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Right kind of fat keeps the heart healthy

Right kind of fat keeps the heart healthy

Too much dietary fat is bad for the heart, but the right kind of fat keeps the heart healthy, according to a paper published in The Journal of Experimental Medicine. [More]
Learning role of immune-system cells in digestive tracts may lead to new treatments for IBS

Learning role of immune-system cells in digestive tracts may lead to new treatments for IBS

Learning the role of immune-system cells in healthy digestive tracts and how they interact with neighboring nerve cells may lead to new treatments for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). [More]
Role of immune system cells in healthy digestive tracts may lead to new treatments for IBS

Role of immune system cells in healthy digestive tracts may lead to new treatments for IBS

Learning the role of immune system cells in healthy digestive tracts and how they interact with neighboring nerve cells may lead to new treatments for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). [More]
Researchers release evidence substantiating unexpected dual role of immune system

Researchers release evidence substantiating unexpected dual role of immune system

University of Leicester researchers have released evidence substantiating an unexpected dual role of an important component of the immune system. [More]
Inflammatory shift in long-standing bipolar disorder

Inflammatory shift in long-standing bipolar disorder

Patients with chronic bipolar disorder, but not those with schizophrenia, have a shift towards an M1 rather than an M2 macrophage response, research suggests. [More]
CRISPR system involved in promoting antibiotic resistance

CRISPR system involved in promoting antibiotic resistance

CRISPR, a system of genes that bacteria use to fend off viruses, is involved in promoting antibiotic resistance in Francisella novicida, a close relative of the bacterium that causes tularemia. [More]
Bacterial respiratory tract colonization before catching influenza may protect against severe disease

Bacterial respiratory tract colonization before catching influenza may protect against severe disease

Many studies have shown that more severe illness and even death are likely to result if you develop a secondary respiratory infection after developing influenza. Now, however, a team of researchers based at The Wistar Institute has determined that if you reverse the order of infection, the bacteria Streptococcus pneumoniae (often called pneumococcus) may actually protect against a bad case of the flu. [More]
Clear advances in the fight against tuberculosis are within reach, say immunologists

Clear advances in the fight against tuberculosis are within reach, say immunologists

Leading immunologists expect to see some clear advances in the fight against tuberculosis, an infectious disease that is widespread the world over. Professor Stefan Kaufmann, Director at the Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology in Berlin, echoed these sentiments at today's launch of the scientific programme for the 64th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting at Lindau, Germany. [More]
Heavy drinkers at greater risk of developing pneumonia and ARDS

Heavy drinkers at greater risk of developing pneumonia and ARDS

Heavy drinking damages the body in many ways. In addition to liver failure, alcoholics are at a much greater risk of developing pneumonia and life threatening acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), for which there is no treatment. [More]
Microparticles in crab, shrimp and lobster shells may help prevent inflammatory bowel disease

Microparticles in crab, shrimp and lobster shells may help prevent inflammatory bowel disease

Yoshimi Shibata, Ph.D., professor of biomedical science in the Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine at Florida Atlantic University, has received a $380,552 grant from the National Institute of Complementary and Alternative Medicine of the National Institutes of Health to further investigate how microparticles called "chitin" found in crab, shrimp and lobster shells have anti-inflammatory mechanisms that could lead to the development of novel preventive and therapeutic strategies for individuals who suffer from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and others diseases. [More]
NIH receives $10 million grant for research on breast cancer metastasis

NIH receives $10 million grant for research on breast cancer metastasis

The American Cancer Society predicts that 40,000 American women will die from breast cancer this year. Most of those deaths will occur due to cells from the primary tumor that spread to other parts of the body-the process known as metastasis. [More]
New driver of atherosclerosis may prove to be promising therapeutic target

New driver of atherosclerosis may prove to be promising therapeutic target

A new driver of atherosclerosis has been identified by researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center. This molecule, known as 27HC (27-hydroxycholesterol), has been found to exacerbate the development of the condition, and may prove to be a promising therapeutic target. [More]
Exercise transiently suppresses inflammation in rheumatic disease

Exercise transiently suppresses inflammation in rheumatic disease

Research findings presented today at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress suggest that exercise transiently suppresses local and systemic inflammation, reinforcing the beneficial effects of exercise and the need for this to be regular in order to achieve clinical efficacy in rheumatic disease. [More]
Macrophages present in shed endometrium may contribute to lesion formation, shows study

Macrophages present in shed endometrium may contribute to lesion formation, shows study

A mouse model of endometriosis has been developed that produces endometriosis lesions similar to those found in humans, according to a report published in The American Journal of Pathology. [More]
New discovery may shed light on how common cold triggers asthma attacks

New discovery may shed light on how common cold triggers asthma attacks

Cold season may be just behind us, but a new discovery may shed light on how this common condition triggers asthma attacks. In a new research report published in the June 2014 issue of the Journal of Leukocyte Biology, researchers show that in individuals with asthma, statins significantly reduce the in vitro inflammatory response of human monocytes to rhinovirus (RV), the cause of the common cold. [More]
ASCO: Biothera to present phase 2 study data on predictive serum biomarker for NSCLC

ASCO: Biothera to present phase 2 study data on predictive serum biomarker for NSCLC

Biothera will present research at the American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting linking a potential predictive serum biomarker to the clinical response to Imprime PGG immunotherapy in a recent phase 2 study in non-small cell lung cancer patients. The meeting begins today and runs through June 3 in Chicago. [More]
Study: E-cigarettes appear to increase virulence of drug- resistant and life-threatening bacteria

Study: E-cigarettes appear to increase virulence of drug- resistant and life-threatening bacteria

Despite being touted by their manufacturers as a healthy alternative to cigarettes, e-cigarettes appear in a laboratory study to increase the virulence of drug- resistant and potentially life-threatening bacteria, while decreasing the ability of human cells to kill these bacteria [More]
Novel targeted drug shows promise in treating patients with advanced pigmented villonodular synovitis

Novel targeted drug shows promise in treating patients with advanced pigmented villonodular synovitis

A novel targeted drug shows promise in treating patients with advanced pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS), a rare neoplastic joint disorder, according to new phase I data from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and other institutions highlighted to media today in advance of the 50th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), which will take place from May 30 to June 3 in Chicago. [More]
Research offers potential for future treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

Research offers potential for future treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

Researchers at Children's Hospital Los Angeles have discovered that by targeting a particular receptor, chemotherapy-resistant cancer cells can be killed in an acute form of childhood leukemia, offering the potential for a future treatment for patients who would otherwise experience relapse of their disease. [More]
Corneal nerve fiber assessment has potential to monitor peripheral neuropathy induced by HIV

Corneal nerve fiber assessment has potential to monitor peripheral neuropathy induced by HIV

Corneal nerve fiber assessment has great potential as a tool to diagnose and monitor peripheral neuropathy induced by HIV, say scientists at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. [More]