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Vanderbilt investigators report new insights into workings of calprotectin

Vanderbilt investigators report new insights into workings of calprotectin

On the front lines of our defenses against bacteria is the protein calprotectin, which "starves" invading pathogens of metal nutrients. Vanderbilt investigators now report new insights to the workings of calprotectin - including a detailed structural view of how it binds the metal manganese. [More]
UAB dietitian suggests five foods for healthier eating

UAB dietitian suggests five foods for healthier eating

With the hectic hustle and bustle of daily life — managing family, career, home and more — it is no wonder that creativity in the kitchen can fall to the wayside. To help people get out of a food rut and eat healthier this year, a dietitian from the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) suggests adding five foods to the grocery cart. [More]
Calmangafodipir protects against side effects of cancer treatments

Calmangafodipir protects against side effects of cancer treatments

A drug developed at Linköping University in Sweden protects against the side effects of cancer treatments while strengthening the effects on the tumour. [More]
New photoactive compound eradicates 'Iraqibacter' from wounds and skin infections

New photoactive compound eradicates 'Iraqibacter' from wounds and skin infections

Researchers at the University of California, Santa Cruz, have developed a novel approach for eradicating drug-resistant bacteria from wounds and skin infections, using light to trigger the controlled release of nitric oxide. The UCSC team developed a photoactive compound that releases nitric oxide when exposed to light, and loaded it into a porous, biocompatible material that could be applied as a sprayable powder. [More]
New article describes design and properties of magnetoelectric composite materials

New article describes design and properties of magnetoelectric composite materials

Up to now, the brain's magnetic field is measurable only under technical laboratory conditions. This technique is therefore not feasible in terms of the broader medical use, although it would be significant for diagnosing numerous conditions such as epilepsy and dementia, or even for improving therapies such as deep brain stimulation for treating Parkinson's disease. [More]
Eating pistachios may help alter levels of beneficial bacteria in the gut

Eating pistachios may help alter levels of beneficial bacteria in the gut

A preliminary 16-person study suggests that eating pistachios may help alter levels of potentially beneficial bacteria in the gut, a finding that holds promise for supporting digestive health. The research, presented as an abstract this week at the Experimental Biology conference, is the first study of pistachios and almonds and their modulating role on the gut microbiota composition. [More]
Soldiers, farmers can have common chronic exposure to nerve impacting chemicals

Soldiers, farmers can have common chronic exposure to nerve impacting chemicals

Soldiers in war zones and farmers tending their fields can have in common chronic exposure to chemicals that impact their nerves. [More]
ACOEM joins AHA, ALA and other organizations to formally oppose S.J. Res. 37

ACOEM joins AHA, ALA and other organizations to formally oppose S.J. Res. 37

The American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine (ACOEM) has joined the American Heart Association, the American Lung Association, and other leading organizations to formally oppose S.J. Res. 37, a resolution by Senator James Inhofe (R-Okla) that employs the Congressional Review Act to reverse the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Mercury and Air Toxics Standards for Power Plants. [More]
New perspective on why the immune system makes us worse while trying to make us well

New perspective on why the immune system makes us worse while trying to make us well

A new article in The Quarterly Review of Biology helps explain why the immune system often makes us worse while trying to make us well. [More]
Tree nut consumption may reduce weight and health risks

Tree nut consumption may reduce weight and health risks

March is National Nutrition Month and as the spotlight shines on all things healthy, celebrate with a mindful snack that loves you back-California pistachios. [More]
Insight into relationship between two types of suppressors in cancerous tumors

Insight into relationship between two types of suppressors in cancerous tumors

The University of Kentucky has announced that Dr. Daret St. Clair, the James Graham Brown Endowed Chair and professor of toxicology, has published the first comprehensive study that provides insight into the relationship between two types of suppressors in cancerous tumors. The results will enhance the understanding of transcriptional mechanisms in carcinogenesis. [More]
Exposure to manganese may increase risk of clumsiness in former welders

Exposure to manganese may increase risk of clumsiness in former welders

Welders who are exposed to manganese from welding fumes, risk developing increased clumsiness - and the result may remain decades after exposure has ceased. This is the finding of a study at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, of former shipyard workers. [More]
Origin of osteoporosis could be directly linked to manganese depletion

Origin of osteoporosis could be directly linked to manganese depletion

The loss of manganese could mean that calcium does not stick to bones and could cause osteoporosis. This is the new theory put forward by researchers at the University of Castilla-La Mancha (UCLM) in Spain after studying deer antlers. [More]
Research provides data on nutritional content of broccoli for breeders

Research provides data on nutritional content of broccoli for breeders

Research performed by scientists at the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and published recently in the journal Crop Science has demonstrated that mineral levels in new varieties of broccoli have not declined since 1975, and that the broccoli contains the same levels of calcium, copper, iron, magnesium, potassium and other minerals that have made the vegetable a healthy staple of American diets for decades. [More]
Gazpacho shows lower vitamin C content after preparation

Gazpacho shows lower vitamin C content after preparation

The paper referred to in this article has been published in the European Journal of Public Health In summer, more dishes like gazpacho -a cold soup containing raw vegetables, bread, olive oil and vinegar- are consumed. A new study has revealed that gazpacho ingredients' vitamin C content as well as other organic acids is lower in the resulting mixture, meaning that it should be eaten immediately after preparation. [More]
Low-cost UC sensor can quickly detect heavy metals in humans

Low-cost UC sensor can quickly detect heavy metals in humans

Work by University of Cincinnati researchers to create a sensor that provides fast feedback related to the presence and levels of heavy metals - specifically manganese - in humans is published in the August issue of the prestigious international journal, Biomedical Microdevices. [More]
Enzyme Research journal publishes new peer-reviewed article involving Protandim

Enzyme Research journal publishes new peer-reviewed article involving Protandim

LifeVantage Corporation, the maker of Protandim, a clinically demonstrated, science-based therapy for the reduction of oxidative stress by the synergistic activation of Nrf2, announced today that a new peer-reviewed review article involving Protandim was published in the scientific journal Enzyme Research. [More]
Workers exposed to welding fumes may face risk of developing brain damage

Workers exposed to welding fumes may face risk of developing brain damage

New research suggests that workers exposed to welding fumes may be at risk for developing brain damage in an area of the brain also affected in Parkinson's disease. The study is published in the April 6, 2011, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
MnSOD oral drug can protect against lung cancer radiation therapy

MnSOD oral drug can protect against lung cancer radiation therapy

Patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer can safely take an experimental oral drug intended to protect healthy tissue from the effects of radiation, according to a study led by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute and published in this month's issue of Human Gene Therapy. [More]
Medical expert speaks about effects of sugar on human body

Medical expert speaks about effects of sugar on human body

With the many forms of sugar available, from table sugar, to high-fructose corn syrup to agave and honey, understanding the differences between sugars and their effects on the body is not all sweet. [More]