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Scientists develop unique method to deliver cancer vaccines

Scientists develop unique method to deliver cancer vaccines

Cancer vaccines have recently emerged as a promising approach for killing tumor cells before they spread. But so far, most clinical candidates haven't worked that well. Now, scientists have developed a new way to deliver vaccines that successfully stifled tumor growth when tested in laboratory mice. [More]
Early detection of cancers on the horizon with supersensitive nanodevice

Early detection of cancers on the horizon with supersensitive nanodevice

Extremely early detection of cancers and other diseases is on the horizon with a supersensitive nanodevice being developed at The University of Alabama in Huntsville in collaboration with The Joint School of Nanoscience and Nanoengineering in Greensboro, NC. [More]
Study reveals how stem cells work to improve lung function in ARDS

Study reveals how stem cells work to improve lung function in ARDS

A new study has revealed how stem cells work to improve lung function in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). [More]
Scientists identify how immune cells use two critical receptors to clear dead cells from the body

Scientists identify how immune cells use two critical receptors to clear dead cells from the body

In most of the tissues of the body, specialized immune cells are entrusted with the task of engulfing the billions of dead cells that are generated every day. [More]
Scientists aim to develop rapid test system for immune dysfunction to treat cystic fibrosis

Scientists aim to develop rapid test system for immune dysfunction to treat cystic fibrosis

Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a frequent genetic disease affecting the lung and the gastrointestinal tract. Scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum München now have shown that many of the adult patients with CF in addition lack a cell surface molecule, which is important for immune defence. The results have been published recently in the 'Journal of Molecular Medicine'. [More]
Artificial cells to devour undesirables: an interview with Dr. Takanari Inoue

Artificial cells to devour undesirables: an interview with Dr. Takanari Inoue

If junk is not removed, pathological conditions can develop. For example, in one condition, the neutrophil count significantly decreases. Neutrophils remove pathogens and people with a reduced neutrophil count are more prone to infection, especially to rare bacteria that wouldn’t cause infection under normal conditions. [More]

Painkillers may not offer relief to people suffering from irritable bowel syndrome

University of Adelaide researchers have discovered that the immune system is defective in people suffering from irritable bowel syndrome, which is a major reason why sufferers have ongoing issues with pain. [More]
Researchers shed light on the dual action of aspirin

Researchers shed light on the dual action of aspirin

Hugely popular non-steroidal anti-inflammation drugs like aspirin, naproxen (marketed as Aleve) and ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) all work by inhibiting or killing an enzyme called cyclooxygenase - a key catalyst in production of hormone-like lipid compounds called prostaglandins that are linked to a variety of ailments, from headaches and arthritis to menstrual cramps and wound sepsis. [More]
Scientists create computer algorithm for cell and tissue engineering

Scientists create computer algorithm for cell and tissue engineering

In a boon to stem cell research and regenerative medicine, scientists at Boston Children's Hospital, the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University and Boston University have created a computer algorithm called CellNet as a "roadmap" for cell and tissue engineering, to ensure that cells engineered in the lab have the same favorable properties as cells in our own bodies. [More]
Scientists identify long-overlooked function of vascular smooth muscle cells in atherosclerosis

Scientists identify long-overlooked function of vascular smooth muscle cells in atherosclerosis

Scientists at the Interfaculty Institute of Biochemistry (IFIB) have collaborated with colleagues from the Department of Pharmacy and the Department of Dermatology of the University of Tübingen to identify a long-overlooked function of vascular smooth muscle cells in atherosclerosis. [More]
Seven physicians receive ASTRO grants to advance radiation oncology research

Seven physicians receive ASTRO grants to advance radiation oncology research

The American Society for Radiation Oncology has selected seven leading physicians to receive a total of $675,000 in awards and grants to advance radiation oncology research. The ASTRO Junior Faculty Career Research Training Award, the ASTRO Residents/Fellows in Radiation Oncology Research Seed Grant and the ASTRO/Radiation Oncology Institute Comparative Effectiveness Research Award will fund studies in radiation and cancer biology, radiation physics, translational research, outcomes/health services research and comparative effectiveness research within radiation oncology. [More]
Exploiting chemical response from body's immune system to attack pathogens using copper

Exploiting chemical response from body's immune system to attack pathogens using copper

Harnessing a natural process in the body that pumps lethal doses of copper to fungi and bacteria shows promise as a new way to kill infectious microbes, a team of scientists at Duke University report. [More]
Right kind of fat keeps the heart healthy

Right kind of fat keeps the heart healthy

Too much dietary fat is bad for the heart, but the right kind of fat keeps the heart healthy, according to a paper published in The Journal of Experimental Medicine. [More]
Learning role of immune-system cells in digestive tracts may lead to new treatments for IBS

Learning role of immune-system cells in digestive tracts may lead to new treatments for IBS

Learning the role of immune-system cells in healthy digestive tracts and how they interact with neighboring nerve cells may lead to new treatments for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). [More]
Role of immune system cells in healthy digestive tracts may lead to new treatments for IBS

Role of immune system cells in healthy digestive tracts may lead to new treatments for IBS

Learning the role of immune system cells in healthy digestive tracts and how they interact with neighboring nerve cells may lead to new treatments for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). [More]
Researchers release evidence substantiating unexpected dual role of immune system

Researchers release evidence substantiating unexpected dual role of immune system

University of Leicester researchers have released evidence substantiating an unexpected dual role of an important component of the immune system. [More]
Scientists build artificial cells programmed to eat their undesirable neighbors

Scientists build artificial cells programmed to eat their undesirable neighbors

A team of researchers has devised a Pac-Man-style power pellet that gets normally mild-mannered cells to gobble up their undesirable neighbors. The development may point the way to therapies that enlist patients’ own cells to better fend off infection and even cancer, the researchers say. A description of the work will be published July 15 in the journal Science Signaling. [More]
Inflammatory shift in long-standing bipolar disorder

Inflammatory shift in long-standing bipolar disorder

Patients with chronic bipolar disorder, but not those with schizophrenia, have a shift towards an M1 rather than an M2 macrophage response, research suggests. [More]
CRISPR system involved in promoting antibiotic resistance

CRISPR system involved in promoting antibiotic resistance

CRISPR, a system of genes that bacteria use to fend off viruses, is involved in promoting antibiotic resistance in Francisella novicida, a close relative of the bacterium that causes tularemia. [More]
Bacterial respiratory tract colonization before catching influenza may protect against severe disease

Bacterial respiratory tract colonization before catching influenza may protect against severe disease

Many studies have shown that more severe illness and even death are likely to result if you develop a secondary respiratory infection after developing influenza. Now, however, a team of researchers based at The Wistar Institute has determined that if you reverse the order of infection, the bacteria Streptococcus pneumoniae (often called pneumococcus) may actually protect against a bad case of the flu. [More]