Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) News and Research RSS Feed - Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) News and Research

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a large magnet and radio waves to look at organs and structures inside your body. Health care professionals use MRI scans to diagnose a variety of conditions, from torn ligaments to tumors. MRIs are very useful for examining the brain and spinal cord. Also called: Magnetic resonance imaging, NMR, Nuclear magnetic resonance.
Pre-term infants fed with breast milk have better IQs, working memory and motor function, study shows

Pre-term infants fed with breast milk have better IQs, working memory and motor function, study shows

A new study, which followed 180 pre-term infants from birth to age seven, found that babies who were fed more breast milk within the first 28 days of life had had larger volumes of certain regions of the brain at term equivalent and had better IQs, academic achievement, working memory, and motor function. [More]
DPUK brings organisations together to tackle dementia across the UK

DPUK brings organisations together to tackle dementia across the UK

Dementia, is an overall term that describes a wide range of symptoms that includes memory loss and difficulties with thinking, is caused when the brain cells degenerate and die more quickly than they would as part of the normal ageing process. [More]
New superconducting coil allows MRI scanners to produce high resolution brain images

New superconducting coil allows MRI scanners to produce high resolution brain images

A multidisciplinary research team led by University of Houston scientist Jarek Wosik has developed a high-temperature superconducting coil that allows magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners to produce higher resolution images or acquire images in a shorter time than when using conventional coils. [More]
Neuroscientists investigate how our brain puts the world in order

Neuroscientists investigate how our brain puts the world in order

The world around is complex and changing constantly. To put it in order, we devise categories into which we sort new concepts. [More]
Increasing access to MRI scanning: an interview with Jane Kilkenny

Increasing access to MRI scanning: an interview with Jane Kilkenny

MRI scanners use strong magnetic fields, radio waves and field gradients to produce cross sectional images throughout the human body. [More]
Pancreatic cysts increase overall risk of pancreatic cancer, study shows

Pancreatic cysts increase overall risk of pancreatic cancer, study shows

A look back at more than half a million patient records has established that patients with pancreatic cysts have a significantly higher overall risk of pancreatic cancer compared to those without such cysts, according to a study in the July issue of GIE: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, the journal of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. [More]
Connectome imaging could help predict severity of language deficits after stoke

Connectome imaging could help predict severity of language deficits after stoke

Loss or impairment of the ability to speak is one of the most feared complications of stroke--one faced by about 20% of stroke patients. Language, as one of the most complex functions of the brain, is not seated in a single brain region but involves connections between many regions. [More]
Study finds link between AF and reduced frontal lobe brain volumes

Study finds link between AF and reduced frontal lobe brain volumes

According to a recent Framingham Heart Study, people who experience the heart arrhythmia atrial fibrillation (AF), may also suffer from a smaller brain, specifically reduced frontal lobe volume. [More]
UCI researchers use new imaging method to measure fat metabolism

UCI researchers use new imaging method to measure fat metabolism

A team from the University of California, Irvine and supported by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering has used a new imaging technique to measure how people break down dietary fat into products the cells of their bodies can use. [More]
People with IED have connectivity deficits in SLF region of the brain

People with IED have connectivity deficits in SLF region of the brain

People with intermittent explosive disorder (IED), or impulsive aggression, have a weakened connection between regions of the brain associated with sensory input, language processing and social interaction. [More]
Study finds no substantial link between gadolinium exposure and parkinsonism

Study finds no substantial link between gadolinium exposure and parkinsonism

In a study appearing in the July 5 issue of JAMA, Blayne Welk, M.D., M.Sc., of Western University, London, Canada, and colleagues conducted a study to assess the association between gadolinium exposure and parkinsonism, a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system characterized by tremor and impaired muscular coordination. [More]
Mayo Clinic to launch new, compact 3T MRI scanner developed in partnership with GE researchers

Mayo Clinic to launch new, compact 3T MRI scanner developed in partnership with GE researchers

On June 28, Mayo Clinic will unveil a new, one-of-a-kind, compact 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner developed in collaboration with General Electric's Global Research Center to an invitation-only audience. [More]
New study finds many healthcare providers underestimate actual radiation dose from CT scans

New study finds many healthcare providers underestimate actual radiation dose from CT scans

Computed tomography (CT) scans are an invaluable diagnostic tool in modern medicine, but they do come at a price: exposing patients to potentially dangerous ionizing radiation. [More]
Neck device can protect sportsmen from devastating effects of head  injuries

Neck device can protect sportsmen from devastating effects of head  injuries

Two new studies involving high school football and hockey players indicate wearing a specifically designed compression collar around the neck may prevent or reduce the devastating effects of head collisions in sports. [More]
Immunoablation strengthens haemopoietic stem-cell transplantation effects in MS

Immunoablation strengthens haemopoietic stem-cell transplantation effects in MS

Intensifying current transplant conditioning to remove rather than suppress immune cells ahead of autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation may result in long-term remission of multiple sclerosis, phase II trial findings show. [More]
First European fully superconductive coil reaching a magnetic field of 25 Tesla produced

First European fully superconductive coil reaching a magnetic field of 25 Tesla produced

Today, the magnets used in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and medical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) represent the primary commercial applications of superconductivity. NMR, used mainly in the chemical and pharmaceutical industry, allows discovering new molecules, studying the structure of proteins or analyzing food content. It is essential for drug development or the quality control of chemical compounds. [More]
HLA genetic risk burden extends to MS outcomes

HLA genetic risk burden extends to MS outcomes

Human leukocyte antigen alleles not only increase susceptibility to multiple sclerosis, but also influence the course of the disease, suggests research. [More]
Advanced imaging kit Netspot gets FDA approval to detect rare neuroendocrine tumors

Advanced imaging kit Netspot gets FDA approval to detect rare neuroendocrine tumors

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Netspot, the first kit for the preparation of gallium Ga 68 dotatate injection, a radioactive diagnostic agent for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. [More]
RSI-MRI imaging technology can effectively differentiate aggressive prostate cancer

RSI-MRI imaging technology can effectively differentiate aggressive prostate cancer

Physicians have long used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to detect cancer but results of a University of California San Diego School of Medicine study describe the potential use of restriction spectrum imaging (RSI) as an imaging biomarker that enhances the ability of MRI to differentiate aggressive prostate cancer from low-grade or benign tumors and guide treatment and biopsy. [More]
Clinical trial to evaluate ability of MRI to improve prostate cancer diagnosis

Clinical trial to evaluate ability of MRI to improve prostate cancer diagnosis

The Movember Foundation, the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research and Prostate Cancer Canada today announced $3 million in funding for a new Phase III clinical trial to evaluate if magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can replace the current standard of care to diagnose prostate cancer. [More]
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