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A macrophage is a type of white blood cell that surrounds and kills microorganisms, removes dead cells, and stimulates the action of other immune system cells.
Study: CD206-targeting Manocept platform may provide potential avenues to enhance diagnosis in Kaposi Sarcoma

Study: CD206-targeting Manocept platform may provide potential avenues to enhance diagnosis in Kaposi Sarcoma

Navidea Biopharmaceuticals, Inc. (NYSE MKT: NAVB), a biopharmaceutical company focused on precision diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals, today announced that collaborators from the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) presented results at the 2014 American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) conference, April 5-9, 2014 in San Diego, CA, highlighting the potential utility of imaging agents derived from Navidea's Manocept™ platform in identifying affected tissues and lymph nodes in patients with Kaposi Sarcoma (KS). [More]

Study provides insights into why alcohol has negative effect on wound healing

People who are injured while binge drinking are much slower to heal from wounds suffered in car accidents, shootings, fires, etc. [More]

Plymouth University doctor wins national award for animal testing alternative

Dr. Gyorgy Fejer from Plymouth University School of Biomedical and Healthcare Sciences has received a national award for his work developing the lab-based creation of a type of mouse cell line which could be used in place of live animals for research related to infectious diseases. [More]
New study shows increase in certain macrophages may lead to therapeutic targets for Crohn's disease

New study shows increase in certain macrophages may lead to therapeutic targets for Crohn's disease

​For those coping with Crohn's disease, a new research report published in the Journal of Leukocyte Biology offers hope for the development of new and more effective drugs. In the report, scientists show for the first time, precisely what type of immune cells are involved in driving the inflammation process in the disease. [More]
Blocking Netrin-1 in immune system stops chronic inflammation and insulin resistance tied to obesity

Blocking Netrin-1 in immune system stops chronic inflammation and insulin resistance tied to obesity

Researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center have found that blocking the action of a key signaling molecule in the immune system known as Netrin-1 stalls chronic inflammation and insulin resistance tied to obesity and often derived from fatty diets. [More]

Research grows "mini-livers" to reduce use of animals in science

Research that has for the first time successfully grown "mini-livers" from adult mouse stem cells has won the UK's international prize for the scientific and technological advance with the most potential to replace, reduce or refine the use of animals in science (the 3Rs). [More]
Cystinosis Research Foundation granted $2.15M in 2013 to researchers investigating cure for cystinosis

Cystinosis Research Foundation granted $2.15M in 2013 to researchers investigating cure for cystinosis

The Cystinosis Research Foundation awarded $2,153,048 in 2013 to researchers investigating better treatments and a cure for cystinosis, a rare metabolic and genetic disease that afflicts about 500 children and young adults in the United States and 2,000 worldwide. [More]
FDA approves CSC’s Phase II clinical trial for cancer immunotherapy in women with ovarian cancer

FDA approves CSC’s Phase II clinical trial for cancer immunotherapy in women with ovarian cancer

California Stem Cell, Inc. (CSC) announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the Company's application to begin a Phase II clinical trial exploring the potential of a patient-specific cancer immunotherapy in women with Stage III or IV ovarian, fallopian tube or primary peritoneal cancer. [More]
New study reveals way to combat drug-resistant tumors

New study reveals way to combat drug-resistant tumors

Cancer drugs that recruit antibodies from the body's own immune system to help kill tumors have shown much promise in treating several types of cancer. However, after initial success, the tumors often return. [More]
Researchers uncover how typhoid pathogen manages to evade host's immune system

Researchers uncover how typhoid pathogen manages to evade host's immune system

The life-threatening disease typhoid fever results from the ongoing battle between the bacterial pathogen Salmonella and the immune cells of the body. Prof. Dirk Bumann's research group at the Biozentrum of the University of Basel has now uncovered how the typhoid pathogen repeatedly manages to evade the host's immune system. Their findings are published in the scientific journal "Cell Host & Microbe". [More]
Macrophages invade diabetic pancreatic tissue during early stages of type 2 diabetes

Macrophages invade diabetic pancreatic tissue during early stages of type 2 diabetes

As people's waistlines increase, so does the incidence of type 2 diabetes. Now scientists have a better understanding of exactly what happens in the body that leads up to type 2 diabetes, and what likely causes some of the complications related to the disease. Specifically, scientists from Denmark have found that in mice, macrophages, a specific type of immune cell, invade the diabetic pancreatic tissue during the early stages of the disease. [More]
UCLA researchers find no evidence of association between iron levels and atherosclerosis risk

UCLA researchers find no evidence of association between iron levels and atherosclerosis risk

A UCLA research team has found no evidence of an association between iron levels in the body and the risk of atherosclerosis, the hardening and narrowing of the arteries that leads to cardiovascular disease, the No. 1 killer in the U.S. [More]

Experimental drug that targets macrophages decreases cancer's growth

An experimental drug that targets macrophages, a type of immune cells, in the microenvironment surrounding the lethal brain tumor glioblastoma multiforme decreased the cancer's growth and extended survival of laboratory mice with the cancer, scientists will report on Tuesday Dec. 17, at the American Society for Cell Biology annual meeting in New Orleans. [More]
Type 2 diabetes cytokine elevation places teeth at risk

Type 2 diabetes cytokine elevation places teeth at risk

Scientists have detected significant differences in the cytokine and chemokine make up of gingival crevicular fluid taken from chronic periodontitis patients with uncontrolled Type 2 diabetes and those without. [More]
Staphylococcus Aureus Bacteria anticipates and turns immune defenses against the host

Staphylococcus Aureus Bacteria anticipates and turns immune defenses against the host

Around 20 percent of all humans are persistently colonized with Staphylococcus aureus bacteria, a leading cause of skin infections and one of the major sources of hospital-acquired infections, including the antibiotic-resistant strain MRSA. [More]
GM-CSF therapy does not improve treadmill walking time in patients with peripheral artery disease

GM-CSF therapy does not improve treadmill walking time in patients with peripheral artery disease

Joseph Poole, M.D., Ph.D., of the Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, and colleagues studied whether therapy with granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), an agent that functions as a white blood cell growth factor, would improve walking performance in patients with symptomatic peripheral artery disease (a form of vascular disease in which there is partial or total blockage of an artery, usually one leading to a leg or arm). [More]

Study: Blood cell growth factor improves effects of exercise in patients with peripheral artery disease

A blood cell growth factor can boost the effects of exercise in improving mobility for patients with peripheral artery disease, a clinical study has shown. [More]
Identifying 'sensome' of microglia could improve treatments for neurodegenerative disorders

Identifying 'sensome' of microglia could improve treatments for neurodegenerative disorders

Massachusetts General Hospital investigators have used a new sequencing method to identify a group of genes used by the brain's immune cells - called microglia - to sense pathogenic organisms, toxins or damaged cells that require their response. [More]
‘Pioneering’ non-invasive coronary plaque imaging revealed

‘Pioneering’ non-invasive coronary plaque imaging revealed

Combined 18F-sodium fluoride positron emission tomography–computed tomography allows physicians to visualize high-risk or ruptured coronary atherosclerotic plaques in patients with myocardial infarction or stable angina, research shows. [More]

Patients with mutation in gene encoding CX3CR1 at higher risk of candidiasis

Candida albicans is one of the leading causes of hospital-acquired infections in immune compromised patients. The risk of both developing candidiasis and the clinical outcome of infection is variable among patients, and the host-dependent factors that contribute to patient susceptibility to C. albicans infection are poorly understood. [More]