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Malaria is a mosquito-borne disease caused by a parasite called Plasmodium - when infected mosquitoes bite the human body, the parasites multiply in the liver, and then infect red blood cells. Even though this potentially fatal disease can be prevented and cured, each year 350-500 million cases of malaria still occur worldwide, and over one million people die, most of them young children in Africa south of the Sahara, where one in every five (20%) childhood deaths is due to the effects of the disease.

Malaria is so common in Africa because a lack of resources and political instability have prevented the building of solid malaria control programs. Experts say an African child has on average between 1.6 and 5.4 episodes of malaria fever each year and according to the World Health Organization (WHO) as many as half of the world's population are at risk of malaria mainly in the world's poorest and most vulnerable countries and every 30 seconds a child dies from malaria.
Sixty-ninth World Health Assembly comes to end after approving many new resolutions

Sixty-ninth World Health Assembly comes to end after approving many new resolutions

The Sixty-ninth World Health Assembly closed today after approving new resolutions on WHO's Framework for Engagement with Non-State Actors; the Sustainable Development Goals; the International Health Regulations; tobacco control; road traffic deaths and injuries; nutrition; HIV, hepatitis and STIs; mycetoma; research and development; access to medicines and integrated health services. [More]
Drexel scientists identify how two new antimalarial drugs work

Drexel scientists identify how two new antimalarial drugs work

Drexel University scientists have discovered an unusual mechanism for how two new antimalarial drugs operate: They give the parasite's skin a boost in cholesterol, making it unable to traverse the narrow labyrinths of the human bloodstream. [More]
Malaria parasites use complement system to evade human immune response, study finds

Malaria parasites use complement system to evade human immune response, study finds

The malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum hijacks an immune system process to invade red blood cells, according to a study led by researchers at Penn State College of Medicine. Understanding how malaria invades the cells could lead to a more effective vaccine. [More]
GMU’s early-detection urine test works for Lyme disease, study shows

GMU’s early-detection urine test works for Lyme disease, study shows

After three years and 300 patients, George Mason University researchers have proof that their early-detection urine test for Lyme disease works. [More]
Global life expectancy on the rise, but major health inequalities persist

Global life expectancy on the rise, but major health inequalities persist

Dramatic gains in life expectancy have been made globally since 2000, but major inequalities persist within and among countries, according to this year’s “World Health Statistics: Monitoring Health for the SDGs”. [More]
OpenZika project uses supercomputing power to identify potential drug candidates to cure Zika virus

OpenZika project uses supercomputing power to identify potential drug candidates to cure Zika virus

Rutgers is taking a leading role in an IBM-sponsored World Community Grid project that will use supercomputing power to identify potential drug candidates to cure the Zika virus. [More]
More neonatal infection research could drive forward measures to reduce infant deaths

More neonatal infection research could drive forward measures to reduce infant deaths

No one knows how many newborns are dying each year due to antibiotic resistant infections, because of a lack of funding to research the issue fully, Professor Mike Sharland from St George's, University London said. [More]
Tackling Zika: are insect repellents the answer? An interview with Bruno Jactel

Tackling Zika: are insect repellents the answer? An interview with Bruno Jactel

The repellents that are used today are mostly based on what we call chemical pesticides. These products are used to repel mosquitoes as well as ticks. They are very broadly used, but there are different issues surrounding their use. [More]
Inhibiting autophagy can effectively block tumor cell migration, breast cancer metastasis

Inhibiting autophagy can effectively block tumor cell migration, breast cancer metastasis

Researchers from the University of Chicago have shown that inhibiting autophagy, a self-devouring process used by cells to degrade large intra-cellular cargo, effectively blocks tumor cell migration and breast cancer metastasis in tumor models. [More]
Experimental vaccine protects healthy U.S. adults from malaria infection for more than one year

Experimental vaccine protects healthy U.S. adults from malaria infection for more than one year

An experimental malaria vaccine protected a small number of healthy, malaria-naïve adults in the United States from infection for more than one year after immunization, according to results from a Phase 1 trial described in the May 9th issue of Nature Medicine. [More]
Study shows short-term statin treatment does not benefit heart surgery patients

Study shows short-term statin treatment does not benefit heart surgery patients

Giving daily doses of statins for a few days before and after heart surgery does not prevent heart muscle damage or the development of atrial fibrillation (AF), according to an international clinical trial led by the University of Oxford and funded by the British Heart Foundation. [More]
New project explores role of mosquitoes in transmission of pathogens in Austria

New project explores role of mosquitoes in transmission of pathogens in Austria

In the wake of climate change and globalisation, non-indigenous mosquito species establish in Europe together with the pathogens they transmit. A project funded by the Austrian Science Fund FWF is currently investigating mosquito species found in Austria and their role in the transmission of pathogens. [More]
Zika virus present in Americas prior to first identification in Brazil

Zika virus present in Americas prior to first identification in Brazil

The Zika virus was present in Haiti several months before the first Zika cases were identified in Brazil, according to new research by infectious-disease specialists at the University of Florida. [More]
New blood treatment technology could reduce malaria risk following blood transfusions

New blood treatment technology could reduce malaria risk following blood transfusions

Patients, especially children, who undergo blood transfusions in sub-Saharan Africa are at high risk of transfusion-transmitted malaria. A new trial, published in The Lancet today, suggests that treating donated blood with a new technology that combines UV radiation and vitamin B is safe and could minimise the risk of malaria infection following blood transfusions. [More]
Scientists discover Hobit, Blimp1 genes that fight disease-causing pathogens

Scientists discover Hobit, Blimp1 genes that fight disease-causing pathogens

Melbourne researchers have uncovered the genes responsible for the way the body fights infection at the point of 'invasion' - whether it's the skin, liver, lungs or the gut. [More]

Study: Global malaria elimination possible within a generation

Global malaria eradication is possible within a generation, but only with renewed focus, new tools and sufficient financial support, according to a paper published in The Lancet by the Global Health Group’s Malaria Elimination Initiative (MEI) at UC San Francisco. [More]
WHO outlines steps to close immunization gap across countries during World Immunization Week 2016

WHO outlines steps to close immunization gap across countries during World Immunization Week 2016

During World Immunization Week 2016, held 24-30 April, the World Health Organization highlights recent gains in immunization coverage, and outlines further steps countries can take to “Close the Immunization Gap” and meet global vaccination targets by 2020. [More]
WHO: Europe becomes first malaria-free region in the world

WHO: Europe becomes first malaria-free region in the world

The European Region is the first in the world to have achieved interruption of indigenous malaria transmission. The number of indigenous malaria cases dropped from 90 712 in 1995 to zero cases in 2015. [More]
Developing countries face health financing crisis due to low domestic investment, stagnating international aid

Developing countries face health financing crisis due to low domestic investment, stagnating international aid

Two major studies published in The Lancet reveal the health financing crisis facing developing countries as a result of low domestic investment and stagnating international aid, which could leave millions of people without access to even the most basic health services. [More]
Funding improves for maternal, child health compared to donor investments in HIV, TB and malaria

Funding improves for maternal, child health compared to donor investments in HIV, TB and malaria

Funding earmarked for improving maternal and child health in low- and middle-income countries has grown faster since 2010 than funding for HIV, TB, and malaria. [More]
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