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Malaria is a mosquito-borne disease caused by a parasite called Plasmodium - when infected mosquitoes bite the human body, the parasites multiply in the liver, and then infect red blood cells. Even though this potentially fatal disease can be prevented and cured, each year 350-500 million cases of malaria still occur worldwide, and over one million people die, most of them young children in Africa south of the Sahara, where one in every five (20%) childhood deaths is due to the effects of the disease.

Malaria is so common in Africa because a lack of resources and political instability have prevented the building of solid malaria control programs. Experts say an African child has on average between 1.6 and 5.4 episodes of malaria fever each year and according to the World Health Organization (WHO) as many as half of the world's population are at risk of malaria mainly in the world's poorest and most vulnerable countries and every 30 seconds a child dies from malaria.
Cloud Pharmaceuticals awarded Phase I grant from NSF SBIR program

Cloud Pharmaceuticals awarded Phase I grant from NSF SBIR program

Cloud Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a therapeutics company focused on cloud-based drug design and development, announced today that it has been awarded a Phase I grant from the National Science Foundation Small Business Innovation Research program. [More]
Researchers uncover how malaria parasite becomes resistant to fosmidomycin drug

Researchers uncover how malaria parasite becomes resistant to fosmidomycin drug

Researchers have uncovered a way the malaria parasite becomes resistant to an investigational drug. The discovery, at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, also is relevant for other infectious diseases including bacterial infections and tuberculosis. [More]
New momentum: WHO welcomes progress in tackling viral hepatitis

New momentum: WHO welcomes progress in tackling viral hepatitis

On World Hepatitis Day, 28 July, WHO welcomes new progress in tackling one of the world's most serious diseases. Viral hepatitis - a group of infectious diseases known as hepatitis A, B, C, D, and E - affects millions of people worldwide, causing acute and chronic liver disease and killing close to 1.4 million people every year. [More]
Researchers prove that CD27 drug is true alternative against malaria

Researchers prove that CD27 drug is true alternative against malaria

Researchers from the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya · BarcelonaTech (UPC), the Instituto de Química Mèdica (IQM-CSIC) and the University of Glasgow have proved that the CD27 drug is a true alternative against malaria. [More]
Researchers propose ‘microbiome cloud model’ to understand variation in individual's microbiome composition

Researchers propose ‘microbiome cloud model’ to understand variation in individual's microbiome composition

The Human Microbiome Project (HMP) is a global initiative to identify and characterize the microorganisms present at multiple sites in the human body. [More]
Researchers use anti-tank Javelin missile detector to identify malaria parasites in blood

Researchers use anti-tank Javelin missile detector to identify malaria parasites in blood

State-of-the-art military hardware could soon fight malaria, one of the most deadly diseases on the planet. Researchers at Monash University and the University of Melbourne have used an anti-tank Javelin missile detector, more commonly used in warfare to detect the enemy, in a new test to rapidly identify malaria parasites in blood. [More]
Scientists may be able to entomb malaria parasite in prison

Scientists may be able to entomb malaria parasite in prison

Scientists may be able to entomb the malaria parasite in a prison of its own making, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis report July 16 in Nature. [More]

OSU creates new assay to test authenticity of primary drugs used to treat malaria

Chemists and students in science and engineering at Oregon State University have created a new type of chemical test, or assay, that's inexpensive, simple, and can tell whether or not one of the primary drugs being used to treat malaria is genuine - an enormous and deadly problem in the developing world. [More]
B vitamins do not prevent Alzheimer's disease

B vitamins do not prevent Alzheimer's disease

Taking B vitamins doesn't slow mental decline as we age, nor is it likely to prevent Alzheimer's disease, conclude Oxford University researchers who have assembled all the best clinical trial data involving 22,000 people to offer a final answer on this debate. [More]
ACS Infectious Diseases journal highlights chemistry and collaborative research area

ACS Infectious Diseases journal highlights chemistry and collaborative research area

The American Chemical Society (ACS) announced today that Courtney Aldrich, Ph.D., will head the brand-new, web-only journal ACS Infectious Diseases as editor-in-chief. With the first issue slated for publication in January 2015, the pioneering journal will meet a growing demand for a place to publish top-notch chemistry-focused infectious diseases research. [More]
New report highlights impact of malaria interventions on maternal, newborn health

New report highlights impact of malaria interventions on maternal, newborn health

A new report highlighting the impact of malaria interventions on maternal, newborn and child health was launched today alongside the annual High-Level Segment of the United Nations Economic and Social Council in New York. [More]
Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes increase risk of West Nile virus

Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes increase risk of West Nile virus

Mosquitoes infected with the bacteria Wolbachia are more likely to become infected with West Nile virus and more likely to transmit the virus to humans, according to a team of researchers. [More]
Scientists develop chip for detection of RNA strand of dengue fever virus

Scientists develop chip for detection of RNA strand of dengue fever virus

Scientists at the Center for Research and Advanced Studies (Cinvestav) in Mexico developed a chip (also known as cDNA microarray) that allows detection of the RNA strand of the dengue fever virus. [More]
Poor nutrition, health cause disparities in fetal growth and newborn size worldwide

Poor nutrition, health cause disparities in fetal growth and newborn size worldwide

Babies' growth in the womb and their size at birth, especially their length, are strikingly similar the world over - when babies are born to healthy, well-educated and well-nourished mothers. [More]

Population centers in cool, highland regions of East Africa more vulnerable to malaria

Fine-scale climate model projections suggest the possibility that population centers in cool, highland regions of East Africa could be more vulnerable to malaria than previously thought, while population centers in hot, lowland areas could be less vulnerable, according to a team of researchers. The team applied a statistical technique to conventional, coarse-scale climate models to better predict malaria dynamics at local levels. [More]
New compound blocks action of key 'gatekeeper' enzyme for malaria parasite survival

New compound blocks action of key 'gatekeeper' enzyme for malaria parasite survival

Melbourne researchers are homing in on a new target for malaria treatment, after developing a compound that blocks the action of a key 'gatekeeper' enzyme essential for malaria parasite survival. [More]

Malaria parasites alter chemical odor signal of hosts to attract mosquitos

Malaria parasites alter the chemical odor signal of their hosts to attract mosquitos and better spread their offspring, according to researchers, who believe this scent change could be used as a diagnostic tool. [More]
Viewpoints: Abortion rights buffer; coming 'freakout' on health law; repercussions of malaria prevention

Viewpoints: Abortion rights buffer; coming 'freakout' on health law; repercussions of malaria prevention

A Unanimous Supreme Court: Abortion Rights Lose A Buffer
Yet on Thursday the Supreme Court, in McCullen v. Coakley, struck down that law for violating the First Amendment. [More]
Researchers compare genome sequences of malaria vectors to investigate insecticide resistance

Researchers compare genome sequences of malaria vectors to investigate insecticide resistance

Researchers from LSTM have exploited a natural experiment created by insecticidal pressure to determine how the most important malaria vectors - A. gambiae s.s. and A. coluzzii - respond rapidly to environmental change. [More]
New device could offer more reliable alternative for detecting biomarkers

New device could offer more reliable alternative for detecting biomarkers

A device proposed by researchers at Sweden's KTH Royal Institute of Technology could offer a more reliable alternative for detecting biomarkers in patients facing such illnesses as cancer or malaria. [More]