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Malaria is a mosquito-borne disease caused by a parasite called Plasmodium - when infected mosquitoes bite the human body, the parasites multiply in the liver, and then infect red blood cells. Even though this potentially fatal disease can be prevented and cured, each year 350-500 million cases of malaria still occur worldwide, and over one million people die, most of them young children in Africa south of the Sahara, where one in every five (20%) childhood deaths is due to the effects of the disease.

Malaria is so common in Africa because a lack of resources and political instability have prevented the building of solid malaria control programs. Experts say an African child has on average between 1.6 and 5.4 episodes of malaria fever each year and according to the World Health Organization (WHO) as many as half of the world's population are at risk of malaria mainly in the world's poorest and most vulnerable countries and every 30 seconds a child dies from malaria.
Government of the Republic of Equatorial Guinea to sponsor development of Sanaria PfSPZ Vaccine for malaria

Government of the Republic of Equatorial Guinea to sponsor development of Sanaria PfSPZ Vaccine for malaria

The Government of the Republic of Equatorial Guinea announced an agreement with industry partners, Marathon Oil Corporation, Noble Energy Inc. and AMPCO, to sponsor the clinical development of Sanaria PfSPZ Vaccine against malaria, including a series of clinical trials from 2015 until 2018. [More]
University of Oklahoma professor finds key mosquito protein for development of new malaria vaccine

University of Oklahoma professor finds key mosquito protein for development of new malaria vaccine

A University of Oklahoma professor studying malaria mosquito interaction has discovered a new mosquito protein for the development of a new vaccine that is expected to stop the spread of the disease in areas where it is considered endemic. [More]
Artemisinin and the fight against malaria: an interview with Dr. Robert Sebbag, Sanofi

Artemisinin and the fight against malaria: an interview with Dr. Robert Sebbag, Sanofi

Since 2014, more than 16 million anti-malarial treatments derived from the Sanofi patented process for semi-synthetic artemisinin have been supplied to endemic countries in Africa. [More]
Malaria parasite protein essential for parasite invasion into red blood cells

Malaria parasite protein essential for parasite invasion into red blood cells

A new study led by researchers at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health finds that a malaria parasite protein called calcineurin is essential for parasite invasion into red blood cells. Human calcineurin is already a proven target for drugs treating other illnesses including adult rheumatoid arthritis and lupus, and the new findings suggest that parasite calcineurin should be a focus for the development of new antimalarial drugs. [More]
Artificial blood technology may help fight disease-transmitting mosquitoes in resource-limited areas

Artificial blood technology may help fight disease-transmitting mosquitoes in resource-limited areas

A "nuisance" is probably one of the nicest things people call mosquitoes. Mosquitoes have been called the deadliest animal on the planet, because of the diseases they spread. [More]
Rising number of malaria deaths likely to exceed total number of Ebola deaths

Rising number of malaria deaths likely to exceed total number of Ebola deaths

Around 74000 fewer malaria cases than expected were seen at health facilities in Guinea in 2014 compared with pre-Ebola years, new research published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases journal has found. [More]
Computational models can forecast outbreak and spread of Ebola

Computational models can forecast outbreak and spread of Ebola

The 2014 outbreak of Ebola virus disease, the worst since the disease first appeared in 1976, has claimed more than 11,000 lives in the West African nations of Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia, and a handful more in nearby Nigeria and Mali. [More]
Sysmex unveils latest series of haematology analysers at IFCC congress

Sysmex unveils latest series of haematology analysers at IFCC congress

The Sysmex Corporation, the global leader in haematology, unveiled its latest series of haematology analysers at the annual IFCC congress, EuroMedLab JIB in Paris today. The XN-L series follows in the footsteps of its game-changing big brother, the XN-Series. The new, smaller XN-L Series makes top quality haematology available for all. [More]
Columbia University's Earth Institute director recognized with 2015 Blue Planet Prize

Columbia University's Earth Institute director recognized with 2015 Blue Planet Prize

Jeffrey Sachs, director of Columbia University's Earth Institute, has been awarded the 2015 Blue Planet Prize. The prize is presented each year to two individuals or organizations worldwide to recognize major efforts to solve global environmental problems. Many consider it to be the world's highest such honor. The other recipient this year is Cambridge University economist emeritus Sir Partha Dasgupta (also a member of the Earth Institute Advisory Board). [More]
Study shows development assistance for health increased substantially since 1990

Study shows development assistance for health increased substantially since 1990

Funding for health in developing countries has increased substantially since 1990, with a focus on HIV/AIDS, maternal health, and newborn and child health, and limited funding for noncommunicable diseases, according to a study in the June 16 issue of JAMA. [More]
Potential mosquito-based malaria vaccine could be a step closer

Potential mosquito-based malaria vaccine could be a step closer

A promising type of vaccine designed to eradicate malaria by blocking parasite transmission could be a step closer, as a result of experts uncovering new information about the targeted protein. [More]
Researchers locate promising target for potential vaccine against malaria

Researchers locate promising target for potential vaccine against malaria

Researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have located a new - and likely more promising, they say - target for a potential vaccine against malaria, a mosquito-borne illness that kills as many as 750,000 people each year. [More]
Improving air quality could prevent pollution-related deaths worldwide

Improving air quality could prevent pollution-related deaths worldwide

Improving air quality -- in clean and dirty places -- could reduce pollution-related deaths worldwide by millions of people each year. That finding comes from a team of environmental engineering and public health researchers who developed a global model of how changes in outdoor air pollution could lead to changes in the rates of health problems such as heart attack, stroke and lung cancer. [More]
March of Dimes funds studies that explore factors, mechanisms involved in placental malaria

March of Dimes funds studies that explore factors, mechanisms involved in placental malaria

Malaria infection during pregnancy poses serious risks to women and infants. The March of Dimes Foundation, an American organization that works to improve pregnancy and baby health, has now funded Carlos Penha-Goncalves' laboratory, at the Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciencia (IGC, Portugal), for their studies on factors and mechanisms involved in placental malaria. This is the first time that this American Foundation funds research from a Portuguese Institution. [More]

ProBioGen initiates clinical trials of Ebola vaccine using AGE1.CR.pIX cell line

Complex biologics development and manufacturing specialist ProBioGen today announced that an investigational vaccine against Ebola virus disease, produced on its proprietary, continuous muscovy duck AGE1.CR.pIX cell line, has proceeded into clinical trials at the Jenner Institute, Oxford University, UK. [More]
Pennsylvania physicians urge residents to take precautions against bug bites, bee stings

Pennsylvania physicians urge residents to take precautions against bug bites, bee stings

For many people, bug bites and bee stings aren't a big deal beyond a small irritation. But for some, it could mean the start of a painful - possibly long-term or even deadly - experience. [More]
GHIT Fund expands investments in leishmaniasis, diagnostic tests

GHIT Fund expands investments in leishmaniasis, diagnostic tests

The Global Health Innovative Technology Fund, which in the last two years has funded almost $32 million for innovative tools to tackle global infectious diseases, today announced additional investments of nearly $11 million that bring its portfolio to approximately $43 million. [More]
UH pharmacy students receive awards for excellence in clinical skills, disease management

UH pharmacy students receive awards for excellence in clinical skills, disease management

University of Houston pharmacy students wrapped up the spring semester with awards for excellence in professional service, clinical skills and disease management, earning kudos at the state level from the Texas Society of Health-System Pharmacists. [More]
Chancellor Angela Merkel calls for new plan to tackle Ebola outbreak at 68th World Health Assembly

Chancellor Angela Merkel calls for new plan to tackle Ebola outbreak at 68th World Health Assembly

Angela Merkel, Chancellor of the Federal Republic of Germany addressed delegates on the first morning of the Sixty-eighth World Health Assembly. "The WHO is the only international organization that has universal political legitimacy on global health issues,” she said. [More]
New study reveals that 'imperfect drug penetration' can accelerate pathogens' resistance

New study reveals that 'imperfect drug penetration' can accelerate pathogens' resistance

Prescribing patients two or more drugs that do not reach the same parts of the body could accelerate a pathogen's resistance to all of the drugs being used in treatment, according to a new study published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. [More]
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