Magnetic Resonance Imaging News and Research RSS Feed - Magnetic Resonance Imaging News and Research

Researchers use functional MRI to understand how the brain functions

Researchers use functional MRI to understand how the brain functions

University of Nevada, Reno neuroscientists are working with Renown Health to bring new research capabilities to northern Nevada. The research group, led by University Professor of Psychology Michael Webster, has purchased equipment that augments the existing 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology at Renown Health for studies of human brain function. [More]
CVRx gets CE Mark approval to expand labeling of Barostim neo System as MR Conditional

CVRx gets CE Mark approval to expand labeling of Barostim neo System as MR Conditional

CVRx, Inc., a privately held medical device company, announced today that CE Marking has been granted to expand labeling of the Barostim neo System as MR Conditional, or safe for use in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) systems under specified conditions. [More]
Study examines why young people with Type-2 diabetes develop heart problems

Study examines why young people with Type-2 diabetes develop heart problems

A new study led by a research team at Leicester's Hospitals hope to reveal, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), why young people with Type-2 diabetes develop heart damage. [More]
Cerebellar cortical volume reduction specific to schizophrenia

Cerebellar cortical volume reduction specific to schizophrenia

Reduced cerebellar cortical volume occurs only in patients with schizophrenia, rather than all those with psychosis, say researchers. [More]
New technique shows promise for early diagnosis of cardiovascular disease

New technique shows promise for early diagnosis of cardiovascular disease

A new technique developed at Sweden's KTH Royal Institute of Technology shows promise for early diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular disease. [More]
Amgen announces new data from BLINCYTO Phase 2 study for treatment of patients with ALL

Amgen announces new data from BLINCYTO Phase 2 study for treatment of patients with ALL

Amgen today announced that new data from a pivotal Phase 2 study evaluating BLINCYTO (blinatumomab) for the treatment of adult patients with relapsed/refractory B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) was presented at the 56th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting and Exposition. [More]
Abstinence-induced changes in the brain could help predict relapse in smokers

Abstinence-induced changes in the brain could help predict relapse in smokers

Quitting smoking sets off a series of changes in the brain that Penn Medicine researchers say may better identify smokers who will start smoking again—a prediction that goes above and beyond today's clinical or behavioral tools for assessing relapse risk. [More]
Noninvasive PAH diagnosis on the horizon

Noninvasive PAH diagnosis on the horizon

Measuring the duration of vortical blood flow in the main pulmonary artery allows accurate estimation of pulmonary blood pressure and diagnosis of pulmonary arterial hypertension, say researchers. [More]
Researchers use MRI techniques to study consequences of anorexia nervosa on brain structure

Researchers use MRI techniques to study consequences of anorexia nervosa on brain structure

Researchers from the Translational Developmental Neuroscience Lab led by Professor Stefan Ehrlich at the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy of the University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus at the TU Dresden (Faculty of Medicine) used state-of-the-art magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to investigate the consequences of anorexia nervosa on brain structure. [More]
Meniscal surgery may increase risk of osteoarthritis, cartilage loss

Meniscal surgery may increase risk of osteoarthritis, cartilage loss

A popular surgery to repair meniscal tears may increase the risk of osteoarthritis and cartilage loss in some patients, according to research presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America. The findings show that the decision for surgery requires careful consideration in order to avoid accelerated disease onset, researchers said. [More]
Initial relapsing phase hastens postprogression MS disability

Initial relapsing phase hastens postprogression MS disability

Patients in the progressive phase of multiple sclerosis have a faster decline towards disability if they previously had a clinical relapsing phase, say researchers. [More]
'Safe entry zones' for neurosurgeons who perform brainstem surgery

'Safe entry zones' for neurosurgeons who perform brainstem surgery

A study using intricate fiber dissection techniques provides new insights into the deep anatomy of the human brainstem--and helps to define "safe entry zones" for neurosurgeons performing brainstem surgery, according to a special article published in Operative Neurosurgery, a quarterly supplement to Neurosurgery, official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons. [More]
Plaza Centers' shareholders approve proposed rights offering

Plaza Centers' shareholders approve proposed rights offering

​Elbit Imaging Ltd. ("Elbit" or the "Company") announced today, following its announcements dated June 23, 2014 and October 14, 2014, that its 62.25% owned subsidiary, Plaza Centers N.V. ("Plaza"), announced that Plaza's shareholders have approved the proposed rights offering (the "Rights Offering") which forms part of Plaza's restructuring plan. [More]
Philips launches Ambient Experience patient in-bore solution to reduce patient anxiety during MRI scans

Philips launches Ambient Experience patient in-bore solution to reduce patient anxiety during MRI scans

Royal Philips announced the launch of the Ambient Experience patient in-bore solution designed to reduce patient anxiety and movement during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations. [More]
Functional connectivity loss may underlie Parkinson’s cognitive decline

Functional connectivity loss may underlie Parkinson’s cognitive decline

Patients with Parkinson’s disease have deceases in functional connectivity over time and these correlate closely with cognitive decline, research shows. [More]
CMU scientists use Harry Potter book to identify brain activity

CMU scientists use Harry Potter book to identify brain activity

Some people say that reading "Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone" taught them the importance of friends, or that easy decisions are seldom right. Carnegie Mellon University scientists used a chapter of that book to learn a different lesson: identifying what different regions of the brain are doing when people read. [More]
Research findings highlight power of expectations to drive brain activity in Parkinson's patients

Research findings highlight power of expectations to drive brain activity in Parkinson's patients

Learning-related brain activity in Parkinson's patients improves as much in response to a placebo treatment as to real medication, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder and Columbia University. [More]
InSightec's MRgFUS system approved in Japan for treatment of women with uterine fibroids

InSightec's MRgFUS system approved in Japan for treatment of women with uterine fibroids

Elbit Imaging Ltd. announced today that it was informed by InSightec Ltd. that Japan's Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare (MHLW) has approved InSightec's MR-guided Focused Ultrasound (MRgFUS) system for the treatment of pain palliation caused by bone metastases and advanced treatment for women with uterine fibroids. [More]
Flexure-based Electromagnetic Linear Actuator featured in 2014 R&D 100 Awards

Flexure-based Electromagnetic Linear Actuator featured in 2014 R&D 100 Awards

A Flexure-Based Electromagnetic Linear Actuator (FELA) developed by the Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology, a research institute of the Agency for Science, Technology and Research, is the only locally-developed innovation featured in the 2014 R&D 100 Awards, an international competition that recognises the 100 most technologically-significant products introduced into the marketplace over the past year. [More]
Plaque buildup in the arteries associated with mild cognitive impairment

Plaque buildup in the arteries associated with mild cognitive impairment

In a study of nearly 2,000 adults, researchers found that a buildup of plaque in the body's major arteries was associated with mild cognitive impairment. Results of the study conducted at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center will be presented next week at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America. [More]