Malaria News and Research RSS Feed - Malaria News and Research Twitter

Malaria is a mosquito-borne disease caused by a parasite called Plasmodium - when infected mosquitoes bite the human body, the parasites multiply in the liver, and then infect red blood cells. Even though this potentially fatal disease can be prevented and cured, each year 350-500 million cases of malaria still occur worldwide, and over one million people die, most of them young children in Africa south of the Sahara, where one in every five (20%) childhood deaths is due to the effects of the disease.

Malaria is so common in Africa because a lack of resources and political instability have prevented the building of solid malaria control programs. Experts say an African child has on average between 1.6 and 5.4 episodes of malaria fever each year and according to the World Health Organization (WHO) as many as half of the world's population are at risk of malaria mainly in the world's poorest and most vulnerable countries and every 30 seconds a child dies from malaria.
Vaxine’s unique adjuvants boost effectiveness of vaccines for battling against infectious diseases

Vaxine’s unique adjuvants boost effectiveness of vaccines for battling against infectious diseases

SUGAR-based adjuvants from Australia are boosting the effectiveness of vaccines to target some of the world’s deadliest diseases. [More]
NIH scientists unravel chain of events that lead to fatal outcomes in cerebral malaria

NIH scientists unravel chain of events that lead to fatal outcomes in cerebral malaria

Using state-of-the-art brain imaging technology, scientists at the National Institutes of Health filmed what happens in the brains of mice that developed cerebral malaria (CM). [More]
Monell Center receives Gates Foundation grant to support innovative global health research project

Monell Center receives Gates Foundation grant to support innovative global health research project

The Monell Center announced today that it has received a $345,000 grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The grant supports an innovative global health research project titled, "Developing Novel Pediatric Formulation Technologies for Global Health: Human Taste Assays." [More]
Liverpool-led research consortium aims to reduce mother-to-child transmission of HIV

Liverpool-led research consortium aims to reduce mother-to-child transmission of HIV

Researchers from the University of Liverpool's Institute of Translational Medicine have been awarded a grant of up to US$ 8.9 million (GBP £5.8m) to lead a multinational research consortium that aims to reduce mother-to-child transmission of HIV. [More]
Synthetic rice odour blend attracts egg-laying female malaria mosquitoes

Synthetic rice odour blend attracts egg-laying female malaria mosquitoes

The increased use of irrigation in sub-Saharan Africa has benefited the Anopheles arabiensis mosquito - an important malaria vector - particularly in rice paddies. [More]
New report highlights global burden of maternal, newborn and young child deaths

New report highlights global burden of maternal, newborn and young child deaths

Today FIGO, ICM, ICN and IPA announce the publication of a report showing the global burden of maternal, newborn and young child deaths and launch the Together We Can campaign to tackle it. [More]
WHO confirms pilot deployment of first-generation malaria vaccine in sub-Saharan Africa

WHO confirms pilot deployment of first-generation malaria vaccine in sub-Saharan Africa

The world’s first malaria vaccine will be rolled out in pilot projects in sub-Saharan Africa, WHO confirmed today. Funding is now secured for the initial phase of the programme and vaccinations are due to begin in 2018. [More]
Most rapid diagnostic tests fail to detect P. falciparum malaria parasites in asymptomatic children

Most rapid diagnostic tests fail to detect P. falciparum malaria parasites in asymptomatic children

The Democratic Republic of the Congo has one of the highest rates of people living with malaria. Rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) account for more than 70 percent of diagnostic testing for malaria in Africa. [More]
New, rapid diagnostic test for malaria wins $100,000 Grand Challenges Explorations grant

New, rapid diagnostic test for malaria wins $100,000 Grand Challenges Explorations grant

An interdisciplinary team of scientists and engineers at Vanderbilt University headed by Stevenson Professor of Chemistry David Wright has designed a new kind of rapid diagnostic test for malaria that has received a $100,000 Grand Challenges Explorations grant which is designed to support innovative global health and development research projects. [More]
Intestinal parasite increases susceptibility to colitis, study finds

Intestinal parasite increases susceptibility to colitis, study finds

Researchers from the University of Toronto have discovered that mice infected with the common gut parasite Tritrichomonas muris are at an increased risk of developing inflammatory colitis. [More]
NCATS funds collaboration initiative aimed at repurposing antimalarial to combat Ebola virus

NCATS funds collaboration initiative aimed at repurposing antimalarial to combat Ebola virus

The National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences recently awarded $596,533.00 to Collaborations Pharmaceuticals, Inc. to initiate a partnership with Texas Biomedical Research Institute aimed at repurposing an antimalarial for use against the Ebola virus. [More]
Researchers discover set of immune proteins that facilitate long-lasting immunity against malaria

Researchers discover set of immune proteins that facilitate long-lasting immunity against malaria

Houston Methodist researchers have discovered a set of immune proteins that facilitate long-lasting immunity against malaria. [More]
WHO Trauma Care Checklist Programme leads to improvements in care for injured patients

WHO Trauma Care Checklist Programme leads to improvements in care for injured patients

Injury is responsible for more than 10 percent of the global burden of disease, killing more people each year than HIV, malaria and tuberculosis combined. [More]
UT researchers discover bacterial genes that could lead to effective malaria treatment

UT researchers discover bacterial genes that could lead to effective malaria treatment

Researchers at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, have identified a set of bacterial genes that may help them find ways to lessen the severity of the disease malaria. [More]

Study reveals highest number of imported malaria cases seen in the UK and France

An international study, led by the University of Southampton, shows the UK and France experience the highest number of malaria cases imported from other countries. [More]
Researchers propose new strategy to control malaria by driving mosquito evolution

Researchers propose new strategy to control malaria by driving mosquito evolution

One of the frustrations of fighting malaria is that mosquitoes evolve resistance to the insecticides used to kill them. [More]
Novel approach could help counter Influenza A virus in immune-compromised patients

Novel approach could help counter Influenza A virus in immune-compromised patients

To infect its victims, influenza A heads for the lungs, where it latches onto sialic acid on the surface of cells. [More]
New research underscores problems affecting cognitive development of children in sub-Saharan Africa

New research underscores problems affecting cognitive development of children in sub-Saharan Africa

New research from the University of Liverpool highlights problems impacting on the cognitive development of children in sub-Saharan Africa. [More]
Doctors urge medical journals to incentivise academics to improve health information on Wikipedia

Doctors urge medical journals to incentivise academics to improve health information on Wikipedia

Wikipedia is the most read source of medical information by the general public, as well as medical students, doctors, and policymakers. Ensuring that it is accurate and complete is therefore of the utmost importance for global health since its content has immediate real-world health consequences. [More]
UCLA scientists take promising step towards killing mosquitoes that carry Zika virus and dengue fever

UCLA scientists take promising step towards killing mosquitoes that carry Zika virus and dengue fever

Five UCLA researchers were part of an international team that has used X-rays to reveal the structure of a molecule that is toxic to disease-carrying mosquitoes. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement