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Multimodal approach to distinguish people with autism spectrum disorder

Multimodal approach to distinguish people with autism spectrum disorder

In an ancient Indian parable, a group of blind men touches different parts of a large animal to find what it is. Only when they share the descriptions of an ear, tail, trunk and leg do they know it is an elephant. [More]
New research challenges current theories of ageing

New research challenges current theories of ageing

Older brains may be more similar to younger brains than previously thought. [More]
Study: Omega-3 fatty acids appear to protect heart function among heart attack survivors

Study: Omega-3 fatty acids appear to protect heart function among heart attack survivors

Taking omega-3 fatty acids appeared to lower inflammation and guard against further declines in heart function among recent heart attack survivors already receiving optimal standard care, according to results from a randomized, controlled trial to be presented at the American College of Cardiology's 64th Annual Scientific Session in San Diego. [More]
Salt may help control infection

Salt may help control infection

Researchers at Vanderbilt University and in Germany have found that sodium - salt - accumulates in the skin and tissue in humans and mice to help control infection. [More]
Researchers develop quantum radar that can detect objects invisible to conventional systems

Researchers develop quantum radar that can detect objects invisible to conventional systems

A prototype quantum radar that has the potential to detect objects which are invisible to conventional systems has been developed by an international research team led by a quantum information scientist at the University of York. [More]
New technology could help researchers advance blood biomarker capabilities for TBI

New technology could help researchers advance blood biomarker capabilities for TBI

New technology being introduced at NYU Langone Medical Center could help researchers advance blood biomarker capabilities that show changes in low concentrations of specific proteins present following a neurological injury. [More]
Study suggests that strong beliefs can treat nicotine addiction

Study suggests that strong beliefs can treat nicotine addiction

Two identical cigarettes led to a discovery by scientists at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute. Study participants inhaled nicotine, yet they showed significantly different brain activity. Why the difference? Some subjects were told their cigarettes were nicotine free. [More]
University of Tübingen, Mediso partner to develop whole body preclinical PET insert

University of Tübingen, Mediso partner to develop whole body preclinical PET insert

University of Tübingen and Mediso Ltd announced today at the 4th Tübingen PET/MR Workshop to enter into a collaboration to develop a whole body preclinical PET insert based on silicon photomultiplier sensor technology. This system can be inserted into a high field (7T) preclinical MRI scanner to enable simultaneous PET/MR imaging. [More]
Study results pave way for new clinical trial for glioblastoma patients

Study results pave way for new clinical trial for glioblastoma patients

Immune cells engineered to seek out and attack a type of deadly brain cancer were found to be both safe and effective at controlling tumor growth in mice that were treated with these modified cells, according to a study published in Science Translational Medicine by a team from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and the Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research. [More]
Radionuclide angiography-assessed RVEF predicts PAH outcomes

Radionuclide angiography-assessed RVEF predicts PAH outcomes

Baseline right ventricular ejection fraction as evaluated by conventional planar equilibrium radionuclide angiography is significantly associated with outcomes in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension, research suggests. [More]
Novel image-analysis technique improves breast cancer detection and diagnosis

Novel image-analysis technique improves breast cancer detection and diagnosis

Researchers at the University of Oklahoma have developed an image-analysis technique that is designed to improve breast cancer detection and diagnosis. [More]
Study provides further evidence of cerebellum's role in higher cognitive functions

Study provides further evidence of cerebellum's role in higher cognitive functions

Grasping an object involves a complex network of brain functions. First, visual cues are processed in specialized areas of the brain. Then, other areas of the brain use these signals to control the hands to reach for and manipulate the desired object. [More]
Researchers develop new MRI-based technique to better detect NAFLD in children

Researchers develop new MRI-based technique to better detect NAFLD in children

Between 5 and 8 million children in the United States have nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), yet most cases go undiagnosed. To help address this issue, researchers at UC San Diego School of Medicine have developed a new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based technique to help clinicians and researchers better detect and evaluate NAFLD in children. [More]
Decades of progress save countless lives, but biggest research challenges lie ahead

Decades of progress save countless lives, but biggest research challenges lie ahead

The 2015 Heart and Stroke Foundation Report on the Health of Canadians looks back on 60 years of life-saving, ground-breaking research, revealing astonishing improvements in diagnosis, treatments, and outcomes. [More]
Meditation appears to help preserve the brain's gray matter

Meditation appears to help preserve the brain's gray matter

Since 1970, life expectancy around the world has risen dramatically, with people living more than 10 years longer. That's the good news. [More]
ECOG-ACRIN Cancer Research Group opens clinical trial for women with newly diagnosed DCIS

ECOG-ACRIN Cancer Research Group opens clinical trial for women with newly diagnosed DCIS

In direct response to recommendations made by a National Institutes of Health scientific consensus panel, the ECOG-ACRIN Cancer Research Group announced today the opening of E4112, a clinical trial for women with newly diagnosed ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast who, together with their doctors, will use the results of a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exam to determine whether to undergo a lumpectomy or a mastectomy. [More]
Endogenous cannabinoids linked to weight gain in people with schizophrenia

Endogenous cannabinoids linked to weight gain in people with schizophrenia

Cannabinoids may be involved in the weight gain that occurs in people with schizophrenia who are treated with the antipsychotic olanzapine, according to a pilot study published in the Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology by researchers at the Institut universitaire en santé mentale de Montréal and Université de Montréal. [More]
Researchers are one step closer to devising an approach to identify pancreatic cancer earlier

Researchers are one step closer to devising an approach to identify pancreatic cancer earlier

Pancreatic cancer affects approximately 46,000 people each year in the United States and ranks fourth among the leading causes of cancer-related deaths. Only about 6 percent of individuals with pancreatic cancer will live five years after their diagnosis. [More]
New test can help measure vital aspects of retinal health

New test can help measure vital aspects of retinal health

New research published in the February 2015 issue of The FASEB Journal details a test developed using mice that can help measure two important aspects of retinal health--the function of retinal blood vessels and light-detecting cells. This approach opens new possibilities for understanding the molecular changes that occur in retinal disease and for evaluating the benefits of treatment early in the course of disease. [More]
Using NMR to study influenza and TB: an interview with Dr. Tim Cross

Using NMR to study influenza and TB: an interview with Dr. Tim Cross

In this interview, Tim Cross, Director of the NMR and MRI programs at the National High Magnetic Field Lab (NHMFL) in Tallahassee, Florida, talks about his research into protein structures in viruses and bacteria, and how the findings will affect medical research into disease prevention. [More]