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Malaria is a mosquito-borne disease caused by a parasite called Plasmodium - when infected mosquitoes bite the human body, the parasites multiply in the liver, and then infect red blood cells. Even though this potentially fatal disease can be prevented and cured, each year 350-500 million cases of malaria still occur worldwide, and over one million people die, most of them young children in Africa south of the Sahara, where one in every five (20%) childhood deaths is due to the effects of the disease.

Malaria is so common in Africa because a lack of resources and political instability have prevented the building of solid malaria control programs. Experts say an African child has on average between 1.6 and 5.4 episodes of malaria fever each year and according to the World Health Organization (WHO) as many as half of the world's population are at risk of malaria mainly in the world's poorest and most vulnerable countries and every 30 seconds a child dies from malaria.
Global leaders announce launch of new council to help eradicate malaria

Global leaders announce launch of new council to help eradicate malaria

Bill Gates, co-chair of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and Ray Chambers, the United Nations Secretary-General's Special Envoy for Health in Agenda 2030 and for Malaria, today announced the launch of the End Malaria Council, a group of influential public and private sector leaders who aim to ensure malaria eradication remains a top global priority. [More]
Cattle-based vector control efforts may help eradicate malaria in India

Cattle-based vector control efforts may help eradicate malaria in India

The goal of eliminating malaria in countries like India could be more achievable if mosquito-control efforts take into account the relationship between mosquitoes and cattle, according to an international team of researchers. [More]
Diet and exercise can help lessen damage caused by malaria, UTA study suggests

Diet and exercise can help lessen damage caused by malaria, UTA study suggests

The right amount of diet and exercise can help lessen damage to the heart and skeletal muscles brought on by malaria, according to a new UTA study. [More]
Anemia protects children against blood-stage malaria in Africa, UNC study finds

Anemia protects children against blood-stage malaria in Africa, UNC study finds

Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional deficiency in the world and causes long-term adverse consequences in children. [More]
Experts confirm high risk of famine in northeast Nigeria

Experts confirm high risk of famine in northeast Nigeria

Multiple experts, including Action Against Hunger, have validated new analysis confirming an elevated risk of famine in Nigeria's Borno State among populations cut off from humanitarian assistance due to the Boko Haram insurgency. [More]
WHO’s new report reveals children, pregnant women in Africa have better access to malaria control

WHO’s new report reveals children, pregnant women in Africa have better access to malaria control

The World Health Organization’s (WHO) World Malaria Report 2016 reveals that children and pregnant women in sub-Saharan Africa have greater access to effective malaria control. [More]
Leaf-shaped prototype reactor could act as 'mini-factory' for drugs

Leaf-shaped prototype reactor could act as 'mini-factory' for drugs

To produce drugs sustainably and cheaply, anywhere you want. Whether in the middle of the jungle or even on Mars. A 'mini-factory' whereby sunlight can be captured to make chemical products. [More]
Ancient Chinese medicine for malaria could potentially aid in treatment of tuberculosis

Ancient Chinese medicine for malaria could potentially aid in treatment of tuberculosis

A centuries-old herbal medicine, discovered by Chinese scientists and used to effectively treat malaria, has been found to potentially aid in the treatment of tuberculosis and may slow the evolution of drug resistance. [More]
New study suggests potential new approach to combat spread of malaria

New study suggests potential new approach to combat spread of malaria

Disruption of hormone signaling in mosquitoes may reduce their ability to transmit the parasite that causes malaria, according to a new study published in PLOS Pathogens. The findings suggest a potential new approach to combat spread of the disease. [More]
Vaxine’s unique adjuvants boost effectiveness of vaccines for battling against infectious diseases

Vaxine’s unique adjuvants boost effectiveness of vaccines for battling against infectious diseases

SUGAR-based adjuvants from Australia are boosting the effectiveness of vaccines to target some of the world’s deadliest diseases. [More]
NIH scientists unravel chain of events that lead to fatal outcomes in cerebral malaria

NIH scientists unravel chain of events that lead to fatal outcomes in cerebral malaria

Using state-of-the-art brain imaging technology, scientists at the National Institutes of Health filmed what happens in the brains of mice that developed cerebral malaria (CM). [More]
Monell Center receives Gates Foundation grant to support innovative global health research project

Monell Center receives Gates Foundation grant to support innovative global health research project

The Monell Center announced today that it has received a $345,000 grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The grant supports an innovative global health research project titled, "Developing Novel Pediatric Formulation Technologies for Global Health: Human Taste Assays." [More]
Liverpool-led research consortium aims to reduce mother-to-child transmission of HIV

Liverpool-led research consortium aims to reduce mother-to-child transmission of HIV

Researchers from the University of Liverpool's Institute of Translational Medicine have been awarded a grant of up to US$ 8.9 million (GBP £5.8m) to lead a multinational research consortium that aims to reduce mother-to-child transmission of HIV. [More]
Synthetic rice odour blend attracts egg-laying female malaria mosquitoes

Synthetic rice odour blend attracts egg-laying female malaria mosquitoes

The increased use of irrigation in sub-Saharan Africa has benefited the Anopheles arabiensis mosquito - an important malaria vector - particularly in rice paddies. [More]
New report highlights global burden of maternal, newborn and young child deaths

New report highlights global burden of maternal, newborn and young child deaths

Today FIGO, ICM, ICN and IPA announce the publication of a report showing the global burden of maternal, newborn and young child deaths and launch the Together We Can campaign to tackle it. [More]
WHO confirms pilot deployment of first-generation malaria vaccine in sub-Saharan Africa

WHO confirms pilot deployment of first-generation malaria vaccine in sub-Saharan Africa

The world’s first malaria vaccine will be rolled out in pilot projects in sub-Saharan Africa, WHO confirmed today. Funding is now secured for the initial phase of the programme and vaccinations are due to begin in 2018. [More]
Most rapid diagnostic tests fail to detect P. falciparum malaria parasites in asymptomatic children

Most rapid diagnostic tests fail to detect P. falciparum malaria parasites in asymptomatic children

The Democratic Republic of the Congo has one of the highest rates of people living with malaria. Rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) account for more than 70 percent of diagnostic testing for malaria in Africa. [More]
New, rapid diagnostic test for malaria wins $100,000 Grand Challenges Explorations grant

New, rapid diagnostic test for malaria wins $100,000 Grand Challenges Explorations grant

An interdisciplinary team of scientists and engineers at Vanderbilt University headed by Stevenson Professor of Chemistry David Wright has designed a new kind of rapid diagnostic test for malaria that has received a $100,000 Grand Challenges Explorations grant which is designed to support innovative global health and development research projects. [More]
Intestinal parasite increases susceptibility to colitis, study finds

Intestinal parasite increases susceptibility to colitis, study finds

Researchers from the University of Toronto have discovered that mice infected with the common gut parasite Tritrichomonas muris are at an increased risk of developing inflammatory colitis. [More]
NCATS funds collaboration initiative aimed at repurposing antimalarial to combat Ebola virus

NCATS funds collaboration initiative aimed at repurposing antimalarial to combat Ebola virus

The National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences recently awarded $596,533.00 to Collaborations Pharmaceuticals, Inc. to initiate a partnership with Texas Biomedical Research Institute aimed at repurposing an antimalarial for use against the Ebola virus. [More]
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