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Malaria is a mosquito-borne disease caused by a parasite called Plasmodium - when infected mosquitoes bite the human body, the parasites multiply in the liver, and then infect red blood cells. Even though this potentially fatal disease can be prevented and cured, each year 350-500 million cases of malaria still occur worldwide, and over one million people die, most of them young children in Africa south of the Sahara, where one in every five (20%) childhood deaths is due to the effects of the disease.

Malaria is so common in Africa because a lack of resources and political instability have prevented the building of solid malaria control programs. Experts say an African child has on average between 1.6 and 5.4 episodes of malaria fever each year and according to the World Health Organization (WHO) as many as half of the world's population are at risk of malaria mainly in the world's poorest and most vulnerable countries and every 30 seconds a child dies from malaria.
Research uncovers new clues to combat dengue and Zika virus

Research uncovers new clues to combat dengue and Zika virus

Structural biology research conducted at the U.S. Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory has uncovered how small insecticidal protein crystals that are naturally produced by bacteria might be tailored to combat dengue fever and the Zika virus. [More]
Researchers identify fungus that makes mosquitoes more susceptible to malaria infection

Researchers identify fungus that makes mosquitoes more susceptible to malaria infection

Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have identified a fungus that compromises the immune system of mosquitoes, making them more susceptible to infection with the parasite that causes malaria. [More]
Australia ranked 10th in global health study, but faces challenges in alcohol and childhood obesity

Australia ranked 10th in global health study, but faces challenges in alcohol and childhood obesity

Australia has come in at No. 10 of a global study tracking progress on health, but faces challenges around suicide, alcohol consumption and overweight children. [More]
World leaders at UN meeting commit to develop action plans on antimicrobial resistance

World leaders at UN meeting commit to develop action plans on antimicrobial resistance

World leaders today signalled an unprecedented level of attention to curb the spread of infections that are resistant to antimicrobial medicines. [More]
Study compares different strategies to prevent malaria among pregnant women in sub Saharan Africa

Study compares different strategies to prevent malaria among pregnant women in sub Saharan Africa

A novel strategy to screen pregnant women for malaria with rapid diagnostic tests and treat the test-positive women with effective antimalarials does not lower the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes compared with treating all pregnant women with the malaria preventive sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) in sub-Saharan Africa, according to an open label randomized trial published this week in PLOS Medicine by Feiko ter Kuile, of the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, and colleagues. [More]
Open-source research mechanism could lead to discovery of new, cheap medicines for malaria

Open-source research mechanism could lead to discovery of new, cheap medicines for malaria

Malaria is one of the leading causes of mortality in developing countries – last year killing more than 400,000 people. Researchers worldwide have found the solution for drug discovery could lie in open, “crowd-sourced” science. [More]
Unique open science project shows way for development of new antimalarial treatments

Unique open science project shows way for development of new antimalarial treatments

Malaria remains one of the world's leading causes of mortality in developing countries. Last year alone, it killed more than 400,000 people, mostly young children. [More]
Changing dosing regimen could improve efficacy of malaria vaccine candidate, study shows

Changing dosing regimen could improve efficacy of malaria vaccine candidate, study shows

Researchers at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research and collaborators recently published results of a phase II study which demonstrated that by changing the dosing regimen, the efficacy of malaria vaccine candidate, RTS,S/AS01, was improved to approximately 87%, compared with 63% using the current standard regimen. [More]
Meridian wins innovation award for illumigene Malaria test

Meridian wins innovation award for illumigene Malaria test

Meridian Bioscience, Inc. was awarded 1st place for innovation in emergency treatment and point-of-care testing for its illumigene Malaria test at the 2016 JIB/ACNBH Conference this summer. [More]
Research findings of protein may form foundation for new approach to antibiotics

Research findings of protein may form foundation for new approach to antibiotics

Researchers have made the first-ever detailed, atomic-level images of a peroxiredoxin, which has revealed a peculiar characteristic of this protein and might form the foundation for a new approach to antibiotics. [More]
Study finds wild birds as crucial indicators of malaria infection risk

Study finds wild birds as crucial indicators of malaria infection risk

The Griffith University study investigated parasite interactions in wild birds and found they are a crucial indicator of malaria infection risk. [More]
Pre-travel consultation can help international travelers to prepare for trip

Pre-travel consultation can help international travelers to prepare for trip

International tourism exceeds 1.2 billion persons each year, with more than 20 percent of travelers reporting some type of illness. [More]
Fiocruz to start phase II clinical trials of novel vaccine for schistosomiasis

Fiocruz to start phase II clinical trials of novel vaccine for schistosomiasis

The Oswaldo Cruz Foundation at Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, will start the phase II clinical trials of a vaccine for schistosomiasis, called 'Sm14 Vaccine'. [More]
Majority of cancers can be caused by infectious agents in sub-Saharan Africa, reveals study

Majority of cancers can be caused by infectious agents in sub-Saharan Africa, reveals study

In 1963, Irish surgeon Denis Parson Burkitt airmailed samples of an unusual jaw tumor found in Ugandan children to his colleague, Anthony Epstein, at Middlesex Hospital in London. [More]
Geographers map internal migration across three continents to help combat infectious diseases

Geographers map internal migration across three continents to help combat infectious diseases

Geographers at the University of Southampton have completed a large scale data and mapping project to track the flow of internal human migration in low and middle income countries. [More]
Novel marine natural product appears to reduce pancreatic tumor size

Novel marine natural product appears to reduce pancreatic tumor size

Scientists at Florida Atlantic University's Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute found that a deep-water marine sponge collected off of Fort Lauderdale's coast contains leiodermatolide, a natural product that has the ability to inhibit the growth of cancer cells as well as block cancer cells from dividing using extremely low concentrations of the compound. [More]
Specific molecular features control uptake of biguanides into mitochondria to inhibit respiration

Specific molecular features control uptake of biguanides into mitochondria to inhibit respiration

The biguanides are a family of drugs with diverse clinical applications. Metformin, a widely used anti-hyperglycemic biguanide, suppresses mitochondrial respiration by inhibiting respiratory complex I. Phenformin, a related anti-hyperglycemic biguanide, also inhibits respiration, but proguanil, which is widely used for the prevention of malaria, does not. [More]
New odour-baited traps offer effective and safe solution to fight against malaria mosquito

New odour-baited traps offer effective and safe solution to fight against malaria mosquito

The use of a newly-developed mosquito trap incorporating human odour has resulted in a 70% decline in the population of the most significant malaria mosquito on the Kenyan island of Rusinga. [More]
Study reveals needle biopsy hormone receptor testing for DCIS wastes millions

Study reveals needle biopsy hormone receptor testing for DCIS wastes millions

For patients with the most common type of noninvasive breast cancer, routine testing for estrogen and progesterone receptors in tissue taken at the first "needle" biopsy is both unnecessary and wasteful, according to results of a study led by Johns Hopkins pathologists. [More]
Scientists modeling new control mechanism to combat Zika-infecting mosquitoes

Scientists modeling new control mechanism to combat Zika-infecting mosquitoes

The images are heartbreaking: thousands of infants born with small, misshapen heads, the result of a rare neurological disorder, called microcephaly, which can cause a myriad of intellectual and developmental disabilities. The culprit? Zika, a mosquito-borne virus that has swept through many parts of South America and more recently surfaced in Florida. [More]
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