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Mayo Clinic to launch new, compact 3T MRI scanner developed in partnership with GE researchers

Mayo Clinic to launch new, compact 3T MRI scanner developed in partnership with GE researchers

On June 28, Mayo Clinic will unveil a new, one-of-a-kind, compact 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner developed in collaboration with General Electric's Global Research Center to an invitation-only audience. [More]
New study finds many healthcare providers underestimate actual radiation dose from CT scans

New study finds many healthcare providers underestimate actual radiation dose from CT scans

Computed tomography (CT) scans are an invaluable diagnostic tool in modern medicine, but they do come at a price: exposing patients to potentially dangerous ionizing radiation. [More]
Switch to rituximab shows anti-inflammatory effect in relapsing-remitting MS

Switch to rituximab shows anti-inflammatory effect in relapsing-remitting MS

Rituximab may be an attractive treatment option for patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, suggest phase II study findings showing its efficacy in controlling inflammatory activity. [More]
Study links brain chemistry and fluid intelligence in living humans

Study links brain chemistry and fluid intelligence in living humans

A new study begins to clarify how brain structure and chemistry give rise to specific aspects of "fluid intelligence," the ability to adapt to new situations and solve problems one has never encountered before. [More]
Prenatal cannabis exposure could have important effects on brain development in infants

Prenatal cannabis exposure could have important effects on brain development in infants

Compared with unexposed children, those who were prenatally exposed to cannabis had a thicker prefrontal cortex, a region of the brain involved in complex cognition, decision-making, and working memory. [More]
Cerebral microbleeds linked to increased risk of physical, cognitive disability in MS patients

Cerebral microbleeds linked to increased risk of physical, cognitive disability in MS patients

Leaky blood vessels in the brain called cerebral microbleeds are associated with an increased risk of physical and cognitive disability in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a new study by researchers in the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at the University at Buffalo. [More]
Neck device can protect sportsmen from devastating effects of head  injuries

Neck device can protect sportsmen from devastating effects of head  injuries

Two new studies involving high school football and hockey players indicate wearing a specifically designed compression collar around the neck may prevent or reduce the devastating effects of head collisions in sports. [More]
Risk factors differ for early and delayed dementia after ICH

Risk factors differ for early and delayed dementia after ICH

Acute haematoma parameters predict the onset of dementia in the first 6 months after intracerebral haemorrhage, but not that of delayed dementia, report researchers. [More]
Blue wavelength light exposure leads to subsequent increases in brain activity in prefrontal cortex

Blue wavelength light exposure leads to subsequent increases in brain activity in prefrontal cortex

A new study found that blue wavelength light exposure led to subsequent increases in brain activity in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) when participants were engaging in a cognitive task after cessation of light exposure. [More]
Facebook advertising could be more effective way of identifying IBP patients

Facebook advertising could be more effective way of identifying IBP patients

The results of a UK study presented today at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress showed that busing Facebook to raise awareness about the symptoms of Inflammatory Back Pain (IBP) and the need to seek medical help early may reduce the delay in diagnosis and treatment. [More]
Immunoablation strengthens haemopoietic stem-cell transplantation effects in MS

Immunoablation strengthens haemopoietic stem-cell transplantation effects in MS

Intensifying current transplant conditioning to remove rather than suppress immune cells ahead of autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation may result in long-term remission of multiple sclerosis, phase II trial findings show. [More]
MRI-guided focal laser ablation could be feasible, safe in prostate cancer patients

MRI-guided focal laser ablation could be feasible, safe in prostate cancer patients

Prostate cancer patients may soon have a new option to treat their disease: laser heat. UCLA researchers have found that focal laser ablation - the precise application of heat via laser to a tumor - is both feasible and safe in men with intermediate risk prostate cancer. [More]
Implantable loop recorder can help diagnose heart rhythm abnormalities in SSc patients

Implantable loop recorder can help diagnose heart rhythm abnormalities in SSc patients

The results of a study presented today at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress showed that use of an easy to insert heart monitor in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) and no known heart disease enables early detection and treatment of potentially fatal cardiac arrhythmias. [More]
UAB receives new image-guided robotic system for early prostate cancer diagnosis

UAB receives new image-guided robotic system for early prostate cancer diagnosis

The world-renowned iSR'obotTM Mona Lisa makes its way to the United States, providing urologic surgeons with a tool to diagnose prostate cancer earlier through accurate diagnosis and precise localization that may allow for targeted treatments in the future. [More]
Chronic marijuana use can interrupt the brain's natural reward processes

Chronic marijuana use can interrupt the brain's natural reward processes

Chronic marijuana use disrupts the brain's natural reward processes, according to researchers at the Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at Dallas. [More]
First European fully superconductive coil reaching a magnetic field of 25 Tesla produced

First European fully superconductive coil reaching a magnetic field of 25 Tesla produced

Today, the magnets used in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and medical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) represent the primary commercial applications of superconductivity. NMR, used mainly in the chemical and pharmaceutical industry, allows discovering new molecules, studying the structure of proteins or analyzing food content. It is essential for drug development or the quality control of chemical compounds. [More]
Cerebral microbleeds warn of dementia risk

Cerebral microbleeds warn of dementia risk

A high cerebral microbleed count increases an individual's risk of cognitive deterioration and dementia, study results indicate. [More]
HLA genetic risk burden extends to MS outcomes

HLA genetic risk burden extends to MS outcomes

Human leukocyte antigen alleles not only increase susceptibility to multiple sclerosis, but also influence the course of the disease, suggests research. [More]
Advanced imaging kit Netspot gets FDA approval to detect rare neuroendocrine tumors

Advanced imaging kit Netspot gets FDA approval to detect rare neuroendocrine tumors

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Netspot, the first kit for the preparation of gallium Ga 68 dotatate injection, a radioactive diagnostic agent for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. [More]
PAN-EX supports neoadjuvant chemotherapy in high-risk rectal cancer

PAN-EX supports neoadjuvant chemotherapy in high-risk rectal cancer

Patients with high-risk, locally advanced rectal cancer could benefit from neoadjuvant chemotherapy before undergoing chemoradiotherapy, suggest the results of a pooled analysis. [More]
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