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RADAR-CNS programme aims to improve lives of patients with brain disorders

RADAR-CNS programme aims to improve lives of patients with brain disorders

A major new research program supported by the Innovative Medicines Initiative launches today, which will develop new ways of monitoring major depressive disorder, epilepsy, and multiple sclerosis using wearable devices and smartphone technology. [More]
New meta-analysis supports link between intake of omega-3 fatty acids and reduction in MDD

New meta-analysis supports link between intake of omega-3 fatty acids and reduction in MDD

According to the World Health Organization, depression is a major cause of disease burden worldwide, affecting an estimated 350 million people. According to the National Institutes of Mental Health, in 2014, an estimated 15.7 million adults aged 18 or older in the United States had at least one major depressive episode in the past year. [More]
Orexigen Therapeutics, Valeant Pharmaceuticals sign distribution agreement for Mysimba

Orexigen Therapeutics, Valeant Pharmaceuticals sign distribution agreement for Mysimba

Orexigen Therapeutics, Inc. today announced Valeant Pharmaceuticals International, Inc. will commercialize Mysimba (naltrexone HCl / bupropion HCl prolonged release) in Central and Eastern Europe. [More]
New imaging study shows how exercise affects the brain

New imaging study shows how exercise affects the brain

People who exercise have better mental fitness, and a new imaging study from UC Davis Health System shows why. Intense exercise increases levels of two common neurotransmitters -- glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid, or GABA -- that are responsible for chemical messaging within the brain. [More]
Researchers explore effects of attention bias modification in adolescents with MDD

Researchers explore effects of attention bias modification in adolescents with MDD

A study to be published in the March 2016 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry reports that adolescents with major depression who performed a computer-based task designed to shift attention from sad to neutral to positive word associations showed reductions in negative attention biases and clinician-rated depressive symptoms. [More]
Neurocrine Biosciences reports net loss of $29.3 million for fourth quarter 2015

Neurocrine Biosciences reports net loss of $29.3 million for fourth quarter 2015

Neurocrine Biosciences, Inc. today announced its financial results for the quarter and year ended December 31, 2015. [More]
Study: People with schizophrenia more likely to attempt suicide

Study: People with schizophrenia more likely to attempt suicide

A new study by the University of Toronto, released today, found that those with schizophrenia who'd been physically abused during childhood were five times more likely to have attempted suicide. [More]
FDA's PDAC supports use of Brintellix for treating cognitive dysfunction in adults with MDD

FDA's PDAC supports use of Brintellix for treating cognitive dysfunction in adults with MDD

Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Limited and H. Lundbeck A/S today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Psychopharmacologic Drugs Advisory Committee voted 8 to 2 that the companies presented substantial evidence to support the effectiveness of Brintellix (vortioxetine) for treating certain aspects of cognitive dysfunction in adults with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). [More]
Novel non-invasive method of vagus nerve stimulation reduces depressive symptoms

Novel non-invasive method of vagus nerve stimulation reduces depressive symptoms

Researchers of a new study published in the current issue of Biological Psychiatry report successful reduction of depressive symptoms in patients using a novel non-invasive method of vagus nerve stimulation, or VNS. [More]
People injured by police officers more likely to have mental illness

People injured by police officers more likely to have mental illness

People hospitalized due to an encounter with a law enforcement officer are more likely to have a mental illness, have longer hospitalizations, more injuries to the back and spine, and greater need for extended care than those hospitalized due to altercations with other civilians. [More]
Allergan's investigational medication rapastinel granted FDA Breakthrough Therapy designation

Allergan's investigational medication rapastinel granted FDA Breakthrough Therapy designation

Allergan plc., a leading global pharmaceutical company today announced that its Phase III ready investigational medication rapastinel (GLYX-13) received Breakthrough Therapy designation from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for adjunctive treatment of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). [More]
Study provides better understanding of familial risk for depression

Study provides better understanding of familial risk for depression

Building on a 30-year, three-generation study of depressed individuals, their children and offspring, a study published in the journal Psychiatry Research: Neuroimaging provides a better understanding of the familial risk for depression and the role neuroplasticity might have in increasing the risk of developing depression. [More]
Rapastinel demonstrates pro-cognitive benefits in animal model of cognitive impairment

Rapastinel demonstrates pro-cognitive benefits in animal model of cognitive impairment

Allergan plc, a leading global pharmaceutical company, announced today that new data on the investigational medication rapastinel (GLYX-13) and its lack of impairment on cognitive function were published in the peer-reviewed journal Behavioural Brain Research. [More]
Women who earn less than male counterparts more likely to experience depression, anxiety

Women who earn less than male counterparts more likely to experience depression, anxiety

The odds of major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder were markedly greater among women who earned less than their male counterparts, with whom they were matched on education and years of experience, according to new research conducted at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. [More]
Feeling sad can alter levels of inflammatory proteins linked to increased risk of comorbid diseases

Feeling sad can alter levels of inflammatory proteins linked to increased risk of comorbid diseases

Feeling sad can alter levels of stress-related opioids in the brain and increase levels of inflammatory proteins in the blood that are linked to increased risk of comorbid diseases including heart disease, stroke and metabolic syndrome, according to a study by researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. [More]

Cognitive behavioral therapy can be equally effective as second generation antidepressant for depression

Major depressive disorder affects more than 32 million Americans, and their first stop for treatment is often their primary care provider. A recent evidence review of several alternatives to medication found that using cognitive behavioral therapy as the first treatment for depression can be equally effective as using a second generation antidepressant. [More]
Novel antidepressant appears to be safe, effective against depression in clinical trial

Novel antidepressant appears to be safe, effective against depression in clinical trial

A small clinical trial of a novel antidepressant that stimulates neurogenesis - the production of new brain cells - shows that the compound appears to be safe and may be effective against depression. [More]
New research finds insufficient evidence for use of Omega 3 supplements in treating major depressive disorder

New research finds insufficient evidence for use of Omega 3 supplements in treating major depressive disorder

New research out today concludes that there is insufficient evidence for the use of taking an Omega 3 fatty acid supplement in treating major depressive disorder. [More]
Estradiol fluctuation may enhance emotional sensitivity to psychosocial stress during menopausal transition

Estradiol fluctuation may enhance emotional sensitivity to psychosocial stress during menopausal transition

If you're feeling a little blue during the transition to menopause, there's good reason, according to a new study being reported online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). The study from the Department of Psychiatry at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill suggests that the estradiol (a form of estrogen) fluctuation that is common during the menopausal transition may enhance emotional sensitivity to psychosocial stress. [More]
New Rice University study explores connections between fatal bereavement and cardiovascular risk

New Rice University study explores connections between fatal bereavement and cardiovascular risk

Medical professionals know that when a spouse dies, the surviving partner is at increased risk of suffering early mortality - but they don't entirely understand why. A new Rice University professor has received a $3.765 million R01 grant from the National Institutes of Health to embark on a five-year study of the connection between psychological and physiological responses to such extraordinary stress. [More]
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