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Two new drug compounds appear to be effective in treating endometriosis

Two new drug compounds appear to be effective in treating endometriosis

Two new drug compounds - one of which has already proven useful in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis - appear to be effective in treating endometriosis, a disorder that, like MS, is driven by estrogen and inflammation, scientists report in Science Translational Medicine. [More]
Rice researchers develop new version of hydrogel to promote wound healing

Rice researchers develop new version of hydrogel to promote wound healing

Rice University scientists have found the balance necessary to aid healing with high-tech hydrogel. [More]
PharmaMar to begin PM1183 Phase III trial in combination with doxorubicin in SCLC

PharmaMar to begin PM1183 Phase III trial in combination with doxorubicin in SCLC

Zeltia announces today that its pharmaceutical division PharmaMar will start a Phase III trial with PM1183 in combination with doxorubicin against topotecan in SCLC, given the activity observed in an interim analysis of an ongoing Phase Ib trial. The results of this study will be presented at a prominent international cancer meeting this year, which will be soon announced. [More]
CML mouse model reveals previously unreported facets of disease

CML mouse model reveals previously unreported facets of disease

A humanised murine model of chronic phase chronic myeloid leukaemia, developed by a Swedish research team, provides insight into previously unexplored characteristics of the disease. [More]
Exposure to nanoparticles can play major role in development of cardiovascular diseases

Exposure to nanoparticles can play major role in development of cardiovascular diseases

Nanoparticles, extremely tiny particles measured in billionths of a meter, are increasingly everywhere, and especially in biomedical products. Their toxicity has been researched in general terms, but now a team of Israeli scientists has for the first time found that exposure nanoparticles (NPs) of silicon dioxide (SiO2) can play a major role in the development of cardiovascular diseases when the NP cross tissue and cellular barriers and also find their way into the circulatory system. [More]
Fat cells below skin help protect from bacteria, say researchers

Fat cells below skin help protect from bacteria, say researchers

When it comes to skin infections, a healthy and robust immune response may depend greatly upon what lies beneath. In a new paper published in the January 2, 2015 issue of Science, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report the surprising discovery that fat cells below the skin help protect us from bacteria. [More]
Scientists identify white blood cells that tumors use to suppress disease-fighting immune system

Scientists identify white blood cells that tumors use to suppress disease-fighting immune system

A study led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists has identified the population of white blood cells that tumors use to enhance growth and suppress the disease-fighting immune system. [More]
New study finds that immune cells in the brain may contribute to obesity

New study finds that immune cells in the brain may contribute to obesity

Immune cells perform a previously unsuspected role in the brain that may contribute to obesity, according to a new study by UC San Francisco researchers. [More]
Brunel scientists find way to target hard-to-reach cancers using 'Trojan horse' nanoparticles

Brunel scientists find way to target hard-to-reach cancers using 'Trojan horse' nanoparticles

Scientists at Brunel University London have found a way of targeting hard-to-reach cancers and degenerative diseases using nanoparticles, but without causing the damaging side effects the treatment normally brings. [More]
Scientists review HBV-associated tumor microenvironment in hepatocellular carcinoma

Scientists review HBV-associated tumor microenvironment in hepatocellular carcinoma

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the few cancers in which a continued increase in incidence has been observed over recent years. Globally, there are approximately 750,000 new cases of liver cancer reported each year. Importantly, population-based studies show that HCC ranks as the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. [More]
Component of Glycyrrhiza uralensis plant may thwart development of metabolic disorders

Component of Glycyrrhiza uralensis plant may thwart development of metabolic disorders

New research published in the December 2014 issue of the Journal of Leukocyte Biology, shows that a component found in in the plant, Glycyrrhiza uralensis, may inhibit the development of metabolic disorders by stopping the activation of NLRP3, a protein involved in the disease process. [More]
Immune-suppressing protein may predict how patients respond to treatment

Immune-suppressing protein may predict how patients respond to treatment

The presence of an immune-suppressing protein in non-cancerous immune cells may predict how patients with different types of cancer respond to treatment, a multi-center phase I study using an investigational immune therapy drug has found. [More]
New cell therapy offers hope for patients with liver cirrhosis

New cell therapy offers hope for patients with liver cirrhosis

Liver disease patients could be helped by a new cell therapy to treat the condition. [More]
Excess fat in lungs may cause pulmonary fibrosis

Excess fat in lungs may cause pulmonary fibrosis

Pulmonary fibrosis has no cure. It's caused by scarring that seems to feed on itself, with the tougher, less elastic tissue replacing the ever moving and stretching lung, making it increasingly difficult for patients to breathe. [More]
Type 3 interferons and T helper 2 cells: an interview with Grant Gallagher, Managing Director, HUMIGEN

Type 3 interferons and T helper 2 cells: an interview with Grant Gallagher, Managing Director, HUMIGEN

The type 3 interferons - usually called the “lambda” interferons, or “IFNL” - are the most recently identified IFNs. We (myself and Sergei Kotenko) originally identified the receptor and then the three ligands (IFNL1,2,3; very recently a fourth, IFNL4, was discovered); the key paper was published in 2003. [More]
First steps in the origin of pancreatic cancer identified by Mayo Clinic researchers

First steps in the origin of pancreatic cancer identified by Mayo Clinic researchers

Researchers at Mayo Clinic's campus in Jacksonville say they have identified first steps in the origin of pancreatic cancer and that their findings suggest preventive strategies to explore. [More]
New model explains how immune cells recognize, destroy bacteria

New model explains how immune cells recognize, destroy bacteria

The innate immune system serves as the body's specialized armed forces division, comprised of a host of defense mechanisms used to battle bacterial infections. Among the system's warriors are white blood cells including the specialized macrophages, which maintain constant surveillance for foreign intruders or pathogens, functioning as the body's first line of defense, poised to attack at barrier sites including the skin, lungs and intestines. [More]
Regenerative medicine may offer new standard of advanced treatment for foot and leg ulcers

Regenerative medicine may offer new standard of advanced treatment for foot and leg ulcers

These are exciting times for regenerative medicine. Unlike conventional medicines, the regenerative approach can potentially work to restore the lost functionality of tissues or organs—the major reason for intensive focus on research and development in the field. [More]
Health benefits of modified formulation of curcumin supplements

Health benefits of modified formulation of curcumin supplements

The health benefits of over-the-counter curcumin supplements might not get past your gut, but new research shows that a modified formulation of the spice releases its anti-inflammatory goodness throughout the body. [More]
Osteoporosis drugs may also benefit patients with tumours outside the skeleton

Osteoporosis drugs may also benefit patients with tumours outside the skeleton

Australian researchers have shown why calcium-binding drugs commonly used to treat people with osteoporosis, or with late-stage cancers that have spread to bone, may also benefit patients with tumours outside the skeleton, including breast cancer. [More]