Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) News and Research RSS Feed - Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) News and Research

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a large magnet and radio waves to look at organs and structures inside your body. Health care professionals use MRI scans to diagnose a variety of conditions, from torn ligaments to tumors. MRIs are very useful for examining the brain and spinal cord. Also called: Magnetic resonance imaging, NMR, Nuclear magnetic resonance.
Compact MRI and multimodality: an interview with Bernard Siow, UCL

Compact MRI and multimodality: an interview with Bernard Siow, UCL

CABI is a preclinical imaging laboratory where we have about ten modalities. We started off with MRI and we have a 9.4T high-field system. [More]
Researchers find strong relationship between prenatal PAH exposure and behavioral impairment

Researchers find strong relationship between prenatal PAH exposure and behavioral impairment

Researchers at the Institute for the Developing Mind at Children's Hospital Los Angeles and colleagues at Columbia University's Center for Children's Environmental Health have found a powerful relationship between prenatal PAH exposure and disturbances in parts of the brain that support information processing and behavioral control. [More]
New study may help decode attention deficit disorders

New study may help decode attention deficit disorders

Sometimes being too focused on a task is not a good thing. During tasks that require our attention, we might become so engrossed in what we are doing that we fail to notice there is a better way to get the job done. [More]
National Science Foundation announces recipient of Faculty Early Career Development Award

National Science Foundation announces recipient of Faculty Early Career Development Award

The National Science Foundation announced that New York University Assistant Professor Riccardo Lattanzi is a recipient of the Faculty Early Career Development Award, more widely known as a CAREER Award. [More]
Serious head injuries may contribute to faster brain ageing, new study reveals

Serious head injuries may contribute to faster brain ageing, new study reveals

People who have suffered serious head injuries show changes in brain structure resembling those seen in older people, according to a new study. [More]
Multimodality at the Center for Advanced Biomedical Imaging: an interview with Professor Mark Lythgoe, UCL

Multimodality at the Center for Advanced Biomedical Imaging: an interview with Professor Mark Lythgoe, UCL

Imaging techniques used to live in medical physics departments, where physicists worked on them, but now we're seeing biologists, cell biologists and developmental biologists looking at cellular processes and it's those advances that are really enabling imaging to move forward in a way that it hasn't previously been able to... [More]
New MRI technique from NIST may help diagnose TBI in U.S. veterans

New MRI technique from NIST may help diagnose TBI in U.S. veterans

More than 300,000 U.S. veterans have been diagnosed with traumatic brain injury (TBI) in recent years, a legacy of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. But these numbers don't tell the whole story. While severe TBI can be obvious, milder cases involving symptoms such as memory loss or inability to concentrate are difficult to confirm and treat. [More]
MSU researchers discover cause of death in children who get malaria

MSU researchers discover cause of death in children who get malaria

Researchers from Michigan State University have uncovered the cause of death in children who die from cerebral malaria. [More]
Results of pacritinib Phase 2 study in myelofibrosis patients published in journal 'Blood'

Results of pacritinib Phase 2 study in myelofibrosis patients published in journal 'Blood'

CTI BioPharma Corp. today announced that results of a Phase 2 study of pacritinib, in patients with myelofibrosis were published in the journal Blood. Pacritinib is a next-generation oral JAK2/FLT3 multikinase inhibitor currently in Phase 3 development in the PERSIST program. [More]
Physical activity may protect older people from effects of brain damage

Physical activity may protect older people from effects of brain damage

Older people who are physically active may be protecting themselves from the effects of small areas of brain damage that can affect their movement abilities, according to a new study published in the March 11, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Pacritinib for myelofibrosis meets primary endpoint in Phase 3 PERSIST-1 trial

Pacritinib for myelofibrosis meets primary endpoint in Phase 3 PERSIST-1 trial

CTI BioPharma Corp. and Baxter International Inc. today announced positive top-line results for the primary endpoint from PERSIST-1, the randomized, controlled Phase 3 registration clinical trial examining pacritinib, a next generation oral JAK2/FLT3 multikinase inhibitor, for the treatment of patients with primary or secondary myelofibrosis. [More]
CPRIT awards research and recruitment grants to improve cancer research

CPRIT awards research and recruitment grants to improve cancer research

The Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas (CPRIT) has awarded UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers more than $7.5 million in research grants to improve diagnostic and therapeutic services and research relating to cancers of the brain, breast, throat, and bone, as well as to improve scientific understanding of cancer biology. [More]

Study sheds new light on perception and memory of human brain

The human brain can select relevant objects from a flood of information and edit out what is irrelevant. It also knows which parts belong to a whole. [More]
Multimodal approach to distinguish people with autism spectrum disorder

Multimodal approach to distinguish people with autism spectrum disorder

In an ancient Indian parable, a group of blind men touches different parts of a large animal to find what it is. Only when they share the descriptions of an ear, tail, trunk and leg do they know it is an elephant. [More]
Salt may help control infection

Salt may help control infection

Researchers at Vanderbilt University and in Germany have found that sodium - salt - accumulates in the skin and tissue in humans and mice to help control infection. [More]
University of Tübingen, Mediso partner to develop whole body preclinical PET insert

University of Tübingen, Mediso partner to develop whole body preclinical PET insert

University of Tübingen and Mediso Ltd announced today at the 4th Tübingen PET/MR Workshop to enter into a collaboration to develop a whole body preclinical PET insert based on silicon photomultiplier sensor technology. This system can be inserted into a high field (7T) preclinical MRI scanner to enable simultaneous PET/MR imaging. [More]
Study results pave way for new clinical trial for glioblastoma patients

Study results pave way for new clinical trial for glioblastoma patients

Immune cells engineered to seek out and attack a type of deadly brain cancer were found to be both safe and effective at controlling tumor growth in mice that were treated with these modified cells, according to a study published in Science Translational Medicine by a team from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and the Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research. [More]
AXT establishes preclinical imaging portfolio with MR solutions product lines

AXT establishes preclinical imaging portfolio with MR solutions product lines

To coincide with the start of Lorne Cancer conference, AXT are proud to announce the commencement of their distributorship with MR SOLUTIONS, a world leader in the development of innovative preclinical imaging solutions [More]
Researchers develop new MRI-based technique to better detect NAFLD in children

Researchers develop new MRI-based technique to better detect NAFLD in children

Between 5 and 8 million children in the United States have nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), yet most cases go undiagnosed. To help address this issue, researchers at UC San Diego School of Medicine have developed a new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based technique to help clinicians and researchers better detect and evaluate NAFLD in children. [More]
Decades of progress save countless lives, but biggest research challenges lie ahead

Decades of progress save countless lives, but biggest research challenges lie ahead

The 2015 Heart and Stroke Foundation Report on the Health of Canadians looks back on 60 years of life-saving, ground-breaking research, revealing astonishing improvements in diagnosis, treatments, and outcomes. [More]
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