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Malaria is a mosquito-borne disease caused by a parasite called Plasmodium - when infected mosquitoes bite the human body, the parasites multiply in the liver, and then infect red blood cells. Even though this potentially fatal disease can be prevented and cured, each year 350-500 million cases of malaria still occur worldwide, and over one million people die, most of them young children in Africa south of the Sahara, where one in every five (20%) childhood deaths is due to the effects of the disease.

Malaria is so common in Africa because a lack of resources and political instability have prevented the building of solid malaria control programs. Experts say an African child has on average between 1.6 and 5.4 episodes of malaria fever each year and according to the World Health Organization (WHO) as many as half of the world's population are at risk of malaria mainly in the world's poorest and most vulnerable countries and every 30 seconds a child dies from malaria.
Sustained international efforts can help reduce premature deaths by 40% over next 20 years

Sustained international efforts can help reduce premature deaths by 40% over next 20 years

New research published today [Friday 19 September] in The Lancet suggests that, with sustained international efforts, the number of premature deaths could be reduced by 40% over the next two decades (2010-2030), halving under–50 mortality and preventing a third of the deaths at ages 50–69 years. [More]
Longer looks: Lithium in the water; controlling cancer; recovering from brain injury

Longer looks: Lithium in the water; controlling cancer; recovering from brain injury

There are many kinds of cancer, but treatments have typically combatted them in one way only: by attempting to destroy the cancerous cells. Surgery aims to remove the entire growth from the body; chemotherapy drugs are toxic to the cancer cells; radiation generates toxic molecules that break up the cancer cells' DNA and proteins, causing their demise. [More]
GHIT Fund announces new grants to tackle malaria, chagas disease and dengue

GHIT Fund announces new grants to tackle malaria, chagas disease and dengue

The Global Health Innovative Technology Fund, a new public health partnership that is bringing Japanese know-how and investment to the global fight against infectious diseases, today announced seven grant investments totaling US$15.3 million to speed the development of promising drugs and vaccines to battle three insect-borne diseases-malaria, dengue and Chagas disease. [More]
NSF, NIH, USDA receive more than $12 million in new EEID grants

NSF, NIH, USDA receive more than $12 million in new EEID grants

Ebola, MERS (Middle East Respiratory Syndrome), malaria, antibiotic-resistant infections: Is our interaction with the environment somehow responsible for their increased incidence? [More]
Weak spot in complex life cycle of malaria could prevent spread of deadly disease

Weak spot in complex life cycle of malaria could prevent spread of deadly disease

A new study has revealed a weak spot in the complex life cycle of malaria, which could be exploited to prevent the spread of the deadly disease. [More]

Pharmaceuticals against malaria can now be produced from waste of plant-extraction

Research success through collaborative efforts of chemists and engineers from Berlin/Potsdam and Magdeburg. All of the best currently available pharmaceuticals against malaria can now be produced in pure form using a single process, even from the waste of the plant-extraction. [More]
Canada funds 22 inventive ideas for improving health in low-resource countries

Canada funds 22 inventive ideas for improving health in low-resource countries

Grand Challenges Canada, funded by the Government of Canada, today announced $2.4 million in seed funds shared between 22 projects from Canada and nine developing nations, to pursue inventive new ideas for improving health in low-resource countries. [More]
Researchers reveal new approaches for antimalarial drug development

Researchers reveal new approaches for antimalarial drug development

Melbourne researchers are making progress towards new antimalarial drugs, after revealing how an antibiotic called emetine blocks the molecular machinery that produces the proteins required for malaria parasite survival. [More]

Researchers develop new test to identify sickle cell disease in minutes

Within minutes after birth, every child in the U.S. undergoes a battery of tests designed to diagnose a host of conditions, including sickle cell disease. Thousands of children born in the developing world, however, aren't so lucky, meaning many suffer and die from the disease each year. [More]
Research report on global market for drug discovery technologies

Research report on global market for drug discovery technologies

Reportlinker.com announces that a new market research report is available in its catalogue: Drug Discovery Technologies - A Global Market Overview [More]
Researchers come up with new technique to diagnose malaria

Researchers come up with new technique to diagnose malaria

Over the past several decades, malaria diagnosis has changed very little. After taking a blood sample from a patient, a technician smears the blood across a glass slide, stains it with a special dye, and looks under a microscope for the Plasmodium parasite, which causes the disease. [More]
International consortium to accelerate collaborative multi-site trials of potential Ebola vaccine

International consortium to accelerate collaborative multi-site trials of potential Ebola vaccine

A candidate Ebola vaccine could be given to healthy volunteers in the UK, The Gambia and Mali as early as September, as part of an series of safety trials of potential vaccines aimed at preventing the disease that has killed more than 1,400 people in the current outbreak in West Africa. [More]
Experts call for action to prevent health risks associated with climate change

Experts call for action to prevent health risks associated with climate change

Previously unrecognized health benefits could be realized from fast action to reduce climate change and its consequences. For example, changes in energy and transport policies could save millions of lives annually from diseases caused by high levels of air pollution. The right energy and transport policies could also reduce the burden of disease associated with physical inactivity and traffic injury. [More]
Scientists identify number of compounds to treat cancer could add to anti-malarial arsenal

Scientists identify number of compounds to treat cancer could add to anti-malarial arsenal

Scientists searching for new drugs to fight malaria have identified a number of compounds -- some of which are currently in clinical trials to treat cancer -- that could add to the anti-malarial arsenal. [More]
Three commonly used NSAIDs affect cell membranes, produce unwanted side effects

Three commonly used NSAIDs affect cell membranes, produce unwanted side effects

Researchers have discovered that three commonly used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs, alter the activity of enzymes within cell membranes. Their finding suggests that, if taken at higher-than-approved doses and/or for long periods of time, these prescription-level NSAIDs and other drugs that affect the membrane may produce wide-ranging and unwanted side effects. [More]

Novel "man and machine" decision support system for diagnosing malaria infection

A Finnish-Swedish research group at the Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), University of Helsinki, and Karolinska institutet, Stockholm, has developed a novel "man and machine" decision support system for diagnosing malaria infection. [More]
Prenatal care for pregnant women increases from 61 to 91.3%, highlights Equatorial Guinea

Prenatal care for pregnant women increases from 61 to 91.3%, highlights Equatorial Guinea

Equatorial Guinea's infant mortality rate has decreased from 111 in 1994 to 65 per one thousand in 2011, said the country's Health Secretary of State, Maria del Carmen Andeme Ela. She also reported that the percentage of pregnant women receiving prenatal care from skilled health personnel has increase from 61% in 2000 to 91.3% this year. [More]

Researchers use optical tweezers to measure how strongly parasites adhere to red blood cells

Malaria is a life-threatening disease caused by a parasite that invades one red blood cell after another. Little is known about this infection process because it happens so quickly, potentially explaining why there is currently no approved malaria vaccine. [More]
Sanofi, PATH announce delivery of first large-scale batches of antimalarial treatments

Sanofi, PATH announce delivery of first large-scale batches of antimalarial treatments

Sanofi and PATH today announced the delivery of the first large-scale batches of antimalarial treatments manufactured with a new semisynthetic artemisinin derivative to malaria-endemic countries in Africa. [More]
GenVec reports net loss of $1.7 million for second quarter 2014

GenVec reports net loss of $1.7 million for second quarter 2014

GenVec, Inc. today reported financial results for the three-month and six-month periods ended June 30, 2014. For the three-month period ended June 30, 2014, the company reported a net loss of $1.7 million or $0.10 per share on revenues of $0.1 million as compared to a net loss of $3.1 million or $0.24 per share on revenues of $0.7 million in the same period in the prior year. [More]