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Discovery reveals possibility of using water for finer analysis of the brain's functioning

Discovery reveals possibility of using water for finer analysis of the brain's functioning

To observe the brain in action, scientists and physicians use imaging techniques, among which functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is the best known. These techniques are not based on direct observations of electric impulses from activated neurons, but on one of their consequences. Indeed, this stimulation triggers physiological modifications in the activated cerebral region, changes that become visible by imaging. [More]
DGIST researchers set on creating microrobot-assisted procedure for dealing with blocked arteries

DGIST researchers set on creating microrobot-assisted procedure for dealing with blocked arteries

Swarms of microscopic, magnetic, robotic beads could be scrubbing in next to the world's top vascular surgeons--all taking aim at blocked arteries. [More]
Helen DeVos Children's Hospital uses two imaging techniques to produce hybrid 3D model of a patient's heart

Helen DeVos Children's Hospital uses two imaging techniques to produce hybrid 3D model of a patient's heart

Congenital heart experts from Spectrum Health Helen DeVos Children's Hospital have successfully integrated two common imaging techniques to produce a three-dimensional anatomic model of a patient's heart. [More]
MSD announces EC approval of SIMPONI (golimumab) for treatment of adult patients with nr-axial SpA

MSD announces EC approval of SIMPONI (golimumab) for treatment of adult patients with nr-axial SpA

MSD (Merck & Co., Inc., Kenilworth, New Jersey, USA) today announced that on 22 June the European Commission approved SIMPONI (golimumab) for the treatment of adult patients with severe, active non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis (nr-axial SpA). [More]
New UCLA study may lead to more precise treatments for obsessive-compulsive disorder

New UCLA study may lead to more precise treatments for obsessive-compulsive disorder

Tens of millions of Americans -- an estimated 1 to 2 percent of the population -- will suffer at some point in their lifetimes from obsessive-compulsive disorder, a disorder characterized by recurrent, intrusive, and disturbing thoughts (obsessions), and/or stereotyped recurrent behaviors (compulsions). [More]
Animal study highlights major safety concern regarding use of MRI contrast agents in patients

Animal study highlights major safety concern regarding use of MRI contrast agents in patients

New results in animals highlight a major safety concern regarding a class of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents used in millions of patients each year, according to a paper published online by the journal Investigative Radiology. [More]
Fructose stimulates reward system in the brain to a lesser degree than glucose

Fructose stimulates reward system in the brain to a lesser degree than glucose

Fructose not only results in a lower level of satiety, it also stimulates the reward system in the brain to a lesser degree than glucose. This may cause excessive consumption accompanied by effects that are a risk to health, report researchers from the University of Basel in a study published in the scientific journal PLOS ONE. Various diseases have been attributed to industrial fructose in sugary drinks and ready meals. [More]
Biontech, Siemens enter into strategic collaboration on manufacture of personalized cancer vaccines

Biontech, Siemens enter into strategic collaboration on manufacture of personalized cancer vaccines

Siemens and BioNTech AG, a fully integrated biotechnology company developing truly personalized cancer immunotherapies, have entered into a strategic collaboration. [More]
Preclinical Magnetic Particle Imaging: an interview with Professor Jeff Bulte, Johns Hopkins

Preclinical Magnetic Particle Imaging: an interview with Professor Jeff Bulte, Johns Hopkins

I'm Jeff Bulte, professor of Radiology and Director of Cellular Imaging at the Institute for Cell Engineering at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland in the United States. I lead a group of about 20 to 25 people who focus their research on imaging cells. [More]
10-week reading intervention improves brain activity in autistic children

10-week reading intervention improves brain activity in autistic children

Ten weeks of intensive reading intervention for children with autism spectrum disorder was enough to strengthen the activity of loosely connected areas of their brains that work together to comprehend reading, University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers have found. [More]
Biotin benefits ‘clinically relevant’ in progressive multiple sclerosis

Biotin benefits ‘clinically relevant’ in progressive multiple sclerosis

Patients with progressive multiple sclerosis and their clinicians see clear improvements during treatment with a high dose of biotin, show further results from the phase III trial of the therapy. [More]
Near-infrared imaging techniques for visualization of cartilage tissue

Near-infrared imaging techniques for visualization of cartilage tissue

The mainstream techniques for visualization of cartilage tissue in the body are magnetic resonance imaging and computer tomography, but both techniques do not provide optimum quality images. [More]
Researchers highlight important factors that impact early-stage breast cancer patients' access to BCT

Researchers highlight important factors that impact early-stage breast cancer patients' access to BCT

The first comprehensive national review of breast-conserving therapy (BCT) shows that over the last 13 years rates of this treatment modality for early-stage breast cancer have increased at a steady pace. However, the review also highlights important demographic factors that impact which patients have access to BCT. [More]
Research: Interaction between cortical and subcortical brain regions highlights role of hypersensitivity in ASD

Research: Interaction between cortical and subcortical brain regions highlights role of hypersensitivity in ASD

The increased interaction between cortical and subcortical brain regions highlights the central role of hypersensitivity and other sensory symptoms in defining Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). [More]
Monteris Medical's NeuroBlate System wins Gold 2015 Medical Design Excellence Award

Monteris Medical's NeuroBlate System wins Gold 2015 Medical Design Excellence Award

Monteris Medical today announced that its NeuroBlate System, a minimally invasive robotic laser thermotherapy tool for treating neurological lesions, has been selected as a gold winning product in the "Surgical Equipment, Instruments, and Supplies" category of the 2015 Medical Design Excellence Awards. [More]
Autistic children who are sensitive to sensory stimuli have brains that react differently

Autistic children who are sensitive to sensory stimuli have brains that react differently

Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, a team of UCLA researchers has shown for the first time that children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) who are overly sensitive to sensory stimuli have brains that react differently than those with the disorder who don't respond so severely to noises, visual stimulation and physical contact. [More]
INS announces winners of inaugural best abstract competition at 12th World Congress

INS announces winners of inaugural best abstract competition at 12th World Congress

The International Neuromodulation Society (INS) announced winners today of its inaugural best abstract competition at the 12th World Congress in Montreal. [More]
GSU scientists design new MRI technique for early detection of liver tumors

GSU scientists design new MRI technique for early detection of liver tumors

Scientists at Georgia State University with funding from the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering have designed an imaging technique to detect early-stage liver tumors, and have proven it successful in mice. [More]
CMU scientists identify how specific concrete objects are coded in the brain

CMU scientists identify how specific concrete objects are coded in the brain

Thanks to Carnegie Mellon University advances in brain imaging technology, we now know how specific concrete objects are coded in the brain, to the point where we can identify which object, such as a house or a banana, someone is thinking about from its brain activation signature. [More]
Researchers generate computer models for targeted drug therapy on DIPG cancer cells

Researchers generate computer models for targeted drug therapy on DIPG cancer cells

The results of a recent study on targeted therapy of a specific type of brain cancer were published by Nature Medicine showing specific progress in cancer treatment. [More]
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