports efforts to bring first ever treatment guidelines for Peyronie's Disease

Endo Pharmaceuticals Inc., a subsidiary of Endo International plc, supports efforts to bring the medical community the first ever treatment guidelines for Peyronie's Disease (PD), a condition in which collagen plaque, or scar tissue, develops on the shaft of the penis, and may harden and reduce flexibility. [More]
Patients with operable early-stage NSCLC could achieve better overall survival rates with SABR

Patients with operable early-stage NSCLC could achieve better overall survival rates with SABR

Patients with operable stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) could achieve better overall survival rates if treated with Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) rather than the current standard of care -- invasive surgery -- according to research from a phase III randomized international study from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. [More]
Australian researchers discover rogue germinal centre B cells that trigger autoimmune disease

Australian researchers discover rogue germinal centre B cells that trigger autoimmune disease

Australian researchers believe they have discovered a group of cells that trigger autoimmune disease, as well as the molecular 'trigger guard' that normally holds them in check. [More]
Study: Disrupting cancer pathway could extend benefits of new immunity-boosting drugs

Study: Disrupting cancer pathway could extend benefits of new immunity-boosting drugs

Understanding how to overrule a signaling pathway that can cause treatments to fail in metastatic melanoma patients should help physicians extend the benefits of recently approved immunity-boosting drugs known as checkpoint inhibitors to more patients. [More]
Thyroid ultrasound ‘not highly accurate’ for malignancy in children

Thyroid ultrasound ‘not highly accurate’ for malignancy in children

Ultrasound has only limited value for diagnosing thyroid cancer in children, say the authors of a meta-analysis. [More]
Men who receive brachytherapy more likely to be cancer-free five years later

Men who receive brachytherapy more likely to be cancer-free five years later

Results from a randomised controlled trial to compare the use of permanent radioactive implants (brachytherapy) with dose-escalated external beam radiotherapy in patients with prostate cancer show that the men who received brachytherapy were twice as likely to be cancer-free five years later. [More]
Personalized cancer vaccines can be used to marshal powerful immune response

Personalized cancer vaccines can be used to marshal powerful immune response

Personalized melanoma vaccines can be used to marshal a powerful immune response against unique mutations in patients' tumors, according to early data in a first-in-people clinical trial at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. [More]
Women face Lymphangioleiomyomatosis risk during their childbearing years

Women face Lymphangioleiomyomatosis risk during their childbearing years

A rare and potentially deadly lung disease called Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) strikes women during their childbearing years. [More]

New approach to treating B-ALL tumour disease

B cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, or B-ALL, is the most common tumour disease in children and also occurs in adults. It develops when signalling pathways in immature B cells, or pre-B cells, are dysregulated. Prof. Dr. Markus Müschen from the University of California in San Francisco, USA, and his team worked together with the BIOSS researchers Prof. Dr. Hassan Jumaa and Prof. Dr. Michael Reth to find a new approach for treating the B-ALL tumour disease. [More]
Researchers find way to enhance effects of immunotherapy in glioblastoma

Researchers find way to enhance effects of immunotherapy in glioblastoma

When cancer strikes, it may be possible for patients to fight back with their own defenses, using a strategy known as immunotherapy. According to a new study published in Nature, researchers have found a way to enhance the effects of this therapeutic approach in glioblastoma, a deadly type of brain cancer, and possibly improve patient outcomes. [More]
Tetanus booster shot enhances effect of vaccine therapy for lethal brain tumors

Tetanus booster shot enhances effect of vaccine therapy for lethal brain tumors

An innovative approach using a tetanus booster to prime the immune system enhances the effect of a vaccine therapy for lethal brain tumors, dramatically improving patient survival, according to a study led by Duke Cancer Institute researchers. [More]
Oncologists welcome gene expression profiling tests for women with early-stage breast cancer but have concerns

Oncologists welcome gene expression profiling tests for women with early-stage breast cancer but have concerns

Oncologists welcome gene expression profiling tests as an added tool in deciding whether women with early-stage breast cancer should have chemotherapy, a new study has found. But they have significant reservations about the cost of the test and whether it is being overused and used for the right patients. [More]
Breast cancer survivors at increased risk of developing thyroid cancer, finds new study

Breast cancer survivors at increased risk of developing thyroid cancer, finds new study

Breast cancer survivors are at increased risk of developing thyroid cancer, especially within five years of their breast cancer diagnosis, according to a new analysis of a large national database. The study results will be presented Thursday at the Endocrine Society's 97th annual meeting in San Diego. [More]
Single-site laparoscopic surgery effective for colorectal cancer

Single-site laparoscopic surgery effective for colorectal cancer

Colorectal cancer may be highly preventable, yet it is second only to lung cancer in the number of lives it takes nationwide each year. [More]
Patients who undergo chemo before breast cancer operation more likely to opt for lumpectomy

Patients who undergo chemo before breast cancer operation more likely to opt for lumpectomy

Patients with larger malignant tumors of the breast who undergo chemotherapy before a breast cancer operation are more likely to opt for a breast-preserving procedure and forgo a mastectomy (surgical removal of the breast), according to a new study published online as an "article in press" in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons. [More]
Sorafenib, sunitinib provide no benefit to patients with locally advanced kidney cancer

Sorafenib, sunitinib provide no benefit to patients with locally advanced kidney cancer

Findings from a federally funded study suggest that patients with locally advanced kidney cancer should not be treated with either adjuvant (post-surgery) sorafenib or sunitinib. The average period to disease recurrence was similar between those who received sorafenib or sunitinib after surgery (5.6 years) and those treated with placebo (5.7 years). [More]
Discovery offers much needed information about how virulent insect-borne diseases cause infection

Discovery offers much needed information about how virulent insect-borne diseases cause infection

For decades, scientists have thought the bacteria that cause the bubonic plague hijack host cells at the site of a fleabite and are then taken to the lymph nodes, where the bacteria multiply and trigger severe disease. But UNC School of Medicine researchers discovered that this accepted theory is off base. The bacteria do not use host cells; they traffic to lymph nodes on their own and not in great numbers. [More]
Research provides new insights into rapid defence responses in human immune system

Research provides new insights into rapid defence responses in human immune system

Researchers have uncovered a sieve-like structure in lymph nodes that regulates the transport of proteins and migration of white blood cells into lymph nodes. [More]
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