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Malaria is a mosquito-borne disease caused by a parasite called Plasmodium - when infected mosquitoes bite the human body, the parasites multiply in the liver, and then infect red blood cells. Even though this potentially fatal disease can be prevented and cured, each year 350-500 million cases of malaria still occur worldwide, and over one million people die, most of them young children in Africa south of the Sahara, where one in every five (20%) childhood deaths is due to the effects of the disease.

Malaria is so common in Africa because a lack of resources and political instability have prevented the building of solid malaria control programs. Experts say an African child has on average between 1.6 and 5.4 episodes of malaria fever each year and according to the World Health Organization (WHO) as many as half of the world's population are at risk of malaria mainly in the world's poorest and most vulnerable countries and every 30 seconds a child dies from malaria.
Fiocruz to start phase II clinical trials of novel vaccine for schistosomiasis

Fiocruz to start phase II clinical trials of novel vaccine for schistosomiasis

The Oswaldo Cruz Foundation at Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, will start the phase II clinical trials of a vaccine for schistosomiasis, called 'Sm14 Vaccine'. [More]
Majority of cancers can be caused by infectious agents in sub-Saharan Africa, reveals study

Majority of cancers can be caused by infectious agents in sub-Saharan Africa, reveals study

In 1963, Irish surgeon Denis Parson Burkitt airmailed samples of an unusual jaw tumor found in Ugandan children to his colleague, Anthony Epstein, at Middlesex Hospital in London. [More]
Geographers map internal migration across three continents to help combat infectious diseases

Geographers map internal migration across three continents to help combat infectious diseases

Geographers at the University of Southampton have completed a large scale data and mapping project to track the flow of internal human migration in low and middle income countries. [More]
Novel marine natural product appears to reduce pancreatic tumor size

Novel marine natural product appears to reduce pancreatic tumor size

Scientists at Florida Atlantic University's Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute found that a deep-water marine sponge collected off of Fort Lauderdale's coast contains leiodermatolide, a natural product that has the ability to inhibit the growth of cancer cells as well as block cancer cells from dividing using extremely low concentrations of the compound. [More]
Specific molecular features control uptake of biguanides into mitochondria to inhibit respiration

Specific molecular features control uptake of biguanides into mitochondria to inhibit respiration

The biguanides are a family of drugs with diverse clinical applications. Metformin, a widely used anti-hyperglycemic biguanide, suppresses mitochondrial respiration by inhibiting respiratory complex I. Phenformin, a related anti-hyperglycemic biguanide, also inhibits respiration, but proguanil, which is widely used for the prevention of malaria, does not. [More]
New odour-baited traps offer effective and safe solution to fight against malaria mosquito

New odour-baited traps offer effective and safe solution to fight against malaria mosquito

The use of a newly-developed mosquito trap incorporating human odour has resulted in a 70% decline in the population of the most significant malaria mosquito on the Kenyan island of Rusinga. [More]
Study reveals needle biopsy hormone receptor testing for DCIS wastes millions

Study reveals needle biopsy hormone receptor testing for DCIS wastes millions

For patients with the most common type of noninvasive breast cancer, routine testing for estrogen and progesterone receptors in tissue taken at the first "needle" biopsy is both unnecessary and wasteful, according to results of a study led by Johns Hopkins pathologists. [More]
Scientists modeling new control mechanism to combat Zika-infecting mosquitoes

Scientists modeling new control mechanism to combat Zika-infecting mosquitoes

The images are heartbreaking: thousands of infants born with small, misshapen heads, the result of a rare neurological disorder, called microcephaly, which can cause a myriad of intellectual and developmental disabilities. The culprit? Zika, a mosquito-borne virus that has swept through many parts of South America and more recently surfaced in Florida. [More]
UM SOM selected as study site for human safety trial of new Zika vaccine

UM SOM selected as study site for human safety trial of new Zika vaccine

As world leaders increasingly recognize the Zika virus as an international public health threat, the Center for Vaccine Development at the University of Maryland School of Medicine's Institute for Global Health has been chosen as one of three study sites in a human safety trial of a new Zika vaccine. [More]
Plant sugar source can drive malaria transmission by modulating mosquito-Plasmodium interactions

Plant sugar source can drive malaria transmission by modulating mosquito-Plasmodium interactions

Female mosquitoes are well known blood-feeders, but they also consume sugar sources such as nectar, fruits and tree sap. [More]
People with lymphatic filariasis more likely to acquire HIV infection, study shows

People with lymphatic filariasis more likely to acquire HIV infection, study shows

People infected with a parasitic worm called Wuchereria bancrofti in areas where HIV is endemic may be more likely to acquire HIV than people who are not infected with the worm, according to a new study in southwest Tanzania, published in The Lancet. [More]
New study provides projections for Zika outbreaks in the Americas through January 2017

New study provides projections for Zika outbreaks in the Americas through January 2017

With the report from Florida Gov. Rick Scott on Monday that 14 people in the state have been infected with the Zika virus most likely through mosquito transmission, the concern about out­breaks in the U.S. has intensified. [More]
Griffith researchers create Malaria Box to advance drug discovery for major topical diseases

Griffith researchers create Malaria Box to advance drug discovery for major topical diseases

Griffith University tropical disease researchers have joined together with a host of international laboratories to advance drug discovery for major topical diseases through the creation and testing of the Malaria Box. [More]
WHO supports deployment of mobile lab for fast-tracking diagnosis of yellow fever

WHO supports deployment of mobile lab for fast-tracking diagnosis of yellow fever

“Treating a yellow fever patient is reliant on having the right diagnosis. This is dependent on having the necessary laboratory capacity to quickly identify the disease,” says Dr Pierre Formenty, an expert in haemorrhagic fevers at WHO and Manager of the Emerging Dangerous Pathogens Laboratory Network. [More]
Novel crowdsourced disease surveillance tool may help fight against dengue

Novel crowdsourced disease surveillance tool may help fight against dengue

Brought to you by Break Dengue, Dengue Track is a novel approach to disease mapping which could also be used to tracking Zika virus or Malaria. [More]
WHO works with Ministry of Health to ramp up disease surveillance, treatment efforts to prevent cholera outbreak

WHO works with Ministry of Health to ramp up disease surveillance, treatment efforts to prevent cholera outbreak

In a move to prevent a cholera outbreak from spreading, the Ministry of Health of South Sudan with support from the World Health Organization and health partners are ramping up disease surveillance and treatment efforts. [More]
Achilles' heel of malaria parasite could be exploited to treat deadly disease

Achilles' heel of malaria parasite could be exploited to treat deadly disease

Malaria researchers at The Australian National University have found one of the malaria parasite's best weapons against drug treatments turns out to be an Achilles' heel, which could be exploited to cure the deadly disease. [More]
Texas Biomed scientists receive $23 million NIH grant to develop AIDS vaccine

Texas Biomed scientists receive $23 million NIH grant to develop AIDS vaccine

To support a coordinated, innovative approach to the development of an AIDS vaccine, Texas Biomedical Research Institute scientists, together with a multi-institutional coalition of experts from the United States and Europe, have received a grant for $23 million from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases of the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Researchers identify how sensory nerve receptors work together to transmit itch signals

Researchers identify how sensory nerve receptors work together to transmit itch signals

Researchers have found how sensory nerve cells work together to transmit itch signals from the skin to the spinal cord, where neurons then carry those signals to the brain. Their discovery may help scientists find more effective ways to make itching stop. [More]
First clinical study for Zika vaccine to begin in Canada

First clinical study for Zika vaccine to begin in Canada

Université Laval's Infectious Disease Research Centre and Centre de recherche du CHU de Québec-Université Laval are proud to announce that the first clinical study for a Zika vaccine in Canada is set to begin in Quebec City. [More]
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