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Cubresa's new NuPET scanner enables simultaneous PET/MRI in existing third-party MRI systems

Cubresa's new NuPET scanner enables simultaneous PET/MRI in existing third-party MRI systems

A compact PET scanner called NuPET has been commercially released for simultaneous preclinical PET (Positron Emission Tomography) and MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) in existing third-party MRI systems. [More]
Scientists build semantic atlas to show how human brain organizes language

Scientists build semantic atlas to show how human brain organizes language

What if a map of the brain could help us decode people's inner thoughts? Scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, have taken a step in that direction by building a "semantic atlas" that shows in vivid colors and multiple dimensions how the human brain organizes language. The atlas identifies brain areas that respond to words that have similar meanings. [More]
Why don’t MS patients always engage with specialists? An interview with Dr Anita Rose

Why don’t MS patients always engage with specialists? An interview with Dr Anita Rose

The recent survey you ask about was conducted by the MS Trust in 2012. It revealed that nearly one fifth of respondents had seen neither an MS specialist nurse (MSSN) nor a neurologist in the past year, and so will not have received the comprehensive annual review recommended by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE). [More]
Pediatric researchers develop minimally invasive techniques to treat plastic bronchitis

Pediatric researchers develop minimally invasive techniques to treat plastic bronchitis

Pediatric researchers have devised an innovative, safe and minimally invasive procedure that helps relieve rare but potentially life-threatening airway blockages occurring in children who had surgery for congenital heart defects. [More]
Scientists find interaction between amyloid and tau proteins that cause brain damage linked with AD

Scientists find interaction between amyloid and tau proteins that cause brain damage linked with AD

For years, neuroscientists have puzzled over how two abnormal proteins, called amyloid and tau, accumulate in the brain and damage it to cause Alzheimer's disease (AD). Which one is the driving force behind dementia? The answer: both of them, according to a new study by researchers at the Douglas Mental Health University Institute. [More]
Scientists identify pSTS region in the brain responsible for recognizing human facial expressions

Scientists identify pSTS region in the brain responsible for recognizing human facial expressions

Researchers at The Ohio State University have pinpointed the area of the brain responsible for recognizing human facial expressions. [More]
Psilocybin administration reduces reaction to social rejection in associated brain areas

Psilocybin administration reduces reaction to social rejection in associated brain areas

Social ties are vital for mental and physical health. However, psychiatric patients in particular frequently encounter social exclusion and rejection. Furthermore, psychiatric patients often react more strongly to social rejection than healthy persons and this can have negative consequences for the development and treatment of psychiatric disorders. [More]
Scientists develop innovative technique to deliver cancer drugs deep into tumour cells

Scientists develop innovative technique to deliver cancer drugs deep into tumour cells

Scientists at Nanyang Technological University (NTU Singapore) have invented a new way to deliver cancer drugs deep into tumour cells. [More]
New classifier method may improve diagnosis of autism spectrum disorders

New classifier method may improve diagnosis of autism spectrum disorders

Many doctors and scientists think they could improve the diagnosis and understanding of autism spectrum disorders if they had reliable means to identify specific abnormalities in the brain. [More]
Scientists aim to develop latest biosensors for personalized medicine, drug development

Scientists aim to develop latest biosensors for personalized medicine, drug development

Scientists at the Leibniz Institute for Molecular Pharmacology in Berlin-Buch and the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena cooperate in the future for the development of the latest biosensors for usage related to personalized medicine and drug development. [More]
Brain implant enables paralyzed man to move his hand

Brain implant enables paralyzed man to move his hand

Researchers have developed an electrical device that has helped a quadriplegic man to move his hand, wrist and several fingers, enabling him to carry out basic movements such as picking up a bottle and pouring a glass of water. [More]
Study assesses risk factors for metastases in prostate cancer patients on active surveillance

Study assesses risk factors for metastases in prostate cancer patients on active surveillance

Radical treatment such as surgery and radiation for localized prostate cancer may cause significant side effects. Active surveillance is increasingly accepted as an option for treating patients with clinically insignificant disease to maintain their quality of life. [More]
The Weizmann Institute of Science purchases novel Aeon™ 1GHz NMR system from Bruker

The Weizmann Institute of Science purchases novel Aeon™ 1GHz NMR system from Bruker

The Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel today announced major scientific instrument purchases from Bruker (NASDAQ: BRKR), including a novel Aeon™ 1GHz nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) system for expanding frontiers in structural biology and intrinsically disordered protein (IDPs) research. Furthermore, the Weizmann Institute is adding an Aeon 600 MHz NMR, a 263 GHz dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-NMR system, and a Biospec® 15 Tesla system for preclinical ultra-high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Various NMR and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) instrument upgrades round out this major acquisition, instantly propelling the Weizmann Institute to the frontiers of modern magnetic resonance research infrastructure. [More]
3D MRE offers accurate non-invasive method to detect advanced fibrosis

3D MRE offers accurate non-invasive method to detect advanced fibrosis

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, or NAFLD, comprises a group of liver disorders whose prevalence is widespread and rising. It's estimated that at least one-third of Americans have NAFLD; among obese persons, the figure is 50 percent. [More]
Liraglutide drug makes highly desirable foods less appealing to people

Liraglutide drug makes highly desirable foods less appealing to people

Understanding the motivations that drive humans to eat is an important consideration in the development of weight loss therapies. Now a study led by researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center helps explain how the diabetes and weight loss drug liraglutide acts on brain receptors to make enticing foods seems less desirable. [More]
Intravenous beta blockers offer no clinical benefit to patients with STEMI

Intravenous beta blockers offer no clinical benefit to patients with STEMI

Giving intravenous beta blockers before performing a coronary angioplasty in patients who had experienced the deadliest form of heart attack—ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI)—was safe but did not reduce heart attack severity or improve blood flow from the heart's main pumping chamber, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 65th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Higher aortic stiffness associated with reduced white matter volume among young adults

Higher aortic stiffness associated with reduced white matter volume among young adults

A large, multi-center study led by the UC Davis School of Medicine for the first time has shown that people as young as their 40s have stiffening of the arteries that is associated with subtle structural damage to the brain that is implicated in cognitive decline and Alzheimer's disease later in life. [More]
Oral administration of cyclotide may improve symptoms of multiple sclerosis

Oral administration of cyclotide may improve symptoms of multiple sclerosis

MedUni Vienna has made a crucial development in the treatment of Multiple Sclerosis (MS): Together with his team and the research group led by Gernot Schabbauer, international partners from Australia, Germany and Sweden, Christian Gruber, Chief Researcher at the Center for Physiology and Pharmacology has demonstrated in an animal model that, following treatment with a specially synthesized plant peptide (cyclotide), there is no further progression of the usual clinical signs of multiple sclerosis. [More]
New form of molecular tags enhance MRI signals by 10,000-fold

New form of molecular tags enhance MRI signals by 10,000-fold

Duke University researchers have taken a major step towards realizing a new form of MRI that could record biochemical reactions in the body as they happen. [More]
Study demonstrates possibility of simultaneous improvement in all mental, physical functions

Study demonstrates possibility of simultaneous improvement in all mental, physical functions

Let's say you've decided to make some changes in your life. You're out of shape, your mind wanders, your self-esteem is wavering, and you have no idea what you just read. So you decide to focus on one thing -- losing weight, maybe -- and tackle the other issues later. You don't want to take on too much at once, right? [More]
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