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Penn study clarifies action of potential new class of pain relievers that may benefit and not hurt heart

Penn study clarifies action of potential new class of pain relievers that may benefit and not hurt heart

Nonsteroidal antinflamatory drugs (NSAIDs) that block an enzyme called COX-2 relieve pain and inflammation but can cause heart attacks, stroke, heart failure, and even sudden cardiac death. [More]

Scientists receive federal grant to track how multi-walled carbon nanotubes interact with human cells

Scientists at The University of Texas at Dallas have received a federal grant to investigate how tiny carbon structures used in the manufacture of many everyday products might affect human health. [More]

Study: CD206-targeting Manocept platform may provide potential avenues to enhance diagnosis in Kaposi Sarcoma

Navidea Biopharmaceuticals, Inc. (NYSE MKT: NAVB), a biopharmaceutical company focused on precision diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals, today announced that collaborators from the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) presented results at the 2014 American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) conference, April 5-9, 2014 in San Diego, CA, highlighting the potential utility of imaging agents derived from Navidea's Manocept™ platform in identifying affected tissues and lymph nodes in patients with Kaposi Sarcoma (KS). [More]

Study provides insights into why alcohol has negative effect on wound healing

People who are injured while binge drinking are much slower to heal from wounds suffered in car accidents, shootings, fires, etc. [More]
Study points to potential culprit that kills motor neurons in ALS

Study points to potential culprit that kills motor neurons in ALS

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, is marked by a cascade of cellular and inflammatory events that weakens and kills vital motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord. The process is complex, involving cells that ordinarily protect the neurons from harm. Now, a new study by scientists in The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital points to a potential culprit in this good-cell-gone-bad scenario, a key step toward the ultimate goal of developing a treatment. [More]
Study examines events that lead to sepsis by Streptococcus pneumoniae

Study examines events that lead to sepsis by Streptococcus pneumoniae

An international team of academics, including Professor Marco Oggioni from the University of Leicester's Department of Genetics, has studied how localised infections can turn into the dangerous systematic disease sepsis - and has identified for the first time through genetic evidence that a single bacteria could be the cause. [More]
Insulin-secreting beta cells of pancreas have capacity to regenerate, say scientists

Insulin-secreting beta cells of pancreas have capacity to regenerate, say scientists

Vanderbilt University scientists have found evidence that the insulin-secreting beta cells of the pancreas, which are either killed or become dysfunctional in the two main forms of diabetes, have the capacity to regenerate. [More]

Study suggests effective therapeutics for IBD may hinge on targeting GM-CSF axis

​The protein GM-CSF plays a critical role in maintaining immune tolerance in the gut, with defects in the protein increasing the susceptibility to inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), according to a new mouse study by a team of researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. [More]
Gut bacteria and blood cell development relationship helps immune system fight infection

Gut bacteria and blood cell development relationship helps immune system fight infection

The human relationship with microbial life is complicated. At almost any supermarket, you can pick up both antibacterial soap and probiotic yogurt during the same shopping trip. [More]
Researchers examine association between diabetes and obesity

Researchers examine association between diabetes and obesity

It's by now well established that obesity is a major risk factor for diabetes. But what exactly is it about extra body fat that leads to insulin resistance and blood glucose elevation, the hallmarks of diabetes? [More]

Plymouth University doctor wins national award for animal testing alternative

Dr. Gyorgy Fejer from Plymouth University School of Biomedical and Healthcare Sciences has received a national award for his work developing the lab-based creation of a type of mouse cell line which could be used in place of live animals for research related to infectious diseases. [More]
New study shows increase in certain macrophages may lead to therapeutic targets for Crohn's disease

New study shows increase in certain macrophages may lead to therapeutic targets for Crohn's disease

​For those coping with Crohn's disease, a new research report published in the Journal of Leukocyte Biology offers hope for the development of new and more effective drugs. In the report, scientists show for the first time, precisely what type of immune cells are involved in driving the inflammation process in the disease. [More]

Blocking Netrin-1 in immune system stops chronic inflammation and insulin resistance tied to obesity

Researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center have found that blocking the action of a key signaling molecule in the immune system known as Netrin-1 stalls chronic inflammation and insulin resistance tied to obesity and often derived from fatty diets. [More]

Hypervirulent S. pneumoniae mutants discovered

Swedish researchers studying Streptococcus pneumoniae have discovered “hypervirulent” mutant forms of the bacteria that are selected for because they are more resistant to clearance by macrophages. [More]
Cognitive decline in obese diabetic mice can be reversed with regular exercise, surgical removal of belly fat

Cognitive decline in obese diabetic mice can be reversed with regular exercise, surgical removal of belly fat

Cognitive decline that often accompanies obesity and diabetes can be reversed with regular exercise or surgical removal of belly fat, scientists report. [More]
Some neurologic diseases associated with prenatal exposure to inflammatory immune responses

Some neurologic diseases associated with prenatal exposure to inflammatory immune responses

Johns Hopkins researchers report that fetal mice — especially males — show signs of brain damage that lasts into their adulthood when they are exposed in the womb to a maternal immune system kicked into high gear by a serious infection or other malady. The findings suggest that some neurologic diseases in humans could be similarly rooted in prenatal exposure to inflammatory immune responses. [More]
Research suggests that male mice may be vulnerable to effects of maternal inflammation than females

Research suggests that male mice may be vulnerable to effects of maternal inflammation than females

Johns Hopkins researchers report that fetal mice - especially males - show signs of brain damage that lasts into their adulthood when they are exposed in the womb to a maternal immune system kicked into high gear by a serious infection or other malady. [More]
ACE protein overexpression elevates immune responses and prevents Alzheimer's-like cognitive decline

ACE protein overexpression elevates immune responses and prevents Alzheimer's-like cognitive decline

Many people with high blood pressure are familiar with ACE inhibitors, drugs that widen blood vessels by limiting activity of ACE - angiotensin-converting enzyme - a naturally occurring protein found in tissues throughout the body. [More]
New study reveals way to combat drug-resistant tumors

New study reveals way to combat drug-resistant tumors

Cancer drugs that recruit antibodies from the body's own immune system to help kill tumors have shown much promise in treating several types of cancer. However, after initial success, the tumors often return. [More]
Study demonstrates direct effects of fragmented sleep on tumor growth

Study demonstrates direct effects of fragmented sleep on tumor growth

Poor-quality sleep marked by frequent awakenings can speed cancer growth, increase tumor aggressiveness and dampen the immune system's ability to control or eradicate early cancers, according to a new study published online January 21, 2014, in the journal Cancer Research. [More]