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New Orthopaedic & Spine Center guide discusses conservative treatment options for hip, knee and spine pain

New Orthopaedic & Spine Center guide discusses conservative treatment options for hip, knee and spine pain

The physicians at Orthopaedic & Spine Center have put together an information guide – Surgery Isn't Always the Answer. The resource discusses conservative treatment options for those who suffer from hip, knee, and spine pain. The guide also shares information on the benefits of early diagnosis and minimally-invasive surgical treatments. [More]
Ultrasound safer than other imaging modalities for imaging female pelvis, say OB/GYN experts

Ultrasound safer than other imaging modalities for imaging female pelvis, say OB/GYN experts

Ultrasound technology has evolved dramatically in recent years. A group of noted obstetricians and gynecologists maintain that ultrasound is more cost-effective and safer than other imaging modalities for imaging the female pelvis and should be the first imaging modality used for patients with pelvic symptoms. [More]
Researchers find strong relationship between prenatal PAH exposure and behavioral impairment

Researchers find strong relationship between prenatal PAH exposure and behavioral impairment

Researchers at the Institute for the Developing Mind at Children's Hospital Los Angeles and colleagues at Columbia University's Center for Children's Environmental Health have found a powerful relationship between prenatal PAH exposure and disturbances in parts of the brain that support information processing and behavioral control. [More]
New study may help decode attention deficit disorders

New study may help decode attention deficit disorders

Sometimes being too focused on a task is not a good thing. During tasks that require our attention, we might become so engrossed in what we are doing that we fail to notice there is a better way to get the job done. [More]
National Science Foundation announces recipient of Faculty Early Career Development Award

National Science Foundation announces recipient of Faculty Early Career Development Award

The National Science Foundation announced that New York University Assistant Professor Riccardo Lattanzi is a recipient of the Faculty Early Career Development Award, more widely known as a CAREER Award. [More]
Serious head injuries may contribute to faster brain ageing, new study reveals

Serious head injuries may contribute to faster brain ageing, new study reveals

People who have suffered serious head injuries show changes in brain structure resembling those seen in older people, according to a new study. [More]
MRI more accurate, safe and less painful than liver biopsy in measuring total body iron balance

MRI more accurate, safe and less painful than liver biopsy in measuring total body iron balance

Investigators at The Saban Research Institute of Children's Hospital Los Angeles have demonstrated that MR imaging of the liver is more accurate than liver biopsy in determining total body iron balance in patients with sickle cell disease and other disorders requiring blood transfusion therapy. [More]
New MRI technique from NIST may help diagnose TBI in U.S. veterans

New MRI technique from NIST may help diagnose TBI in U.S. veterans

More than 300,000 U.S. veterans have been diagnosed with traumatic brain injury (TBI) in recent years, a legacy of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. But these numbers don't tell the whole story. While severe TBI can be obvious, milder cases involving symptoms such as memory loss or inability to concentrate are difficult to confirm and treat. [More]
Researchers working on new tool for diagnosing concussions in young Canadians

Researchers working on new tool for diagnosing concussions in young Canadians

Researchers at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital -The Neuro, at McGill University and the MUHC, are working to develop a much needed tool for helping diagnose concussions or mild traumatic brain injuries suffered by thousands of young Canadians ---hockey and football players among them. [More]
New drug fails to prevent irreversible injury to the heart after angioplasty

New drug fails to prevent irreversible injury to the heart after angioplasty

Patients who received the new drug Bendavia before undergoing angioplasty or receiving a stent to clear blocked arteries after a heart attack showed no significant reduction in scarring as compared to patients given a placebo, according to a study presented at the American College of Cardiology's 64th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Results of pacritinib Phase 2 study in myelofibrosis patients published in journal 'Blood'

Results of pacritinib Phase 2 study in myelofibrosis patients published in journal 'Blood'

CTI BioPharma Corp. today announced that results of a Phase 2 study of pacritinib, in patients with myelofibrosis were published in the journal Blood. Pacritinib is a next-generation oral JAK2/FLT3 multikinase inhibitor currently in Phase 3 development in the PERSIST program. [More]
Study suggests distinct role of brain regions in dental pain relief

Study suggests distinct role of brain regions in dental pain relief

Today at the 93rd General Session and Exhibition of the International Association for Dental Research, researcher Michael L. Meier, Center for Dental Medicine, University of Zürich, Switzerland, will present a study titled "Distinct Brain Mechanisms Related to Dental Pain Relief." [More]
Existing epilepsy drug reverses aMCI in elderly patients at risk for Alzheimer's disease

Existing epilepsy drug reverses aMCI in elderly patients at risk for Alzheimer's disease

A novel therapeutic approach for an existing drug reverses a condition in elderly patients who are at high risk for dementia due to Alzheimer's disease, researchers at Johns Hopkins University found. [More]
Physical activity may protect older people from effects of brain damage

Physical activity may protect older people from effects of brain damage

Older people who are physically active may be protecting themselves from the effects of small areas of brain damage that can affect their movement abilities, according to a new study published in the March 11, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Simple blood test could be developed to diagnose Alzheimer's disease, say UCLA researchers

Simple blood test could be developed to diagnose Alzheimer's disease, say UCLA researchers

UCLA researchers have provided the first evidence that a simple blood test could be developed to confirm the presence of beta amyloid proteins in the brain, which is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. [More]
18F-fluoride PET/MR imaging could diagnose cause of foot pain better than other methods

18F-fluoride PET/MR imaging could diagnose cause of foot pain better than other methods

A single scan could diagnose the cause of foot pain better and with less radiation exposure to the patient than other methods, according to a study in the March 2015 issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. [More]
Traffic signal labels help consumers resist high-calorie foods

Traffic signal labels help consumers resist high-calorie foods

Should food products be labeled with traffic light symbols to make health-related information on ingredients easier to understand? This question has remained a subject of debate. Now researchers at the University of Bonn have reached the conclusion that the traffic light label is more effective in helping consumers resist high-calorie foods than a purely information-based label. [More]
Pacritinib for myelofibrosis meets primary endpoint in Phase 3 PERSIST-1 trial

Pacritinib for myelofibrosis meets primary endpoint in Phase 3 PERSIST-1 trial

CTI BioPharma Corp. and Baxter International Inc. today announced positive top-line results for the primary endpoint from PERSIST-1, the randomized, controlled Phase 3 registration clinical trial examining pacritinib, a next generation oral JAK2/FLT3 multikinase inhibitor, for the treatment of patients with primary or secondary myelofibrosis. [More]
Study finds similar brain anomalies in people with anorexia and body dysmorphic disorder

Study finds similar brain anomalies in people with anorexia and body dysmorphic disorder

People with anorexia nervosa and with body dysmorphic disorder have similar abnormalities in their brains that affect their ability to process visual information, a new UCLA study reveals. [More]
CPRIT awards research and recruitment grants to improve cancer research

CPRIT awards research and recruitment grants to improve cancer research

The Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas (CPRIT) has awarded UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers more than $7.5 million in research grants to improve diagnostic and therapeutic services and research relating to cancers of the brain, breast, throat, and bone, as well as to improve scientific understanding of cancer biology. [More]
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