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Potential new treatment for sepsis and ARDS

Potential new treatment for sepsis and ARDS

Scientists at Queen's University Belfast are developing a potential revolutionary new treatment for Sepsis and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS), which are among the leading causes of death in hospitalised patients in the UK. [More]
Synthetic tissue environment enables spatial definition of cancer cells and macrophages

Synthetic tissue environment enables spatial definition of cancer cells and macrophages

Tumors are notoriously difficult to study in their natural habitat - body tissues - but a new synthetic tissue environment may give cancer researchers the next-best look at tumor growth and behavior. [More]
Combination of chemotherapy and immune-blocking drug could prevent cancer recurrence

Combination of chemotherapy and immune-blocking drug could prevent cancer recurrence

Giving patients a drug that blocks part of the immune system from going into overdrive might help prevent cancer coming back in some people, according to research published today in Cancer Research. [More]
New study explains why statins are more beneficial than others in some cases

New study explains why statins are more beneficial than others in some cases

Statins' success in reducing atherosclerosis-related events has elevated the medications to wonder-drug status, with some researchers advocating for their wider use as a preemptive therapy for cardiovascular disease. [More]
Researcher study potential biomarker to determine patients at risk for aggressive breast cancer

Researcher study potential biomarker to determine patients at risk for aggressive breast cancer

Biomarkers are an important part in detecting certain cancers such as the BRCA gene in breast cancer and the PSA antigen in prostate cancer. They are easy to identify in a blood test and can help in diagnosing and giving a prognosis. [More]
Scientists identify molecular pathway that can contribute to vision loss in macular degeneration

Scientists identify molecular pathway that can contribute to vision loss in macular degeneration

Scientists have identified a pathway that leads to the formation of atypical blood vessels that can cause blindness in people with age-related macular degeneration. [More]
Researchers find CD163 protein limits muscle repair after ischemic injury

Researchers find CD163 protein limits muscle repair after ischemic injury

Researchers have identified a protein produced by white blood cells that puts the brakes on muscle repair after injury. By removing the protein CD163 from mice, scientists at Emory University School of Medicine could boost muscle repair and recovery of blood flow after ischemic injury (damage caused by restriction of blood flow). [More]
CRI commits $29.3 million in new funds to accelerate development of cancer immunotherapies

CRI commits $29.3 million in new funds to accelerate development of cancer immunotherapies

The Cancer Research Institute, a nonprofit organization dedicated to fueling the discovery and development of immunotherapies for all forms of cancer, announced that it has committed more than $29.3 million in new funds to accelerate cancer immunology research and cancer immunotherapy clinical development in the United States, Australia, Canada, France, Sweden, Switzerland, and The Netherlands. [More]
Vaccine containing virus-like nanoparticles could be novel treatment option for RSV

Vaccine containing virus-like nanoparticles could be novel treatment option for RSV

A vaccine containing virus-like nanoparticles, or microscopic, genetically engineered particles, is an effective treatment for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), according to researchers at Georgia State University. [More]
Intracellular microlasers may allow accurate measurement of small changes occurring within cells

Intracellular microlasers may allow accurate measurement of small changes occurring within cells

Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators have induced structures incorporated within individual cells to produce laser light. [More]
Biologists identify genetic mechanisms behind anti-inflammatory impact of cortisone

Biologists identify genetic mechanisms behind anti-inflammatory impact of cortisone

There's no time to lose when an emergency doctor diagnoses „Shock lung!" at the accident scene. What physicians know as "acute lung injury" (ALI) otherwise leads to death by suffocation without immediate treatment. [More]
New study suggests novel ways to treat serous retinal detachment

New study suggests novel ways to treat serous retinal detachment

Wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of severe vision loss in older individuals. AMD and other serious chronic eye problems that affect younger individuals result when fluid accumulates abnormally under or within the retina. A new study published in The American Journal of Pathology shows for the first time that the release of substances from mast cells may be a causal factor in this type of eye pathology, and inhibitors of this release may offer new ways to treat serous retinal detachment. [More]
Proteins responsible for controlling iron levels in the body also fight against infection

Proteins responsible for controlling iron levels in the body also fight against infection

Proteins responsible for controlling levels of iron in the body also play an important role in combatting infection, according to a study published today in Cell Host & Microbe. [More]
Activating bacterial receptors boosts macrophage response, limits damage to spinal cord following injury

Activating bacterial receptors boosts macrophage response, limits damage to spinal cord following injury

Macrophages are cellular sentinels in the body, assigned to identify "attacks" from viruses, bacteria, or fungi and sound the alarm when they are present. However, these cells are a "double edged sword" in spinal cord injury, providing both neural repair-promoting properties and pathological functions that destroy neuronal tissue [More]
Study discovers potential link between inherited genome-wide DNA sequences and CAD

Study discovers potential link between inherited genome-wide DNA sequences and CAD

A study to examine recessively inherited genome-wide DNA sequences has for the first time discovered a potential link with Britain's biggest killer - Coronary Artery Disease (CAD). [More]
Robert G. Miller awarded $1.5 million grant to help fund Neuraltus' Phase 2 clinical study of NP001 for ALS

Robert G. Miller awarded $1.5 million grant to help fund Neuraltus' Phase 2 clinical study of NP001 for ALS

Neuraltus Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a privately-held biopharmaceutical company focused on the development of groundbreaking drugs to treat neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), announced today that Robert G. Miller, M.D., Director of the Forbes Norris MDA/ALS Research Center at Sutter Health's California Pacific Medical Center in San Francisco, has been awarded a grant from The ALS Association for $1.5 million to help fund a Phase 2 clinical study of the company's investigational therapy for ALS, NP001. [More]
Omega-3 fatty acids and antioxidants may benefit people with Alzheimer's disease

Omega-3 fatty acids and antioxidants may benefit people with Alzheimer's disease

Here's more evidence that fish oil supplementation and antioxidants might be beneficial for at least some people facing Alzheimer's disease: A new report published in the July 2015 issue of The FASEB Journal describes the findings of a very small study in which people with mild clinical impairment, such as those in the very early stages of the disease, saw clearance of the hallmark amyloid-beta protein and reduced inflammation in neurological tissues. [More]
SLU's Center for Vaccine Development receives $2.9 million to study new vaccine to combat TB

SLU's Center for Vaccine Development receives $2.9 million to study new vaccine to combat TB

Saint Louis University's Center for Vaccine Development has received a $2.9 million award from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to study a new tuberculosis vaccine. [More]
Findings could lead to treatments for chronic pain caused by nerve damage

Findings could lead to treatments for chronic pain caused by nerve damage

Non-narcotic treatments for chronic pain that work well in people, not just mice, are sorely needed. Drawing from human pain genetics, an international team led by Boston Children's Hospital demonstrates a way to break the cycle of pain hypersensitivity without the development of addiction, tolerance or side effects. [More]
Findings could lead to new therapies that stop breast cancer progression

Findings could lead to new therapies that stop breast cancer progression

Scientists have discovered a trigger that allows breast cancer cells to spread to the lungs. They have found that blocking the signals in mice with breast cancer greatly reduces the number of secondary tumours found in the lungs. [More]
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