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Malaria is a mosquito-borne disease caused by a parasite called Plasmodium - when infected mosquitoes bite the human body, the parasites multiply in the liver, and then infect red blood cells. Even though this potentially fatal disease can be prevented and cured, each year 350-500 million cases of malaria still occur worldwide, and over one million people die, most of them young children in Africa south of the Sahara, where one in every five (20%) childhood deaths is due to the effects of the disease.

Malaria is so common in Africa because a lack of resources and political instability have prevented the building of solid malaria control programs. Experts say an African child has on average between 1.6 and 5.4 episodes of malaria fever each year and according to the World Health Organization (WHO) as many as half of the world's population are at risk of malaria mainly in the world's poorest and most vulnerable countries and every 30 seconds a child dies from malaria.
Pollinator decline could increase risk of malnutrition, disease

Pollinator decline could increase risk of malnutrition, disease

A new study shows that more than half the people in some developing countries could become newly at risk for malnutrition if crop-pollinating animals -- like bees -- continue to decline. [More]
Study uses 'systems genetics' approach to identify potential target for epilepsy

Study uses 'systems genetics' approach to identify potential target for epilepsy

A single gene that coordinates a network of about 400 genes involved in epilepsy could be a target for new treatments, according to research. [More]
Cornell scientists develop new computational method to identify functional human genome

Cornell scientists develop new computational method to identify functional human genome

Striving to unravel and comprehend DNA's biological significance, Cornell University scientists have created a new computational method that can identify positions in the human genome that play a role in the proper functioning of cells, according to a report published Jan. 19 in the journal Nature Genetics. [More]
Research breakthrough in understanding mosquito reproductive process

Research breakthrough in understanding mosquito reproductive process

Diseases transmitted by mosquitoes have contributed to the death and suffering of millions throughout human history, earning the mosquito the title as the world's most dangerous animal. Even today, several devastating mosquito-borne diseases (such as malaria, dengue fever and West Nile virus) continue to rage. [More]
Combining insecticide-treated bed nets and vaccines may worsen malaria

Combining insecticide-treated bed nets and vaccines may worsen malaria

Combining insecticide-treated bed nets with vaccines and other control measures may provide the best chance at eliminating malaria, which killed nearly 600,000 people worldwide in 2013, most of them African children. [More]
Study unveils genetic architecture that enables parasite to develop antimalarial drug resistance

Study unveils genetic architecture that enables parasite to develop antimalarial drug resistance

The largest genome-wide association study to date of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum unveils a complex genetic architecture that enables the parasite to develop resistance to our most effective antimalarial drug, artemisinin. The results could help to improve early detection of emerging artemisinin resistance. [More]
Leading microbiologist warns of killer fungi’s increasing threat

Leading microbiologist warns of killer fungi’s increasing threat

A leading microbiologist has warned of the increasing threat that killer fungi poses to humans and the environment. [More]
Researchers assess the effect of IPT for children with anaemia in malaria endemic regions

Researchers assess the effect of IPT for children with anaemia in malaria endemic regions

Researchers from Tanzania and South Africa, who are part of the Cochrane Infectious Disease Group, hosted at LSTM, have conducted an independent review to assess the effect of intermittent preventive antimalarial treatment (IPT) for children with anaemia living in malaria endemic regions. This is a strategy of giving a treatment dose of antimalarial drugs to children at regular intervals just in case they have become infected. [More]
Vitamin B counteracts levels of DDT in women who are more likely to get, stay pregnant

Vitamin B counteracts levels of DDT in women who are more likely to get, stay pregnant

Women who have adequate levels of B vitamins in their bodies are more likely to get and stay pregnant even when they also have high levels of a common pesticide known to have detrimental reproductive effects, according to new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research. [More]
LSTM emerges high on academic rankings

LSTM emerges high on academic rankings

Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine is emerging high on the academic rankings under its own name following the designation of Higher Education Institutions status earlier in 2013. [More]
New analysis finds global improvements in life expectancy

New analysis finds global improvements in life expectancy

Global life expectancy increased by 5.8 years in men and 6.6 years in women between 1990 and 2013, according to a major new analysis from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 (GBD 2013). [More]
Penn, UGA scientists awarded new contract to develop genome database for microbial pathogens

Penn, UGA scientists awarded new contract to develop genome database for microbial pathogens

At the turn of the millennium, the cost to sequence a single human genome exceeded $50 million, and the process took a decade to complete. Microbes have genomes, too, and the first reference genome for a malaria parasite was completed in 2002 at a cost of roughly $15 million. But today researchers can sequence a genome in a single afternoon for just a few thousand dollars. Related technologies make it possible to capture information about all genes in the genome, in all tissues, from multiple individuals. [More]
EGPAF to receive $63 million UNITAID grant to improve early infant diagnosis of HIV programs

EGPAF to receive $63 million UNITAID grant to improve early infant diagnosis of HIV programs

The Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation is pleased to announce that it has been selected by the UNITAID Executive Board to receive up to $63 million in funding to improve early infant diagnosis (EID) of HIV programs in nine African countries. This investment will pave the way for universal access to HIV testing and enable a ten-fold increase in HIV treatment, thus transforming the effort to end AIDS in children worldwide. [More]
DNDi awarded USAID grant to develop new treatments for river blindness, elephantiasis

DNDi awarded USAID grant to develop new treatments for river blindness, elephantiasis

The Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative has been awarded US$ 10 million by the United States Agency for International Development to develop new treatments for onchocerciasis (river blindness) and lymphatic filariasis (elephantiasis) - the first-ever USAID grant for neglected tropical disease research and development (R&D). [More]
NTU scientists discover how malaria parasite develops resistance towards front-line drugs

NTU scientists discover how malaria parasite develops resistance towards front-line drugs

Scientists from Nanyang Technological University have discovered exactly how the malaria parasite is developing resistance towards the most important front-line drugs used to treat the disease. [More]
Study finds that K13 gene mutations cause malaria drug resistance in Southeast Asia

Study finds that K13 gene mutations cause malaria drug resistance in Southeast Asia

Growing resistance to malaria drugs in Southeast Asia is caused by a single mutated gene inside the disease-causing Plasmodium falciparum parasite, according to a study led by David Fidock, PhD, professor of microbiology & immunology and of medical sciences (in medicine) at Columbia University Medical Center. [More]
Scientists report new family of selective molecules to combat causal agent of malaria

Scientists report new family of selective molecules to combat causal agent of malaria

Malaria is one of the most serious health problems worldwide, registering 200 million clinical cases and more than 600,000 attributable deaths per year, according to information from the World Health Organization in 2013. Given the emerging resistance to the standard treatment most widely used throughout the world, which is based on artemisinin and its analogs, there is a need for new antimalarial compounds. [More]
Treatment guidelines lacking for Ebola patients, say infectious diseases experts

Treatment guidelines lacking for Ebola patients, say infectious diseases experts

As the Ebola Virus Diseases (EVD) epidemic continues to rage in West Africa, infectious diseases experts call attention to the striking lack of treatment guidelines. With over 16,000 total cases and more than 500 new infections reported per week, and probable underreporting of both cases and fatalities, the medical community still does not have specific approved treatment in place for Ebola, according to an editorial published in the International Journal of Infectious Diseases. [More]
Bed nets alone are enough to protect against malaria, study suggests

Bed nets alone are enough to protect against malaria, study suggests

The combined use of spraying insecticide inside homes and insecticide-treated bed nets is no better at protecting children against malaria than using bed nets alone, a study in The Gambia suggests. The findings, published in The Lancet, should encourage donors to invest their limited resources in additional bed nets, the more cost-effective solution to tackling malaria. [More]

Malaria deaths decline by 54% in Africa, 47% worldwide

The number of people dying from malaria has fallen dramatically since 2000 and malaria cases are also steadily declining, according to the World Malaria Report 2014. Between 2000 and 2013, the malaria mortality rate decreased by 47% worldwide and by 54% in the WHO African Region - where about 90% of malaria deaths occur. [More]