Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) News and Research RSS Feed - Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) News and Research

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a large magnet and radio waves to look at organs and structures inside your body. Health care professionals use MRI scans to diagnose a variety of conditions, from torn ligaments to tumors. MRIs are very useful for examining the brain and spinal cord. Also called: Magnetic resonance imaging, NMR, Nuclear magnetic resonance.
Survey: Some patients with multiple sclerosis not engaging with specialist services

Survey: Some patients with multiple sclerosis not engaging with specialist services

A new survey has highlighted that the lack of engagement with specialist services of some patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) is a concern for MS-specialists. [More]
Multimodal MRI recommended to prevent brain mass misdiagnosis

Multimodal MRI recommended to prevent brain mass misdiagnosis

T2*-weighted gradient recalled echo or susceptibility-weighted imaging sequences should be performed during the diagnosis of brain masses to rule out pseudotumoural presentation of cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related inflammation, say researchers. [More]
Unlocking intrinsically disordered proteins: an interview with Peter Wright

Unlocking intrinsically disordered proteins: an interview with Peter Wright

I'm a professor in the Department of Integrative Structural and Computational Biology at The Scripps Research Institute. I have been performing NMR research on proteins for nearly 40 years. [More]
Aging brains work differently than younger brains, say cognitive scientists

Aging brains work differently than younger brains, say cognitive scientists

Cognitive scientists have found more evidence that aging brains work differently than younger brains when performing the same memory task, pointing to a potentially new direction for age-related cognitive care and exploration. [More]
Molecular imaging and radiochemistry: the importance of instrumentation. An interview with Professor Björn Wängler

Molecular imaging and radiochemistry: the importance of instrumentation. An interview with Professor Björn Wängler

I’m Björn Wängler, Professor for Molecular Imaging and Radiochemistry at the medical faculty Mannheim of Heidelberg University. I’m a radiopharmaceutical chemist by background and completed my PhD in 2004 at the University of Mainz. [More]
Combined MRI and ultramicroscopy toolkit could help study vessel growth in glioma models in more detail

Combined MRI and ultramicroscopy toolkit could help study vessel growth in glioma models in more detail

Stopping the growth of blood vessels in tumours is a key target for glioblastoma therapies, and imaging methods are essential for initial diagnosis and monitoring the effects of treatments. While mapping vessels in tumours has proven a challenge, researchers have now developed a combined magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultramicroscopy 'toolkit' to study vessel growth in glioma models in more detail than previously possible. [More]
Researchers link symptoms of schizophrenia with the brain's anatomical characteristics

Researchers link symptoms of schizophrenia with the brain's anatomical characteristics

An international team, made up of researchers from the University of Granada, Washington University in St. Louis, and the University of South Florida, has linked the symptoms of schizophrenia with the anatomical characteristics of the brain, by employing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). [More]
Men with ASD have differences in brain connections

Men with ASD have differences in brain connections

Research at King's College London has revealed subtle brain differences in adult males with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), which may go some way towards explaining why symptoms persist into adulthood in some people with the disorder. [More]
New technique may reduce need for amputation in patients with critical limb ischemia

New technique may reduce need for amputation in patients with critical limb ischemia

A new imaging technique could reduce the need for amputation in patients with critical limb ischemia, according to a study publised today in the scientific journal JACC. [More]
Pioneer calls on electrophysiologists to reexamine substrate mapping for deadly heart arrhythmia

Pioneer calls on electrophysiologists to reexamine substrate mapping for deadly heart arrhythmia

A pioneer in developing life-saving therapies for a deadly heart arrhythmia has called on electrophysiologists to reexamine a widely used technique to guide the treatment of the faulty electrical impulses responsible for these abnormal heartbeats. [More]
New method could improve accurate diagnosis of ovarian cancer before surgery

New method could improve accurate diagnosis of ovarian cancer before surgery

In a landmark study, investigators from Europe propose a new and simple method to assess the risk of malignancy of women with an adnexal mass. The method identified between 89-99% of patients with ovarian cancer using the results of ultrasound examination, which can be obtained in referral and non-referral centers. [More]
Metamaterials could reduce MRI scanning times by more than 50%

Metamaterials could reduce MRI scanning times by more than 50%

A group of researchers from Russia, Australia and the Netherlands have developed a technology that can reduce Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scanning times by more than 50%, meaning hospitals can drastically increase the number of scans without changing equipment. [More]
New materials promise safer, faster MRI scans

New materials promise safer, faster MRI scans

Scientists have found a way to increase the resolution of MRI scanners, while at the same time making the procedure quicker and safer for the patient. [More]
People with intermittent explosive disorder have smaller 'emotional brains'

People with intermittent explosive disorder have smaller 'emotional brains'

Neuroimaging studies suggest that frontolimbic regions of the brain, structures that regulate emotions, play an important role in the biology of aggressive behavior. [More]
Determinations of breast density could be unreliable, study finds

Determinations of breast density could be unreliable, study finds

A systematic review of the scientific literature on dense breasts by researchers at UC Davis and other institutions has found that determinations of breast density can be unreliable and that as many as 19 percent of women are re-categorized as dense rather than non-dense or vice versa from one mammogram to the next. [More]
Naturally occurring changes in brain wiring can help patients avert onset of bipolar disorder

Naturally occurring changes in brain wiring can help patients avert onset of bipolar disorder

Naturally occurring changes in brain wiring can help patients at high genetic risk of developing bipolar disorder avert the onset of the illness, according to a new study led by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published online today in the journal Translational Psychiatry. [More]
EORTC study examines DW-MRI in patients with resectable liver metastases from colorectal cancer

EORTC study examines DW-MRI in patients with resectable liver metastases from colorectal cancer

Diffusion weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a widely used technique to detect and characterize cancers as well as to monitor response to therapy. DW-MRI offers numerous advantages for patients with cancer and their treating physicians. It is a non-invasive imaging tool which does not require the administration of contrast agents nor ionizing radiation. [More]
FDA approves Fenix Continence Restoration System to treat fecal incontinence

FDA approves Fenix Continence Restoration System to treat fecal incontinence

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved the Fenix Continence Restoration System to treat fecal incontinence in patients who are not candidates for, or have previously failed, medical or other surgical options. [More]
Diamonds may hold key to the future for NMR and MRI technologies

Diamonds may hold key to the future for NMR and MRI technologies

Researchers with the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California Berkeley have demonstrated that diamonds may hold the key to the future for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technologies. [More]
Active individuals may need to maintain higher vitamin D levels to reduce risk of stress fractures

Active individuals may need to maintain higher vitamin D levels to reduce risk of stress fractures

Vitamin D plays a crucial role in ensuring appropriate bone density. Active individuals who enjoy participating in higher impact activities may need to maintain higher vitamin D levels to reduce their risk of stress fractures, report investigators in The Journal of Foot & Ankle Surgery. [More]
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