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Researchers find zinc starves bacteria by preventing its uptake of essential metal

Researchers find zinc starves bacteria by preventing its uptake of essential metal

Australian researchers have found that zinc can 'starve' one of the world's most deadly bacteria by preventing its uptake of an essential metal. [More]
Honey may be detrimental for patients with type 2 diabetes

Honey may be detrimental for patients with type 2 diabetes

Honey may be detrimental for patients with type 2 diabetes because of the great quantities of sugars it contains. [More]

Researchers theoretically create large, hollow magnetic cage molecules that could used in drug delivery system

Virginia Commonwealth University researchers have discovered, in theory, the possibility of creating large, hollow magnetic cage molecules that could one day be used in medicine as a drug delivery system to non-invasively treat tumors, and in other emerging technologies. [More]
Pregnant women exposed to high levels of air pollution more likely to have a child with autism

Pregnant women exposed to high levels of air pollution more likely to have a child with autism

Women in the U.S. exposed to high levels of air pollution while pregnant were up to twice as likely to have a child with autism as women who lived in areas with low pollution, according to a new study from Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH). It is the first large national study to examine links between autism and air pollution across the U.S. [More]
TAU researcher develops peptide to protect and restore microtubule function

TAU researcher develops peptide to protect and restore microtubule function

A structure called "the microtubule network" is a crucial part of our nervous system. It acts as a transportation system within nerve cells, carrying essential proteins and enabling cell-to-cell communications. But in neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's, ALS, and Parkinson's, this network breaks down, hindering motor abilities and cognitive function. [More]
Researchers explore new technique to determine the activity of different calcium channels in cancer cells

Researchers explore new technique to determine the activity of different calcium channels in cancer cells

Two Wayne State University researchers are working on a technique that could lead to easier, faster identification of cancer tumors that can be effectively treated by calcium channel-based therapies. [More]
Scientists discover enzyme regulation that catalyzes chain elongation in the terpenoid pathway

Scientists discover enzyme regulation that catalyzes chain elongation in the terpenoid pathway

Max Planck scientists in Jena, Germany, have discovered an unusual regulation of enzymes that catalyze chain elongation in an important secondary metabolism, the terpenoid pathway. [More]
High iron and zinc intake may reduce risk of pre-menstrual syndrome in women

High iron and zinc intake may reduce risk of pre-menstrual syndrome in women

Women who reported eating a diet rich in iron were 30 to 40 percent less likely to develop pre-menstrual syndrome (PMS) than women who consumed lower amounts, in a study reported this week by researchers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst School of Public Health and Health Sciences and Harvard. [More]
Vanderbilt investigators report new insights into workings of calprotectin

Vanderbilt investigators report new insights into workings of calprotectin

On the front lines of our defenses against bacteria is the protein calprotectin, which "starves" invading pathogens of metal nutrients. Vanderbilt investigators now report new insights to the workings of calprotectin - including a detailed structural view of how it binds the metal manganese. [More]
UAB dietitian suggests five foods for healthier eating

UAB dietitian suggests five foods for healthier eating

With the hectic hustle and bustle of daily life — managing family, career, home and more — it is no wonder that creativity in the kitchen can fall to the wayside. To help people get out of a food rut and eat healthier this year, a dietitian from the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) suggests adding five foods to the grocery cart. [More]
Calmangafodipir protects against side effects of cancer treatments

Calmangafodipir protects against side effects of cancer treatments

A drug developed at Linköping University in Sweden protects against the side effects of cancer treatments while strengthening the effects on the tumour. [More]
New photoactive compound eradicates 'Iraqibacter' from wounds and skin infections

New photoactive compound eradicates 'Iraqibacter' from wounds and skin infections

Researchers at the University of California, Santa Cruz, have developed a novel approach for eradicating drug-resistant bacteria from wounds and skin infections, using light to trigger the controlled release of nitric oxide. The UCSC team developed a photoactive compound that releases nitric oxide when exposed to light, and loaded it into a porous, biocompatible material that could be applied as a sprayable powder. [More]
New article describes design and properties of magnetoelectric composite materials

New article describes design and properties of magnetoelectric composite materials

Up to now, the brain's magnetic field is measurable only under technical laboratory conditions. This technique is therefore not feasible in terms of the broader medical use, although it would be significant for diagnosing numerous conditions such as epilepsy and dementia, or even for improving therapies such as deep brain stimulation for treating Parkinson's disease. [More]
Eating pistachios may help alter levels of beneficial bacteria in the gut

Eating pistachios may help alter levels of beneficial bacteria in the gut

A preliminary 16-person study suggests that eating pistachios may help alter levels of potentially beneficial bacteria in the gut, a finding that holds promise for supporting digestive health. The research, presented as an abstract this week at the Experimental Biology conference, is the first study of pistachios and almonds and their modulating role on the gut microbiota composition. [More]
Soldiers, farmers can have common chronic exposure to nerve impacting chemicals

Soldiers, farmers can have common chronic exposure to nerve impacting chemicals

Soldiers in war zones and farmers tending their fields can have in common chronic exposure to chemicals that impact their nerves. [More]
ACOEM joins AHA, ALA and other organizations to formally oppose S.J. Res. 37

ACOEM joins AHA, ALA and other organizations to formally oppose S.J. Res. 37

The American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine (ACOEM) has joined the American Heart Association, the American Lung Association, and other leading organizations to formally oppose S.J. Res. 37, a resolution by Senator James Inhofe (R-Okla) that employs the Congressional Review Act to reverse the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Mercury and Air Toxics Standards for Power Plants. [More]
New perspective on why the immune system makes us worse while trying to make us well

New perspective on why the immune system makes us worse while trying to make us well

A new article in The Quarterly Review of Biology helps explain why the immune system often makes us worse while trying to make us well. [More]
Tree nut consumption may reduce weight and health risks

Tree nut consumption may reduce weight and health risks

March is National Nutrition Month and as the spotlight shines on all things healthy, celebrate with a mindful snack that loves you back-California pistachios. [More]
Insight into relationship between two types of suppressors in cancerous tumors

Insight into relationship between two types of suppressors in cancerous tumors

The University of Kentucky has announced that Dr. Daret St. Clair, the James Graham Brown Endowed Chair and professor of toxicology, has published the first comprehensive study that provides insight into the relationship between two types of suppressors in cancerous tumors. The results will enhance the understanding of transcriptional mechanisms in carcinogenesis. [More]

Exposure to manganese may increase risk of clumsiness in former welders

Welders who are exposed to manganese from welding fumes, risk developing increased clumsiness - and the result may remain decades after exposure has ceased. This is the finding of a study at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, of former shipyard workers. [More]
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