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Malaria is a mosquito-borne disease caused by a parasite called Plasmodium - when infected mosquitoes bite the human body, the parasites multiply in the liver, and then infect red blood cells. Even though this potentially fatal disease can be prevented and cured, each year 350-500 million cases of malaria still occur worldwide, and over one million people die, most of them young children in Africa south of the Sahara, where one in every five (20%) childhood deaths is due to the effects of the disease.

Malaria is so common in Africa because a lack of resources and political instability have prevented the building of solid malaria control programs. Experts say an African child has on average between 1.6 and 5.4 episodes of malaria fever each year and according to the World Health Organization (WHO) as many as half of the world's population are at risk of malaria mainly in the world's poorest and most vulnerable countries and every 30 seconds a child dies from malaria.
LSTM researchers to conduct extensive research on HIV and schistosomiasis coinfection in African children

LSTM researchers to conduct extensive research on HIV and schistosomiasis coinfection in African children

​Researchers from LSTM have called for more research to be carried out into HIV and schistosomiasis coinfection in children in sub-Saharan Africa. [More]
Drug used to treat TB may also act against various infections, says study

Drug used to treat TB may also act against various infections, says study

A drug under clinical trials to treat tuberculosis could be the basis for a class of broad-spectrum drugs that act against various bacteria, fungal infections and parasites, yet evade resistance, according to a study by University of Illinois chemists and collaborators. [More]
Deaths from viral Hepatitis B and C exceed deaths caused by HIV/AIDS

Deaths from viral Hepatitis B and C exceed deaths caused by HIV/AIDS

Deaths from viral Hepatitis B and C have surpassed HIV/AIDS in many countries, including Australia and in Western Europe, according to an analysis of the 2010 Global Burden of Disease study. [More]

Findings could revive use of chloroquine drug in treating, preventing mosquito-bourne disease

An anti-malarial treatment that lost its status as the leading weapon against the deadly disease could be given a new lease of life, with new research indicating it simply needs to be administered differently. [More]

Researchers examine effects of introducing rapid diagnostic tests for malaria in Africa

Researchers from the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group conducted a review of the effects of introducing rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for diagnosing malaria in primary healthcare settings in Africa where laboratory services are unavailable. [More]

Research on HIV and schistosomiasis coinfection in sub-Saharan Africa children

Paper shows that more work is needed to fully understand the consequences of coinfection. Researchers from LSTM have called for more research to be carried out into HIV and schistosomiasis coinfection in children in sub-Saharan Africa. [More]
Scientists to combine environmental, surveillance data to predict malaria outbreaks in Ethiopia

Scientists to combine environmental, surveillance data to predict malaria outbreaks in Ethiopia

Dealing with malaria is a fact of life for more than 91 million Ethiopians. Each year four to five million contract malaria, one of the biggest health problems in this poor country. [More]

Young children suffering from diarrheal diseases less likely to receive ORT in private facilities

Young children suffering from diarrheal diseases are less likely to receive life-saving oral rehydration therapy (ORT) if they seek treatment at private, for-profit clinics, according to the first-ever, large-scale study of child diarrhea treatment practices in sub-Saharan Africa. [More]

DesignMedix receives $3 million NIH grant to develop new anti-malarial drug

DesignMedix, Inc., a biotech startup with ties to Portland State University, received a grant for almost $3 million from the National Institutes of Health to continue development and manufacture of a new anti-malarial drug. [More]

New analysis finds less research attention is given to diseases of developing world

Death is not distributed equally around the world. In high-income countries, people typically die in old age of chronic diseases such as cancer or cardiovascular problems. In low-income countries, death comes primarily from infectious and perinatal diseases, and strikes at a young age. [More]
Researchers generate 3D model of human malaria parasite genome

Researchers generate 3D model of human malaria parasite genome

A research team led by a cell biologist at the University of California, Riverside has generated a 3D model of the human malaria parasite genome at three different stages in the parasite's life cycle - the first time such 3D architecture has been generated during the progression of the life cycle of a parasite. [More]
Repellents from Greek herb extracts show potent effects against malaria carrying mosquitoes

Repellents from Greek herb extracts show potent effects against malaria carrying mosquitoes

Repellents derived from Greek herb extracts show potent effects, as spatial repellents, against malaria carrying mosquitoes, and possibly others. [More]

Researchers develop new eco repellent that stops mosquitoes from attacking humans

This year's World Health Day (April 7th) focuses on vector-borne diseases, like malaria. Malaria still kills more than half a million people every year, mainly children. In the battle against this disease researchers in Switzerland have developed a new eco repellent that stops mosquitoes from attacking humans. [More]
JPIAMR outlines steps to minimise antimicrobial resistance

JPIAMR outlines steps to minimise antimicrobial resistance

Antibiotics have saved millions of lives from once deadly infectious diseases. But, misuse of antibiotics and other antimicrobials in humans and animals has led to bacteria evolving resistance. [More]
Sanaria receives 2014 Vaccine Industry Excellence Award for "Best Prophylactic Vaccine"

Sanaria receives 2014 Vaccine Industry Excellence Award for "Best Prophylactic Vaccine"

Sanaria received the 2014 Vaccine Industry Excellence Award for the "Best Prophylactic Vaccine" at a ceremony held March 25 in Washington DC during the 14th World Vaccine Congress. [More]
WHO to highlight increasing threat of vector-borne diseases on World Health Day 2014

WHO to highlight increasing threat of vector-borne diseases on World Health Day 2014

More than half the world's population is at risk from diseases such as malaria, dengue, leishmaniasis, Lyme disease, schistosomiasis, and yellow fever, carried by mosquitoes, flies, ticks, water snails and other vectors. Every year, more than one billion people are infected and more than one million die from vector-borne diseases. [More]
GenVec's revenues decrease 61% to $3.7M in fourth quarter 2013

GenVec's revenues decrease 61% to $3.7M in fourth quarter 2013

GenVec, Inc. today reported financial results for the fourth quarter and year ended December 31, 2013. For the year ended December 31, 2013, the company reported a net loss of $10.0 million, or $0.77 per share, compared with a net loss of $14.1 million, or $1.09 per share, for the year ended December 31, 2012. [More]
Longer looks: Exercise to treat depression; crowdsourcing treatment decisions; nitroglycerin shortage

Longer looks: Exercise to treat depression; crowdsourcing treatment decisions; nitroglycerin shortage

Depression is the most common mental illness-;affecting a staggering 25 percent of Americans-;but a growing body of research suggests that one of its best cures is cheap and ubiquitous. [More]

Simple chip-based method for better diagnosis of parasitic infections

Parasitic infections like malaria and sleeping sickness affect hundreds of millions of people, primarily in the poorest regions of the world. Diagnosis of these diseases is often difficult because the concentration of parasites in the blood can be very low. [More]

Experimental vaccine for HSV-2 infection reduces rate of viral shedding at 6 months

Updated Phase 1/2a results with GEN-003, a vaccine candidate under development by Genocea Biosciences, Inc. (Nasdaq: GNCA) for the treatment of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infection, showed the experimental vaccine to generate highly significant reductions in both the number of clinical lesion days and rate of viral shedding at six months after the final vaccine dose. [More]