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Malaria is a mosquito-borne disease caused by a parasite called Plasmodium - when infected mosquitoes bite the human body, the parasites multiply in the liver, and then infect red blood cells. Even though this potentially fatal disease can be prevented and cured, each year 350-500 million cases of malaria still occur worldwide, and over one million people die, most of them young children in Africa south of the Sahara, where one in every five (20%) childhood deaths is due to the effects of the disease.

Malaria is so common in Africa because a lack of resources and political instability have prevented the building of solid malaria control programs. Experts say an African child has on average between 1.6 and 5.4 episodes of malaria fever each year and according to the World Health Organization (WHO) as many as half of the world's population are at risk of malaria mainly in the world's poorest and most vulnerable countries and every 30 seconds a child dies from malaria.
Researchers discover new way to attract, kill pregnant malaria-transmitting mosquitoes

Researchers discover new way to attract, kill pregnant malaria-transmitting mosquitoes

The battle against malaria is also a battle against its natural host, the mosquito, which means disrupting the insect's lifecycle is every bit as important as putting nets over beds. Now, an international research team has discovered what attracts mosquitos to lay their eggs in specific places. [More]
Discovery opens door to possible new ways to break transmission cycle of schistosomiasis

Discovery opens door to possible new ways to break transmission cycle of schistosomiasis

Researchers at Oregon State University have discovered a group of genes in one species of snail that provide a natural resistance to the flatworm parasite that causes schistosomiasis, and opens the door to possible new drugs or ways to break the transmission cycle of this debilitating disease. [More]
TB Alliance receives Australian DFAT grant to support late-stage clinical trials of new TB drugs

TB Alliance receives Australian DFAT grant to support late-stage clinical trials of new TB drugs

TB Alliance, a not-for-profit product development partnership with the mission of developing better, faster, and affordable drugs for tuberculosis (TB), has received a grant from the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade to support late-stage clinical trials of new TB treatments. [More]
GenVec reports record financial results for Q4 and fiscal year 2014

GenVec reports record financial results for Q4 and fiscal year 2014

GenVec, Inc. today reported financial results for the fourth quarter and year ended December 31, 2014. For the year ended December 31, 2014, the company reported a net loss of $2.5 million, or $0.16 per share, compared with a net loss of $10.0 million, or $0.77 per share, for the year ended December 31, 2013. [More]
Co-infection reduces severity of East Coast fever, can help curb human malaria

Co-infection reduces severity of East Coast fever, can help curb human malaria

When calves are infected by two parasite species at the same time, one parasite renders the other far less deadly, according to a new study published in the current journal of Science Advances. [More]
Insect-borne diseases increase with warmer climate

Insect-borne diseases increase with warmer climate

Insects, such as mosquitoes and ticks, are responsible for transmitting a range of diseases, such as malaria, chikungunya, dengue fever, and West Nile virus. The risk of contracting such illnesses is generally only considered when booking an exotic holiday. However, experts from the Emergency Response Department at Public Health England have warned that climate change could allow such vector-borne diseases to emerge closer to home. [More]
Climate change could accelerate emergence of vector-borne diseases in UK

Climate change could accelerate emergence of vector-borne diseases in UK

Climate change could accelerate the emergence of vector-borne diseases such as chikungunya, dengue fever, and West Nile virus in the UK, warn leading public health experts Dr Jolyon Medlock and Professor Steve Leach from the Emergency Response Department at Public Health England, writing in The Lancet Infectious Diseases journal. [More]
WHO calls for intensification of routine immunization services in all Ebola-affected areas

WHO calls for intensification of routine immunization services in all Ebola-affected areas

A growing risk of outbreaks of measles, pertussis, and other vaccine-preventable diseases in countries affected by Ebola must be countered by urgent scaling up of routine immunization activities, according to the World Health Organization. [More]
Healthcare systems miss life-saving treatments learnt on battlefield

Healthcare systems miss life-saving treatments learnt on battlefield

Trauma is responsible for more global deaths annually than HIV, malaria and tuberculosis combined. Yet healthcare systems in many countries are missing out on life-saving treatments learnt on the battlefield, according to a review by King's College London and published today in the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. [More]
Case Western Reserve professor urges action to eliminate yaws

Case Western Reserve professor urges action to eliminate yaws

Half a century ago, a concentrated global effort nearly wiped a disfiguring tropical disease from the face of the earth. Now, says Case Western Reserve's James W. Kazura, MD, it's time to complete the work. [More]
MSU researchers discover cause of death in children who get malaria

MSU researchers discover cause of death in children who get malaria

Researchers from Michigan State University have uncovered the cause of death in children who die from cerebral malaria. [More]
MSU researchers discover what causes death in children with cerebral malaria

MSU researchers discover what causes death in children with cerebral malaria

Malaria kills a child every minute. While medical researchers have successfully developed effective drugs to kill the malaria parasite, efforts to treat the effects of the disease have not been as successful. But that soon may change. [More]
Virginia Tech researchers use genome-editing method to study lethal disease-carrying animal

Virginia Tech researchers use genome-editing method to study lethal disease-carrying animal

Life science researchers at Virginia Tech have accelerated a game-changing technology that's being used to study one of the planet's most lethal disease-carrying animals. [More]
First clinical trial of new malaria vaccine held in Equatorial Guinea

First clinical trial of new malaria vaccine held in Equatorial Guinea

Equatorial Guinea has held the first clinical trial of a new malaria vaccine known as PfSPZ. Three volunteers participated this month in the trial of the vaccine, which was developed by the American biotechnology company Sanaria. The trial took place at the La Paz Medical Center, the country's premier medical facility, located in Sipopo, just outside the capital. [More]
Medical experts aim to offer lifesaving treatments to eliminate preventable deaths from AKI by 2025

Medical experts aim to offer lifesaving treatments to eliminate preventable deaths from AKI by 2025

Preventable deaths caused by acute kidney injury (AKI) could be nearly eliminated in just 10 years, according to leading medical experts. This often forgotten condition - which affects around 13 million people every year and contributes to 1.7 million deaths annually - is preventable and can be treated for as little as $US150 per patient. [More]
Study: Countries most affected by Ebola outbreak may soon have 100,000 more measles cases

Study: Countries most affected by Ebola outbreak may soon have 100,000 more measles cases

An international study involving the University of Southampton suggests there could be a rise in measles cases of 100,000 across the three countries most affected by the Ebola outbreak in West Africa due to health system disruptions. [More]
GHTC report confronts key challenge of renewing US leadership in global health technology

GHTC report confronts key challenge of renewing US leadership in global health technology

‚ÄčToday, the world is looking to the United States for cutting-edge diagnostics, drugs, and vaccines that could have the last word on an Ebola outbreak that is down but not out. But those innovations are the product of past US investments in research and development (R&D). [More]
Ebola crisis increases susceptibility to measles, other vaccine-preventable illnesses

Ebola crisis increases susceptibility to measles, other vaccine-preventable illnesses

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researchers say that major disruptions in the health care systems in West Africa caused by the Ebola crisis have led to significant decreases in vaccinations for childhood diseases, increasing susceptibility to measles and other vaccine-preventable illnesses. [More]
Penn researcher named a recipient of 2015 Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize

Penn researcher named a recipient of 2015 Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize

University of Pennsylvania cancer and HIV expert Carl June, MD, has been named one of two recipients of the 2015 Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize for his outstanding work in cancer immunotherapy. Since 1952, the Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize has been awarded to scientists who have made great advancements in the fields in which Paul Ehrlich worked, in particular immunology, cancer research, microbiology, and chemotherapy. [More]

Two researchers win Humanity in Science prize for developing new antimalarial drug production methods

Prof. Dr. Peter H. Seeberger, a director at the Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces in Potsdam and a professor of chemistry at Freie Universität Berlin, and Prof. Dr.-Ing. Andreas Seidel-Morgenstern, a director at the Max Planck Institute for Dynamics of Complex Technical Systems in Magdeburg and a professor of chemical engineering at the Otto-von Guericke-University in Magdeburg, won the Humanity in Science prize for their groundbreaking work in developing new production methods for antimalarial drugs. [More]
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