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University of Maryland Medicine offers MRI-guided focused ultrasound treatment to Parkinson's patients

University of Maryland Medicine offers MRI-guided focused ultrasound treatment to Parkinson's patients

University of Maryland Medicine (the University of Maryland Medical Center and the University of Maryland School of Medicine) and its Center for Metabolic Imaging and Image-Guided Therapeutics (CMIT) has begun to use MRI-guided focused ultrasound on a deep structure within the brain related to Parkinson's disease - the globus pallidus. [More]
Researchers perform first focused ultrasound treatments in the U.S. for dyskinesia

Researchers perform first focused ultrasound treatments in the U.S. for dyskinesia

Researchers at the University of Maryland and the University of Virginia have performed the first focused ultrasound treatments in the United States for dyskinesia associated with Parkinson's disease. [More]
Pie Medical Imaging receives 2015 European Frost & Sullivan Award for Technology Leadership

Pie Medical Imaging receives 2015 European Frost & Sullivan Award for Technology Leadership

Based on its recent analysis of the cardiovascular image management market, Frost & Sullivan recognizes Pie Medical Imaging (PMI) with the 2015 European Frost & Sullivan Award for Technology Leadership. [More]
People with BPD traits have lowered activity in brain regions that support empathy

People with BPD traits have lowered activity in brain regions that support empathy

Those with borderline personality disorder, or BPD, a mental illness marked by unstable moods, often experience trouble maintaining interpersonal relationships. New research from the University of Georgia indicates that this may have to do with lowered brain activity in regions important for empathy in individuals with borderline personality traits. [More]
OU and Mercy receive $2.5 million grant to develop new short-term breast cancer risk prediction models

OU and Mercy receive $2.5 million grant to develop new short-term breast cancer risk prediction models

The University of Oklahoma and Mercy Hospital Oklahoma City are developing new short-term breast cancer risk prediction models that aim to help increase cancer detection of breast magnetic resonance imaging screening. [More]
Moffitt researchers hope to improve pancreatic cancer survival rates by developing blood test to identify IPMNs

Moffitt researchers hope to improve pancreatic cancer survival rates by developing blood test to identify IPMNs

Pancreatic cancer is the fourth most common cause of cancer-related death in the United States and has a 5-year survival rate of only 6 percent, which is the lowest rate of all types of cancer according to the American Cancer Society. [More]
Brain scans may help predict patients' response to antipsychotic drug treatment

Brain scans may help predict patients' response to antipsychotic drug treatment

Investigators at The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research have discovered that brain scans can be used to predict patients' response to antipsychotic drug treatment. The findings are published online in the latest issue of The American Journal of Psychiatry. [More]

Young adults diagnosed with ADHD in adolescence show differences in brain structure, memory

Young adults diagnosed with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adolescence show differences in brain structure and perform poorly in memory tests compared to their peers, according to new research from the University of Cambridge, UK, and the University of Oulu, Finland. [More]
Study provides insight into how the ability to inhibit an action affects attention and memory

Study provides insight into how the ability to inhibit an action affects attention and memory

You're driving on a busy road and you intend to switch lanes when you suddenly realize that there's a car in your blind spot. You have to put a stop to your lane change -- and quickly. A new study by Duke University researchers suggests that this type of scenario makes a person less likely to remember what halted the action -- for example, the make and model of the car in the blind spot. [More]
Boston Scientific receives CE Mark on MRI conditional labeling for CRT-D and ICD systems

Boston Scientific receives CE Mark on MRI conditional labeling for CRT-D and ICD systems

Boston Scientific Corporation has received CE Mark on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) conditional labeling for the current family of EL (Extended Longevity) and MINI implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) and the X4 cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillator (CRT-D) systems. This revised labeling ensures that future patients and those already implanted with these systems are able to undergo MRI scans if indicated. [More]
Study finds significant decline in CT usage at children's hospitals for common childhood diagnoses

Study finds significant decline in CT usage at children's hospitals for common childhood diagnoses

A study published online Aug. 24 by the journal Pediatrics finds a significant decrease in the use of computed tomography (CT) scans at children's hospitals for 10 common childhood diagnoses including seizure, concussion, appendectomy and upper respiratory tract infection. [More]
Maltreated children experience more intense emotions than their peers

Maltreated children experience more intense emotions than their peers

Children who have been abused or exposed to other types of trauma typically experience more intense emotions than their peers, a byproduct of living in volatile, dangerous environments. [More]
Hippocampus in the brain's temporal lobe involved in quick, successful conflict resolution

Hippocampus in the brain's temporal lobe involved in quick, successful conflict resolution

The hippocampus in the brain's temporal lobe is responsible for more than just long-term memory. Researchers have for the first time demonstrated that it is also involved in quick and successful conflict resolution. [More]
Scientists reveal link between smaller hippocampal brain volume and marijuana use

Scientists reveal link between smaller hippocampal brain volume and marijuana use

How scientists study the effects of marijuana on the brain is changing. Until recently marijuana research largely excluded tobacco users from its participant pool, but scientists at the Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at Dallas have found reason to abandon this practice, uncovering significant differences in the brains of individuals who use both tobacco and marijuana and the brains of those who only use marijuana. [More]
MRI scanners can steer cell-based, tumour busting therapies to exact target sites in the body

MRI scanners can steer cell-based, tumour busting therapies to exact target sites in the body

Scientists from the University of Sheffield have discovered MRI scanners, normally used to produce images, can steer cell-based, tumour busting therapies to specific target sites in the body. [More]
Physical activity linked to reduced paediatric MS burden

Physical activity linked to reduced paediatric MS burden

A cross-sectional study has found an association between moderate or strenuous physical activity and reduced fatigue, lesion volumes and relapse rates in children and adolescents with multiple sclerosis. [More]
New MRI contrast agent detects tiny breast cancer tumors, micrometastases

New MRI contrast agent detects tiny breast cancer tumors, micrometastases

Researchers at Case Western Reserve University have developed a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent that detects much smaller aggressive breast cancer tumors and micrometastases than current agents can identify. [More]
New approach may offer improved way to detect early breast cancer

New approach may offer improved way to detect early breast cancer

Researchers have shown that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can detect the earliest signs of breast cancer recurrence and fast-growing tumors. Their approach detects micromestastases, breakaway tumor cells with the potential to develop into dangerous secondary breast cancer tumors elsewhere in the body. [More]
Early exposure to repetitive head impacts linked to later life structural brain changes among former NFL players

Early exposure to repetitive head impacts linked to later life structural brain changes among former NFL players

Former National Football League (NFL) players who started playing tackle football before the age of 12 were found to have a higher risk of altered brain development compared to those who started playing at a later age. The study is the first to demonstrate a link between early exposure to repetitive head impacts and later life structural brain changes. [More]
Imaging studies required to diagnose traumatic injuries in pregnant women can be safe when used properly

Imaging studies required to diagnose traumatic injuries in pregnant women can be safe when used properly

According to a new study in the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (JAAOS), imaging studies necessary to diagnose traumatic injuries sustained by pregnant women are safe when used properly. [More]
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