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MGH study reveals effects of obesity on pancreatic and breast cancer

MGH study reveals effects of obesity on pancreatic and breast cancer

Massachusetts General Hospital investigators may have uncovered a novel mechanism behind the ability of obesity to promote cancer progression. In their report published online in the journal Clinical Cancer Research, the research team describes finding an association between obesity and an overabundance of a factor called PlGF (placental growth factor) and that PlGF's binding to its receptor VEGFR-1, which is expressed on immune cells within tumors, promotes tumor progression. [More]
Neutrophils promote cardiac repair

Neutrophils promote cardiac repair

Following an acute heart attack, immune cells called neutrophils coordinate an inflammatory response which can exacerbate the damage to the organ. Now researchers from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet in Munich have shown that neutrophils also promote cardiac repair. [More]
UIC researchers discover molecular switch that allows salmonella bacteria to fight immune system

UIC researchers discover molecular switch that allows salmonella bacteria to fight immune system

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have discovered a molecular regulator that allows salmonella bacteria to switch from actively causing disease to lurking in a chronic but asymptomatic state called a biofilm. [More]
Study identifies potential therapeutic targets for treatment of multiple sclerosis

Study identifies potential therapeutic targets for treatment of multiple sclerosis

Treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) and other inflammatory diseases may benefit by new findings from a study that identified potential therapeutic targets for a devastating disease striking some 2.3 million people worldwide. [More]
Neurons protect intestinal tissue from over-inflammation

Neurons protect intestinal tissue from over-inflammation

The immune system exercises constant vigilance to protect the body from external threats--including what we eat and drink. A careful balancing act plays out as digested food travels through the intestine. Immune cells must remain alert to protect against harmful pathogens like Salmonella, but their activity also needs to be tempered since an overreaction can lead to too much inflammation and permanent tissue damage. [More]
MGH researchers find how metformin drug prevents progression of pancreatic cancer

MGH researchers find how metformin drug prevents progression of pancreatic cancer

Massachusetts General Hospital investigators may have uncovered a novel mechanism behind the ability of the diabetes drug metformin to inhibit the progression of pancreatic cancer. [More]
Malaysian scientists join forces with Harvard experts to help revolutionize lung disease treatment

Malaysian scientists join forces with Harvard experts to help revolutionize lung disease treatment

Malaysian scientists are joining forces with Harvard University experts to help revolutionize the treatment of lung diseases -- the delivery of nanomedicine deep into places otherwise impossible to reach. [More]
Drexel biomedical engineer identifies immune cell as potential strategy for growing blood vessels

Drexel biomedical engineer identifies immune cell as potential strategy for growing blood vessels

In what could be a pivotal step toward repairing non-healing wounds and damaged organs, a Drexel University biomedical engineer has identified an immune cell as a potential strategy for growing blood vessels. [More]
Scientists demonstrate workings of CCL2 mechanism that stimulates nerve regeneration

Scientists demonstrate workings of CCL2 mechanism that stimulates nerve regeneration

The peripheral nervous system is a vast network of nerves that exists primarily outside of brain and spinal cord and connects to the far reaches of the body. The very expanse of peripheral nerves makes them highly vulnerable to injuries such as blunt-force blows, cuts, and leg and arm fractures, as well as diseases that attack peripheral nerves such as diabetes, Charcot-Marie-Tooth, and Guillain-Barre syndrome. [More]
New footage shows how AIDS vaccine candidate recruits immune cells to destroy infected cells

New footage shows how AIDS vaccine candidate recruits immune cells to destroy infected cells

Using innovative technology, scientists from the Institut Pasteur and Inserm have filmed in vivo the process by which an AIDS vaccine candidate, developed by the French Vaccine Research Institute and the ANRS, triggers the immune response. [More]
TET proteins needed to maintain genome instability, say researchers

TET proteins needed to maintain genome instability, say researchers

Members of the TET (short for ten-eleven translocation) family have been known to function as tumor suppressors for many years, but how they keep a lid on the uncontrolled cell proliferation of cancer cells had remained uncertain. Now, researchers at the La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology demonstrate that TET proteins collectively constitute a major class of tumor suppressors and are required to maintain genome instability. [More]
Macrophages play key role in maintaining healthy arteries after inflammation

Macrophages play key role in maintaining healthy arteries after inflammation

Researchers from the University of Toronto have found that a specific cell type plays a key role in maintaining healthy arteries after inflammation. It's a discovery that could provide treatment options for cardiovascular disease -- one of the leading causes of death in Canada. [More]
Study reveals how MGCs dispose waste that obstructs normal physiological processes

Study reveals how MGCs dispose waste that obstructs normal physiological processes

If rubbish is too big and unwieldy for normal household waste, its removal becomes the job of specialized experts. Researchers from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have now discovered, in cooperation with colleagues from the UK, how large, fused cells help our body to deal with bulky items that may otherwise obstruct normal physiological processes. [More]
People with viral infections and identical gene mutations may be prone to hyperinflammatory disorder

People with viral infections and identical gene mutations may be prone to hyperinflammatory disorder

A group of people with fatal H1N1 flu died after their viral infections triggered a deadly hyperinflammatory disorder in susceptible individuals with gene mutations linked to the overactive immune response, according to a study in The Journal of Infectious Diseases. [More]
High-fat diet appears to prompt immune cells to start consuming connections between neurons

High-fat diet appears to prompt immune cells to start consuming connections between neurons

When a high-fat diet causes us to become obese, it also appears to prompt normally bustling immune cells in our brain to become sedentary and start consuming the connections between our neurons, scientists say. [More]
Researchers successfully create infinitely reproducing tissue cultures

Researchers successfully create infinitely reproducing tissue cultures

Most cases of small cell lung cancer are only diagnosed after the tumour has already formed metastases. Until now it has not been possible to investigate the reasons for this rapid metastasis, because of a lack of sufficient tumour material from patients. Now, the group of researchers led by Gerhard Hamilton, University Department of Surgery at Medical University of Vienna has succeeded in creating infinitely reproducing tissue cultures. [More]
MCG researchers explore how neurofibromatosis puts young patients at risk for cardiovascular disease

MCG researchers explore how neurofibromatosis puts young patients at risk for cardiovascular disease

It's a fairly common genetic condition that can surface as a series of dark skin spots and result in a host of maladies from tumors to premature cardiovascular disease. Medical College of Georgia researchers hope their studies of how neurofibromatosis 1, or NF1, can dangerously thicken or thin blood vessel walls will one day help physicians better identify and treat these young patients at cardiovascular risk. [More]
Gamma interferon may have potential to prevent Ebola infection

Gamma interferon may have potential to prevent Ebola infection

The recent Ebola outbreak in West Africa has claimed more than 11,300 lives and starkly revealed the lack of effective options for treating or preventing the disease. Progress has been made on developing vaccines, but there is still a need for antiviral therapies to protect health care workers and local populations in the event of future outbreaks. [More]
UCLA researchers find new way to reduce ascites with minimal side effects

UCLA researchers find new way to reduce ascites with minimal side effects

Women who have ovarian cancer often develop a condition called ascites, which is a buildup of fluids in the abdomen. The most common treatment for ascites is puncturing the abdomen and manually draining the fluid, which is painful and risky and must be repeated every few weeks. [More]
TSRI scientists discover first-in-class compounds that target persistent tuberculosis

TSRI scientists discover first-in-class compounds that target persistent tuberculosis

Tuberculosis has been infecting humans for several millennia, making it one of the most horribly successful diseases in history. Today, it is still a major killer, responsible for some 1.5 million deaths each year. [More]
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