Malaria News and Research RSS Feed - Malaria News and Research Twitter

Malaria is a mosquito-borne disease caused by a parasite called Plasmodium - when infected mosquitoes bite the human body, the parasites multiply in the liver, and then infect red blood cells. Even though this potentially fatal disease can be prevented and cured, each year 350-500 million cases of malaria still occur worldwide, and over one million people die, most of them young children in Africa south of the Sahara, where one in every five (20%) childhood deaths is due to the effects of the disease.

Malaria is so common in Africa because a lack of resources and political instability have prevented the building of solid malaria control programs. Experts say an African child has on average between 1.6 and 5.4 episodes of malaria fever each year and according to the World Health Organization (WHO) as many as half of the world's population are at risk of malaria mainly in the world's poorest and most vulnerable countries and every 30 seconds a child dies from malaria.
Special issue of Future Science OA highlights research on protein misfolding diseases

Special issue of Future Science OA highlights research on protein misfolding diseases

Future Science Group today announced the publication of a special issue in Future Science OA, covering the rapidly evolving field of protein misfolding diseases. [More]
Health providers still prescribing expensive malaria drugs in Nigeria to patients who do not have malaria

Health providers still prescribing expensive malaria drugs in Nigeria to patients who do not have malaria

Health providers trained to perform malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDT) are still prescribing valuable malaria medicines to patients who do not have malaria, according to new research published in PLOS ONE. [More]
Global life expectancy climbs, but people live longer with illnesses

Global life expectancy climbs, but people live longer with illnesses

Global life expectancy has risen by more than six years since 1990 as healthy life expectancy grows; ischemic heart disease, lower respiratory infections, and stroke cause the most health loss around the world. [More]
Special issue of SAGE's JERHRE presents guidelines, new resources to improve data sharing across the globe

Special issue of SAGE's JERHRE presents guidelines, new resources to improve data sharing across the globe

With the globalization of biomedical research and growing concerns about possible pandemics of diseases such as HIV, SARS, and Ebola, international data-sharing practices are of growing interest to the biomedical science community. But what are the advantages and disadvantages of sharing data in low and middle-income settings? What challenges stand in the way for researchers in countries such as India, Kenya, and Vietnam? A new special issue of SAGE's Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics presents guidelines, protocols, models, and new resources to improve data sharing across the globe. [More]
WHO and health cluster partners cope with health needs of internally displaced persons in South Sudan

WHO and health cluster partners cope with health needs of internally displaced persons in South Sudan

The World Health Organization and partners are racing to cope with the health needs of thousands of internally displaced persons (IDPs) in northeastern South Sudan where fighting continues and the humanitarian situation remains dire. [More]
60P to commence Phase II clinical trial among dengue fever patients

60P to commence Phase II clinical trial among dengue fever patients

60 Degrees Pharmaceuticals, a company focused on development of therapeutics for tropical diseases, and Singapore General Hospital announced today that the Hospital has received a grant from Singapore's National Medical Research Council to support a Phase II clinical trial among dengue fever patients. [More]
Researchers capture images of immune cell interactions rallying to destroy herpes simplex virus

Researchers capture images of immune cell interactions rallying to destroy herpes simplex virus

Doctor Scott Mueller and colleagues from the University of Melbourne's Department of Microbiology and Immunology at the Doherty Institute used state-of-the-art microscopy to painstakingly capture images of the interactions of three crucial types of immune cells rallying to destroy herpes simplex virus. [More]
New study explores impact of climate change on human health

New study explores impact of climate change on human health

Researchers at Columbia University's National Center for Disaster Preparedness and the University of Washington have published a new study focused on the public health implications of climate change. The article explores climate change impacts on human health in the U.S. Gulf Coast and has implications for this and other coastal regions that are particularly vulnerable to climate change. [More]
Researchers help explain how malaria infection increases children's risk of developing Burkitt's lymphoma

Researchers help explain how malaria infection increases children's risk of developing Burkitt's lymphoma

In equatorial Africa, a region of the globe known as the "lymphoma belt," children are ten times more likely than in other parts of the world to develop Burkitt's lymphoma, a highly aggressive blood cancer that can be fatal if left untreated. That area is also plagued by high rates of malaria, and scientists have spent the last 50 years trying to understand how the two diseases are connected. [More]
CMC Biologics, PATH Malaria Vaccine Initiative sign agreement for development of specific monoclonal antibodies

CMC Biologics, PATH Malaria Vaccine Initiative sign agreement for development of specific monoclonal antibodies

CMC Biologics, a global leader in clinical and commercial development and contract manufacture of therapeutic proteins, announced today it has entered into an agreement with the PATH Malaria Vaccine Initiative (MVI) for process development and manufacture of specific monoclonal antibodies to test for their capacity to protect humans from malaria infection. [More]
Impax sells U.S. rights to Daraprim brand for $55 million to Turing Pharmaceuticals

Impax sells U.S. rights to Daraprim brand for $55 million to Turing Pharmaceuticals

Impax Laboratories, Inc. today announced that it has sold its U.S. rights to the Daraprim brand to Turing Pharmaceuticals AG for approximately $55 million. [More]
Turing Pharmaceuticals acquires rights to market Daraprim (pyrimethamine) in the U.S.

Turing Pharmaceuticals acquires rights to market Daraprim (pyrimethamine) in the U.S.

Turing Pharmaceuticals AG today announced that it has acquired the exclusive rights to market Daraprim (pyrimethamine) in the U.S. from Impax Laboratories, Inc. The acquisition by Turing is part of a strategic effort focused on treatments for toxoplasmosis and other serious infectious diseases. The company also announced plans to invest in the development of new drug candidates for toxoplasmosis. [More]
GenVec reports net loss of $1.9 million for second quarter 2015

GenVec reports net loss of $1.9 million for second quarter 2015

GenVec, Inc. today reported financial results for the second quarter ended June 30, 2015. For the three months ended June 30, 2015, GenVec reported a net loss of $1.9 million, or $0.11 per share, on revenues of $0.1 million, compared with a net loss of $1.7 million, or $0.10 per share, on revenues of $0.1 million, for the same period in the prior year. [More]

Leidos Holdings reports strong financial results in Q2 2015

Leidos Holdings, Inc., a national security, health and engineering solutions company, today reported financial results for the second quarter of calendar year 2015. [More]
Breakthroughs against Plasmodium falciparum pave way for latest advancement

Breakthroughs against Plasmodium falciparum pave way for latest advancement

When the highly-influential European Medicines Agency announced its recommendation to approve what could be the world's first licensed vaccine against malaria in infants and children, there was much celebrating in the research community at NYU Langone Medical Center. [More]
New synthetic gene drives could one day improve human health and the environment

New synthetic gene drives could one day improve human health and the environment

Gene drives are genetic elements - found naturally in the genomes of most of the world's organisms - that increase the chance of the gene they carry being passed on to all offspring, and thus, they can quickly spread through populations. Looking to these natural systems, researchers around the world, including some Wyss Institute scientists, are developing synthetic gene drives that could one day be leveraged by humans to purposefully alter the traits of wild populations of organisms to prevent disease transmission and eradicate invasive species. [More]
New polymer gel could help create swallowable devices for ultra-long drug delivery

New polymer gel could help create swallowable devices for ultra-long drug delivery

Medical devices designed to reside in the stomach have a variety of applications, including prolonged drug delivery, electronic monitoring, and weight-loss intervention. However, these devices, often created with nondegradable elastic polymers, bear an inherent risk of intestinal obstruction as a result of accidental fracture or migration. As such, they are usually designed to remain in the stomach for a limited time. [More]
Europe has increasing prevalence of fungal resistance, warns ESCMID

Europe has increasing prevalence of fungal resistance, warns ESCMID

The European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Disease – an organization that explores the risks and best practices in infectious disease – is imploring global healthcare professionals and bodies to take a more active role in the growing problem of fungal resistance. [More]
Cepheid, FIND unveil new portable molecular diagnostics system for patients suspected of TB, HIV and Ebola

Cepheid, FIND unveil new portable molecular diagnostics system for patients suspected of TB, HIV and Ebola

Cepheid and FIND today unveiled the GeneXpert Omni, the world's most portable molecular diagnostics system enabling unprecedented access to accurate, fast and potentially life-saving diagnosis for patients suspected of TB, HIV and Ebola in even the most remote areas of the world. [More]
Study sheds light on current and potential treatment options for schistosomiasis

Study sheds light on current and potential treatment options for schistosomiasis

In a special free issue of Future Medicinal Chemistry, leading experts explore current and potential new treatment options for the deadly neglected tropical disease schistosomiasis. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement