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Malaria is a mosquito-borne disease caused by a parasite called Plasmodium - when infected mosquitoes bite the human body, the parasites multiply in the liver, and then infect red blood cells. Even though this potentially fatal disease can be prevented and cured, each year 350-500 million cases of malaria still occur worldwide, and over one million people die, most of them young children in Africa south of the Sahara, where one in every five (20%) childhood deaths is due to the effects of the disease.

Malaria is so common in Africa because a lack of resources and political instability have prevented the building of solid malaria control programs. Experts say an African child has on average between 1.6 and 5.4 episodes of malaria fever each year and according to the World Health Organization (WHO) as many as half of the world's population are at risk of malaria mainly in the world's poorest and most vulnerable countries and every 30 seconds a child dies from malaria.
GHIT Fund expands investments in leishmaniasis, diagnostic tests

GHIT Fund expands investments in leishmaniasis, diagnostic tests

The Global Health Innovative Technology Fund, which in the last two years has funded almost $32 million for innovative tools to tackle global infectious diseases, today announced additional investments of nearly $11 million that bring its portfolio to approximately $43 million. [More]
UH pharmacy students receive awards for excellence in clinical skills, disease management

UH pharmacy students receive awards for excellence in clinical skills, disease management

University of Houston pharmacy students wrapped up the spring semester with awards for excellence in professional service, clinical skills and disease management, earning kudos at the state level from the Texas Society of Health-System Pharmacists. [More]
Chancellor Angela Merkel calls for new plan to tackle Ebola outbreak at 68th World Health Assembly

Chancellor Angela Merkel calls for new plan to tackle Ebola outbreak at 68th World Health Assembly

Angela Merkel, Chancellor of the Federal Republic of Germany addressed delegates on the first morning of the Sixty-eighth World Health Assembly. "The WHO is the only international organization that has universal political legitimacy on global health issues,” she said. [More]
New study reveals that 'imperfect drug penetration' can accelerate pathogens' resistance

New study reveals that 'imperfect drug penetration' can accelerate pathogens' resistance

Prescribing patients two or more drugs that do not reach the same parts of the body could accelerate a pathogen's resistance to all of the drugs being used in treatment, according to a new study published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. [More]

Researchers present new model for evaluating malaria treatment programs across multiple countries

In a study published this month in Malaria Journal, researchers from Uppsala University and other institutions present a new model for systematically evaluating new malaria treatment programs in routine conditions across multiple countries. [More]
New CLIP-PCR test could help diagnose malaria cases

New CLIP-PCR test could help diagnose malaria cases

One of the biggest difficulties faced by worldwide programs aimed at eliminating malaria is that the tests they use are not sensitive enough to detect all people who have the disease and need treatment. [More]
GenVec reports net loss of $1.5 million for first quarter 2015

GenVec reports net loss of $1.5 million for first quarter 2015

GenVec, Inc. today reported financial results for the first quarter ended March 31, 2015. For the three months ended March 31, 2015, GenVec reported a net loss of $1.5 million, or $0.09 per share, on revenues of $0.4 million, compared with a net loss of $1.0 million, or $0.07 per share, on revenues of $2.1 million, for the same period in the prior year. [More]
Discovery opens up new avenue for development of potential therapies to treat, prevent malaria

Discovery opens up new avenue for development of potential therapies to treat, prevent malaria

Scientists have identified a protein on the surface of human red blood cells that serves as an essential entry point for invasion by the malaria parasite. This discovery opens up a promising new avenue for the development of therapies to treat and prevent malaria. [More]
WHO committed to helping Nepal deliver health care to its citizens, says WHO South-East Asia Regional Director

WHO committed to helping Nepal deliver health care to its citizens, says WHO South-East Asia Regional Director

The World Health Organization is committed to supporting Nepal’s health system to deliver life-saving and essential services to its people and build back resilient health facilities that will be safe in emergencies... [More]
Elekta striving to build radiation therapy infrastructures and save lives of cancer patients in Africa

Elekta striving to build radiation therapy infrastructures and save lives of cancer patients in Africa

In Africa, cancer kills more people than HIV/AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis combined. Approximately 40 percent of cancer cases can be prevented and 40 percent can be cured with the right treatment. Together with Elekta, ministries of health in almost a dozen African nations are working to build up their radiation therapy infrastructures and save lives. [More]
First patient receives new 'resistance-busting' experimental skin cancer drug

First patient receives new 'resistance-busting' experimental skin cancer drug

A patient has become the first to receive a new 'resistance-busting' experimental skin cancer drug with the launch of a phase I clinical trial. The patient has received a new panRAF inhibitor - a new type of drug under development to address the problem of drug resistance in advanced skin cancer and a number of other cancer types. [More]
New study finds high levels of HCV infection among HIV-infected people across Africa

New study finds high levels of HCV infection among HIV-infected people across Africa

A new study has found high levels of infection with hepatitis C (HCV) across Africa, particularly in people infected with HIV. [More]
Researchers reveal potential mode of drug resistance in malaria parasites

Researchers reveal potential mode of drug resistance in malaria parasites

Scientists have uncovered a potential mode of parasite drug resistance in malaria infection, according to a report published in The Journal of Experimental Medicine. [More]
Locally procured drugs can be as effective as IQA drugs for treating MDR-TB in Pakistan

Locally procured drugs can be as effective as IQA drugs for treating MDR-TB in Pakistan

Locally-sourced antibiotics can be as effective as 'internationally quality-assured' (IQA) antibiotics for treating multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in Pakistan, and may help avoid delays in starting treatment while programmes wait for drugs to arrive from overseas, according to new research published in PLOS ONE. [More]
New device can turn smartphone into DNA-scanning fluorescent microscope

New device can turn smartphone into DNA-scanning fluorescent microscope

If you thought scanning one of those strange, square QR codes with your phone was somewhat advanced, hold on to your seat. Researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles have recently developed a device that can turn any smartphone into a DNA-scanning fluorescent microscope. [More]
New WHO report analyzes global response to antimicrobial resistance

New WHO report analyzes global response to antimicrobial resistance

A quarter of countries that responded to a WHO survey have national plans to preserve antimicrobial medicines like antibiotics, but many more countries must also step up. A new report, "Worldwide country situation analysis: Response to antimicrobial resistance", which outlines the survey findings, reveals that while much activity is underway and many governments are committed to addressing the problem, there are major gaps in actions needed across all 6 WHO regions to prevent the misuse of antibiotics and reduce spread of antimicrobial resistance. [More]
Scientific study confirms harmful effect of submicroscopic malarial infections during pregnancy

Scientific study confirms harmful effect of submicroscopic malarial infections during pregnancy

A scientific study conducted in Benin by researchers from IRD and the Centre for study and research on pregnancy associated malaria and infancy (CERPAGE, Benin) confirms the harmful impact of submicroscopic malarial infections during pregnancy. These complications include maternal anaemia, premature births and low birthweights in children. [More]
Researchers pinpoint new mechanism responsible for malaria progression

Researchers pinpoint new mechanism responsible for malaria progression

A team of researchers from four universities has pinpointed one of the mechanisms responsible for the progression of malaria, providing a new target for possible treatments. [More]
Two thirds of the world’s population have no access to safe and affordable surgery

Two thirds of the world’s population have no access to safe and affordable surgery

New estimates suggest that number of people worldwide who are unable to access basic surgery and anaesthesia is more than twice as high as previously thought. [More]
Large majority of people in the world lack access to safe, affordable surgery and anaesthesia

Large majority of people in the world lack access to safe, affordable surgery and anaesthesia

Millions of people are dying from common, easily treatable conditions like appendicitis, fractures, or obstructed labour because they do not have access to, or can't afford, proper surgical care, according to a major new Commission, published in The Lancet. [More]
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