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NPI leaders to invest more than $30M to support White House BRAIN Initiative

NPI leaders to invest more than $30M to support White House BRAIN Initiative

Leaders of the National Photonics Initiative (NPI), an alliance of top scientific societies uniting industry and academia to raise awareness of photonics, launched its Photonics Industry Neuroscience Group alongside officials from the White House Office of Science and Technology (OSTP) in conjunction with today's White House BRAIN Initiative conference. [More]
New study reports how TMS treatment works in people with depression

New study reports how TMS treatment works in people with depression

On Star Trek, it is easy to take for granted the incredible ability of futuristic doctors to wave small devices over the heads of both humans and aliens, diagnose their problems through evaluating changes in brain activity or chemistry, and then treat behavior problems by selectively stimulating relevant brain circuits. [More]
NRL scientists develop novel one-step process to form oxide nanoparticles

NRL scientists develop novel one-step process to form oxide nanoparticles

Scientists at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory Materials Science and Technology Division have developed a novel one-step process using, for the first time in these types of syntheses, potassium superoxide (KO2) to rapidly form oxide nanoparticles from simple salt solutions in water. [More]
Research findings open up new avenues for development of chronic itch treatments

Research findings open up new avenues for development of chronic itch treatments

Areas of the brain that respond to reward and pleasure are linked to the ability of a drug known as butorphanol to relieve itch, according to new research led by Gil Yosipovitch, MD, Professor and Chairman of the Department of Dermatology at Temple University School of Medicine, and Director of the Temple Itch Center. [More]
Patients and healthcare professionals willing to trade false-positive diagnoses, study finds

Patients and healthcare professionals willing to trade false-positive diagnoses, study finds

Both patients and healthcare professionals believe diagnosis of extracolonic malignancy with screening computed tomography (CT) colonography greatly outweighs the potential disadvantages of subsequent radiologic or invasive follow-up tests precipitated by false-positive diagnoses, according to a new study published in the October issue of the journal Radiology. [More]
Studies explain why some people are at greater risk for ACL injury than others

Studies explain why some people are at greater risk for ACL injury than others

The successful rise and fall of an athlete's moving body relies on an orchestrated response of bones, joints, ligaments and tendons, putting the many angles and intersecting planes - literally the geometry - of a critical part like a knee joint to the test. But it's more than just a footfall error at the root of one of the most devastating of sports injuries: the ACL or anterior cruciate ligament tear. [More]
St. Jude Medical gets CE Mark approval for updated labeling of Tendril STS, IsoFlex Optim pacing leads

St. Jude Medical gets CE Mark approval for updated labeling of Tendril STS, IsoFlex Optim pacing leads

St. Jude Medical, Inc., a global medical device company, today announced CE Mark approval of updated labeling for its Tendril STS and IsoFlex Optim pacing leads, allowing existing and future patients with the devices access to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. [More]
Research findings provide more details about earliest stages of neurodegenerative disease

Research findings provide more details about earliest stages of neurodegenerative disease

The link between a protein typically associated with Alzheimer's disease and its impact on memory and cognition may not be as clear as once thought, according to a new study from the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Waisman Center. [More]
Research findings could help explain how some people stave off dementia

Research findings could help explain how some people stave off dementia

The human brain is capable of a neural workaround that compensates for the buildup of beta-amyloid, a destructive protein associated with Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study led by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley. [More]
MRI and PET techniques can help monitor response of bone metastases to treatment

MRI and PET techniques can help monitor response of bone metastases to treatment

Imaging technologies are very useful in evaluating a patient's response to cancer treatment, and this can be done quite effectively for most tumors using RECIST, Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors. [More]
Food commercials 'get under the skin' of teens by activating reward regions

Food commercials 'get under the skin' of teens by activating reward regions

Children and adolescents see thousands of food commercials each year and most of them advertise junk foods high in sugar, fat and salt. [More]
Researchers infuse antibody-studded iron nanoparticles into bloodstream to treat heart attack damage

Researchers infuse antibody-studded iron nanoparticles into bloodstream to treat heart attack damage

Researchers at the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute infused antibody-studded iron nanoparticles into the bloodstream to treat heart attack damage. [More]
People with multiple sclerosis lose myelin in gray matter

People with multiple sclerosis lose myelin in gray matter

People with multiple sclerosis (MS) lose myelin in the gray matter of their brains and the loss is closely correlated with the severity of the disease, according to a new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study. [More]
Experts share tips on prevention of prostate cancer

Experts share tips on prevention of prostate cancer

Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in American men. One in seven men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer and 233,000 new cases are diagnosed annually. [More]
One year of CPAP therapy restores white matter, improves cognition and mood

One year of CPAP therapy restores white matter, improves cognition and mood

A neuroimaging study is the first to show that white matter damage caused by severe obstructive sleep apnea can be reversed by continuous positive airway pressure therapy. [More]
Researchers demonstrate neuronal effects of novel treatment method for neurological diseases

Researchers demonstrate neuronal effects of novel treatment method for neurological diseases

Tinnitus, migraine, epilepsy, depression, schizophrenia, Alzheimer's: all these are examples of diseases with neurological causes, the treatment and study of which is more and more frequently being carried out by means of magnetic stimulation of the brain. However, the method's precise mechanisms of action have not, as yet, been fully understood. [More]
Transplantation of B10 cells helps inhibit development of bladder fibrosis post SCI

Transplantation of B10 cells helps inhibit development of bladder fibrosis post SCI

A team of researchers from Korea and Canada have found that transplantation of B10 cells (a stable immortalized human bone marrow derived -mesenchymal stem cell line; B10 hMSC) directly into the bladder wall of mice modeled with spinal cord injury (SCI) helped inhibit the development of bladder fibrosis and improved bladder function by promoting the growth of smooth muscle cells in the bladder. [More]
Inhaled nitric oxide given to heart attack patients may improve recovery

Inhaled nitric oxide given to heart attack patients may improve recovery

Inhaled nitric oxide, delivered to heart attack patients before and during treatment with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) did not reduce the extent of damaged tissue (infarct), but may have improved recovery, according to Hot Line results presented today at ESC Congress 2014. [More]
Researchers see benefit from behavioral weight loss program designed to curb food addiction

Researchers see benefit from behavioral weight loss program designed to curb food addiction

It may be possible to train the brain to prefer healthy low-calorie foods over unhealthy higher-calorie foods, according to new research by scientists at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging (USDA HNRCA) at Tufts University and at Massachusetts General Hospital. [More]
Researchers come up with new technique to diagnose malaria

Researchers come up with new technique to diagnose malaria

Over the past several decades, malaria diagnosis has changed very little. After taking a blood sample from a patient, a technician smears the blood across a glass slide, stains it with a special dye, and looks under a microscope for the Plasmodium parasite, which causes the disease. [More]