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Malaria is a mosquito-borne disease caused by a parasite called Plasmodium - when infected mosquitoes bite the human body, the parasites multiply in the liver, and then infect red blood cells. Even though this potentially fatal disease can be prevented and cured, each year 350-500 million cases of malaria still occur worldwide, and over one million people die, most of them young children in Africa south of the Sahara, where one in every five (20%) childhood deaths is due to the effects of the disease.

Malaria is so common in Africa because a lack of resources and political instability have prevented the building of solid malaria control programs. Experts say an African child has on average between 1.6 and 5.4 episodes of malaria fever each year and according to the World Health Organization (WHO) as many as half of the world's population are at risk of malaria mainly in the world's poorest and most vulnerable countries and every 30 seconds a child dies from malaria.
Mymetics' innovative HIV vaccine candidate to enter new preclinical trial

Mymetics' innovative HIV vaccine candidate to enter new preclinical trial

Mymetics Corporation, a pioneer in the research and development of virosome-based vaccines to prevent transmission of human infectious diseases across mucosal membranes, announced today that its innovative HIV vaccine candidate will enter a new preclinical trial to confirm excellent results obtained in a previous trial. [More]
Department of Veterans Affairs awards $25M task order to Leidos

Department of Veterans Affairs awards $25M task order to Leidos

Leidos, a national security, health and engineering solutions company, was awarded a task order by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to provide technical and programmatic support to assist the VA in executing the OneVA Enterprise Architecture (EA) program. [More]
Dr. Rodrigo Guerrero becomes the first winner of Roux Prize

Dr. Rodrigo Guerrero becomes the first winner of Roux Prize

Dr. Rodrigo Guerrero, a Harvard-trained epidemiologist and mayor of Cali, Colombia, is the first winner of the Roux Prize, a new US$100,000 award for turning evidence into health impact and the largest prize of its kind. [More]
New report urges nations to adopt improved data collection efforts for community health workers

New report urges nations to adopt improved data collection efforts for community health workers

A new report finds that developing nations' ability to deal with pressing health challenges like HIV/AIDS and ensuring maternal and newborn survival will be strengthened by creating a common definition for community health workers, as well as a core set of skills and competencies that would help ensure they are optimally trained, supported and deployed to provide care and treatment when and where it is needed most. [More]
Prevalence of NTDs in Latin American countries presents opportunity for US foreign policy

Prevalence of NTDs in Latin American countries presents opportunity for US foreign policy

Recently published prevalence estimates of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) in five Latin American countries - Bolivia, Cuba, Ecuador, Nicaragua and Venezuela - could suggest a new direction for United States foreign policy in the region, according to a tropical-disease expert at Rice University's Baker Institute for Public Policy. [More]
Scientists analyze current situation of malaria and dengue fever in Himalayas

Scientists analyze current situation of malaria and dengue fever in Himalayas

Research by Nepalese and German scientists from the Nepal Health Research Council, Goethe University and the LOEWE Biodiversity and Climate Research Centre analyzes the current situation of these diseases in the Himalayan country of Nepal and highlights how they profit from climate change and globalization. [More]
New NIH program awards $2.5 million to spur innovation in mobile health

New NIH program awards $2.5 million to spur innovation in mobile health

A new NIH program is awarding nearly $2.5 million to spur innovation in mobile communication technologies and software applications used in biomedical research in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). [More]
Celgene Global Health, DNDi expand partnership to identify new drug candidates for NTDs

Celgene Global Health, DNDi expand partnership to identify new drug candidates for NTDs

Celgene Global Health, a division of Celgene Corporation, and the Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative strengthen their collaboration with a four-year Research Collaboration Agreement to identify and optimize new drug candidates for the treatment of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs). [More]
Poll: Canadians support initiatives to save lives of children, mothers in developing countries

Poll: Canadians support initiatives to save lives of children, mothers in developing countries

As Prime Minister Harper and other world leaders gather this week at the United Nations General Assembly, a new poll shows Canadians care deeply about Canada's efforts to save the lives children and mothers in developing countries who are dying of preventable causes. [More]
Leidos awarded NMLC contract to provide services in support of HIV/AIDS prevention programs

Leidos awarded NMLC contract to provide services in support of HIV/AIDS prevention programs

Leidos, a national security, health, and engineering solutions company, was awarded a prime contract by the Naval Medical Logistics Command to provide services in support of the Naval Health Research Center's, Department of Defense, HIV/AIDS Prevention Program (DHAPP). [More]
Dry roasted peanuts more likely to trigger allergy risk

Dry roasted peanuts more likely to trigger allergy risk

Dry roasted peanuts are more likely to trigger an allergy to peanuts than raw peanuts, suggests an Oxford University study involving mice. [More]
New research identifies novel cellular factors vital for CCHFV infection

New research identifies novel cellular factors vital for CCHFV infection

New research into the Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV), a tick-borne virus which causes a severe hemorrhagic disease in humans similar to that caused by Ebolavirus, has identified new cellular factors essential for CCHFV infection. [More]
Sustained international efforts can help reduce premature deaths by 40% over next 20 years

Sustained international efforts can help reduce premature deaths by 40% over next 20 years

New research published today [Friday 19 September] in The Lancet suggests that, with sustained international efforts, the number of premature deaths could be reduced by 40% over the next two decades (2010-2030), halving under–50 mortality and preventing a third of the deaths at ages 50–69 years. [More]
Longer looks: Lithium in the water; controlling cancer; recovering from brain injury

Longer looks: Lithium in the water; controlling cancer; recovering from brain injury

There are many kinds of cancer, but treatments have typically combatted them in one way only: by attempting to destroy the cancerous cells. Surgery aims to remove the entire growth from the body; chemotherapy drugs are toxic to the cancer cells; radiation generates toxic molecules that break up the cancer cells' DNA and proteins, causing their demise. [More]
GHIT Fund announces new grants to tackle malaria, chagas disease and dengue

GHIT Fund announces new grants to tackle malaria, chagas disease and dengue

The Global Health Innovative Technology Fund, a new public health partnership that is bringing Japanese know-how and investment to the global fight against infectious diseases, today announced seven grant investments totaling US$15.3 million to speed the development of promising drugs and vaccines to battle three insect-borne diseases-malaria, dengue and Chagas disease. [More]
NSF, NIH, USDA receive more than $12 million in new EEID grants

NSF, NIH, USDA receive more than $12 million in new EEID grants

Ebola, MERS (Middle East Respiratory Syndrome), malaria, antibiotic-resistant infections: Is our interaction with the environment somehow responsible for their increased incidence? [More]
Weak spot in complex life cycle of malaria could prevent spread of deadly disease

Weak spot in complex life cycle of malaria could prevent spread of deadly disease

A new study has revealed a weak spot in the complex life cycle of malaria, which could be exploited to prevent the spread of the deadly disease. [More]

Pharmaceuticals against malaria can now be produced from waste of plant-extraction

Research success through collaborative efforts of chemists and engineers from Berlin/Potsdam and Magdeburg. All of the best currently available pharmaceuticals against malaria can now be produced in pure form using a single process, even from the waste of the plant-extraction. [More]
Canada funds 22 inventive ideas for improving health in low-resource countries

Canada funds 22 inventive ideas for improving health in low-resource countries

Grand Challenges Canada, funded by the Government of Canada, today announced $2.4 million in seed funds shared between 22 projects from Canada and nine developing nations, to pursue inventive new ideas for improving health in low-resource countries. [More]
Researchers reveal new approaches for antimalarial drug development

Researchers reveal new approaches for antimalarial drug development

Melbourne researchers are making progress towards new antimalarial drugs, after revealing how an antibiotic called emetine blocks the molecular machinery that produces the proteins required for malaria parasite survival. [More]