Malnutrition News and Research RSS Feed - Malnutrition News and Research

Malnutrition is a condition which occurs when there is a deficiency of certain vital nutrients in a person’s diet. The deficiency fails to meet the demands of the body leading to effects on the growth, physical health, mood, behaviour and other functions of the body. Malnutrition commonly affects children and the elderly.
Two new studies show that fecal transplantation may help fight against ulcerative colitis

Two new studies show that fecal transplantation may help fight against ulcerative colitis

Two new studies led by researchers from the Farncombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute at McMaster University show that transplantation of fecal matter may be a useful tool in the fight against ulcerative colitis (UC). [More]
WHO/UNICEF: Lack of progress on water and sanitation threatens to undermine child survival, health benefits

WHO/UNICEF: Lack of progress on water and sanitation threatens to undermine child survival, health benefits

Lack of progress on sanitation threatens to undermine the child survival and health benefits from gains in access to safe drinking water, warn WHO and UNICEF in a report tracking access to drinking water and sanitation against the Millennium Development Goals. [More]
Researchers develop world's first prognosis scoring system for life expectancy of patients in hospitals

Researchers develop world's first prognosis scoring system for life expectancy of patients in hospitals

Researchers at the MedUni Vienna's University Department of Anaesthetics, General Intensive Care Medicine and Pain Therapy, the University Department of Internal Medicine III and the Centre for Medical Statistics, Information Technology and Intelligent Systems have developed the world's first prognosis scoring system (PANDORA score) for hospital patients and their life expectancy within the next 30 days. [More]
BUSM recognized with People's Health Medals for advancing hospital nutrition in Vietnam

BUSM recognized with People's Health Medals for advancing hospital nutrition in Vietnam

Carine Lenders, M.D., M.S., ScD, associate professor of pediatrics at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) and physician nutrition specialist at Boston Medical Center (BMC), and Elizabeth Henry, DrPH, MHS, who will graduate from BU's School of Public Health (BUSPH) in September, have received the People's Health Medal from the Social Republic of Vietnam's Ministry of Health for their work on behalf of the Abbott Fund Institute of Nutrition Science (AFINS). [More]
Despite global progress, unequal opportunities have left millions of world’s children living in poverty

Despite global progress, unequal opportunities have left millions of world’s children living in poverty

The global community will fail millions of children if it does not focus on the most disadvantaged in its new 15-year development roadmap, UNICEF warned today. [More]
Climate change poses medical emergency, threatens 50 years of gains in global health

Climate change poses medical emergency, threatens 50 years of gains in global health

Climate change is a “medical emergency” says Commission author, but tackling it could be the greatest global health opportunity of the 21st century [More]
CHLA researchers provide new hope for infants with short bowel syndrome

CHLA researchers provide new hope for infants with short bowel syndrome

Investigators at Children's Hospital Los Angeles are providing new hope for babies with short bowel syndrome (SBS) by developing a novel model of SBS in zebrafish, described in a paper published online on June 18 by the American Journal of Physiology-Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology. [More]
Columbia University's Earth Institute director recognized with 2015 Blue Planet Prize

Columbia University's Earth Institute director recognized with 2015 Blue Planet Prize

Jeffrey Sachs, director of Columbia University's Earth Institute, has been awarded the 2015 Blue Planet Prize. The prize is presented each year to two individuals or organizations worldwide to recognize major efforts to solve global environmental problems. Many consider it to be the world's highest such honor. The other recipient this year is Cambridge University economist emeritus Sir Partha Dasgupta (also a member of the Earth Institute Advisory Board). [More]
Metro transit bus to become St. Louis MetroMarket's first mobile farmers market

Metro transit bus to become St. Louis MetroMarket's first mobile farmers market

The St. Louis MetroMarket and Saint Louis University are celebrating the delivery of a retired Metro transit bus which will soon be converted into St. Louis MetroMarket's first mobile farmers market. The bus was delivered Tuesday, June 2, to its new home at Salus Center on the Saint Louis University Med Center campus. [More]
Study reveals surgical consequences of severe obesity

Study reveals surgical consequences of severe obesity

Research from the University of Alberta's Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry is revealing the heavy surgical consequences of severe obesity. [More]
GSF's financial support helps seven million people become open-defecation free

GSF's financial support helps seven million people become open-defecation free

The GSF's latest Progress Report details how its financial support for nationally-led programmes has helped seven million people in over 20,500 communities become open-defecation free, improved toilets for 4.2 million people and seen eight million people gain access to hand-washing facilities. [More]
ART eligibility shorter for male HIV patients in rural South Africa

ART eligibility shorter for male HIV patients in rural South Africa

Male HIV patients in rural South Africa reach the low immunity levels required to become eligible for antiretroviral treatment in less than half the time it takes for immunity levels to drop to similar levels in women, according to new research from the University of Southampton. [More]
Tumor necrosis factor helps regulate sensitivity to bitter taste

Tumor necrosis factor helps regulate sensitivity to bitter taste

New research from the Monell Center reveals that tumor necrosis factor (TNF), an immune system regulatory protein that promotes inflammation, also helps regulate sensitivity to bitter taste. The finding may provide a mechanism to explain the taste system abnormalities and decreased food intake that can be associated with infections, autoimmune disorders, and chronic inflammatory diseases. [More]
Extreme morning sickness during pregnancy linked to developmental problems in children

Extreme morning sickness during pregnancy linked to developmental problems in children

Women who experience extreme morning sickness during pregnancy are three times more likely to have children with developmental issues, including attention disorders and language and speech delays, than woman who have normal nausea and vomiting, a UCLA study has found. [More]
Scientists identify brain molecule that triggers schizophrenia-like behaviors, brain changes

Scientists identify brain molecule that triggers schizophrenia-like behaviors, brain changes

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have identified a molecule in the brain that triggers schizophrenia-like behaviors, brain changes and global gene expression in an animal model. The research gives scientists new tools for someday preventing or treating psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and autism. [More]
Aging associated with development of dysphagia

Aging associated with development of dysphagia

Nearly 40 percent of Americans 60 and older are living with a swallowing disorder known as dysphagia. Although it is a major health problem associated with aging, it is unknown whether the condition is a natural part of healthy aging or if it is caused by an age-related disease that has yet to be diagnosed, such as Parkinson's disease or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). [More]
Jr. NBA and FrieslandCampina partnership promotes active lifestyle in South-East Asian children

Jr. NBA and FrieslandCampina partnership promotes active lifestyle in South-East Asian children

FrieslandCampina and Jr. NBA today celebrate the first anniversary of their successful partnership designed to encourage an active lifestyle amongst children in South-East Asia. [More]
Anorexics’ brains are wired differently, shows study

Anorexics’ brains are wired differently, shows study

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have pinpointed differences in brain function that may help to explain how people with anorexia nervosa can continue to starve themselves, even when already emaciated. [More]
Discovery can help stop emergence of age-related neurodegenerative diseases

Discovery can help stop emergence of age-related neurodegenerative diseases

As medicine has improved, increasing our ability to treat disease, so our longevity. The deterioration of the body with age, though, is a whole other matter. [More]

New analysis of medieval cesspit in Jerusalem provides window into spread of infectious diseases

A new analysis of a medieval cesspit in the Christian quarter of the old city of Jerusalem has revealed the presence of a number of ancient parasite eggs, providing a window into the nature and spread of infectious diseases in the Middle East during the 15th century. [More]
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