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Breakthrough research opens door to potential new therapies for inflammatory diseases

Breakthrough research opens door to potential new therapies for inflammatory diseases

Scientists have made a major breakthrough in understanding the workings of the cellular machinery involved in a host of inflammatory diseases. [More]
Mitochondrial alternative oxidase from sea-squirt shows potential to fight against sepsis

Mitochondrial alternative oxidase from sea-squirt shows potential to fight against sepsis

Mitochondrial alternative oxidase from a sea-squirt works as a safety valve for stressed mitochondria. This property enables it to stop the runaway inflammatory process that leads to multiple organ failure and eventual death in bacterial sepsis. [More]
Progesterone treatment protects female mice against consequences of influenza infection

Progesterone treatment protects female mice against consequences of influenza infection

Over 100 million women are on hormonal contraceptives. All of them contain some form of progesterone, either alone or in combination with estrogen. [More]
KIT researchers use high-resolution microscopy to uncover how scavenger cells repair muscle fibers

KIT researchers use high-resolution microscopy to uncover how scavenger cells repair muscle fibers

Everybody knows the burning sensation in the legs when climbing down a steep slope for a long time. It is caused by microruptures in the cell membrane of our muscle fibers. [More]
Researchers discover new strategy to boost effectiveness of anti-cancer immune therapy

Researchers discover new strategy to boost effectiveness of anti-cancer immune therapy

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center have identified a strategy to maximize the effectiveness of anti-cancer immune therapy. [More]
Using the immune system to fight cancer: an interview with Dr Charles Akle

Using the immune system to fight cancer: an interview with Dr Charles Akle

We all produce as many as 100,000 different types of cancer cells every day, which are recognized and eliminated by our extraordinarily efficient immune system. However, if something goes wrong with the immune system, and it no longer gets rid of these cells, then that’s when cancerous cells grow and become a problem. [More]
Study reveals promising strategy against bladder cancer metastasis

Study reveals promising strategy against bladder cancer metastasis

The popular kids' card game "Exploding Kittens" teaches a concept critical to cancer science: When a player plays a "Nope" card, the subsequent player may lay another "Nope", thus creating a double-negative that becomes a positive, allowing the initial action to proceed. [More]
Stealth insulin-producing pig cells may offer solution for treating Type 1 diabetes in humans

Stealth insulin-producing pig cells may offer solution for treating Type 1 diabetes in humans

University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers are exploring ways to wrap pig tissue with a protective coating to ultimately fight diabetes in humans. The nano-thin bilayers of protective material are meant to deter or prevent immune rejection. [More]
Leading Chikungunya vaccine in clinical trial phase 2

Leading Chikungunya vaccine in clinical trial phase 2

With the first patient vaccinated, a Phase 2 clinical trial of a promising prophylactic vaccine candidate against Chikungunya fever has now commenced. The product is the most advanced Chikungunya vaccine candidate globally and is developed by the Austrian biotech company Themis Bioscience GmbH. [More]
AgriLife scientists examine role of ghrelin receptor in age-related adipose tissue inflammation in mice

AgriLife scientists examine role of ghrelin receptor in age-related adipose tissue inflammation in mice

Scientists have proposed that inflammation is the harbinger of aging and central to the aging process, a phenomenon described as 'inflamm-aging,' said Dr. Yuxiang Sun. [More]
Research finding opens door to new treatment options for inflammatory rheumatism

Research finding opens door to new treatment options for inflammatory rheumatism

Enthesitis, inflammation of tendons where they attach to the bone, is a common medical problem which underlies various forms of inflammatory rheumatism. [More]
NYIT researcher aims to study link between wound healing problems and methamphetamine use

NYIT researcher aims to study link between wound healing problems and methamphetamine use

A chance observation in a Southern California fast food restaurant led Luis Martinez, Ph.D., to wonder about the connections behind wound healing problems and methamphetamine use. [More]
Researchers find reason behind epidemiological success of Russian tuberculosis strains

Researchers find reason behind epidemiological success of Russian tuberculosis strains

Researchers from the Federal Research and Clinical Centre of Physical-Chemical Medicine, and staff from MIPT's Systems Biology Laboratory, the Research Institute of Phthisiopulmonology and the St. Petersburg Pasteur Institute, conducted a large-scale analysis of the proteins and genomes of mycobacterium tuberculosis strains that are common in Russia and countries of the former Soviet Union and found features that provide a possible explanation for their epidemiological success. [More]
MSU scientists show how special genes stay open to fight against infections

MSU scientists show how special genes stay open to fight against infections

A new discovery at Michigan State University has revealed how special genes stay open for business, helping diagram a mechanism that plays a key role in fighting inflammation and infections. [More]
Researchers explain why secondary infection with MRSA kills influenza patients

Researchers explain why secondary infection with MRSA kills influenza patients

Researchers have discovered that secondary infection with the Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacterium (or "superbug") often kills influenza patients because the flu virus alters the antibacterial response of white blood cells, causing them to damage the patients' lungs instead of destroying the bacterium. [More]
Scientists identify potential mechanism that paves way for improved treatment of fungal infections

Scientists identify potential mechanism that paves way for improved treatment of fungal infections

By identifying new compounds that selectively block mitochondrial respiration in pathogenic fungi, Whitehead Institute scientists have identified a potential antifungal mechanism that could enable combination therapy with fluconazole, one of today's most commonly prescribed fungal infection treatments. [More]
Antioxidant compound could be effective to combat immune rejection after islet transplantation

Antioxidant compound could be effective to combat immune rejection after islet transplantation

A team of researchers has found that doses of bilirubin help provide suppression of the immune response following islet transplantation in mouse models. [More]
Heart-resident macrophages promote neutrophil recruitment after ischemic injury

Heart-resident macrophages promote neutrophil recruitment after ischemic injury

Tissue injury, such as occurs in response to a lack of oxygen, promotes an influx of immune cells to the site of damage. [More]
E. coli K1 inhibits glucose transporters during meningitis, report scientists

E. coli K1 inhibits glucose transporters during meningitis, report scientists

Escherichia coli K1 (E. coli K1) continues to be a major threat to the health of young infants. Affecting the central nervous system, it causes neonatal meningitis by multiplying in immune cells, such as macrophages, and then disseminating into the bloodstream to subsequently invade the blood-brain barrier. [More]
Researchers identify crucial innate immunity role for gene linked to ARC syndrome in children

Researchers identify crucial innate immunity role for gene linked to ARC syndrome in children

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have found an important innate immunity role for a gene linked to a rare, fatal syndrome in children. Their study has implications for a much more common disease: tuberculosis. [More]
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